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POLISCI 101: Introduction to International Relations

The course provides an introduction to major factors shaping contemporary international politics, including the distribution of power among states, ideas, and domestic regimes. The course will explore the causes of the First and Second World Wars, the Cold War, the impact of nuclear weapons, the rise of China, and external state building.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 103: Justice (ETHICSOC 171, PHIL 171, POLISCI 336S, PUBLPOL 103C, PUBLPOL 307)

In this course, we explore three sets of questions relating to justice and the meaning of a just society: (1) Liberty: What is liberty, and why is it important? Which liberties must a just society protect? (2) Equality: What is equality, and why is it important? What sorts of equality should a just society ensure? (3) Reconciliation: Are liberty and equality in conflict? If so, how should we respond to the conflict between them? We approach these topics by examining competing theories of justice including utilitarianism, libertarianism/classical liberalism, and egalitarian liberalism. The class also serves as an introduction to how to do political philosophy, and students approaching these topics for the first time are welcome. Political Science majors taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 103.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 114D: Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (INTLPOL 230, INTNLREL 114D, POLISCI 314D)

This course explores the different dimensions of development - economic, social, and political - as well as the way that modern institutions (the state, market systems, the rule of law, and democratic accountability) developed and interacted with other factors across different societies around the world. The class will feature additional special guest lectures by Francis Fukuyama, Larry Diamond, Michael McFaul, Anna Grzymala-Busse, and other faculty and researchers affiliated with the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. Undergraduate students should enroll in this course for 5 units. Graduate students should enroll for 3.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 118P: U.S. Relations with Iran

The evolution of relations between the U.S. and Iran. The years after WW II when the U.S. became more involved in Iran. Relations after the victory of the Islamic republic. The current state of affairs and the prospects for the future. Emphasis is on original documents of U.S. diplomacy (White House, State Department, and the U.S. Embassy in Iran). Research paper.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Milani, A. (PI); Reza, C. (TA)

POLISCI 121L: Racial-Ethnic Politics in US (CSRE 121L, PUBLPOL 121L)

Why is contemporary American politics so sharply divided along racial and party lines? Are undocumented immigrants really more likely to commit crimes than U.S. citizens? What makes a political ad "racist?" The U.S. population will be majority-minority by 2050; what does this mean for future electoral outcomes? We will tackle such questions in this course, which examines various issues surrounding the development of political solidarity within racial groups; the politics of immigration, acculturation, and identification; and the influence of race on public opinion, political behavior, the media, and in the criminal justice system. Prior coursework in Economics or Statistics strongly recommended.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 122: Introduction to American Law (AMSTUD 179, PUBLPOL 302A)

For undergraduates. The structure of the American legal system including the courts; American legal culture; the legal profession and its social role; the scope and reach of the legal system; the background and impact of legal regulation; criminal justice; civil rights and civil liberties; and the relationship between the American legal system and American society in general.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 135E: Philosophy of Public Policy (ETHICSOC 175X, PHIL 175B, PHIL 275B, POLISCI 235E, PUBLPOL 177)

From healthcare to voting reforms, social protection and educational policies, public policies are underpinned by moral values. When we debate those policies, we typically appeal to values like justice, fairness, equality, freedom, privacy, and safety. A proper understanding of those values, what they mean, how they may conflict, and how they can be weighed against each other is essential to developing a competent and critical eye on our complex political world. We will ask questions such as: Is compulsory voting justified? Should children have the right to vote? Is affirmative action just? What is wrong with racial profiling? What are the duties of citizens of affluent countries towards migrants? Do we have a right to privacy? Is giving cash to all unconditionally fair? This class will introduce students to a number of methods and frameworks coming out of ethics and political philosophy and will give students a lot of time to practice ethically informed debates on public policies. At the end of this class, students should have the skills to critically examine a wide range of diverse policy proposals from the perspective of ethics, moral and political philosophy. There are no prerequisites. Undergraduates and graduates from all departments are welcome to attend.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Bidadanure, J. (PI)

POLISCI 149T: Middle Eastern Politics

Topics in contemporary Middle Eastern politics including institutional sources of underdevelopment, political Islam, electoral authoritarianism, and the political economy of oil.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 150A: Data Science for Politics (POLISCI 355A)

Data science is quickly changing the way we understand and and engage in the political process. In this course we will develop fundamental techniques of data science and apply them to large political datasets on elections, campaign finance, lobbying, and more. The objective is to give students the skills to carry out cutting edge quantitative political studies in both academia and the private sector. Students with technical backgrounds looking to study politics quantitatively are encouraged to enroll.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 219: Directed Reading and Research in International Relations

For undergraduates. Directed reading in Political Science with a focus on international relations. To be considered for enrollment, interested students must complete the directed reading petition form available on the Political Science website before the end of week 1 of the quarter in which they'd like to enroll. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 223A: Public Opinion and American Democracy

This course focuses on the public mood and politics in America today. It accordingly examines, among other things, the coherence (or lack of it) of public opinion; the partisan sorting of the electorate; and the ideological and affective polarization of mass politics. It also examines contemporary critiques of representation and citizenship in liberal democracies.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sniderman, P. (PI)

POLISCI 224X: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 118X, CEE 218X, ESS 118X, ESS 218X, GEOLSCI 118X, GEOLSCI 218X, GEOPHYS 118X, GEOPHYS 218X, PUBLPOL 118X)

The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to drive responsible systems change in their future careers. The Autumn (X) course is specifically focused on concepts and skills, and completion is a prerequisite for participation in the Winter (Y) and/or Spring (Z) practicum quarters, which engage teams in real-world projects with Bay Area local governments or community groups. X is composed of four modules: (A) participation in two weekly classes which prominently feature experts in research and practice related to urban systems; (B) reading and writing assignments designed to deepen thinking on class topics; (C) fundamental data analysis skills, particularly focused on Excel and ArcGIS, taught in lab sessions through basic exercises; (D) advanced data analysis skills, particularly focused on geocomputation in R, taught through longer and more intensive assignments. X can be taken for 3 units (ABC), 4 units (ACD), or 5 units (ABCD). Open to undergraduate and graduate students in any major. For more information, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

POLISCI 229: Directed Reading and Research in American Politics

For undergraduates. Directed reading in Political Science with a focus on American politics. To be considered for enrollment, interested students must complete the directed reading petition form available on the Political Science website before the end of week 1 of the quarter in which they'd like to enroll. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 235E: Philosophy of Public Policy (ETHICSOC 175X, PHIL 175B, PHIL 275B, POLISCI 135E, PUBLPOL 177)

From healthcare to voting reforms, social protection and educational policies, public policies are underpinned by moral values. When we debate those policies, we typically appeal to values like justice, fairness, equality, freedom, privacy, and safety. A proper understanding of those values, what they mean, how they may conflict, and how they can be weighed against each other is essential to developing a competent and critical eye on our complex political world. We will ask questions such as: Is compulsory voting justified? Should children have the right to vote? Is affirmative action just? What is wrong with racial profiling? What are the duties of citizens of affluent countries towards migrants? Do we have a right to privacy? Is giving cash to all unconditionally fair? This class will introduce students to a number of methods and frameworks coming out of ethics and political philosophy and will give students a lot of time to practice ethically informed debates on public policies. At the end of this class, students should have the skills to critically examine a wide range of diverse policy proposals from the perspective of ethics, moral and political philosophy. There are no prerequisites. Undergraduates and graduates from all departments are welcome to attend.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Bidadanure, J. (PI)

POLISCI 239: Directed Reading and Research in Political Theory

For undergraduates. Directed reading in Political Science with a focus on political theory. To be considered for enrollment, interested students must complete the directed reading petition form available on the Political Science website before the end of week 1 of the quarter in which they'd like to enroll. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 241A: Political Economy of Development

This course is an upper-level undergraduate seminar providing an introduction to the political economy of development. We explore many of the key academic debates surrounding how nations develop politically and economically. Course topics will include: theories of state development, the role of institutions, inequality and societal divisions, the impact of natural resources, the consequences of corruption, and the effect of globalization on the world's poor. The course emphasizes teaching students how to read the literature critically.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Takagi, Y. (PI)

POLISCI 244U: Political Culture (POLISCI 344U)

The implications of social norms, preferences and beliefs for political and economic behavior and societal outcomes.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Laitin, D. (PI)

POLISCI 249: Directed Reading and Research in Comparative Politics

For undergraduates. Directed reading in Political Science with a focus on comparative politics. To be considered for enrollment, interested students must complete the directed reading petition form available on the Political Science website before the end of week 1 of the quarter in which they'd like to enroll. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 259: Directed Reading and Research in Political Methodology

For undergraduates. Directed reading in Political Science with a focus on political methodology. To be considered for enrollment, interested students must complete the directed reading petition form available on the Political Science website before the end of week 1 of the quarter in which they'd like to enroll. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 299B: Honors Thesis Seminar

Restricted to Political Science Research Honors students who have completed POLISCI 299A.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Davenport, L. (PI)

POLISCI 314D: Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (INTLPOL 230, INTNLREL 114D, POLISCI 114D)

This course explores the different dimensions of development - economic, social, and political - as well as the way that modern institutions (the state, market systems, the rule of law, and democratic accountability) developed and interacted with other factors across different societies around the world. The class will feature additional special guest lectures by Francis Fukuyama, Larry Diamond, Michael McFaul, Anna Grzymala-Busse, and other faculty and researchers affiliated with the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. Undergraduate students should enroll in this course for 5 units. Graduate students should enroll for 3.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 319: Directed Reading in International Relations

For PhD students. Directed reading in Political Science with a focus on international relations. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 329: Directed Reading and Research in American Politics

For PhD students. Directed reading in Political Science with a focus on American politics. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 334: Philanthropy and Civil Society (EDUC 374, SOC 374)

Cross-listed with Law (LAW 781), Political Science (POLISCI 334) and Sociology (SOC 374). Associated with the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS). Year-long workshop for doctoral students and advanced undergraduates writing senior theses on the nature of civil society or philanthropy. Focus is on pursuit of progressive research and writing contributing to the current scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and philanthropy. Accomplished in a large part through peer review. Readings include recent scholarship in aforementioned fields. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

POLISCI 336S: Justice (ETHICSOC 171, PHIL 171, POLISCI 103, PUBLPOL 103C, PUBLPOL 307)

In this course, we explore three sets of questions relating to justice and the meaning of a just society: (1) Liberty: What is liberty, and why is it important? Which liberties must a just society protect? (2) Equality: What is equality, and why is it important? What sorts of equality should a just society ensure? (3) Reconciliation: Are liberty and equality in conflict? If so, how should we respond to the conflict between them? We approach these topics by examining competing theories of justice including utilitarianism, libertarianism/classical liberalism, and egalitarian liberalism. The class also serves as an introduction to how to do political philosophy, and students approaching these topics for the first time are welcome. Political Science majors taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 103.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 339: Directed Reading and Research in Political Theory

For PhD students. Directed reading in Political Science with a focus on political theory. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 344U: Political Culture (POLISCI 244U)

The implications of social norms, preferences and beliefs for political and economic behavior and societal outcomes.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Laitin, D. (PI)

POLISCI 349: Directed Reading and Research in Comparative Politics

For PhD students. Directed reading in Political Science with a focus on comparative politics. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 353A: Workshop in Political Methodology

Mathematical and statistical models and applications to political science. Guest speakers, faculty, and students present research papers. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Grimmer, J. (PI)

POLISCI 355A: Data Science for Politics (POLISCI 150A)

Data science is quickly changing the way we understand and and engage in the political process. In this course we will develop fundamental techniques of data science and apply them to large political datasets on elections, campaign finance, lobbying, and more. The objective is to give students the skills to carry out cutting edge quantitative political studies in both academia and the private sector. Students with technical backgrounds looking to study politics quantitatively are encouraged to enroll.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 359: Advanced Individual Study in Political Methodology

For PhD students. Directed reading in Political Science with a focus on political methodology. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 410A: International Relations Theory, Part I

This course offers a PhD-level introductory overview of the field of international relations. The primary purpose is to understand and evaluate the main theories, arguments, claims, and conjectures made by scholars in the field so as to enable students to situate arguments in the conceptual structure and intellectual history of IR theory.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Goldstein, J. (PI)

POLISCI 411A: Workshop in International Relations

For graduate students. Contemporary work. Organized around presentation of research by students and outside scholars. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Grinberg, M. (PI)

POLISCI 420A: American Political Institutions

Theories of American politics, focusing on Congress, the presidency, the bureaucracy, and the courts.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Moe, T. (PI)

POLISCI 421K: Questionnaire Design for Surveys and Laboratory Experiments: Social and Cognitive Perspectives (COMM 339, PSYCH 231)

The social and psychological processes involved in asking and answering questions via questionnaires for the social sciences; optimizing questionnaire design; open versus closed questions; rating versus ranking; rating scale length and point labeling; acquiescence response bias; don't-know response options; response choice order effects; question order effects; social desirability response bias; attitude and behavior recall; and introspective accounts of the causes of thoughts and actions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Krosnick, J. (PI)

POLISCI 422: Workshop in American Politics

Research seminar. Frontiers in mass political behavior. Course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hall, A. (PI)

POLISCI 433: Workshop in Political Theory

For graduate students. Faculty, guest speakers, and graduate students conducting research in political theory present works-in-progress. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Coyne, B. (PI)

POLISCI 437C: 20th Century and Contemporary Political Theory

This course provides a survey of some of the major contributions to political thought in the past century. The course will place special emphasis on the development of theories of political authority and legitimacy in the context of the modern bureaucratic state, as well as the connection between authority and other key concepts in normative political authority: democracy, justice, and freedom.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chapman, E. (PI)

POLISCI 440A: Theories in Comparative Politics

Theories addressing major concerns in the comparative field including identity, order, regime type, legitimacy, and governance.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 440D: Workshop in Comparative Politics

Faculty, guest speakers, and graduate students conducting research in comparative politics present work-in-progress. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gulzar, S. (PI)

POLISCI 447: Gender and Development

Gender remains an identity that defines structures of opportunity and representation in markets, society, and importantly in politics. This course studies how gender conditions experiences in political, economic, and social institutions. This seminar will pay special attention to the ways that patterns and processes of development have shaped gender inequality and will draw largely on evidence from low and middle-income countries. Specifically, we will study questions such as: Why do women in much of the world remain relatively underrepresented in formal andninformal institutions? What social, cultural, economic, and institutional factors reduce such gender inequality? How does gender inclusion shape development patterns and political outcomes?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Prillaman, S. (PI)

POLISCI 450A: Political Methodology I: Regression

Introduction to statistical research in political science, with a focus on linear regression. Teaches students how to apply multiple regression models as used in much of political science research. Also covers elements of probability and sampling theory.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 450D: Political Methodology IV: Advanced Topics

Covers advanced statistical tools that are useful for empirical research in political science. Possible topics include missing data, survey sampling and experimental designs for field research, machine learning, text mining, clustering, Bayesian methods, spatial statistics, and web scraping. Prerequisites: POLISCI 450A, POLISCI 450B and POLISCI 450C.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 450X: Programming for Political Scientists

This one-unit course is designed to complement our core methods sequence. In this biweekly course, students will be introduced to programming concepts, ideas, and tools that will assist them in completing homework faster and help them to produce better, more clear, and more easily replicated code.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Grimmer, J. (PI)

POLISCI 460A: Political Economy I (ECON 220)

Introduction to empirical and theoretical research in political economy. This course focuses on issues in democracies, while Political Economy II focuses on issues in non-democracies. Topics may include institutional foundations, social choice, electoral competition and candidate positioning, accountability, voter behavior, polarization, media and political communication, redistribution, special interests and lobbying, collective action, immigration, and populism. Prerequisite for Econ PhD students: ECON 202 and 270 or permission of instructors. Prerequisites for Political Science PhD students: POLISCI 450A, POLISCI 450B, and POLISCI 356A.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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