Print Settings
 

PSYC 54N: Genes, Memes and Behavior

Examines how natural selection operates to shape successful genes in the gene pool, how cultural selection operates to shape successful "memes" in the pool of cultural ideas, and how selection by consequences operates to shape successful behaviors in our repertoires. Topics include cases in which selection produces undesirable consequences (e.g. genetic mutations, cultural problems, and aberrant behaviors in children). Emphasis on understanding the role of modern natural science in complex behaviors and why study of human life from an interdisciplinary perspective is important.
Terms: Aut, Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hall, S. (PI)

PSYC 83: Addictions in our World: From Physiology to Human Behavior

Addiction is a powerful brain-based behavioral disorder that interferes with many lives. The National Survey on Drug Use and Health has estimated 21.5 million Americans aged 12 and older are classified as having a substance use disorder, an extraordinary 8.1% of the population. The field of mental health is advancing the understanding of this disorder through research, education, innovation and policy guidance. This class aims to help students better understand the struggles of addiction in our world by discussing many components involved in the disease including: physiology, psychology, treatment options, and the societal implications of addiction.nnStudents will engage in thought-provoking between psychology, neuroscience, and society. They will develop the knowledge-base and framework to critically evaluate the science behind addiction and how to apply this knowledge to address the addiction epidemic in our world. As technology advances, many new types of addiction are emerging, creating an additional urgent need to discuss the implications this burgeoning problem. This highly interactive seminar aims to engage the students in critical thinking didactics, activities and discussions that shape their understanding of the complexity inherent to the issues surrounding addiction, and increase the student¿s ability to more critically assimilate and interrogate information.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, WAY-SMA | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PSYC 125: The Brain and the Law

How does neuroscience intersect with the making of laws, the punishment of criminals, and the development of rehabilitation? Is it a legitimate defense to claim that a tumor made you do it? How are the brains of minors different from adult brains? Should brain imaging be leveraged for sentencing? How should culpability be assessed, given that we're all steered by genetic and environmental influences over which we have no choice? This course covers the biological underpinnings that have legal consequences, with an eye toward designing evidence-based policy. Topics include responsibility, punishment, prediction, rehabilitation, brain death, genetics, competence, technologies, and ethics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PSYC 195: Special Laboratory Projects

Assist Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Program with data entry, library organization, and study-related projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rasgon, N. (PI)

PSYC 199: Undergraduate Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Aboujaoude, E. (PI); Adamson, M. (PI); Adelsheim, S. (PI); Agras, W. (PI); Albucher, R. (PI); Apple, R. (PI); Arnow, B. (PI); Ashford, J. (PI); Barry, J. (PI); Beaudreau, S. (PI); Benham, A. (PI); Berk, M. (PI); Bernert, R. (PI); Birnbaum, J. (PI); Bohon, C. (PI); Brown, M. (PI); Bullock, K. (PI); Carrion, V. (PI); Cassidy, E. (PI); Chang, K. (PI); Chen, L. (PI); Chetty, S. (PI); Cloitre, M. (PI); Conner, L. (PI); Corcoran, K. (PI); Cosgrove, V. (PI); De Golia, S. (PI); DeBattista, C. (PI); Deisseroth, K. (PI); Dement, W. (PI); Derenne, J. (PI); Dhabhar, F. (PI); Duncan, L. (PI); Dunn, L. (PI); Durazzo, T. (PI); Etkin, A. (PI); Feinstein, C. (PI); Fenn, H. (PI); Fung, L. (PI); Furst, A. (PI); Gandy, S. (PI); Garner, C. (PI); Gengoux, G. (PI); Gershon, A. (PI); Gore-Felton, C. (PI); Greaves, C. (PI); Guilleminault, C. (PI); Haberecht, M. (PI); Hall, S. (PI); Hallmayer, J. (PI); Hardan, A. (PI); Hayward, C. (PI); Hill, K. (PI); Hoblyn, J. (PI); Hong, D. (PI); Hosseini, H. (PI); Hsu, J. (PI); Hu, R. (PI); Humphreys, K. (PI); Jo, B. (PI); Joshi, S. (PI); Kesler, S. (PI); Ketter, T. (PI); King, R. (PI); Kishore, A. (PI); Kogon, M. (PI); Koopman, C. (PI); Kushida, C. (PI); Laurent, C. (PI); Lazzeroni, L. (PI); Lee, T. (PI); Lembke, A. (PI); Levinson, D. (PI); Lindley, S. (PI); Linenberg, B. (PI); Lock, J. (PI); Lotspeich, L. (PI); Louie, A. (PI); Luce, K. (PI); Lyons, D. (PI); Maldonado, J. (PI); Malenka, R. (PI); Manber, R. (PI); Marnell, M. (PI); Mason, D. (PI); McGLYNN, L. (PI); McGovern, M. (PI); Mccaslin, S. (PI); Menon, V. (PI); Mignot, E. (PI); Mourrain, P. (PI); Murphy, G. (PI); Nathan, K. (PI); Nishino, S. (PI); Noordsy, D. (PI); O'hara, R. (PI); Ohayon, M. (PI); Ordaz, S. (PI); Ostacher, M. (PI); Palesh, O. (PI); Parker, K. (PI); Pasca, S. (PI); Pelayo, R. (PI); Phillips, J. (PI); Post, L. (PI); Rait, D. (PI); Rasgon, N. (PI); Reicherter, D. (PI); Reiss, A. (PI); Ringold, A. (PI); Roberts, L. (PI); Robinson, A. (PI); Rodriguez, C. (PI); Rosen, A. (PI); Rosen, C. (PI); Ruzek, J. (PI); Sadeh Sharvit, S. (PI); Safer, D. (PI); Saggar, M. (PI); Salehi, A. (PI); Sanders, M. (PI); Schatzberg, A. (PI); Shaw, R. (PI); Singh, M. (PI); Solvason, H. (PI); Sommer, B. (PI); Spiegel, D. (PI); Steiner, H. (PI); Sullivan, E. (PI); Suppes, T. (PI); Taylor, C. (PI); Taylor, J. (PI); Thienemann, M. (PI); Thompson, D. (PI); Tiet, Q. (PI); Tinklenberg, J. (PI); Trafton, J. (PI); Urban, A. (PI); Van Natta, J. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warner, D. (PI); Weitlauf, J. (PI); White-Huber, B. (PI); Williams, K. (PI); Williams, L. (PI); Williams, S. (PI); Woodward, S. (PI); Wroolie, T. (PI); Yesavage, J. (PI); Yoon, J. (PI); Zappert, L. (PI); Zeitzer, J. (PI); Zelenko, M. (PI); de Lecea, L. (PI); Gore-Felton, C. (SI); Hardan, A. (SI); Lock, J. (SI); Manber, R. (SI); Singh, M. (SI); Tarshis, T. (SI); Taylor, C. (SI)

PSYC 211: Developmental Psychopathology, Psychotherapy and Psychopharmacology

Common syndromes in child psychiatry. Topics include diagnosis, epidemiology, etiology, course, outcome and therapeutic interventions. Prerequisite: familiarity with the basics of psychiatric and psychological discourse; psychiatry clerkship or course in psychology.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Joshi, S. (PI)

PSYC 213: Policy Practicum: Alcohol Use Among Stanford Undergraduates

(Same as LAW 806L) Client: Stanford University Vice Provost of Student Affairs, https://studentaffairs.stanford.edu/who-we-are/vice-provost-student-affairs. Excessive alcohol consumption among Stanford undergraduates creates ahealth, educational, social, and legal problems for drinkers and for other members of the Stanford community. With the Vice Provost for Student Affairs as the client, this Policy Lab practicum explores the causes, consequences, and practical evidence to assess and address the problem. The interdisciplinary research team will examine practices and data at Stanford and other academic institutions in the context of scholarly studies and general knowledge from medicine, law, psychology, and other social sciences. As one component of formal policy research methods, the team will conduct ethnographic interviews with stakeholders. Upper-division and graduate students from Law, Medicine, Public Policy, and social science disciplines are especially encouraged to apply. Law students wishing to undertake R credit will perform additional research for a full report analyzing the issues and results of the collective research. R credit is possible only by consent of the instructor. After the term begins, and with the consent of the instructor, students accepted into the course may transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement. NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PSYC 225: Stanford Klingenstein Fellowship Program

A mentoring program designed to expose first and second year medical students to the rewarding field of child and adolescent psychiatry, and to increase awareness and education about child and adolescent mental health issues. Offers a year-long program wherein medical students are paired with child and adolescent psychiatrists, meeting bimonthly for clinical experiences and mentoring. Also provides opportunities for the students to get involved in cutting-edge scientific research, networking opportunities, and opportunities to attend professional conferences.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

PSYC 229A: Topics in Neurodiversity: Introduction and Advocacy, Part 1

This is part 1 of a year-long course which provides students with the foundation, knowledge, and essential skills for understanding, engaging with, and advocating for the neurodiverse population. In addition, this course will also provide direct instruction to students in the areas of activities of daily living (ADLs), social communication strategies, navigating social relationships, self-regulation, support in accommodations, and support in career development.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fung, L. (PI); Sperry, L. (PI)

PSYC 233: Mindfulness: An Awareness-Based Stress Reduction Program in Medicine

An experiential program in which the participants learn the techniques of mindfulness meditation and its application in the management of stress and in healthcare. Modeled after the MBSR, Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction, started by Jon Kabat-Zinn at UMASS Medical Center. Designed to work with the mind/body relationship to stress and chronic illness teaching open sensitive awareness without judgement of mental or physical reactivity. Requirement for the course is the daily practice of mindfulness meditation, attendance at weekly class meetings and the all day retreat, home reading, and a final paper covering the student's observations.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

PSYC 243: Thriving in Collegiate Athletics: Key Concepts in Student-Athlete Health and Wellness

Develops the understanding, self-awareness, confidence, and skills necessary for students to serve as a resource for their athlete peers in the areas of building resilience, promoting well-being, and supporting emotional balance. Examines personal values, athlete identity, signature strengths, self-care and stress management practices, signs and symptoms of common mental health concerns, and barriers for care-seeking in student-athlete population. Develops skills for enhancing personal well-being communication with coaches and teammates, connecting peers with existing resources, and promoting a culture of support, health, and wellness.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

PSYC 249: Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Subspecialty Areas

In this lunch talk series, students will explore psychiatry and behavioral science subspecialty areas through the personal perspectives of psychiatrists and other specialists in behavioral health from a variety of practice settings. Some examples of topics have been advances in subspecialty areas (e.g., child and adolescent psychiatry, psychotherapy, legal issues, mood & anxiety disorders, community outreach, eating disorders), the interplay between social issues and mental healthcare, and the nature of psychiatric work and work/life balance. Of note, this course discusses sensitive topics in psychiatry including suicide, psychosis, addiction, child abuse, sexual assault, trauma, violence, and mental disorders. While priority will be given to MD students, undergraduates and graduate students are welcomed. Address questions to Prof. Alan Louie, Louiemd@stanford.edu
Terms: Aut | Units: 0-1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

PSYC 250: Methodology of Research in Behavioral Sciences

Statistical and methodological issues in three major psychiatric research themes: clinical psychiatric research (Aut), neuroimaging research (Win), and statistical genetics and general statistical modeling (Spr). Autumn series includes: basics of inferential statistics, group comparison, analysis of variance, regression analysis, multivariate analysis, and longitudinal analysis in the context of psychiatric and behavioral research. Also included are conceptual topics such as risk factors, mediation, moderation, and causal inference. Winter series includes: functional and structural neuroimaging research methods (e.g. functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), structural MRI (sMRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), electroencephalogram (EEG)). Basic principles, statistical analysis methods, advantages and limitations, and applications are discussed. Spring series includes: tests and effect estimation for multiple SNPs, genes or pathways in genetic association studies, gene-gene interactions, twins and heritability estimates, Hardy-Weinberg and linkage equilibrium, interpretation and presentation of results for a range of statistical models for different types of data. Practical examples from recent research within the Department of Psychiatry will be used throughout the course. Prerequisite: Some exposure to statistical methods, either from course work or from participation in research having some behavioral aspects, or consent of instructor. 1 unit for class participation only, 2 units includes weekly assignments, 3 units includes a final project.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PSYC 290: Teaching in Psychiatry

Practical experience in teaching by serving as a teaching assistant in a psychiatry course. Unit values are allotted individually to reflect the level of teaching responsibility assigned to the student.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Aboujaoude, E. (PI); Adamson, M. (PI); Adelsheim, S. (PI); Agras, W. (PI); Albucher, R. (PI); Apple, R. (PI); Arnow, B. (PI); Ashford, J. (PI); Barry, J. (PI); Beaudreau, S. (PI); Benham, A. (PI); Berk, M. (PI); Bernert, R. (PI); Birnbaum, J. (PI); Bohon, C. (PI); Brown, M. (PI); Bullock, K. (PI); Carrion, V. (PI); Cassidy, E. (PI); Chang, K. (PI); Chen, L. (PI); Cloitre, M. (PI); Conner, L. (PI); Corcoran, K. (PI); De Golia, S. (PI); DeBattista, C. (PI); Deisseroth, K. (PI); Dement, W. (PI); Derenne, J. (PI); Dhabhar, F. (PI); Duncan, L. (PI); Dunn, L. (PI); Durazzo, T. (PI); Etkin, A. (PI); Feinstein, C. (PI); Fenn, H. (PI); Furst, A. (PI); Gandy, S. (PI); Garner, C. (PI); Gengoux, G. (PI); Gershon, A. (PI); Gore-Felton, C. (PI); Greaves, C. (PI); Guilleminault, C. (PI); Haberecht, M. (PI); Hall, S. (PI); Hallmayer, J. (PI); Hardan, A. (PI); Hayward, C. (PI); Hill, K. (PI); Hoblyn, J. (PI); Hong, D. (PI); Hsu, J. (PI); Hu, R. (PI); Humphreys, K. (PI); Jo, B. (PI); Joshi, S. (PI); Kesler, S. (PI); Ketter, T. (PI); King, R. (PI); Kishore, A. (PI); Kogon, M. (PI); Koopman, C. (PI); Kushida, C. (PI); Laurent, C. (PI); Lazzeroni, L. (PI); Lee, T. (PI); Lembke, A. (PI); Levinson, D. (PI); Lindley, S. (PI); Linenberg, B. (PI); Lock, J. (PI); Lotspeich, L. (PI); Louie, A. (PI); Luce, K. (PI); Lyons, D. (PI); Maldonado, J. (PI); Malenka, R. (PI); Manber, R. (PI); Marnell, M. (PI); Mason, D. (PI); McGLYNN, L. (PI); Mccaslin, S. (PI); Menon, V. (PI); Mignot, E. (PI); Mourrain, P. (PI); Murphy, G. (PI); Nathan, K. (PI); Nishino, S. (PI); Noordsy, D. (PI); O'hara, R. (PI); Ohayon, M. (PI); Ostacher, M. (PI); Palesh, O. (PI); Parker, K. (PI); Pasca, S. (PI); Pelayo, R. (PI); Phillips, J. (PI); Post, L. (PI); Rait, D. (PI); Rasgon, N. (PI); Reicherter, D. (PI); Reiss, A. (PI); Ringold, A. (PI); Roberts, L. (PI); Robinson, A. (PI); Rodriguez, C. (PI); Rosen, A. (PI); Rosen, C. (PI); Ruzek, J. (PI); Safer, D. (PI); Salehi, A. (PI); Sanders, M. (PI); Schatzberg, A. (PI); Shaw, R. (PI); Singh, M. (PI); Solvason, H. (PI); Sommer, B. (PI); Spiegel, D. (PI); Steiner, H. (PI); Sullivan, E. (PI); Suppes, T. (PI); Taylor, C. (PI); Taylor, J. (PI); Thienemann, M. (PI); Thompson, D. (PI); Tiet, Q. (PI); Tinklenberg, J. (PI); Trafton, J. (PI); Urban, A. (PI); Van Natta, J. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warner, D. (PI); Weitlauf, J. (PI); Williams, K. (PI); Williams, L. (PI); Williams, S. (PI); Woodward, S. (PI); Wroolie, T. (PI); Yesavage, J. (PI); Yoon, J. (PI); Zappert, L. (PI); Zeitzer, J. (PI); Zelenko, M. (PI); de Lecea, L. (PI); Eagleman, D. (SI)

PSYC 299: Directed Reading in Psychiatry

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Aboujaoude, E. (PI); Adamson, M. (PI); Adelsheim, S. (PI); Agras, W. (PI); Albucher, R. (PI); Apple, R. (PI); Arnow, B. (PI); Ashford, J. (PI); Bale, R. (PI); Bandstra, B. (PI); Barry, J. (PI); Beaudreau, S. (PI); Benham, A. (PI); Berk, M. (PI); Bernert, R. (PI); Birnbaum, J. (PI); Bohon, C. (PI); Brown, M. (PI); Bullock, K. (PI); Carrion, V. (PI); Cassidy, E. (PI); Chang, K. (PI); Chen, L. (PI); Cloitre, M. (PI); Conner, L. (PI); Corcoran, K. (PI); De Golia, S. (PI); DeBattista, C. (PI); Deisseroth, K. (PI); Dement, W. (PI); Derenne, J. (PI); Dhabhar, F. (PI); Duncan, L. (PI); Dunn, L. (PI); Durazzo, T. (PI); Etkin, A. (PI); Feinstein, C. (PI); Fenn, H. (PI); Furst, A. (PI); Gandy, S. (PI); Garner, C. (PI); Gengoux, G. (PI); Gershon, A. (PI); Gore-Felton, C. (PI); Greaves, C. (PI); Guilleminault, C. (PI); Haberecht, M. (PI); Hall, S. (PI); Hallmayer, J. (PI); Hardan, A. (PI); Hayward, C. (PI); Hill, K. (PI); Hoblyn, J. (PI); Hong, D. (PI); Hsu, J. (PI); Hu, R. (PI); Humphreys, K. (PI); Jo, B. (PI); Joshi, S. (PI); Kesler, S. (PI); Ketter, T. (PI); King, R. (PI); Kishore, A. (PI); Kletter, H. (PI); Kogon, M. (PI); Koopman, C. (PI); Kushida, C. (PI); Laurent, C. (PI); Lazzeroni, L. (PI); Lee, T. (PI); Lembke, A. (PI); Levinson, D. (PI); Lindley, S. (PI); Linenberg, B. (PI); Lock, J. (PI); Lotspeich, L. (PI); Louie, A. (PI); Luce, K. (PI); Lyons, D. (PI); Maldonado, J. (PI); Malenka, R. (PI); Manber, R. (PI); Marnell, M. (PI); McGLYNN, L. (PI); Mccaslin, S. (PI); Menon, V. (PI); Mignot, E. (PI); Mourrain, P. (PI); Murphy, G. (PI); Nathan, K. (PI); Nishino, S. (PI); Noordsy, D. (PI); O'hara, R. (PI); Ohayon, M. (PI); Ostacher, M. (PI); Palesh, O. (PI); Parker, K. (PI); Pasca, S. (PI); Pelayo, R. (PI); Phillips, J. (PI); Post, L. (PI); Rait, D. (PI); Rasgon, N. (PI); Reicherter, D. (PI); Reiss, A. (PI); Ringold, A. (PI); Roberts, L. (PI); Robinson, A. (PI); Rodriguez, C. (PI); Rosen, A. (PI); Rosen, C. (PI); Ruzek, J. (PI); Safer, D. (PI); Salehi, A. (PI); Sanders, M. (PI); Schatzberg, A. (PI); Shaw, R. (PI); Singh, M. (PI); Solvason, H. (PI); Sommer, B. (PI); Spiegel, D. (PI); Steiner, H. (PI); Sullivan, E. (PI); Suppes, T. (PI); Taylor, C. (PI); Taylor, J. (PI); Thienemann, M. (PI); Thompson, D. (PI); Tiet, Q. (PI); Tinklenberg, J. (PI); Trafton, J. (PI); Urban, A. (PI); Van Natta, J. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warner, D. (PI); Weitlauf, J. (PI); Williams, K. (PI); Williams, L. (PI); Williams, S. (PI); Woodward, S. (PI); Wroolie, T. (PI); Yesavage, J. (PI); Yoon, J. (PI); Zappert, L. (PI); Zeitzer, J. (PI); Zelenko, M. (PI); de Lecea, L. (PI); Carrion, V. (SI)

PSYC 300A: Psychiatry Core Clerkship

Required Clerkship. Closed to visitors. The clerkship is designed to solidify the knowledge of psychiatry students have acquired in the Practice of Medicine courses, as students gain practical skills in the application of this knowledge to clinical situations. The focus is on interviewing skills, psychiatric evaluations, on refining diagnostic skills, and offers an overview of psychosocial and biological treatment modalities for the major psychiatric disorders. The clerkship consists of clinical work on inpatient units under the supervision of academic and clinical faculty, a weekly lecture series by academic faculty, interviewing seminars taught by voluntary clinical faculty, and attendance at Grand Rounds. Students are assigned to patient care settings at one of the six affiliated sites: a comprehensive medical psychiatry unit (G2), an inpatient general psychiatry ward (H2), a geriatric psychiatry unit, the consult-liaison service at Stanford Hospital, an inpatient research psychiatric ward specializing in the study of schizophrenia or an acute locked psychiatric ward at the PAVA. In addition, students participate in the specialty outpatient clinics at Stanford including OCD, Child, bipolar, geriatric and general psychopharmacology clinics. Students are given the opportunity to express their preferences regarding assignment. The final rotation assignment is determined by the department based on availability of sites. Students are informed about the specific clerkship requirements at the orientation offered at the start of each clerkship period. They receive a course syllabus, several study guide books and a psychopharmacology textbook. Students are encouraged to visit the Psychiatry clerkship site on Coursework which contains all information, the syllabus and teaching materials. Students are expected to complete five cases on the CaseTool site and to record cases seen by diagnostic category. Requirements include mandatory attendance at seminars, weekly inpatient case history presentations and Emergency room experiences with residents/attending psychiatrists. The NBME Subject Exam in Psychiatry is a required component of the clerkship. Prereq: INDE 205. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 10 students per period (minimum of 3 students per period). Reporting Instructions: Where: 401 Quarry Rd., 2nd Floor, Room 2213; Time: 8:00 am. Units: 6 Call Code: 2, call once per week for the first 3 weeks or 3 nights total during 4 week clerkship period. Director: Charles DeBattista, M.D. (650-723-8324). Coord: Quynh Dang (650-725-2769), 401 Quarry Rd, Rm. 2204.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

PSYC 308E: Trauma Psychiatry

Open to visitors. The Trauma Psychiatry clerkship teaches how trauma impacts the lives and health of patients; lessons learned are generalizable to all areas of medicine (i.e., "trauma-informed medicine¿). Students work with people suffering from PTSD relating to sexual assault, combat or other traumas who are receiving ambulatory-type treatments in an intensive, multidisciplinary setting. Students will have direct patient responsibility, provide evidence-based psychopharmacologic and psychotherapeutic care and longitudinal management, and facilitate recovery. Students will gain perspective on trauma in our world and the importance of sensitive and effective treatment for this all too common condition (7.8% lifetime prevalence). Please note: Visiting students must obtain approval from Ms. Quynh Dang prior to applying for this clerkship. Please email requests to qdang@stanford.edu. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 1 student per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Trauma Recovery Program, Menlo Park VA, Building 351; Time: 8:30 a.m. Units: 6. Call Code: 0. Director: Tasha Souter, M.D. Coord: Quynh Dang (650-725-2769), 401 Quarry Rd, Rm. 2204. (MPVAMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

PSYC 326A: Child Psychiatry Clerkship

Open to visitors. Exposes the student to advanced principles and concepts of child psychiatry. The student is based primarily on the inpatient pediatric psychiatry consultation-liaison service at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford (LPCH). Clinical experience will involve consultation and the treatment of psychological issues in children with medical illness. Examples include depression and anxiety in the medically-ill child, pediatric conversion disorders, somatoform disorders and medically-related posttraumatic stress disorder. Students will develop skills in interviewing children and parents, learn team treatment skills for children with psychosomatic and psychiatric illnesses, observe family therapy, and produce case work-ups of children with a range of behavioral disorders. Students may have the option of spending one day/week in the Stanford child psychiatry outpatient clinic observing new evaluations in subspecialty clinics (anxiety disorders, mood disorders, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, neuropsychiatry/pervasive developmental disorders, pediatric pain). Students may also observe evaluations on the inpatient adolescent eating disorder program. A case presentation is required at the end of the clerkship. Students are supervised by the consult service attending psychiatrist, and the child psychiatry fellows. Prereq: Psychiatry 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 2 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Psych Therapy room on Unit 380 at LPCH; Time: 9:00 am. Students should obtain LPCH EPIC access and an LPCH dictation number prior to starting the clerkship. Units: 6. Call Code: 0. Director: Richard Shaw, M.D. Other Faculty: M. Brown, J. Crawford, W. Daniels, M. Goldsmith, L. Schneider, R. Shaw, P. Tran. Coord: Quynh Dang (650-725-2769), 401 Quarry Rd, Rm. 2204. (LPCH)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

PSYC 328B: Addiction Treatment Services

Selective 1. Open to visitors. In this rotation, medical students observe and participate in a 28-day residential addiction treatment program located at the VA Palo Alto. A typical day includes an admission, which is a typical psychiatric work-up with an additional emphasis on substance abuse assessment; group therapy meetings throughout the day utilizing various psychotherapeutic modalities; a multidisciplinary staff meeting focused on individualized care and management approaches; and a community meeting, in which milieu events are processed. The overall goal is to become familiar with general psychiatry and residential treatment while gaining exposure to substance abuse treatment issues. Residential programs combine elements of both inpatient and outpatient settings and are unique in this regard. The attending psychiatrist teaches history-taking, DSM diagnoses, and psychopharmacology for substance use disorders. In addition to the above, students will gain exposure to the other substance abuse treatment programs located at the Palo Alto VA, such as the multi-disciplinary assessment/consultation clinic, the intensive outpatient program, outpatient addiction medication management, and office-based opioid replacement therapy. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for two weeks or four weeks. 1 student per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Lobby of Building 520-A, 3801 Miranda Ave, Palo Alto.; Time: 8:00 a.m. Units: 3. Call Code: 0. Director: Marina Urman-Yotam, M.D. Other Faculty: Marina Urman-Yotam, M.D. Coord: Quynh Dang (650-725-2769), 401 Quarry Rd, Rm. 2204. (PAVAMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

PSYC 333A: Sleep Medicine for Medical Students

Closed to visitors, This clerkship offers a comprehensive experience in sleep medicine for those interested in pursuing a future career in sleep medicine. Students shadow sleep specialists in their evaluation of patients with sleep disorders; review polysomnography (sleep studies) of patients with sleep disorders; and attend informal discussions and case conferences regarding interesting sleep problems, formal conferences on sleep research, sleep surgery, and sleep disorders, and journal club reviews of topical articles on sleep and sleep disorders. PLEASE NOTE: Visiting students must obtain approval from Dr. Kushida prior to applying for this clerkship. Please email requests to clete@stanford.edu. Periods Avail: 2-12, full-time for 2 weeks or 4 weeks. 1 student per period. Reporting Instructions: Clete Kushida, M.D., Ph.D. or Christian Guilleminault, M.D., Sleep Medicine Center at the Stanford Medicine Outpatient Center, 450. Broadway Street, Redwood City, Pavilion B, 2nd Floor, Control Room, Time: 8:00 am M-F. Units: 3 or 6. Call Code: 0. Director: Clete Kushida, M.D. & Christian Guilleminault, M.D. Coord: Clete Kushida, M.D. (650-721-7560). (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

PSYC 353A: Psychosomatic Medicine (Psychiatry Consultation Service) Clerkship (SHC)

Open to visitors. Psychosomatic Medicine (PM) comprises the area of psychiatry concerned with the psychobiological care of the medically ill, which includes persons of all ages and those cared for in specialized medical settings. PM- psychiatrists, in addition to providing expert formal psychiatric consultation to medical and surgical patients in the general hospital, specialized hospitals and outpatient clinic settings, also train psychiatrists and non-psychiatrists in the recognition of normal and abnormal reactions to illness and appropriate psychological care of patients with such reactions. The PM psychiatrist may function both as a consultant and as part of the primary medical/surgical treatment team. Via conjoint rounds and teaching conferences (primary intervention), formal consultations (secondary intervention), and involvement in inpatient treatment and discharge planning (tertiary intervention), the PM psychiatrist provides a comprehensive approach to the emotional, cognitive, and behavioral needs of the patient. Thus one unique feature of our program is how the members of our team are integral member of so many other medico-surgical teams throughout the medical center. Participation in this rotation should allow students to learn about diagnosis and management of psychiatric disorders common in all medical and surgical specialties, e.g., depression, anxiety, delirium, alcohol abuse, bipolar disorder, psychotic disorders, and somatic symptom and related disorders. Students will accompany psychiatric residents, fellows and faculty five days a week in performing consultations on medical-surgical units in SUH and in performing follow-up visits. Team rounds occur every morning. Formal didactic sessions occur twice weekly. Students will learn interview techniques, how to evaluate patients¿ psychosocial stressors and resources, how to write a cogent case report, present and discuss cases orally, work comfortably as a team member, perform differential diagnosis for depression, delirium, anxiety states, dementia, discuss indications and contra-indications for psychotropic medications and recognize and cope with emotional reactions to patients. Students will also learn advanced psychopharmacology, brief psychotherapy, management of difficult patients, and psychological and cultural aspects of the doctor-patient relationship. Please note: Visiting students must obtain approval from Ms. Quynh Dang prior to applying for this clerkship. Please email requests to qdang@stanford.edu. Prereq: Psychiatry 300A. Periods Avail: 1 -12, full-time for four weeks. 1 student per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Stanford Hospital - page one of the residents on service. Quynh will provide the resident information: Time: 8:00 am. Units: 6. Call Code: 0. Director: Jose Maldonado, M.D. (650-725-5599). Other Faculty: A. Ament, F. Hussain, S. Lahijani, M. Schmajuk, Y. Sher. Coord: Quynh Dang (650-725-2769), 401 Quarry Rd, Rm. 2204. (SHC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

PSYC 355A: Geriatric Psychiatry

Open to visitors. Consists of the evaluation of older individuals with psychiatric illness in an inpatient setting. The inpatient program offers students opportunities to learn about evaluation and treatment strategies for depression, psychotic disorders, anxiety, cognitive impairment, and other illnesses in the elderly. Many patients have comorbid, non-psychiatric illnesses which are considered as possible contributors to their psychiatric symptoms. The bio-psycho-social model is emphasized. Family involvement and meetings are to be expected. Prereq: Psychiatry 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time four or eight weeks. 1 student per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Stanford Hospital - page one of the residents on service. Quynh will provide the resident information; Time: 8:00 am. Units: 6. Call Code: 0. Director: Daniel Kim, M.D. Other Faculty: E. Aboujaoude, D. Mason, K. Sanborn. Coord: Quynh Dang (650-725-2769), 401 Quarry Rd, Rm. 2204. (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

PSYC 358A: Subinternship in Inpatient Psychiatry

Selective 2. Open to visitors. The inpatient psychiatry subinternship at Stanford is designed to provide a training experience similar to that of PGY1 psychiatry residents on an inpatient rotation. Subinternships go above and beyond the Core Psychiatry Clerkship and involve levels of intensity and commitment expected of beginning interns. While still supervised as medical students by the attendings, the subinterns should be preparing themselves mentally and physically for internship training. The subinternship at Stanford offers a diverse patient population across genders, adult ages, social economic status, and ethinicities. Of note, it offers cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy experiences, medical-psychiatry cases, forensic/hearing exposure, and ECT observation. The overarching goal of the psychiatry sub-internship is that, upon successful completion of the rotation, students will be ready to function at the level of a first-week psychiatry intern and be able to discuss his or her performance according to six ACGME competencies. Objectives that set the subinternship apart from the core psychiatry clerkship are (1) demonstrate progression from "interpreter" to "manager" in the "reporter-interpreter-manager-educator" (RIME) scheme; (2) efficiently manage a caseload of 3 to 6 patients at a time; (3) assist the attending in teaching patients/families, core clerkship medical students, and/or staff; and (4) evaluate his or her efforts towards self-reflective practice and self-directed learning. Please note: Visiting students must obtain approval from Ms. Quynh Dang prior to applying for this clerkship. Please email requests to qdang@stanford.edu. Prereq: Psychiatry 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time four weeks. 1 student per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Stanford Hospital - page one of the residents on service. Quynh will provide the resident information; Time: 8:30 am. Units: 6. Call Code: 2. Director: Justin Birnbaum, M.D. (650-736-0106). Other Faculty: J. Ballon, R. Hu, D. Noordsy, P. Wang. Coord: Quynh Dang (650-725-2769), 401 Quarry Rd, Rm. 2204. (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

PSYC 358W: Subinternship in Inpatient Psychiatry (Away)

Terms: Aut | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

PSYC 362B: Subinternship in Inpatient Psychiatry at PAVA

Selective 2. Open to visitors. The inpatient psychiatry subinternship at the Palo Alto VA is designed to provide a training experience similar to that of PGY1 psychiatry residents on an inpatient rotation. The subinternship at the Palo Alto VA offers a diverse patient population across factors such as age, socioeconomic status, ethnicity, and diagnosis. Additionally, it offers individual and group cognitive behavioral therapy experiences, medical-psychiatry cases, forensic/hearing exposure, and the opportunity to work on multi-disciplinary treatment teams in an acute inpatient setting. Additionally, the VA is a unique system in which to work because of the types and number of wrap-around services and resources that work to serve the veteran¿s needs including housing assistance, substance abuse treatment, intensive outpatient treatment programs, groups, and case management services. The unique national VA system of care therefore additionally allows a subintern the experience of learning about systems-based practices that are unique to this setting. The overarching goal of the psychiatry subinternship is that, upon successful completion of the rotation, students will be ready to function at the level of a first-week psychiatry intern and be able to discuss his or her performance according to six ACGME competencies. Objectives that set the subinternship apart from the core psychiatry clerkship are (1) demonstrate progression from ¿interpreter¿ to ¿manager¿ in the ¿reporter-interpreter-manager-educator¿ (RIME) scheme; (2) efficiently manage a caseload of 3 to 6 patients at a time; (3) assist the attending in teaching patients/families, core clerkship medical students, and/or staff; (4) evaluate his or her efforts toward self-reflective practice and self-directed learning. Satisfactory completion of the core psychiatry clerkship is a prerequisite for this subinternship. Please note: Visiting students must obtain approval from Ms. Quynh Dang prior to applying for this clerkship. Please email requests to qdang@stanford.edu. Prereq: Psychiatry 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time four weeks. 1 student per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Palo Alto VA, 3801 Miranda Ave, Building 520. Quynh will provide reporting information; Time: 8:30 am. Units: 6 DropCode: Call Code: 2 (one evening shift from 4:30 pm to 9 pm per week) Director: Margaret May, M.D. Other Faculty: Michael Beal, M.D. Coord: Quynh Dang (650-725-2769), 401 Quarry Rd, Rm. 2204. (PAVA)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

PSYC 370: Medical Scholars Research

Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Aboujaoude, E. (PI); Adamson, M. (PI); Adelsheim, S. (PI); Agras, W. (PI); Albucher, R. (PI); Apple, R. (PI); Arnow, B. (PI); Ashford, J. (PI); Barry, J. (PI); Beaudreau, S. (PI); Benham, A. (PI); Berk, M. (PI); Bernert, R. (PI); Birnbaum, J. (PI); Bohon, C. (PI); Brown, M. (PI); Bullock, K. (PI); Carrion, V. (PI); Cassidy, E. (PI); Chang, K. (PI); Chen, L. (PI); Cloitre, M. (PI); Conner, L. (PI); Corcoran, K. (PI); De Golia, S. (PI); DeBattista, C. (PI); Deisseroth, K. (PI); Dement, W. (PI); Derenne, J. (PI); Dhabhar, F. (PI); Duncan, L. (PI); Dunn, L. (PI); Durazzo, T. (PI); Etkin, A. (PI); Feinstein, C. (PI); Fenn, H. (PI); Fung, L. (PI); Furst, A. (PI); Gandy, S. (PI); Garner, C. (PI); Gengoux, G. (PI); Gershon, A. (PI); Gore-Felton, C. (PI); Greaves, C. (PI); Guilleminault, C. (PI); Haberecht, M. (PI); Hall, S. (PI); Hallmayer, J. (PI); Hardan, A. (PI); Hayward, C. (PI); Hill, K. (PI); Hoblyn, J. (PI); Hong, D. (PI); Hsu, J. (PI); Hu, R. (PI); Humphreys, K. (PI); Jo, B. (PI); Joshi, S. (PI); Kesler, S. (PI); Ketter, T. (PI); King, R. (PI); Kishore, A. (PI); Kogon, M. (PI); Koopman, C. (PI); Kushida, C. (PI); Laurent, C. (PI); Lazzeroni, L. (PI); Lee, T. (PI); Lembke, A. (PI); Levinson, D. (PI); Lindley, S. (PI); Linenberg, B. (PI); Lock, J. (PI); Lotspeich, L. (PI); Louie, A. (PI); Luce, K. (PI); Lyons, D. (PI); Maldonado, J. (PI); Malenka, R. (PI); Manber, R. (PI); Marnell, M. (PI); McGLYNN, L. (PI); Mccaslin, S. (PI); Menon, V. (PI); Mignot, E. (PI); Moran-Miller, K. (PI); Mourrain, P. (PI); Murphy, G. (PI); Nathan, K. (PI); Nishino, S. (PI); Noordsy, D. (PI); O'hara, R. (PI); Ohayon, M. (PI); Ostacher, M. (PI); Palesh, O. (PI); Parker, K. (PI); Pasca, S. (PI); Pelayo, R. (PI); Phillips, J. (PI); Post, L. (PI); Rait, D. (PI); Rasgon, N. (PI); Reicherter, D. (PI); Reiss, A. (PI); Ringold, A. (PI); Roberts, L. (PI); Robinson, A. (PI); Rodriguez, C. (PI); Rosen, A. (PI); Rosen, C. (PI); Ruzek, J. (PI); Safer, D. (PI); Salehi, A. (PI); Sanders, M. (PI); Schatzberg, A. (PI); Shaw, R. (PI); Singh, M. (PI); Solvason, H. (PI); Sommer, B. (PI); Spiegel, D. (PI); Steiner, H. (PI); Sullivan, E. (PI); Suppes, T. (PI); Taylor, C. (PI); Taylor, J. (PI); Thienemann, M. (PI); Thompson, D. (PI); Tiet, Q. (PI); Tinklenberg, J. (PI); Trafton, J. (PI); Urban, A. (PI); Van Natta, J. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warner, D. (PI); Weitlauf, J. (PI); Williams, K. (PI); Williams, L. (PI); Williams, S. (PI); Woodward, S. (PI); Wroolie, T. (PI); Yesavage, J. (PI); Yoon, J. (PI); Zappert, L. (PI); Zeitzer, J. (PI); Zelenko, M. (PI); de Lecea, L. (PI)

PSYC 398A: Advanced Clinical, Research Elective in Psychiatry

Open to visitors. For students who wish to pursue the study of a specific research or clinical experience in the field of psychiatry are encouraged to arrange for this four to eight week clerkship elective. A short statement prepared by each individual student outlining clinical and educational goals for the rotation must be approved by the Director of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry and the Associate Dean for Student Affairs. Please note: Students cannot add 398A clerkships directly to their fishbowl schedules through the regular shuffles. Please contact Caroline Cheang in the Office of Medical Student Affairs at cheang@stanford.edu or 650-498-7619 with the faculty preceptor¿s name and email address to add this clerkship. Prereq: Psychiatry 300A and Medicine 300A, consent of the designated faculty preceptor; and approval by Advisor. Periods Avail: 1-12. Reporting Instructions: Where: TBA (designated faculty preceptor);Time: TBA. Units: 1-12. Call Code: 2. Director: Charles DeBattista, M.D. (650-723-8324). Coord: Quynh Dang (650-725-2769), 401 Quarry Rd, Rm. 2204. (SUMC, PAVAMC, SCVMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

PSYC 399: Graduate Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Aboujaoude, E. (PI); Adamson, M. (PI); Adelsheim, S. (PI); Agras, W. (PI); Albucher, R. (PI); Apple, R. (PI); Arnow, B. (PI); Ashford, J. (PI); Ballon, J. (PI); Barry, J. (PI); Beaudreau, S. (PI); Benham, A. (PI); Berk, M. (PI); Bernert, R. (PI); Birnbaum, J. (PI); Bohon, C. (PI); Brown, M. (PI); Bullock, K. (PI); Carrion, V. (PI); Cassidy, E. (PI); Chang, K. (PI); Chen, L. (PI); Cloitre, M. (PI); Conner, L. (PI); Corcoran, K. (PI); De Golia, S. (PI); DeBattista, C. (PI); Deisseroth, K. (PI); Dement, W. (PI); Derenne, J. (PI); Dhabhar, F. (PI); Duncan, L. (PI); Dunn, L. (PI); Durazzo, T. (PI); Etkin, A. (PI); Feinstein, C. (PI); Fenn, H. (PI); Furst, A. (PI); Gandy, S. (PI); Garner, C. (PI); Gengoux, G. (PI); Gershon, A. (PI); Gore-Felton, C. (PI); Greaves, C. (PI); Guilleminault, C. (PI); Haberecht, M. (PI); Hall, S. (PI); Hallmayer, J. (PI); Hardan, A. (PI); Hayward, C. (PI); Hill, K. (PI); Hoblyn, J. (PI); Hong, D. (PI); Hsu, J. (PI); Hu, R. (PI); Humphreys, K. (PI); Jo, B. (PI); Joshi, S. (PI); Kesler, S. (PI); Ketter, T. (PI); King, R. (PI); Kishore, A. (PI); Kogon, M. (PI); Koopman, C. (PI); Kushida, C. (PI); Laurent, C. (PI); Lazzeroni, L. (PI); Lee, T. (PI); Lembke, A. (PI); Levinson, D. (PI); Lindley, S. (PI); Linenberg, B. (PI); Lock, J. (PI); Lotspeich, L. (PI); Louie, A. (PI); Luce, K. (PI); Lyons, D. (PI); Maldonado, J. (PI); Malenka, R. (PI); Manber, R. (PI); Marnell, M. (PI); McGLYNN, L. (PI); Mccaslin, S. (PI); Menon, V. (PI); Mignot, E. (PI); Mourrain, P. (PI); Murphy, G. (PI); Nathan, K. (PI); Nishino, S. (PI); Noordsy, D. (PI); O'hara, R. (PI); Ohayon, M. (PI); Ostacher, M. (PI); Palesh, O. (PI); Parker, K. (PI); Pasca, S. (PI); Pelayo, R. (PI); Phillips, J. (PI); Post, L. (PI); Rait, D. (PI); Rasgon, N. (PI); Reicherter, D. (PI); Reiss, A. (PI); Ringold, A. (PI); Roberts, L. (PI); Robinson, A. (PI); Rodriguez, C. (PI); Rosen, A. (PI); Rosen, C. (PI); Ruzek, J. (PI); Safer, D. (PI); Salehi, A. (PI); Sanders, M. (PI); Schatzberg, A. (PI); Shaw, R. (PI); Singh, M. (PI); Solvason, H. (PI); Sommer, B. (PI); Spiegel, D. (PI); Steiner, H. (PI); Sullivan, E. (PI); Suppes, T. (PI); Taylor, C. (PI); Taylor, J. (PI); Thienemann, M. (PI); Thompson, D. (PI); Tiet, Q. (PI); Tinklenberg, J. (PI); Trafton, J. (PI); Urban, A. (PI); Van Natta, J. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warner, D. (PI); Weitlauf, J. (PI); Williams, K. (PI); Williams, L. (PI); Williams, S. (PI); Woodward, S. (PI); Wroolie, T. (PI); Yesavage, J. (PI); Yoon, J. (PI); Zappert, L. (PI); Zeitzer, J. (PI); Zelenko, M. (PI); de Lecea, L. (PI)
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints