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PSYCH 1: Introduction to Psychology

An introduction to the science of how people think, feel, and behave. We will explore such topics as intelligence, perception, memory, happiness, personality, culture, social influence, development, emotion, and mental illness. Students will learn about classic and cutting edge research, a range of methods, and discover how psychology informs our understanding of what it means to be human, addresses other fields, and offers solutions to important social problems. Psych 1 fulfills the SI Way, and, effective Autumn 2018, the SMA Way. For more information on PSYCH 1, visit http://psychone.stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 8N: The New Longevity

Life expectancy nearly doubled in the 20th century. Along with a decrease in fertility societies are also aging. These changes have ramifications for all of the fundamental structures that guide people through life, including work, education, and the nature of families, as well as health, social engagement, and fitness. This course focuses on the implications for young generations today that will likely live longer than any in human history.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Carstensen, L. (PI)

PSYCH 10: Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus (STATS 60, STATS 160)

Techniques for organizing data, computing, and interpreting measures of central tendency, variability, and association. Estimation, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses, t-tests, correlation, and regression. Possible topics: analysis of variance and chi-square tests, computer statistical packages.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 15N: Becoming Kinder

Kindness - the ability to understand each other, the instinct to care for each other, and the desire to help each other - is among our most powerful natural resources. It supports cooperation, fosters relationships, improves health, and overwrites hatred. Kindness is also challenging, especially in the modern world. More than ever, individuals are isolated, anonymous, and independent: qualities that make it harder to truly see each other and easier to succumb to indifference and even cruelty. As technology mediates more of our interactions and tribal signifiers occupy more of our identity, kindness erodes. And yet we have options. A growing number of social scientists are now experimenting in re-building kindness, using everything from virtual reality to meditation to literature to old-fashioned friendship. Their efforts demonstrate that through directed effort, people can become kinder. nThis class will explore the nature of kindness, the challenges modernity has placed in front of it, and the many ways scientists and practitioners are stimulating kindness. Though drawing mainly from psychology, we will tour sociology, conflict resolution, technology, the humanities, and neuroscience as well. The class will also grapple with central questions about human nature -most importantly, to what extent can we change ourselves into the people we¿d like to become? Finally, we will meld science with personal narrative and exercises meant to not only explore kindness-building as a research concept, but as a part of our own lives.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Zaki, J. (PI)

PSYCH 24N: Neuroforecasting

Preference to freshmen. This course explores whether brain activity can be used not only to predict the choices of individuals, but also of separate groups of individuals in the future (e.g., in markets). Questions include how neuroforecasting is possible, whether it can add value to other forecasting tools (e.g., traditional measures like behavioral choice and subjective ratings), and when it extends to different aggregate scenarios. The course is ideal for students that would like to extend neural predictions about individual choice to group choice, and who plan to apply this knowledge in future research.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Knutson, B. (PI)

PSYCH 35: Minds and Machines (LINGUIST 35, PHIL 99, SYMSYS 1, SYMSYS 200)

(Formerly SYMSYS 100). An overview of the interdisciplinary study of cognition, information, communication, and language, with an emphasis on foundational issues: What are minds? What is computation? What are rationality and intelligence? Can we predict human behavior? Can computers be truly intelligent? How do people and technology interact, and how might they do so in the future? Lectures focus on how the methods of philosophy, mathematics, empirical research, and computational modeling are used to study minds and machines. Undergraduates considering a major in symbolic systems should take this course as early as possible in their program of study.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Skokowski, P. (PI)

PSYCH 50: Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience

Survey of topics relating brain activity to cognitive processes and behavior. The course begins with an overview of neurophysiology and techniques to measure brain activity. We then discuss perceptual and motor processes before investigating neural responses related to attention, memory, and cognitive control. The course concludes with a discussion of brain processes related to reward, decision making, and social cognition.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SI, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gardner, J. (PI)

PSYCH 50A: Practicum in Teaching: Intro to Cognitive Neuroscience

TA training for Intro to Cognitive Neuroscience: preparing for sections, grading assignments, reviewing and answering questions in Canvas online forums and supporting office hours and review sections. Enrollment limited to teaching assistants for Psych 50: Intro to Cognitive Neuroscience. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gardner, J. (PI)

PSYCH 103: Intergroup Communication (CSRE 103)

In an increasingly globalized world, our ability to connect and engage with new audiences is directly correlated with our competence and success in any field How do our intergroup perceptions and reactions influence our skills as communicators? This course uses experiential activities and discussion sections to explore the role of social identity in effective communication. The objective of the course is to examine and challenge our explicit and implicit assumptions about various groups to enhance our ability to successfully communicate across the complex web of identity. If you are interested in the class but enrollment is full on axess, please fill out the following survey to be put on the waitlist- www.tinyurl.com/psych103winter2019. After filling out this survey you are on the waitlist and do not need to reach out any further. In order to be fully considered for enrollment in the class, you must attend the first day of class. Enrollment will not be offered to those who are not present on the first day.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYCH 103F: Intergroup Communication Facilitation (CSRE 103F)

This is a TA training course for Psych 103 - Intergroup Communication
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 138: Wise Interventions (PSYCH 238, PUBLPOL 238)

Classic and contemporary psychological interventions; the role of psychological factors in social reforms for social problems involving healthcare, the workplace, education, intergroup, relations, and the law. Topics include theories of intervention, the role of laboratory research, evaluation, and social policy.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 146: Observation of Children

Learning about children through guided observations at Bing Nursery School, Psychology's lab for research and training in child development. Physical, emotional, social, cognitive, and language development. Recommended: 60.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 147: Development in Early Childhood

Supervised experience with young children at Bing Nursery School. 3 units require 4 hours per week in Bing classrooms throughout the quarter; 4 units require 7 hours per week; 5 units require 10.5 hours per week. Seminar on developmental issues in the Bing teaching/learning environment. Recommended: 60 or 146, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 160: Seminar on Emotion (PHIL 375G, PSYCH 260)

This undergraduate and graduate seminar will examine ancient Greek philosophical and contemporary psychological literatures relevant to emotion. Questions to be investigated include: What is the nature of emotions? What is the appropriate place in our lives for emotions? How should we manage our emotions? Do the emotions threaten the integrity of the agent? Meetings will be discussion oriented. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 170: The Psychology of Communication About Politics in America (COMM 164, COMM 264, POLISCI 124L, POLISCI 324L)

Focus is on how politicians and government learn what Americans want and how the public's preferences shape government action; how surveys measure beliefs, preferences, and experiences; how poll results are criticized and interpreted; how conflict between polls is viewed by the public; how accurate surveys are and when they are accurate; how to conduct survey research to produce accurate measurements; designing questionnaires that people can understand and use comfortably; how question wording can manipulate poll results; corruption in survey research.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 171: Research Seminar on Aging

Two quarter practicum exposes students to multiple phases of research by participating in a laboratory focusing on social behavior in adulthood and old age. Review of current research; participation in ongoing data collection, analysis, and interpretation. Prerequisites: 1, research experience, and consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Carstensen, L. (PI)

PSYCH 183: SPARQ Lab

Join SPARQ (Social Psychological Answers to Real-world Questions) as a research assistant and help with projects addressing real-world issues.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYCH 188: Special Research Projects

For research in the Stanford Neurodevelopment, Affect, and Psychopathology Lab only.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gotlib, I. (PI)

PSYCH 189: Stanford Center on Longevity Practicum

Student involvement in an interdisciplinary center aimed at changing the culture of human aging using science and technology. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Carstensen, L. (PI)

PSYCH 190: Special Research Projects

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Monin, B. (PI)

PSYCH 191: Special Research Projects in the Mind & Body Lab

May be repeated for credit or for grade. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Crum, A. (PI)

PSYCH 193: Special Laboratory Research

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: 1, 10, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dweck, C. (PI)

PSYCH 198: Senior Honors Research

Limited to students in the senior honors program. Finishing the research and data analysis, written thesis, and presentation at the Senior Honors Convention. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYCH 204A: Human Neuroimaging Methods

This course introduces the student to human neuroimaging using magnetic resonance scanners. The course is a mixture of lectures and hands-on software tutorials. The course begins by introducing basic MR principles. Then various MR measurement modalities are described, including several types of structural and functional imaging methods. Finally algorithms for analyzing and visualizing the various types of neuroimaging data are explained, including anatomical images, functional data, diffusion imaging (e.g., DTI) and magnetization transfer. Emphasis is on explaining software methods used for interpreting these types of data.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYCH 209: Neural Network Models of Cognition

Neural Network models of cognitive and developmental processes and the neural basis of these processes, including contemporary deep learning models. Students learn about fundamental computational principles and classical as well as contemporary applications and carry out exercises in the first six weeks, then undertake projects during the last four weeks of the quarter. Recommended: computer programming ability, familiarity with differential equations, linear algebra, and probability theory, and one or more courses in cognition, cognitive development or cognitive/systems neuroscience.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYCH 211: Developmental Psychology

Prerequisite: 207 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYCH 213: Affective Science

This seminar is the core graduate course on affective science. We consider definitional issues, such as differences between emotion and mood, as well as issues related to the function of affect, such as the role affect plays in daily life. We review autonomic, neural, genetic, and expressive aspects of affective responding. Later in the course we discuss the role of affect in cognitive processing, specifically how affective states direct attention and influence memory, as well as the role of affect in decision making. We will also discuss emotion regulation and the strategic control of emotion; the cultural shaping of emotional experience and regulation; disorders of emotion; and developmental trajectories of experience and control from early to very late life. Meetings are discussion based. Attendance and active participation are required. Prerequisite: 207 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Tsai, J. (PI); Shavit, Y. (TA)

PSYCH 215: Mind, Culture, and Society

Social psychology from the context of society and culture. The interdependence of psychological and sociocultural processes: how sociocultural factors shape psychological processes, and how psychological systems shape sociocultural systems. Theoretical developments to understand social issues, problems, and polity. Works of Baldwin, Mead, Asch, Lewin, Burner, and contemporary theory and empirical work on the interdependence of psychology and social context as constituted by gender, ethnicity, race, religion, and region of the country and the world. Prerequisite: 207 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYCH 238: Wise Interventions (PSYCH 138, PUBLPOL 238)

Classic and contemporary psychological interventions; the role of psychological factors in social reforms for social problems involving healthcare, the workplace, education, intergroup, relations, and the law. Topics include theories of intervention, the role of laboratory research, evaluation, and social policy.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 243: General Development Seminar

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructors. Restricted to Developmental graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Markman, E. (PI)

PSYCH 246: Cognitive and Neuroscience Friday Seminar

Participant presentations. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: graduate standing in psychology or neuroscience program.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wagner, A. (PI)

PSYCH 252: Statistical Methods for Behavioral and Social Sciences

For students who seek experience and advanced training in empirical research. Analysis of data from experimental through factorial designs, randomized blocks, repeated measures; regression methods through multiple regression, model building, analysis of covariance; categorical data analysis through two-way tables. Integrated with the use of statistical computing packages. Prerequisite: 10 or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-6 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 256: Race at Work

In this practicum, students will examine how race works in a variety of institutional spaces by participating in community partnerships relevant to criminal justice, education, economic development, or health. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite for undergraduates: Psych 1, Psych 70, and one of the following: Psych 150, Psych 180, Psych 298, Psych 103, Psych 135, Psych 30N, or Psych 138.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYCH 257: Individually Supervised Practicum

Satisfies INS requirements for curricular practical training. Relevant experience for graduate students as part of their program of study. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: graduate standing in Psychology, consent of adviser.nn (Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYCH 258: Graduate Seminar in Social Psychology Research

For students who are already or are planning to become involved in research on social construal and the role that it plays in a variety of phenomena, notably the origin and escalation of conflict.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PSYCH 259: Race and Crime

The goal of this course is to examine social psychological perspectives on race, crime, and punishment in the United States. Readings will be drawn not only from psychology, but also from sociology, criminology, political science, and legal studies. We will consider the manner in which social psychological variables can operate at various points in the criminal justice system - from policing, to sentencing, to imprisonment. Limited enrollment. Interested students should complete an application for permission at https://tinyurl.com/PSYCH259-2018 and attend the first day of class.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Eberhardt, J. (PI)

PSYCH 260: Seminar on Emotion (PHIL 375G, PSYCH 160)

This undergraduate and graduate seminar will examine ancient Greek philosophical and contemporary psychological literatures relevant to emotion. Questions to be investigated include: What is the nature of emotions? What is the appropriate place in our lives for emotions? How should we manage our emotions? Do the emotions threaten the integrity of the agent? Meetings will be discussion oriented. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 265: Social Psychology and Social Change (EDUC 371)

The course is intended as an exploration of the major ideas, theories, and findings of social psychology and their applied status. Special attention will be given to historical issues, classic experiments, and seminal theories, and their implications for topics relevant to education. Contemporary research will also be discussed. Advanced undergraduates and graduate students from other disciplines are welcome, but priority for enrollment will be given to graduate students. In order to foster a vibrant, discussion-based class, enrollment will be capped at 20 students. Interested students should enroll in the class through simple enroll or axess, and complete this survey (https://tinyurl.com/SPSC17) to be considered for admission to the course. Please contact the course TA, Michael Schwalbe (schwalbe[at]stanford.edu), if you have any further questions.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cohen, G. (PI)

PSYCH 269: Graduate Seminar in Affective Science

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: graduate standing in Psychology. (Gotlib)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Zaki, J. (PI)

PSYCH 276: Graduate Research

Intermediate-level research undertaken with psychology faculty. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Wandell, B. (PI)

PSYCH 282: Practicum in Teaching PSYCH 1

Logistical TA training including: preparing for sections; creating, correcting exams; grading an iterative writing assignment; office hours; review sessions; developing audiovisual expertise; communicating via coursework. Review of student evaluations with instructor to set goals and strategies. Second quarter focuses on pedagogical improvement. Limited to current PSYCH 1 TAs. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PSYCH 288: Perspectives on Belonging

How do people make sense of their relationship with a community or society and how does this affect their behavior and outcomes? We will examine classic and contemporary research and theory on what belonging is; how people draw inferences about their belonging in different contexts; cultural and social-group variation; and how belonging-related motivations affect diverse behaviors.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Walton, G. (PI)

PSYCH 292: Special Topics in Emotion Regulation

This seminar will consider special topics in emotion regulation. Admission is by invitation only.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gross, J. (PI)

PSYCH 373: Research Seminar: Mind, Brain, and Computation

Faculty and student research presentations focusing on work linking cellular, systems, cognitive, behavioral, and computational neuroscience. Limited to affiliates of the Center for Mind, Brain and Computation. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; McClelland, J. (PI)

PSYCH 383: International Conflict Resolution (INTLPOL 250)

(Formerly IPS 250) (Same as LAW 5009; formerly Law 656) This seminar examines the challenges of managing and resolving intractable political and violent intergroup and international conflicts. Employing an interdisciplinary approach drawing on social psychology, political science, game theory, and international law, the course identifies various tactical, psychological, and structural barriers that can impede the achievement of efficient solutions to conflicts. We will explore a conceptual framework for conflict management and resolution that draws not only on theoretical insights, but also builds on historical examples and practical experience in the realm of conflict resolution. This approach examines the need for the parties to conflicts to address the following questions in order to have prospects of creating peaceful relationships: (1) how can the parties to conflict develop a vision of a mutually bearable shared future; (2) how can parties develop trust in the enemy; (3) how can each side be persuaded, as part of a negotiated settlement, to accept losses that it will find very painful; and (4) how do we overcome the perceptions of injustice that each side are likely to have towards any compromise solution? We will consider both particular conflicts, such as the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and the South African transition to majority rule, as well as cross-cutting issues, such as the role international legal rules play in facilitating or impeding conflict resolution, the ways intragroup dynamics affect intergroup conflict resolution efforts, and the role of criminal accountability for atrocities following civil wars. Special Instructions: Section 01: Grades will be based on class participation, written assignments, and a final exam. Section 02: Up to five students, with consent of the instructor, will have the option to write an independent research paper for Research (R) credit in lieu of the written assignments and final exam for Section 01. After the term begins, students (max 5) accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Weiner, A. (PI)

PSYCH 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOC 459, BIOE 459, CHEM 459, CHEMENG 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
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