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ECON 221: Political Economy II (POLISCI 460B)

Continuation of 220. Preparation for advanced research in political economy. Studies political processes and their implications for economic policies and outcomes. This quarter will focus on the study of non-democracies and weakly institutionalized states. Possible topics include conflict and war, corruption, culture, protest movements and rebellion, state capacity and development, autocratic politics, and democratization. Focus is primarily on dynamic game-theoretic models but will also include empirical work. Prerequisite for Political Science PhDnstudents: POLISCI 356A.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LAW 7036: Law of Democracy

This course is intended to give students a basic understanding of the themes in the legal regulation of elections and politics. We will cover all the major Supreme Court cases on topics of voting rights, reapportionment/redistricting, ballot access, regulation of political parties, campaign finance, and the 2000 presidential election controversy. The course pays particular attention to competing political philosophies and empirical assumptions that underlie the Court's reasoning while still focusing on the cases as litigation tools used to serve political ends. Elements used in grading: Class participation and final exam. Cross-listed with Communication (COMM 361) International Policy (INTLPOL 351), and Political Science (POLISCI 327C).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 7096: Law and Politics of Bureaucracy

Modern government is bureaucratic government. In the words of Justice Jackson, the rise of the administrative state is likely "the most significant legal trend of the last century and perhaps more values today are affected by [agency] decisions than by those of all the courts." This seminar will survey the major ways in which law and political science have grappled with bureaucratic governance. How do we understand the rise of the administrative state? Why are bureaucracies designed the way they are? How do bureaucracies work in the face of legal and political constraints? And what avenues are there for meaningful regulatory reform? The class is cross-listed in political science and the law school and course enrollment will be by consent of instructor. Students will be responsible for writing short reflection papers and a research paper. Students may take the course for either 3, 4, or 5 units, depending on the paper length. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. Admission based on application. Instructor consent required. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply, please complete the following webform by February 28, 2020: https://forms.gle/ZBtFE5Xdh2UwBEHb8. Cross-listed with Political Science (POLISCI 228C/428C).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Ho, D. (PI)

POLISCI 1: The Science of Politics

Why do countries go to war? How can we explain problems such as poverty, inequality, and pollution? What can be done to improve political representation in the United States and other countries? We will use scientific methods to answer these and other fundamental questions about politics.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 46N: Contemporary African Politics

Africa has lagged behind the rest of the developing world in terms of three consequential outcomes: economic development, the establishment of social order through effective governance, and the consolidation of democracy. This course seeks to identify the historical and political sources accounting for this lag, to provide extensive case study and statistical material to understand what sustains it, and to examine recent examples of success pointing to a more hopeful future. Students will be asked to develop expertise on one or two African countries and report regularly to fellow students on the progress (or lack thereof) of their countries on each outcome and the reasons for it.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Laitin, D. (PI)

POLISCI 57E: State of the Union 2014 (HISTORY 57E)

This course will examine major themes that contribute to the health, or disease, of the US body politic. Challenges and opportunities abound: we live in an age of rising inequality, dazzling technological innovation, economic volatility, geopolitical uncertainty, and the accumulating impact of climate change. These conditions confront our political leaders and us as citizens of a democracy plagued by dysfunction. What are the implications for the body politic? Led by Rob Reich (Political Science, Stanford), David Kennedy (History, Stanford), and James Steyer (CEO, Common Sense Media), the course will bring together distinguished analysts of American politics. Together, we will examine the following topics: inequality; energy and the environment; media and technology; the economy; and the 2014 midterm elections. The course is designed for the entire Stanford community: jointly offered for undergraduate and graduate students at Stanford (through listings in Political Science and History) and for community members through the Continuing Studies Program. For students, the course is available for 1 credit. This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

POLISCI 101: Introduction to International Relations

The course provides an introduction to major factors shaping contemporary international politics, including the distribution of power among states, ideas, and domestic regimes. The course will explore the causes of the First and Second World Wars, the Cold War, the impact of nuclear weapons, the rise of China, and external state building.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 102: Introduction to American Politics and Policy: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly (AMSTUD 123X, PUBLPOL 101, PUBLPOL 201)

This is a course about American politics, which means this is a course about individuals, identities, and institutions. How do Americans come to think andnreason about politics? What is the role that identities play in affecting the political judgments that individuals make? How do our political institutionsnrespond to the demands of a diverse public that disagrees about issues related to race and justice, income and wealth inequality, climate change, gunncontrol, reproductive rights, the power of the executive, and the role that government ought to play in the lives of the governed? And how do we makensense of this seemingly peculiar contemporary moment in American politics? These are not easy questions, but they are ones for which political sciencenprovides a useful foundation to guide our inquiry. The objective of this course is to introduce students to various concepts and theoretical frameworks thatnhelp us understand the messiness and complexity of American politics. In addition to classroom lectures and discussion sections, students will benrequired to apply concepts and theoretical frameworks to contemporary issues in American politics. Undergraduate Public Policy students are required to enroll in this class for 5 units.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 110G: Governing the Global Economy

Who governs the world economy? Why do countries succeed or fail to cooperate in setting their economic policies? When and how do international institutions help countries cooperate? When and why do countries adopt good and bad economic policies? How does the international economy affect domestic politics? This course examines how domestic and international politics determine how the global economy is governed. We will study the politics of monetary, trade, international investment, energy, environmental, and foreign aid policies to answer these questions. The course will approach each topic by examining alternative theoretical approaches and evaluate these theories using historical and contemporary evidence. There will be an emphasis on applying concepts through the analysis of case studies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 121L: Racial-Ethnic Politics in US (CSRE 121L, PUBLPOL 121L)

Why is contemporary American politics so sharply divided along racial and party lines? Are undocumented immigrants really more likely to commit crimes than U.S. citizens? What makes a political ad "racist?" The U.S. population will be majority-minority by 2050; what does this mean for future electoral outcomes? We will tackle such questions in this course, which examines various issues surrounding the development of political solidarity within racial groups; the politics of immigration, acculturation, and identification; and the influence of race on public opinion, political behavior, the media, and in the criminal justice system. Prior coursework in Economics or Statistics strongly recommended.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 124A: The American West (AMSTUD 124A, ARTHIST 152, ENGLISH 124, HISTORY 151)

The American West is characterized by frontier mythology, vast distances, marked aridity, and unique political and economic characteristics. This course integrates several disciplinary perspectives into a comprehensive examination of Western North America: its history, physical geography, climate, literature, art, film, institutions, politics, demography, economy, and continuing policy challenges. Students examine themes fundamental to understanding the region: time, space, water, peoples, and boom and bust cycles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

POLISCI 124L: The Psychology of Communication About Politics in America (COMM 164, COMM 264, POLISCI 324L, PSYCH 170)

Focus is on how politicians and government learn what Americans want and how the public's preferences shape government action; how surveys measure beliefs, preferences, and experiences; how poll results are criticized and interpreted; how conflict between polls is viewed by the public; how accurate surveys are and when they are accurate; how to conduct survey research to produce accurate measurements; designing questionnaires that people can understand and use comfortably; how question wording can manipulate poll results; corruption in survey research.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 125S: Chicano/Latino Politics (CHILATST 125S)

The political position of Latinos and Latinas in the U.S.. Focus is on Mexican Americans, with attention to Cuban Americans, Puerto Ricans, and other groups. The history of each group in the American polity; their political circumstances with respect to the electoral process, the policy process, and government; the extent to which the demographic category Latino is meaningful; and group identity and solidarity among Americans of Latin American ancestry. Topics include immigration, education, affirmative action, language policy, and environmental justice.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Michelson, M. (PI)

POLISCI 133Z: Ethics and Politics in Public Service (CSRE 133P, PUBLPOL 103Z, URBANST 122Z)

This course examines ethical and political questions that arise in doing public service work, whether volunteering, service learning, humanitarian endeavors overseas, or public service professions such as medicine and teaching. What motives do people have to engage in public service work? Are self-interested motives troublesome? What is the connection between service work and justice? Should the government or schools require citizens or students to perform service work? Is mandatory service an oxymoron?
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 134E: Universal Basic Income: the philosophy behind the proposal (ETHICSOC 174B, ETHICSOC 274B, PHIL 174B, PHIL 274B, POLISCI 338)

Universal basic income (or UBI) is a regular cash allowance given to all members of a community without means test, regardless of personal desert, and with no strings attached. Once a utopian proposal, the policy is now discussed and piloted throughout the world. The growth of income and wealth inequalities, the precariousness of labor, and the persistence of abject poverty have all been important drivers of renewed interest in UBI in the United States. But it is without a doubt the fear that automation may displace workers from the labor market at unprecedented rates that explains the revival of the policy in recent years, including by many in or around Silicon Valley. Among the various objections to the proposal, one concerns its moral adequacy: Isn't it fundamentally unjust to give cash to all indiscriminately rather than to those who need it and deserve it? Over the years, a variety of scholars have defended the policy on moral grounds, arguing that UBI is a tool of equality, liberal freedom, republican freedom, gender equity, or racial equity. Many others have attacked UBI on those very same grounds, making the case that alternative policy proposals like the job guarantee, means-tested benefits, conditional benefits, or reparations should be preferred. Students will learn a great deal about political theory and ethics in general but always through the specific angle of the policy proposal, and they will become experts on the philosophy, politics and economics of UBI. The seminar is open to undergraduate and graduate students in all departments. There are no pre-requisites.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

POLISCI 149T: Middle Eastern Politics

Topics in contemporary Middle Eastern politics including institutional sources of underdevelopment, political Islam, electoral authoritarianism, and the political economy of oil.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 150A: Data Science for Politics (POLISCI 355A)

Data science is quickly changing the way we understand and and engage in the political process. In this course we will develop fundamental techniques of data science and apply them to large political datasets on elections, campaign finance, lobbying, and more. The objective is to give students the skills to carry out cutting edge quantitative political studies in both academia and the private sector. Students with technical backgrounds looking to study politics quantitatively are encouraged to enroll.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 153: Thinking Strategically (POLISCI 354)

This course provides an introduction to strategic reasoning. We discuss ideas such as the commitment problem, credibility in signaling, cheap talk, moral hazard and adverse selection. Concepts are developed through games played in class, and applied to politics, business and everyday life.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

POLISCI 213C: Understanding Russia: Its Power and Purpose in a New Global Order (INTLPOL 231B, REES 231B)

Russia presents a puzzle for theories of socio-economic development and modernization and their relationship to state power in international politics. The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 brought into being the new Russia (or Russian Federation) as its successor in international politics. Russia suffered one of the worst recessions and experienced 25 years of halting reform. Despite these issues, Russia is again a central player in international affairs. Course analyzes motivations behind contemporary Russian foreign policy by reviewing its domestic and economic underpinnings. Examination of concept of state power in international politics to assess Russia's capabilities to influence other states' policies, and under what conditions its leaders use these resources. Is contemporary Russia strong or weak? What are the resources and constraints its projection of power beyond its borders? What are the determinants of state power in international politics in the twenty-first century? Includes lectures, readings, class discussions, films and documentaries.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stoner, K. (PI)

POLISCI 213E: Introduction to European Studies (INTNLREL 122)

This course offers an introduction to major topics in the study of historical and contemporary Europe. We focus on European politics, economics and culture. First, we study what makes Europe special, and how its distinct identity has been influenced by its history. Next, we analyze Europe's politics. We study parliamentary government and proportional representation electoral systems, and how they affect policy. Subsequently, we examine the challenges the European economy faces. We further study the European Union and transatlantic relations.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Crombez, C. (PI)

POLISCI 223A: Public Opinion and American Democracy

This course focuses on the public mood and politics in America today. It accordingly examines, among other things, the coherence (or lack of it) of public opinion; the partisan sorting of the electorate; and the ideological and affective polarization of mass politics. It also examines contemporary critiques of representation and citizenship in liberal democracies.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sniderman, P. (PI)

POLISCI 227C: Money in Politics (POLISCI 427C)

This course will cover campaign finance, lobbying, and interest group politics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bonica, A. (PI)

POLISCI 228C: Law and Politics of Bureaucracy (POLISCI 428C)

Same as Law 7096. Modern government is bureaucratic government. In the words of Justice Jackson, the rise of the administrative state is likely "the most significant legal trend of the last century and perhaps more values today are affected by [agency] decisions than by those of all the courts." This seminar will survey the major ways in which law and political science have grappled with bureaucratic governance. How do we understand the rise of the administrative state? Why are bureaucracies designed the way they are? How do bureaucracies work in the face of legal and political constraints? And what avenues are there for meaningful regulatory reform? The class is cross-listed in Political Science and the Law School and course enrollment will be by consent of instructor. Students will be responsible for writing short reflection papers and a research paper.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ho, D. (PI)

POLISCI 229: Directed Reading and Research in American Politics

For undergraduates. Directed reading in Political Science with a focus on American politics. To be considered for enrollment, interested students must complete the directed reading petition form available on the Political Science website before the end of week 1 of the quarter in which they'd like to enroll. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 231: High-Stakes Politics: Case Studies in Political Philosophy, Institutions, and Interests (CLASSICS 382, POLISCI 331)

Normative political theory combined with positive political theory to better explain how major texts may have responded to and influenced changes in formal and informal institutions. Emphasis is on historical periods in which catastrophic institutional failure was a recent memory or a realistic possibility. Case studies include Greek city-states in the classical period and the northern Atlantic community of the 17th and 18th centuries including upheavals in England and the American Revolutionary era.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Weingast, B. (PI)

POLISCI 234P: Deliberative Democracy and its Critics (AMSTUD 135, COMM 135, COMM 235, COMM 335, ETHICSOC 135F, POLISCI 334P)

This course examines the theory and practice of deliberative democracy and engages both in a dialogue with critics. Can a democracy which emphasizes people thinking and talking together on the basis of good information be made practical in the modern age? What kinds of distortions arise when people try to discuss politics or policy together? The course draws on ideas of deliberation from Madison and Mill to Rawls and Habermas as well as criticisms from the jury literature, from the psychology of group processes and from the most recent normative and empirical literature on deliberative forums. Deliberative Polling, its applications, defenders and critics, both normative and empirical, will provide a key case for discussion.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 244A: Authoritarian Politics (POLISCI 444A)

This course offers a thematic approach to the study of authoritarian politics. We will cover the major areas of political science research on authoritarian politics and governance while simultaneously building empirical knowledge about the politics of particular authoritarian regimes. The course will also discuss transitions to democracy as well as authoritarian political tendencies within democratic contexts.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 245R: Politics in Modern Iran

Modern Iran has been a smithy for political movements, ideologies, and types of states. Movements include nationalism, constitutionalism, Marxism, Islamic fundamentalism, social democracy, Islamic liberalism, and fascism. Forms of government include Oriental despotism, authoritarianism, Islamic theocracy, and liberal democracy. These varieties have appeared in Iran in an iteration shaped by history, geography, proximity to oil and the Soviet Union, and the hegemony of Islamic culture.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Milani, A. (PI)

POLISCI 248S: Latin American Politics (POLISCI 348S)

Fundamental transformations in Latin America in the last two decades: why most governments are now democratic or semidemocratic; and economic transformation as countries abandoned import substitution industrialization policies led by state intervention for neoliberal economic polices. The nature of this dual transformation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Diaz, A. (PI)

POLISCI 249: Directed Reading and Research in Comparative Politics

For undergraduates. Directed reading in Political Science with a focus on comparative politics. To be considered for enrollment, interested students must complete the directed reading petition form available on the Political Science website before the end of week 1 of the quarter in which they'd like to enroll. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 324L: The Psychology of Communication About Politics in America (COMM 164, COMM 264, POLISCI 124L, PSYCH 170)

Focus is on how politicians and government learn what Americans want and how the public's preferences shape government action; how surveys measure beliefs, preferences, and experiences; how poll results are criticized and interpreted; how conflict between polls is viewed by the public; how accurate surveys are and when they are accurate; how to conduct survey research to produce accurate measurements; designing questionnaires that people can understand and use comfortably; how question wording can manipulate poll results; corruption in survey research.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 327C: Law of Democracy (COMM 361)

Combined with LAW 7036 (formerly Law 577). This course is intended to give students a basic understanding of the themes in the legal regulation of elections and politics. We will cover all the major Supreme Court cases on topics of voting rights, reapportionment/redistricting, ballot access, regulation of political parties, campaign finance, and the 2000 presidential election controversy. The course pays particular attention to competing political philosophies and empirical assumptions that underlie the Court's reasoning while still focusing on the cases as litigation tools used to serve political ends. Elements used in grading: Class participation and one day take home final exam. (POLISCI 327C; LAW 577)
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 329: Directed Reading and Research in American Politics

For PhD students. Directed reading in Political Science with a focus on American politics. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 331: High-Stakes Politics: Case Studies in Political Philosophy, Institutions, and Interests (CLASSICS 382, POLISCI 231)

Normative political theory combined with positive political theory to better explain how major texts may have responded to and influenced changes in formal and informal institutions. Emphasis is on historical periods in which catastrophic institutional failure was a recent memory or a realistic possibility. Case studies include Greek city-states in the classical period and the northern Atlantic community of the 17th and 18th centuries including upheavals in England and the American Revolutionary era.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Weingast, B. (PI)

POLISCI 334P: Deliberative Democracy and its Critics (AMSTUD 135, COMM 135, COMM 235, COMM 335, ETHICSOC 135F, POLISCI 234P)

This course examines the theory and practice of deliberative democracy and engages both in a dialogue with critics. Can a democracy which emphasizes people thinking and talking together on the basis of good information be made practical in the modern age? What kinds of distortions arise when people try to discuss politics or policy together? The course draws on ideas of deliberation from Madison and Mill to Rawls and Habermas as well as criticisms from the jury literature, from the psychology of group processes and from the most recent normative and empirical literature on deliberative forums. Deliberative Polling, its applications, defenders and critics, both normative and empirical, will provide a key case for discussion.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 338: Universal Basic Income: the philosophy behind the proposal (ETHICSOC 174B, ETHICSOC 274B, PHIL 174B, PHIL 274B, POLISCI 134E)

Universal basic income (or UBI) is a regular cash allowance given to all members of a community without means test, regardless of personal desert, and with no strings attached. Once a utopian proposal, the policy is now discussed and piloted throughout the world. The growth of income and wealth inequalities, the precariousness of labor, and the persistence of abject poverty have all been important drivers of renewed interest in UBI in the United States. But it is without a doubt the fear that automation may displace workers from the labor market at unprecedented rates that explains the revival of the policy in recent years, including by many in or around Silicon Valley. Among the various objections to the proposal, one concerns its moral adequacy: Isn't it fundamentally unjust to give cash to all indiscriminately rather than to those who need it and deserve it? Over the years, a variety of scholars have defended the policy on moral grounds, arguing that UBI is a tool of equality, liberal freedom, republican freedom, gender equity, or racial equity. Many others have attacked UBI on those very same grounds, making the case that alternative policy proposals like the job guarantee, means-tested benefits, conditional benefits, or reparations should be preferred. Students will learn a great deal about political theory and ethics in general but always through the specific angle of the policy proposal, and they will become experts on the philosophy, politics and economics of UBI. The seminar is open to undergraduate and graduate students in all departments. There are no pre-requisites.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

POLISCI 344: Politics and Geography

The role of geography in topics in political economy, including development, political representation, voting, redistribution, regional autonomy movements, fiscal competition, and federalism.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rodden, J. (PI)

POLISCI 348S: Latin American Politics (POLISCI 248S)

Fundamental transformations in Latin America in the last two decades: why most governments are now democratic or semidemocratic; and economic transformation as countries abandoned import substitution industrialization policies led by state intervention for neoliberal economic polices. The nature of this dual transformation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Diaz, A. (PI)

POLISCI 349: Directed Reading and Research in Comparative Politics

For PhD students. Directed reading in Political Science with a focus on comparative politics. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 354: Thinking Strategically (POLISCI 153)

This course provides an introduction to strategic reasoning. We discuss ideas such as the commitment problem, credibility in signaling, cheap talk, moral hazard and adverse selection. Concepts are developed through games played in class, and applied to politics, business and everyday life.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

POLISCI 355A: Data Science for Politics (POLISCI 150A)

Data science is quickly changing the way we understand and and engage in the political process. In this course we will develop fundamental techniques of data science and apply them to large political datasets on elections, campaign finance, lobbying, and more. The objective is to give students the skills to carry out cutting edge quantitative political studies in both academia and the private sector. Students with technical backgrounds looking to study politics quantitatively are encouraged to enroll.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 356B: Formal Theory II: Models of Politics

A continuation of Formal Theory I covering advanced topics, including classical political economy, comparative institutions, theories of conflict and cooperation, dynamic political economy, and the new behavioral political economy.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 420A: American Political Institutions

Theories of American politics, focusing on Congress, the presidency, the bureaucracy, and the courts.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Moe, T. (PI)

POLISCI 420B: Topics in American Political Behavior

For graduate students with background in American politics embarking on their own research. Current research in American politics, emphasizing political behavior and public opinion. Possible topics: uncertainty and ambivalence in political attitudes, heterogeneity in public opinion, the structure of American political ideology, political learning, the media as a determinant of public opinion, and links between public opinion and public policy.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 422: Workshop in American Politics

Research seminar. Frontiers in mass political behavior. Course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hall, A. (PI)

POLISCI 426: Identity Politics

Whether one considers the partisan and electoral choices citizens make or the judgements citizens render in response to officer-involved shootings or other salient social and political events, the centrality of identity in our politics is indisputable. But what is an identity? What are the conditions under which identities become politicized? How do identities work to structure attitudes and affect behavior? This course is all about identity and its intersection with politics. Taking an interdisciplinary and cross-subfield approach, this course seeks to bring students into conversation with scholarship that demonstrates the powerful ways that identities influence all aspects of the political. Though much of our time will be spent reading about race and racial identification in the context of American politics, students will be encouraged to think critically and creatively about identity as it relates to their own intellectual interests. In addition to being active and engaged seminar participants, students will be required to submit a final research paper that uses concepts, themes, and ideas from the course to explore a research question of their choosing.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jefferson, H. (PI)

POLISCI 427C: Money in Politics (POLISCI 227C)

This course will cover campaign finance, lobbying, and interest group politics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bonica, A. (PI)

POLISCI 428C: Law and Politics of Bureaucracy (POLISCI 228C)

Same as Law 7096. Modern government is bureaucratic government. In the words of Justice Jackson, the rise of the administrative state is likely "the most significant legal trend of the last century and perhaps more values today are affected by [agency] decisions than by those of all the courts." This seminar will survey the major ways in which law and political science have grappled with bureaucratic governance. How do we understand the rise of the administrative state? Why are bureaucracies designed the way they are? How do bureaucracies work in the face of legal and political constraints? And what avenues are there for meaningful regulatory reform? The class is cross-listed in Political Science and the Law School and course enrollment will be by consent of instructor. Students will be responsible for writing short reflection papers and a research paper.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ho, D. (PI)

POLISCI 440A: Theories in Comparative Politics

Theories addressing major concerns in the comparative field including identity, order, regime type, legitimacy, and governance.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 440B: Comparative Political Economy

Required of Political Science Ph.D. students with comparative politics as a first or second concentration; others by consent of the instructor. The origins of political and economic institutions and their impact on long run outcomes for growth and democracy. Emphasis is on the analysis of causal models, hypothesis testing, and the quality of evidence.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 440C: Methods in Comparative Politics

Current methodological standards in comparative politics. Students develop their own research design that meets these standards.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 440D: Workshop in Comparative Politics

Faculty, guest speakers, and graduate students conducting research in comparative politics present work-in-progress. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gulzar, S. (PI)

POLISCI 444A: Authoritarian Politics (POLISCI 244A)

This course offers a thematic approach to the study of authoritarian politics. We will cover the major areas of political science research on authoritarian politics and governance while simultaneously building empirical knowledge about the politics of particular authoritarian regimes. The course will also discuss transitions to democracy as well as authoritarian political tendencies within democratic contexts.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 447: Gender and Development

Gender remains an identity that defines structures of opportunity and representation in markets, society, and importantly in politics. This course studies how gender conditions experiences in political, economic, and social institutions. This seminar will pay special attention to the ways that patterns and processes of development have shaped gender inequality and will draw largely on evidence from low and middle-income countries. Specifically, we will study questions such as: Why do women in much of the world remain relatively underrepresented in formal andninformal institutions? What social, cultural, economic, and institutional factors reduce such gender inequality? How does gender inclusion shape development patterns and political outcomes?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Prillaman, S. (PI)

POLISCI 448R: Workshop: China Social Science (SOC 368W)

For Ph.D. students in the social sciences and history. Research on contemporary society and politics in the People's Republic of China. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

POLISCI 460B: Political Economy II (ECON 221)

Continuation of 220. Preparation for advanced research in political economy. Studies political processes and their implications for economic policies and outcomes. This quarter will focus on the study of non-democracies and weakly institutionalized states. Possible topics include conflict and war, corruption, culture, protest movements and rebellion, state capacity and development, autocratic politics, and democratization. Focus is primarily on dynamic game-theoretic models but will also include empirical work. Prerequisite for Political Science PhDnstudents: POLISCI 356A.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PUBLPOL 353A: Science and Technology Policy

U.S. policies for science, technology, and innovation; political institutions that create and carry out these policies; government programs that support scientific research and the development and use of new technologies; political controversies surrounding some science and technologies and the regulation of research and technology; international aspects of science and technology; the roles of scientists, engineers, and physicians in creating and implementing policy; and opportunities to do policy work in government and other organizations. Assignments: analyzing the politics of particular executive and legislative proposals, assessing options for trying to reach specific policy objectives, and preparing mock memos and testimony. This course is designed primarily for graduate students in science, engineering, and medicine who want to learn more about science and technology policy and how it is made. Public Policy 353A is a "gateway course" - an introduction - both for students pursuing a joint degree or co-terminal degree in Public Policy and for other graduate students interested in S&T policy or possible careers in the policy world. Junior and senior undergraduate students are also welcome to enroll.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Windham, P. (PI)
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