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SOC 1: Introduction to Sociology at Stanford

This course to get students to think like a sociologist; to use core concepts and theories from the field of sociology to make sense of the most pressing issues of our time: race and ethnicity; gender and sexuality; family; education; social class and economic inequality; social connectedness; social movements; and immigration. The course will draw heavily on the research and writing of Stanford¿s own sociologist.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jimenez, T. (PI)

SOC 3: America: Unequal (CSRE 3P, PUBLPOL 113)

It was never imagined "when the U.S. was founded" that the rich would be so rich and the poor so poor. It was never imagined "when the U.S. was founded" that opportunities to get ahead would depend so profoundly on one's family circumstances and other starting conditions. How could this have happened in the "land of opportunity?" What are the effects of such profound inequality? And what, if anything, should be done about it?
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Grusky, D. (PI)

SOC 45Q: Understanding Race and Ethnicity in American Society (CSRE 45Q)

Preference to sophomores. Historical overview of race in America, race and violence, race and socioeconomic well-being, and the future of race relations in America. Enrollment limited to 16.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Snipp, C. (PI)

SOC 114: Economic Sociology (SOC 214)

(Graduate students register for 214.) The sociological approach to production, distribution, consumption, and markets, emphasizing the impact of norms, power, social structure, and institutions on the economy. Comparison of classic and contemporary approaches to the economy among the social science disciplines. Topics: consumption, labor markets, organization of professions such as law and medicine, the economic role of informal networks, industrial organization, including the structure and history of the computer and popular music industries, business alliances, capitalism in non-Western societies, and the transition from state socialism in E. Europe and China.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Granovetter, M. (PI)

SOC 126: Introduction to Social Networks (SOC 226)

(Graduate students register for 226.) Theory, methods, and research. Concepts such as density, homogeneity, and centrality; applications to substantive areas. The impact of social network structure on individuals and groups in areas such as communities, neighborhoods, families, work life, and innovations.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hahn, M. (PI)

SOC 154: The Politics of Algorithms (COMM 154, COMM 254, CSRE 154T, SOC 254C)

Algorithms have become central actors in today's digital world. In areas as diverse as social media, journalism, education, healthcare, and policing, computing technologies increasingly mediate communication processes. This course will provide an introduction to the social and cultural forces shaping the construction, institutionalization, and uses of algorithms. In so doing, we will explore how algorithms relate to political issues of modernization, power, and inequality. Readings will range from social scientific analyses to media coverage of ongoing controversies relating to Big Data. Students will leave the course with a better appreciation of the broader challenges associated with researching, building, and using algorithms.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Christin, A. (PI)

SOC 156A: The Changing American City (CSRE 156, SOC 256A, URBANST 156A)

After decades of decline, U.S. cities today are undergoing major transformations. Young professionals are flocking to cities instead of fleeing to the suburbs. Massive increases in immigration have transformed the racial and ethnic diversity of cities and their neighborhoods. Public housing projects that once defined the inner city are disappearing, and crime rates have fallen dramatically. Do these changes signal the end of residential segregation and urban inequality? Who do these changes benefit? This course will explore these issues and strategies to address them through readings and discussion, analyzing a changing neighborhood in a major city in the Bay Area in groups (which will include at least one site visit), and studying a changing neighborhood or city of their choice for their final project. The course does not have pre-requisites.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hwang, J. (PI)

SOC 189: Race and Immigration (CSRE 189, SOC 289)

In the contemporary United States, supposedly race-neutral immigration laws have racially-unequal consequences. Immigrants from Mexico, Central America, and the Middle East are central to ongoing debates about who's includable, and who's excludable, from American society. These present-day dynamics mirror the historical forms of exclusion imposed on immigrants from places as diverse as China, Eastern Europe, Ireland, Italy, Japan, and much of Africa. These groups' varied experiences of exclusion underscore the long-time encoding of race into U.S. immigration policy and practice. Readings and discussions center on how immigration law has become racialized in its construction and in its enforcement¿over the last 150 years.nn*Undergraduates are encouraged to enroll in the course for three units. Graduate students are encouraged to enroll in the course for four units. Those enrolling in the course for four units will be expected to complete additional reading and writing assignments that are aligned with their status as either undergraduate or graduate students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Asad, A. (PI)

SOC 193: Undergraduate Teaching Apprenticeship

Prior arrangement required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

SOC 194: Computational Undergraduate Research

Computational sociology research working with faculty on an on-going technical research project. Applications for position reviewed on a rolling basis.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Willer, R. (PI)

SOC 204: Capstone Research Seminar

This course focuses on the sociological research and writing process and fulfills the Writing In the Major (WIM) requirement for Sociology majors. Students will write a substantial paper based on the research project developed in 202 or a project developed during the course. Students in the honors program or co-terms in the research track may incorporate their paper into their thesis. Sociology majors who are seniors may take Soc 204 as their sole WIM class, as a substitute for Soc 200, with no prerequisites required. The class is designed to support students as they complete an original research project during the quarter or a piece of a larger honors or master¿s thesis
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hwang, J. (PI)

SOC 214: Economic Sociology (SOC 114)

(Graduate students register for 214.) The sociological approach to production, distribution, consumption, and markets, emphasizing the impact of norms, power, social structure, and institutions on the economy. Comparison of classic and contemporary approaches to the economy among the social science disciplines. Topics: consumption, labor markets, organization of professions such as law and medicine, the economic role of informal networks, industrial organization, including the structure and history of the computer and popular music industries, business alliances, capitalism in non-Western societies, and the transition from state socialism in E. Europe and China.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Granovetter, M. (PI)

SOC 226: Introduction to Social Networks (SOC 126)

(Graduate students register for 226.) Theory, methods, and research. Concepts such as density, homogeneity, and centrality; applications to substantive areas. The impact of social network structure on individuals and groups in areas such as communities, neighborhoods, families, work life, and innovations.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hahn, M. (PI)

SOC 254C: The Politics of Algorithms (COMM 154, COMM 254, CSRE 154T, SOC 154)

Algorithms have become central actors in today's digital world. In areas as diverse as social media, journalism, education, healthcare, and policing, computing technologies increasingly mediate communication processes. This course will provide an introduction to the social and cultural forces shaping the construction, institutionalization, and uses of algorithms. In so doing, we will explore how algorithms relate to political issues of modernization, power, and inequality. Readings will range from social scientific analyses to media coverage of ongoing controversies relating to Big Data. Students will leave the course with a better appreciation of the broader challenges associated with researching, building, and using algorithms.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Christin, A. (PI)

SOC 256A: The Changing American City (CSRE 156, SOC 156A, URBANST 156A)

After decades of decline, U.S. cities today are undergoing major transformations. Young professionals are flocking to cities instead of fleeing to the suburbs. Massive increases in immigration have transformed the racial and ethnic diversity of cities and their neighborhoods. Public housing projects that once defined the inner city are disappearing, and crime rates have fallen dramatically. Do these changes signal the end of residential segregation and urban inequality? Who do these changes benefit? This course will explore these issues and strategies to address them through readings and discussion, analyzing a changing neighborhood in a major city in the Bay Area in groups (which will include at least one site visit), and studying a changing neighborhood or city of their choice for their final project. The course does not have pre-requisites.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hwang, J. (PI)

SOC 278: Introduction to Computational Social Science (MS&E 231)

With a vast amount of data now collected on our online and offline actions -- from what we buy, to where we travel, to who we interact with -- we have an unprecedented opportunity to study complex social systems. This opportunity, however, comes with scientific, engineering, and ethical challenges. In this hands-on course, we develop ideas from computer science and statistics to address problems in sociology, economics, political science, and beyond. We cover techniques for collecting and parsing data, methods for large-scale machine learning, and principles for effectively communicating results. To see how these techniques are applied in practice, we discuss recent research findings in a variety of areas. Prerequisites: introductory course in applied statistics, and experience coding in R, Python, or another high-level language.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 289: Race and Immigration (CSRE 189, SOC 189)

In the contemporary United States, supposedly race-neutral immigration laws have racially-unequal consequences. Immigrants from Mexico, Central America, and the Middle East are central to ongoing debates about who's includable, and who's excludable, from American society. These present-day dynamics mirror the historical forms of exclusion imposed on immigrants from places as diverse as China, Eastern Europe, Ireland, Italy, Japan, and much of Africa. These groups' varied experiences of exclusion underscore the long-time encoding of race into U.S. immigration policy and practice. Readings and discussions center on how immigration law has become racialized in its construction and in its enforcement¿over the last 150 years.nn*Undergraduates are encouraged to enroll in the course for three units. Graduate students are encouraged to enroll in the course for four units. Those enrolling in the course for four units will be expected to complete additional reading and writing assignments that are aligned with their status as either undergraduate or graduate students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Asad, A. (PI)

SOC 291: Coterminal MA directed research

Work on a project of student's choice under supervision of a faculty member. Prior arrangement required
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 292: Coterminal MA research apprenticeship

Work in an apprentice-like relationship with faculty on an on-going research project. Prior arrangement required
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 305: Graduate Proseminar

For first-year Sociology doctoral students only, Introduction and orientation to the field of Sociology. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jimenez, T. (PI)

SOC 311A: Workshop: Comparative Studies of Educational and Political Systems (EDUC 387)

Analysis of quantitative and longitudinal data on national educational systems and political structures. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 312G: Careers and Organizations

The careers of individuals are shaped by their movement within and between organizations, whether those be established employers or entrepreneurial ventures. Conversely, organizations of all sizes are shaped by the flows of individuals through them as individuals construct careers by pursuing different opportunities. This course will examine sociological and economic theory and research on this mutually constitutive relationship. Possible topics include inequality and attainment processes, internal labor markets, mobility dynamics, individual and organizational learning, ecological influences, gender and racial segregation, discrimination, and entrepreneurship as a career process
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Sorensen, J. (PI)

SOC 315W: Workshop: Economic Sociology and Organizations

Theory, methods, and research in the sociology of the economy and of formal organizations, through presentations of ongoing work by students, faculty, and guest speakers, and discussion of recent literature and controversies. May be repeated for credit. Restricted to Sociology doctoral students; others by consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

SOC 319: Ethnographic Methods (COMM 314)

This course offers an introduction to the practice and politics of ethnographic fieldwork. It provides a "how to" of ethnographic research, in which students will conduct an ethnographic project of their own, complemented by weekly readings and discussions. In the process, we will discuss the theory and epistemology of fieldwork, along with the practicalities and politics of fieldwork in different domains. We will examine different stages of ethnographic research (entering the field, conducting and recording fieldwork, exiting the field and writing it up), different methods (observations, interviews, "going along"), as well as distinct styles of ethnographic work (virtual ethnography, organizational ethnography, narrative ethnography, etc.). The course will serve as a participative workshop for students to exchange field notes, share practical advice, and consolidate their research interests. Prerequisite: Must be Communication student, or obtain approval from instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Christin, A. (PI)

SOC 332: Sociology of Education (EDUC 310)

Seminar. Key sociological theories and empirical studies of of the relationship between education and other major social institutions, focusing on drivers of educational change, the organizational infrastructures of education, and the implication of education in processes of social stratification. Targeted to doctoral students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stevens, M. (PI)

SOC 340: Social Stratification

Classical and contemporary approaches to the unequal distribution of goods, status, and power. Modern analytic models of the effects of social contact, cultural capital, family background, and luck in producing inequality. The role of education in stratification. The causes and consequences of inequality by race and gender. The structure of social classes, status groupings, and prestige hierarchies in various societies. Labor markets and their role in inequality. The implications of inequality for individual lifestyles. The rise of the new class, the underclass, and other emerging forms of stratification. Prerequisite: Ph.D. student or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Grusky, D. (PI)

SOC 341W: Workshop: Inequality

Causes, consequences, and structure of inequality; how inequality results from and shapes social classes, occupations, professions, and other aspects of the economy. Research presentations by students, faculty, and guest speakers. Discussion of controversies, theories, and recent writings. May be repeated for credit. Restricted to Sociology doctoral students; others by consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

SOC 350W: Workshop: Migration, Ethnicity, Race and Nation

Weekly research workshop with a focus on ongoing research by faculty and graduate student participants, new theory and research, and recent publications. Workshop participants will present their own work, and read and critique the research-in-progress of their peers. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Sociology doctoral student or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

SOC 361W: Workshop: Networks and Organizations (EDUC 361)

For students doing advanced research. Group comments and criticism on dissertation projects at any phase of completion, including data problems, empirical and theoretical challenges, presentation refinement, and job market presentations. Collaboration, debate, and shaping research ideas. Prerequisite: courses in organizational theory or social network analysis.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Powell, W. (PI)

SOC 363A: Seminar on Organizational Theory (EDUC 375A, MS&E 389)

The social science literature on organizations assessed through consideration of the major theoretical traditions and lines of research predominant in the field. For PhD students only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Powell, W. (PI)

SOC 374: Philanthropy and Civil Society (EDUC 374, POLISCI 334)

Cross-listed with Law (LAW 781), Political Science (POLISCI 334) and Sociology (SOC 374). Associated with the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS). Year-long workshop for doctoral students and advanced undergraduates writing senior theses on the nature of civil society or philanthropy. Focus is on pursuit of progressive research and writing contributing to the current scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and philanthropy. Accomplished in a large part through peer review. Readings include recent scholarship in aforementioned fields. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

SOC 375W: Workshop: Politics, Morality, and Hierarchy

Advanced research workshop with a focus on new theory and research, recent publications, and current research by faculty and graduate student participants. Topics of relevant research include, but are not restricted to, morality, cooperation, solidarity, politics, status, and power. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Willer, R. (PI)

SOC 380W: Qualitative and Fieldwork Methods Workshop

Presentations and discussion of ongoing ethnographic, interview-based, and other fieldwork research by faculty and students . May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Sociology doctoral student or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

SOC 381: Sociological Methodology I: Introduction

Enrollment limited to first-year Sociology doctoral students. Other students by instructor permission only. nn This course provides a conceptual and applied introduction to quantitative social sciences methodology, including measurement, sampling and descriptive statistics, statistical inference, ANOVA, factor analysis, and ordinary least squares regression. Students will be introduced to both the methodological logic and techniques of statistical data analysis. The course will present the purpose, goals, and mathematical assumptions behind techniques of statistical analysis and will discuss applications to analyzing data and interpreting results. In addition to the lecture time, SOC381 includes a weekly lab section to learn statistical software and conduct applied research.nn*Students enrolling in Soc381 are strongly encouraged to take a 1-week Math/Statistics refresher course from September 16 to September 20. Please contact the instructor at torche@stanford.edu for details
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Torche, F. (PI)

SOC 385A: Research Practicum 1

Workshop on research methods and writing research papers for second year Sociology doctoral students. Ongoing student research, methodological problems, writing challenges, and possible solutions. Required for second year paper.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rosenfeld, M. (PI)

SOC 393: Teaching Apprenticeship

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 396: Sociology Colloquium

The Sociology Colloquium is a semimonthly seminar held throughout the academic year, in which distinguished scholars present their cutting-edge research findings. Enrollment for credit, and regular attendance, is required for all first and second year Sociology doctoral students.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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