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PSYCH 1: Introduction to Psychology

An introduction to the science of how people think, feel, and behave. We will explore such topics as intelligence, perception, memory, happiness, personality, culture, social influence, development, emotion, and mental illness. Students will learn about classic and cutting edge research, a range of methods, and discover how psychology informs our understanding of what it means to be human, addresses other fields, and offers solutions to important social problems. Psych 1 fulfills the SI Way, and, effective Autumn 2018, the SMA Way. For more information on PSYCH 1, visit http://psychone.stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 7N: Learn to Intervene, Wisely

One of the most exciting transformations in the social sciences in recent years is the finding that brief psychological exercises can improve important outcomes for months and years such as raising school achievement and reducing inequality, improving health, and reducing intergroup conflict. These interventions help individuals flourish and help our society live up to its ideals. They address critical psychological questions people have, like ¿Do people like me belong in this school?¿, ¿Can I learn math?¿, ¿Am I bad mom?¿, and ¿Can groups in conflict change?¿. In this seminar, we will learn about ¿psychologically wise¿ interventions; how they work; how they can cause lasting benefits; their intellectual lineage; how they can be used, adapted, and scaled to address contemporary problems; and challenges and mistakes that can arise in doing so. In addition to learning from classic and contemporary research, you will design your very own wise intervention and workshop others¿ efforts. Working with a community partner, you will explore a problem your partner faces, identify a specific psychological process you think contributes to this problem, and design an intervention to address this process to improve outcomes, which your partner could implement and evaluate. You will share your approach in a final report with both your seminar-mates and your community partner. When you have completed this seminar, you will more fully understand the psychological aspect of social problems and how this can be addressed through rigorous research.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Walton, G. (PI)

PSYCH 10: Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus (STATS 60, STATS 160)

Techniques for organizing data, computing, and interpreting measures of central tendency, variability, and association. Estimation, confidence intervals, tests of hypotheses, t-tests, correlation, and regression. Possible topics: analysis of variance and chi-square tests, computer statistical packages.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 12N: Self Theories

Preference to freshmen. The impact of people's belief in a growing versus fixed self on their motivation and performance in school, business, sports, and relationships. How such theories develop and can be changed.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dweck, C. (PI)

PSYCH 21N: How to Make a Racist (AFRICAAM 121N, CSRE 21N)

How does a child, born without beliefs or expectations about race, grow up to be racist? To address this complicated question, this seminar will introduce you to some of the psychological theories on the development of racial stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination. Together, these theories highlight how cognitive, social, and motivational factors contribute to racist thinking. We will engage thoughtfully and critically with each topic through reflection and discussion. Occasionally, I will supplement the discussion and class activities with a brief lecture, in order to highlight the central issues, concepts, and relevant findings. We will share our own experiences, perspectives, and insights, and together, we will explore how racist thinking takes root. Come to class with an open mind, a willingness to be vulnerable, and a desire to learn from and with your peers. Students with diverse opinions and perspectives are encouraged to enroll.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Roberts, S. (PI)

PSYCH 35: Minds and Machines (LINGUIST 35, PHIL 99, SYMSYS 1, SYMSYS 200)

(Formerly SYMSYS 100). An overview of the interdisciplinary study of cognition, information, communication, and language, with an emphasis on foundational issues: What are minds? What is computation? What are rationality and intelligence? Can we predict human behavior? Can computers be truly intelligent? How do people and technology interact, and how might they do so in the future? Lectures focus on how the methods of philosophy, mathematics, empirical research, and computational modeling are used to study minds and machines. Undergraduates considering a major in symbolic systems should take this course as early as possible in their program of study.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lassiter, D. (PI)

PSYCH 90: INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY: A NEUROSCIENCE PERSPECTIVE

This course will provide students with an overview of the field of clinical psychology, the various roles of clinical psychologists in research and practice, and implications of current research in neuroscience for clinical psychology. We will discuss the definition and history of clinical psychology as a profession, research methods used in clinical psychology, issues in diagnosis and classification of disorders, techniques used in the assessment of intellectual and personality functioning, various approaches to therapeutic intervention, and issues related to ethics, professionalism, and training in clinical psychology. Throughout this course we will review and integrate relevant research in the field of clinical neuroscience with our discussion and understanding of clinical psychology.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYCH 103: Intergroup Communication (CSRE 103)

In an increasingly globalized world, our ability to connect and engage with new audiences is directly correlated with our competence and success in any field How do our intergroup perceptions and reactions influence our skills as communicators? This course uses experiential activities and discussion sections to explore the role of social identity in effective communication. The objective of the course is to examine and challenge our explicit and implicit assumptions about various groups to enhance our ability to successfully communicate across the complex web of identity. If you are interested in enrolling in this class, please fill out the following survey to be considered- https://tinyurl.com/psych103fall2019. After filling out this survey, you do not need to reach out any further. In order to be fully considered for enrollment in the class, you must attend the first day of class. Enrollment will not be offered to those who are not present on the first day.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 103F: Intergroup Communication Facilitation (CSRE 103F)

Are you interested in strengthening your skills as a facilitator or section leader? Interested in opening up dialogue around identity within your community or among friends? This course will provide you with facilitation tools and practice, but an equal part of the heart of this class will come from your own reflection on the particular strengths and challenges you may bring to facilitation and how to craft a personal style that works best for you. This reflection process is ongoing, for the instructors as well as the students.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 140: Introduction to Psycholinguistics (LINGUIST 145, LINGUIST 245A)

How do people do things with language? How do we go from perceiving the acoustic waves that reach our ears to understanding that someone just announced the winner of the presidential election? How do we go from a thought to spelling that thought out in a sentence? How do babies learn language from scratch? This course is a practical introduction to psycholinguistics -- the study of how humans learn, represent, comprehend, and produce language. The course aims to provide students with a solid understanding of both the research methodologies used in psycholinguistic research and many of the well-established findings in the field. Topics covered will include visual and auditory recognition of words, sentence comprehension, reading, discourse and inference, sentence production, language acquisition, language in the brain, and language disorders. Students will conduct a small but original research project and gain experience with reporting and critiquing psycholinguistic research.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 141: Cognitive Development

How do humans think, learn, and communicate? What are the developmental roots of these capacities, and what makes young children such remarkable learners? This course aims to offer an understanding of how human cognition - the ability to think, reason, and learn about the world - changes in the first few years of life. We will review and evaluate both classic findings and state-of-the-art research on cognitive development and understand the logic behind the scientific methods for studying cognition in young children. By the end of the course, students will gain a deeper understanding of the major theoretical accounts of intellectual growth as well as the key empirical findings that support (or refute) these accounts, understand the basic logic of scientific methods in cognitive development research, and be able to discuss implications of cognitive development research on real-world issues in education and social policy. PSYCH141 is an Area A course for 2019-2020. Prerequisites: PSYCH 1. Recommended: PSYCH 60
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYCH 142A: Special Topics in Adolescent Mental Health (HUMBIO 142M)

Includes the study of aspects of common disorders seen in adolescent populations, such as prevalence, developmental course, gender differences, theoretical explanations, and therapeutic interventions. Topics will include mood/anxiety disorders, eating disorders, learning disabilities and ADHD, sexual risk behaviors, developmental disorders, substance abuse, and self-harm. Goals of this course include getting students to think critically about the unique mental health needs of adolescents, collaborating on devising ways to improve the way our society meets those needs, and strengthening writing and communication skills applicable to this area of inquiry. Prerequisite: Human Biology Core or Biology Foundations or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, not given next year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Medoff, L. (PI)

PSYCH 146: Observation of Children

Learning about children through guided observations at Bing Nursery School, Psychology's lab for research and training in child development. Physical, emotional, social, cognitive, and language development. Recommended: 60.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 147: Development in Early Childhood

Supervised experience with young children at Bing Nursery School. 3 units require 4 hours per week in Bing classrooms throughout the quarter; 4 units require 7 hours per week; 5 units require 10.5 hours per week. Seminar on developmental issues in the Bing teaching/learning environment. Recommended: 60 or 146, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 171: Research Seminar on Aging

Two quarter practicum exposes students to multiple phases of research by participating in a laboratory focusing on social behavior in adulthood and old age. Review of current research; participation in ongoing data collection, analysis, and interpretation. Prerequisites: 1, research experience, and consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Carstensen, L. (PI)

PSYCH 183: SPARQ Lab

Join SPARQ (Social Psychological Answers to Real-world Questions) as a research assistant and help with projects addressing real-world issues.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYCH 189: Stanford Center on Longevity Practicum

Student involvement in an interdisciplinary center aimed at changing the culture of human aging using science and technology. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYCH 191: Special Research Projects in the Mind & Body Lab

May be repeated for credit or for grade. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Crum, A. (PI)

PSYCH 197: Advanced Research

Limited to students in senior honors program. Weekly research seminar, independent research project under the supervision of an appropriate faculty member. A detailed proposal is submitted at the end of Autumn Quarter. Research continues during Winter and Spring quarters as 198. A report demonstrating sufficient progress is required at the end of Winter Quarter.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-4 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PSYCH 199: Individually Supervised Practicum

Satisfies INS requirements for curricular practical training (CPT). May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: consent of adviser.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PSYCH 207: Professional Seminar for First-Year Ph.D. Graduate Students

Required of and limited to first-year Ph.D. students in Psychology. Major issues in contemporary psychology with historical backgrounds.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wagner, A. (PI)

PSYCH 215: Mind, Culture, and Society

Social psychology from the context of society and culture. The interdependence of psychological and sociocultural processes: how sociocultural factors shape psychological processes, and how psychological systems shape sociocultural systems. Theoretical developments to understand social issues, problems, and polity. Works of Baldwin, Mead, Asch, Lewin, Burner, and contemporary theory and empirical work on the interdependence of psychology and social context as constituted by gender, ethnicity, race, religion, and region of the country and the world. Prerequisite: 207 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYCH 217: Topics and Methods Related to Culture and Emotion

Preference to graduate students. How cultural factors shape emotion and other feeling states. Empirical and ethnographic literature, theories, and research on culture and emotion. Applications to clinical, educational, and occupational settings. Research in psychology, anthropology, and sociology. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Tsai, J. (PI)

PSYCH 221: Image Systems Engineering

This course is an introduction to digital imaging technologies. We focus on the principles of key elements of digital systems components; we show how to use simulation to predict how these components will work together in a complete image system simulation. The early lectures introduce the software environment and describe options for the course project. The following topics are covered and software tools are introduced:n- Basic principles of optics (Snell's Law, diffraction, adaptive optics).n- Image sensor and pixel designsn- Color science, metrics, and calibrationn- Human spatial resolutionn- Image processing principlesn- Display technologiesnA special theme of this course is that it explains how imaging technologies accommodate the requirements of the human visual system. The course also explains how image systems simulations can be useful in neuroscience and industrial vision applications.nThe course consists of lectures, software tutorials, and a course project. Tutorials and projects include extensive software simulations of the imaging pipeline. Some background in mathematics (linear algebra) and programming (Matlab) is valuable.nPre-requisite: EE 261 or equivalent. Or permission of instructor required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 223: Social Norms

This course covers research and theory on the origins and function of social norms. Topics include the estimation of public opinion, the function of norms as ideals and standards of judgment, and the impact of norms on collective and individual behavior. In addition to acquainting students with the various forms and functions of social norms the course will provide students with experience in identifying and formulating tractable research questions.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYCH 231: Questionnaire Design for Surveys and Laboratory Experiments: Social and Cognitive Perspectives (COMM 339, POLISCI 421K)

The social and psychological processes involved in asking and answering questions via questionnaires for the social sciences; optimizing questionnaire design; open versus closed questions; rating versus ranking; rating scale length and point labeling; acquiescence response bias; don't-know response options; response choice order effects; question order effects; social desirability response bias; attitude and behavior recall; and introspective accounts of the causes of thoughts and actions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Krosnick, J. (PI)

PSYCH 234: UNDERSTANDING DEPRESSION

In this course we will discuss current issues in the study of major depression, including the epidemiology and phenomenology of depression and other affective disorders, psychological and biological theories of depression, gender differences in depression, cognitive and social functioning of depressed persons, findings from neuroimaging studies of depression, depression in children, risk factors for depression, issues involving suicide, and implications of the NIMH RDoC initiative for the study of depression and other psychiatric diagnostic categories.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYCH 241: Psychometrics and automated experiment design

n this graduate seminar we will consider how modern computational techniques and old ideas in psychometrics combine to enable new approaches to experimentation. We will cover topics such as item response theory, optimal experiment design, adaptive experiments, and Bayesian optional stopping. We will read fairly technical papers and ask students to implement some of the algorithms we are studying.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 245: New Map of Life

This is an advanced graduate seminar focused on ways the ways that key life domains must change to accommodate century-long lives.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Carstensen, L. (PI)

PSYCH 246: Cognitive and Neuroscience Friday Seminar

Participant presentations. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: graduate standing in psychology or neuroscience program.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wagner, A. (PI)

PSYCH 249: Large-Scale Neural Network Modeling for Neuroscience (CS 375)

Introduction to designing, building, and training large-scale neural networks for modeling brain and behavioral data, including: deep convolutional neural network models of sensory systems (vision, audition, somatosensation); variational and generative methods for neural interpretation; recurrent neural networks for dynamics, memory and attention; interactive agent-based deep reinforcement learning for cognitive modeling; and methods and metrics for comparing such models to real-world neural data. Attention will be given both to established methods as well as cutting-edge techniques. Students will learn conceptual bases for deep neural network models and will also implement learn to implement and train large-scale models in Tensorflow using GPUs. Requirements: Fluency in Unix shell and Python programming; familiarity with differential equations, linear algebra, and probability theory; priori experience with modern machine learning concepts (e.g. CS229) and basic neural network training tools (eg. CS230 and/or CS231n). Prior knowledge of basic cognitive science or neuroscience not required but helpful.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Yamins, D. (PI)

PSYCH 251: Experimental Methods

Graduate laboratory class in experimental methods for psychology, with a focus on open science methods and best practices in behavioral research. Topics include experimental design, data collection, data management, data analysis, and the ethical conduct of research. The final project of the course is a replication experiment in which students collect new data following the procedures of a published paper. The course is designed for incoming graduate students in psychology, but is open to qualified students from other programs who have some working knowledge of the R statistical programming language.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 257: Individually Supervised Practicum

Satisfies INS requirements for curricular practical training. Relevant experience for graduate students as part of their program of study. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: graduate standing in Psychology, consent of adviser.nn (Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYCH 258: Graduate Seminar in Social Psychology Research

For students who are already or are planning to become involved in research on social construal and the role that it plays in a variety of phenomena, notably the origin and escalation of conflict.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PSYCH 264: Unleashing Personal Potential: Behavioral Science and Design Thinking Applied to Self (EDUC 426)

This course facilitates the application of the methods, theories, and findings of behavioral science to students own lives and improvement projects. It does so by combining behavioral science with a design thinking approach. You will learn to identify your potential, navigate to achieve it, and stay resilient during the journey. Students will design their own action plans, define goals and prototype strategies to test them, in an iterative feedback cycle. Our course thus blends two intellectual streams that seldom intersect: behavioral science and design thinking.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYCH 269: Graduate Seminar in Affective Science

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: graduate standing in Psychology.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Zaki, J. (PI)

PSYCH 271: Communicating Psychology

A graduate seminar on writing and communication of psychological research, both for our colleagues and audiences outside the field.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Zaki, J. (PI)

PSYCH 276: Graduate Research

Intermediate-level research undertaken with psychology faculty. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

PSYCH 282: Practicum in Teaching PSYCH 1

Pedagogical training focused on teaching introductory psychology: creating engaging and inclusive lesson plans and activities, providing helpful feedback to students, responding to student feedback, and supporting student learning in 1:1 and small group interactions. Second quarter focuses on designing and iterating section activities, giving and receiving peer feedback on teaching, and reflecting on teaching practices. Limited to current PSYCH 1 Teaching Fellows. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PSYCH 292: Special Topics in Emotion Regulation

This seminar will consider special topics in emotion regulation. Admission is by invitation only.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gross, J. (PI)

PSYCH 373: Research Seminar: Mind, Brain, and Computation

Faculty and student research presentations focusing on work linking cellular, systems, cognitive, behavioral, and computational neuroscience. Limited to affiliates of the Center for Mind, Brain and Computation. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; McClelland, J. (PI)

PSYCH 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOC 459, BIOE 459, CHEM 459, CHEMENG 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
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