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STATS 32: Introduction to R for Undergraduates

This short course runs for weeks one through five of the quarter. It is recommended for undergraduate students who want to use R in the humanities or social sciences and for students who want to learn the basics of R programming. The goal of the short course is to familiarize students with R's tools for data analysis. Lectures will be interactive with a focus on learning by example, and assignments will be application-driven. No prior programming experience is needed. Topics covered include basic data structures, File I/O, data transformation and visualization, simple statistical tests, etc, and some useful packages in R. Prerequisite: undergraduate student. Priority given to non-engineering students. Laptops necessary for use in class.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tay, J. (PI)

STATS 48N: Riding the Data Wave (BIODS 48N)

Imagine collecting a bit of your saliva and sending it in to one of the personalized genomics company: for very little money you will get back information about hundreds of thousands of variable sites in your genome. Records of exposure to a variety of chemicals in the areas you have lived are only a few clicks away on the web; as are thousands of studies and informal reports on the effects of different diets, to which you can compare your own. What does this all mean for you? Never before in history humans have recorded so much information about themselves and the world that surrounds them. Nor has this data been so readily available to the lay person. Expression as "data deluge'' are used to describe such wealth as well as the loss of proper bearings that it often generates. How to summarize all this information in a useful way? How to boil down millions of numbers to just a meaningful few? How to convey the gist of the story in a picture without misleading oversimplifications? To answer these questions we need to consider the use of the data, appreciate the diversity that they represent, and understand how people instinctively interpret numbers and pictures. During each week, we will consider a different data set to be summarized with a different goal. We will review analysis of similar problems carried out in the past and explore if and how the same tools can be useful today. We will pay attention to contemporary media (newspapers, blogs, etc.) to identify settings similar to the ones we are examining and critique the displays and summaries there documented. Taking an experimental approach, we will evaluate the effectiveness of different data summaries in conveying the desired information by testing them on subsets of the enrolled students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sabatti, C. (PI)

STATS 60: Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus (PSYCH 10, STATS 160)

Techniques for organizing data, computing, and interpreting measures of central tendency, variability, and association. Estimation, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses, t-tests, correlation, and regression. Possible topics: analysis of variance and chi-square tests, computer statistical packages.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STATS 101: Data Science 101

https://statweb.stanford.edu/~tibs/stat101.html This course will provide a hands-on introduction to statistics and data science. Students will engage with the fundamental ideas in inferential and computational thinking. Each week, we will explore a core topic comprising three lectures and two labs (a module), in which students will manipulate real-world data and learn about statistical and computational tools. Students will engage in statistical computing and visualization with current data analytic software (Jupyter, R). The objectives of this course are to have students (1) be able to connect data to underlying phenomena and to think critically about conclusions drawn from data analysis, and (2) be knowledgeable about programming abstractions so that they can later design their own computational inferential procedures. No programming or statistical background is assumed. Freshmen and sophomores interested in data science, computing and statistics are encouraged to attend. Open to graduates as well.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STATS 110: Statistical Methods in Engineering and the Physical Sciences

Introduction to statistics for engineers and physical scientists. Topics: descriptive statistics, probability, interval estimation, tests of hypotheses, nonparametric methods, linear regression, analysis of variance, elementary experimental design. Prerequisite: one year of calculus.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Miolane, N. (PI)

STATS 116: Theory of Probability

Probability spaces as models for phenomena with statistical regularity. Discrete spaces (binomial, hypergeometric, Poisson). Continuous spaces (normal, exponential) and densities. Random variables, expectation, independence, conditional probability. Introduction to the laws of large numbers and central limit theorem. Prerequisites: MATH 52 and familiarity with infinite series, or equivalent.
Terms: Aut, Spr, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STATS 141: Biostatistics (BIO 141)

Introductory statistical methods for biological data: describing data (numerical and graphical summaries); introduction to probability; and statistical inference (hypothesis tests and confidence intervals). Intermediate statistical methods: comparing groups (analysis of variance); analyzing associations (linear and logistic regression); and methods for categorical data (contingency tables and odds ratio). Course content integrated with statistical computing in R.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Holmes, S. (PI)

STATS 155: Statistical Methods in Computational Genetics

The computational methods necessary for the construction and evaluation of sequence alignments and phylogenies built from molecular data and genetic data such as micro-arrays and data base searches. How to formulate biological problems in an algorithmic decomposed form, and building blocks common to many problems such as Markovian models, multivariate analyses. Some software covered in labs (Python, Biopython, XGobi, MrBayes, HMMER, Probe). Prerequisites: knowledge of probability equivalent to STATS 116, STATS 202 and one class in computing at the CS 106 level. Writing intensive course for undergraduates only. Instructor consent required. (WIM)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Holmes, S. (PI)

STATS 160: Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus (PSYCH 10, STATS 60)

Techniques for organizing data, computing, and interpreting measures of central tendency, variability, and association. Estimation, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses, t-tests, correlation, and regression. Possible topics: analysis of variance and chi-square tests, computer statistical packages.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STATS 191: Introduction to Applied Statistics

Statistical tools for modern data analysis. Topics include regression and prediction, elements of the analysis of variance, bootstrap, and cross-validation. Emphasis is on conceptual rather than theoretical understanding. Applications to social/biological sciences. Student assignments/projects require use of the software package R. Prerequisite: introductory statistical methods course. Recommended: 60, 110, or 141.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jeganathan, P. (PI)

STATS 199: Independent Study

For undergraduates.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

STATS 200: Introduction to Statistical Inference

Modern statistical concepts and procedures derived from a mathematical framework. Statistical inference, decision theory; point and interval estimation, tests of hypotheses; Neyman-Pearson theory. Bayesian analysis; maximum likelihood, large sample theory. Prerequisite: STATS 116.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STATS 202: Data Mining and Analysis

Data mining is used to discover patterns and relationships in data. Emphasis is on large complex data sets such as those in very large databases or through web mining. Topics: decision trees, association rules, clustering, case based methods, and data visualization. Prereqs: Introductory courses in statistics or probability (e.g., Stats 60), linear algebra (e.g., Math 51), and computer programming (e.g., CS 105).
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Walther, G. (PI)

STATS 205: Introduction to Nonparametric Statistics

Nonparametric regression and nonparametric density estimation, modern nonparametric techniques, nonparametric confidence interval estimates, nearest neighbor algorithms (with non-linear features), wavelet, bootstrap. Nonparametric analogs of the one- and two-sample t-tests and analysis of variance
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ma, T. (PI)

STATS 229: Machine Learning (CS 229)

Topics: statistical pattern recognition, linear and non-linear regression, non-parametric methods, exponential family, GLMs, support vector machines, kernel methods, deep learning, model/feature selection, learning theory, ML advice, clustering, density estimation, EM, dimensionality reduction, ICA, PCA, reinforcement learning and adaptive control, Markov decision processes, approximate dynamic programming, and policy search. Prerequisites: linear algebra, and basic probability and statistics.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STATS 240: Statistical Methods in Finance

(SCPD students register for 240P.) Regression analysis and applications to investment models. Principal components and multivariate analysis. Likelihood inference and Bayesian methods. Financial time series. Estimation and modeling of volatilities. Statistical methods for portfolio management. Prerequisite: STATS 200 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lai, T. (PI)

STATS 240P: Statistical Methods in Finance

For SCPD students; see 240.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lai, T. (PI)

STATS 242: NeuroTech Training Seminar (NSUR 239)

This is a required course for students in the NeuroTech training program, and is also open to other graduate students interested in learning the skills necessary for neurotechnology careers in academia or industry. Over the academic year, topics will include: emerging research in neurotechnology, communication skills, team science, leadership and management, intellectual property, entrepreneurship and more.To request approval to register, please visit http://bit.ly/nsur239-fall2019.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

STATS 249: Experimental Immersion in Neuroscience (NSUR 249)

This course provides students from technical backgrounds (e.g., physics, applied physics, electrical or chemical engineering, bioengineering, computer science, statistics) the opportunity to learn how they can apply their expertise to advancing experimental research in the neurosciences. Students will visit one neuroscience lab per week to watch experiments, understand the technical apparatus and animal models being used, discuss the questions being addressed, and interact with students and others conducting the research. This course is strongly encouraged for students who wish to apply to the NeuroTech graduate training program.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

STATS 260A: Workshop in Biostatistics (BIODS 260A)

Applications of statistical techniques to current problems in medical science. To receive credit for one or two units, a student must attend every workshop. To receive two units, in addition to attending every workshop, the student is required to write an acceptable one page summary of two of the workshops, with choices made by the student.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

STATS 264: Foundations of Statistical and Scientific Inference (HRP 264)

The course will consist of readings and discussion of foundational papers and book sections in the domains of statistical and scientific inference. Topics to be covered include philosophy of science, interpretations of probability, Bayesian and frequentist approaches to statistical inference and current controversies about the proper use of p-values and research reproducibility. nnRecommended preparation: At least 2 quarters of biostatistics and one of epidemiology. Intended for second year Masters students, of PhD students with as least 1 year of preceding graduate training.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Goodman, S. (PI)

STATS 285: Massive Computational Experiments, Painlessly

Ambitious Data Science requires massive computational experimentation; the entry ticket for a solid PhD in some fields is now to conduct experiments involving 1 Million CPU hours. Recently several groups have created efficient computational environments that make it painless to run such massive experiments. This course reviews state-of-the-art practices for doing massive computational experiments on compute clusters in a painless and reproducible manner. Students will learn how to automate their computing experiments first of all using nuts-and-bolts tools such as Perl and Bash, and later using available comprehensive frameworks such as ClusterJob and CodaLab, which enables them to take on ambitious Data Science projects. The course also features few guest lectures by renowned scientists in the field of Data Science. Students should have a familiarity with computational experiments and be facile in some high-level computer language such as R, Matlab, or Python.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Donoho, D. (PI)

STATS 298: Industrial Research for Statisticians

Masters-level research as in 299, but with the approval and supervision of a faculty adviser, it must be conducted for an off-campus employer. Students must submit a written final report upon completion of the internship in order to receive credit. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: enrollment in Statistics M.S. program.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

STATS 299: Independent Study

For Statistics M.S. students only. Reading or research program under the supervision of a Statistics faculty member. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STATS 300A: Theory of Statistics I

Finite sample optimality of statistical procedures; Decision theory: loss, risk, admissibility; Principles of data reduction: sufficiency, ancillarity, completeness; Statistical models: exponential families, group families, nonparametric families; Point estimation: optimal unbiased and equivariant estimation, Bayes estimation, minimax estimation; Hypothesis testing and confidence intervals: uniformly most powerful tests, uniformly most accurate confidence intervals, optimal unbiased and invariant tests. Prerequisites: Real analysis, introductory probability (at the level of STATS 116), and introductory statistics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rothenhaeusler, D. (PI)

STATS 303: PhD First/Second Year Student Workshop

For Statistics first and second year PhD students only. Discussion of statistics topics and research areas; consultation with PhD advisors.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Owen, A. (PI)

STATS 305A: Applied Statistics I

Statistics of real valued responses. Review of multivariate normal distribution theory. Univariate regression. Multiple regression. Constructing features from predictors. Geometry and algebra of least squares: subspaces, projections, normal equations, orthogonality, rank deficiency, Gauss-Markov. Gram-Schmidt, the QR decomposition and the SVD. Interpreting coefficients. Collinearity. Dependence and heteroscedasticity. Fits and the hat matrix. Model diagnostics. Model selection, Cp/AIC and crossvalidation, stepwise, lasso. Multiple comparisons. ANOVA, fixed and random effects. Use of bootstrap and permutations. Emphasis on problem sets involving substantive computations with data sets. Prerequisites: consent of instructor, 116, 200, applied statistics course, CS 106A, MATH 114. (NB: prior to 2016-17 the 305ABC series was numbered as 305, 306A and 306B).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Owen, A. (PI)

STATS 310A: Theory of Probability I (MATH 230A)

Mathematical tools: sigma algebras, measure theory, connections between coin tossing and Lebesgue measure, basic convergence theorems. Probability: independence, Borel-Cantelli lemmas, almost sure and Lp convergence, weak and strong laws of large numbers. Large deviations. Weak convergence; central limit theorems; Poisson convergence; Stein's method. Prerequisites: STATS 116, MATH 171.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Montanari, A. (PI)

STATS 314A: Advanced Statistical Theory

Covers a range of topics, including: empirical processes, asymptotic efficiency, uniform convergence of measures, contiguity, resampling methods, Edgeworth expansions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lai, T. (PI)

STATS 319: Literature of Statistics

Literature study of topics in statistics and probability culminating in oral and written reports. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

STATS 322: Function Estimation in White Noise

Gaussian white noise model sequence space form. Hyperrectangles, quadratic convexity, and Pinsker's theorem. Minimax estimation on Lp balls and Besov spaces. Role of wavelets and unconditional bases. Linear and threshold estimators. Oracle inequalities. Optimal recovery and universal thresholding. Stein's unbiased risk estimator and threshold choice. Complexity penalized model selection. Connecting fast wavelet algorithms and theory. Beyond orthogonal bases.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Johnstone, I. (PI)

STATS 366: Modern Statistics for Modern Biology (BIOS 221)

Application based course in nonparametric statistics. Modern toolbox of visualization and statistical methods for the analysis of data, examples drawn from immunology, microbiology, cancer research and ecology. Methods covered include multivariate methods (PCA and extensions), sparse representations (trees, networks, contingency tables) as well as nonparametric testing (Bootstrap, permutation and Monte Carlo methods). Hands on, use R and cover many Bioconductor packages. Prerequisite: Minimal familiarity with computers.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Holmes, S. (PI)

STATS 385: Analyses of Deep Learning

Deep learning is a transformative technology that has delivered impressive improvements in image classification and speech recognition. Many researchers are trying to better understand how to improve prediction performance and also how to improve training methods. Some researchers use experimental techniques; others use theoretical approaches. In this course we will review both experimental and theoretical analyses of deep learning. We will have 8-10 guest lecturers as well as graded projects for those who take the course for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Donoho, D. (PI)

STATS 390: Consulting Workshop

Skills required of practicing statistical consultants, including exposure to statistical applications. Students participate as consultants in the department's drop-in consulting service, analyze client data, and prepare formal written reports. Seminar provides supervised experience in short term consulting. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: course work in applied statistics or data analysis, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

STATS 398: Industrial Research for Statisticians

Doctoral research as in 399, but must be conducted for an off-campus employer. A final report acceptable to the advisor outlining work activity, problems investigated, key results, and any follow-up projects they expect to perform is required. The report is due at the end of the quarter in which the course is taken. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Statistics Ph.D. candidate.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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