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PHYSICS 14N: Quantum Information: Visions and Emerging Technologies

What sets quantum information apart from its classical counterpart is that it can be encoded non-locally, woven into correlations among multiple qubits in a phenomenon known as entanglement. We will discuss paradigms for harnessing entanglement to solve hitherto intractable computational problems or to push the precision of sensors to their fundamental quantum mechanical limits. We will also examine challenges that physicists and engineers are tackling in the laboratory today to enable the quantum technologies of the future.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Schleier-Smith, M. (PI)

PHYSICS 17: Black Holes and Extreme Astrophysics

Black holes represent an extreme frontier of astrophysics. Course will explore the most fundamental and universal force -- gravity -- and how it controls the fate of astrophysical objects, leading in some cases to black holes. How we discover and determine the properties of black holes and their environment. How black holes and their event horizons are used to guide thinking about mysterious phenomena such as Hawking radiation, wormholes, and quantum entanglement. How black holes generate gravitational waves and powerful jets of particles and radiation. Other extreme objects such as pulsars. Relevant physics, including relativity, is introduced and treated at the algebraic level. No prior physics or calculus is required, although some deep thinking about space, time, and matter is important in working through assigned problems.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Abel, T. (PI)

PHYSICS 25: Modern Physics

How do the discoveries since the dawn of the 20th century impact our understanding of 21st-century physics? This course introduces the foundations of modern physics: Einstein's theory of special relativity and quantum mechanics. Combining the language of physics with tools from algebra and trigonometry, students gain insights into how the universe works on both the smallest and largest scales. Topics may include atomic, molecular, and laser physics; semiconductors; elementary particles and the fundamental forces; nuclear physics (fission, fusion, and radioactivity); astrophysics and cosmology (the contents and evolution of the universe). Emphasis on applications of modern physics in everyday life, progress made in our understanding of the universe, and open questions that are the subject of active research. Physical understanding fostered by peer interaction and demonstrations in lecture, and interactive group problem solving in discussion sections. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 23 or PHYSICS 23S.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Irwin, K. (PI)

PHYSICS 26: Modern Physics Laboratory

Guided hands-on and simulation-based exploration of concepts in modern physics, including special relativity, quantum mechanics and nuclear physics with an emphasis on student predictions, observations and explanations. Pre- or corequisite: PHYSICS 25.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Irwin, K. (PI)

PHYSICS 43: Electricity and Magnetism

What is electricity? What is magnetism? How are they related? How do these phenomena manifest themselves in the physical world? The theory of electricity and magnetism, as codified by Maxwell's equations, underlies much of the observable universe. Students develop both conceptual and quantitative knowledge of this theory. Topics include: electrostatics; magnetostatics; simple AC and DC circuits involving capacitors, inductors, and resistors; integral form of Maxwell's equations; electromagnetic waves. Principles illustrated in the context of modern technologies. Broader scientific questions addressed include: How do physical theories evolve? What is the interplay between basic physical theories and associated technologies? Discussions based on the language of mathematics, particularly differential and integral calculus, and vectors. Physical understanding fostered by peer interaction and demonstrations in lecture, and discussion sections based on interactive group problem solving. In order to register for this class students must EITHER have already taken an introductory Physics class (20, 40, or 60 sequence) or have taken the Physics Placement Diagnostic at https://physics.stanford.edu/academics/undergraduate-students/placement-diagnostic. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 41 or equivalent. MATH 21 or MATH 51 or CME 100 or equivalent. Recommended corequisite: MATH 52 or CME 102.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kasevich, M. (PI)

PHYSICS 43A: Electricity and Magnetism: Concepts, Calculations and Context

Additional assistance and applications for Physics 43. In-class problems in physics and engineering. Exercises in calculations of electric and magnetic forces and field to reinforce concepts and techniques; Calculations involving inductors, transformers, AC circuits, motors and generators. Highly recommended for students with limited or no high school physics or calculus. Corequisite: PHYSICS 43-34 or PHYSICS 43-35; Prerequisite: application at https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bsje3AZeKVpGgRf .
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PHYSICS 44: Electricity and Magnetism Lab

Hands-on exploration of concepts in electricity, magnetism, and circuits. Introduction to multimeters, function generators, oscilloscopes, and graphing techniques. Pre- or corequisite: PHYSICS 43.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kasevich, M. (PI)

PHYSICS 65: Quantum and Thermal Physics

(Third in a three-part advanced freshman physics series: PHYSICS 61, PHYSICS 63, PHYSICS 65.) This course introduces the foundations of quantum and statistical mechanics for students with a strong high school mathematics and physics background, who are contemplating a major in Physics or Engineering Physics, or are interested in a rigorous treatment of physics. Quantum mechanics: atoms, electrons, nuclei. Quantization of light, Planck's constant. Photoelectric effect, Compton and Bragg scattering. Bohr model, atomic spectra. Matter waves, wave packets, interference. Fourier analysis and transforms, Heisenberg uncertainty relationships. Schrödinger equation, eigenfunctions and eigenvalues. Particle-in-a-box, simple harmonic oscillator, barrier penetration, tunneling, WKB and approximate solutions. Time-dependent and multi-dimensional solution concepts. Coulomb potential and hydrogen atom structure. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics: ideal gas, equipartition, heat capacity. Probability, counting states, entropy, equilibrium, chemical potential. Laws of thermodynamics. Cycles, heat engines, free energy. Partition function, Boltzmann statistics, Maxwell speed distribution, ideal gas in a box, Einstein model. Quantum statistical mechanics: classical vs. quantum distribution functions, fermions vs. bosons. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 61 & PHYSICS 63. Pre- or corequisite: MATH 53 or MATH 63CM or MATH 63DM.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gratta, G. (PI)

PHYSICS 67: Introduction to Laboratory Physics

Methods of experimental design, data collection and analysis, statistics, and curve fitting in a laboratory setting. Experiments drawn from electronics, optics, heat, and modern physics. Lecture plus laboratory format. Required for PHYSICS 60 series Physics and Engineering Physics majors; recommended, in place of PHYSICS 44, for PHYSICS 40 series students who intend to major in Physics or Engineering Physics. Pre- or corequisite: PHYSICS 65 or PHYSICS 43.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pam, R. (PI)

PHYSICS 91SI: Practical Computing for Scientists

Essential computing skills for researchers in the natural sciences. Helping students transition their computing skills from a classroom to a research environment. Topics include the Unix operating system, the Python programming language, and essential tools for data analysis, simulation, and optimization. More advanced topics as time allows. Prerequisite: CS106A or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hogan, J. (PI)

PHYSICS 94SI: Diverse Perspectives in Physics

Have you ever wondered how your professors got to be where they are today? Or what it is like to be a female professor, a faculty member raised first-generation/low income, or even a Nobel laureate? Professors of a diverse set of identities and backgrounds will share the story of their lives and career trajectories over lunch, with an emphasis on their personal lives and experiences as undergraduates and graduate students. A Q&A session will follow. Free lunch provided.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PHYSICS 96N: Harmony and the Universe

Harmony is a multifaceted concept that has profoundly connects music, mathematics, physics, philosophy, physiology, and psychology. We will explore the evolution of our understanding of harmony and its immediate application in the function of musical instruments, and employ it as a nexus to understand its role in revolutionary scientific advances in gravity, relativity, quantum mechanics, and cosmology. In these explorations, we will examine some of the fundamental mathematical tools which provide us our current understanding of harmony. We will also see how the some concepts surrounding harmony are in tension, if not conflict, and how some great thinkers have followed them down down blind alleys and dead ends. The aim of the course is to show the enormous consequences of harmony in the evolution of our understanding of the universe, and how science itself progresses in fits, starts, and setbacks as old ideas intermingle with new developments. We will also see how objective/quantitative aspects of harmony interact with subjective/qualitative considerations, and how cultural perspectives and prejudices can affect the progression of science.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tanaka, H. (PI)

PHYSICS 100: Introduction to Observational Astrophysics

Designed for undergraduate physics majors but open to all students with a calculus-based physics background and some laboratory and coding experience. Students make and analyze observations using the telescopes at the Stanford Student Observatory. Topics covered include navigating the night sky, the physics of stars and galaxies, telescope instrumentation and operation, imaging and spectroscopic techniques, quantitative error analysis, and effective scientific communication. The course concludes with an independent project where student teams propose and execute an observational astronomy project of their choosing, using techniques learned in class to gather and analyze their data, and presenting their findings in the forms of professional-style oral presentations and research papers. Enrollment by permission. To get a permission number please complete form: http://web.stanford.edu/~elva/physics100prelim.fb If you have not heard from us by the beginning of class, please come to the first class session.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Macintosh, B. (PI)

PHYSICS 108: Advanced Physics Laboratory: Project

Have you ever gotten to come up with a scientific question you'd like to explore, then worked with a small group to plan, design, build, and carry out an experiment to pursue this? Most projects pursued (drawn from condensed matter or particle physics) have never before been done in the class. This is an accelerated, guided "simulation" of real frontier experimental research. We provide substantial resources to help your team. Prerequisites PHYSICS 105, PHYSICS 107. PHYSICS 130 preferred.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Goldhaber-Gordon, D. (PI)

PHYSICS 113: Computational Physics

Numerical methods for solving problems in mechanics, astrophysics, electromagnetism, quantum mechanics, and statistical mechanics. Methods include numerical integration; solutions of ordinary and partial differential equations; solutions of the diffusion equation, Laplace's equation and Poisson's equation with various methods; statistical methods including Monte Carlo techniques; matrix methods and eigenvalue problems. Short introduction to Python, which is used for class examples and active learning notebooks; independent class projects make up more than half of the grade and may be programmed in any language such as C, Python or Matlab. No Prerequisites but some previous programming experience is advisable.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cabrera, B. (PI)

PHYSICS 121: Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism II

Conservation laws and electromagnetic waves, Poynting's theorem, tensor formulation, potentials and fields. Plane wave problems (free space, conductors and dielectric materials, boundaries). Dipole and quadruple radiation. Special relativity and transformation between electric and magnetic fields. Prerequisites: PHYS 120 and PHYS 111 or MATH 131P or MATH 173; Recommended: PHYS 112.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hogan, J. (PI)

PHYSICS 131: Quantum Mechanics II

Identical particles; Fermi and Bose statistics. Time-independent perturbation theory. Fine structure, the Zeeman effect and hyperfine splitting in the hydrogen atom. Time-dependent perturbation theory. Variational principle and WKB approximation. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 120, PHYSICS 130, PHYSICS 111 or MATH 131P, or MATH 173. Pre- or corequisite: PHYSICS 121.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Qi, X. (PI)

PHYSICS 152: Introduction to Particle Physics I (PHYSICS 252)

Elementary particles and the fundamental forces. Quarks and leptons. The mediators of the electromagnetic, weak and strong interactions. Interaction of particles with matter; particle acceleration, and detection techniques. Symmetries and conservation laws. Bound states. Decay rates. Cross sections. Feynman diagrams. Introduction to Feynman integrals. The Dirac equation. Feynman rules for quantum electrodynamics and for chromodynamics. Undergraduates register for PHYSICS 152. Graduate students register for PHYSICS 252. (Graduate students will be required to complete additional assignments in a format determined by the instructor.) Prerequisite: PHYSICS 130. Pre- or corequisite: PHYSICS 131.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tompkins, L. (PI)

PHYSICS 161: Introduction to Cosmology and Extragalactic Astrophysics (PHYSICS 261)

What do we know about the physical origins, content, and evolution of the Universe -- and how do we know it? Students learn how cosmological distances and times, and the geometry and expansion of space, are described and measured. Composition of the Universe. Origin of matter and the elements. Observational evidence for dark matter and dark energy. Thermal history of the Universe, from inflation to the present. Emergence of large-scale structure from quantum perturbations in the early Universe. Astrophysical tools used to learn about the Universe. Big open questions in cosmology. Undergraduates register for Physics 161. Graduates register for Physics 261. (Graduate students will be required to complete additional assignments in a format determined by the instructor.) Prerequisite: PHYSICS 121 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Romani, R. (PI)

PHYSICS 172: Solid State Physics (APPPHYS 272)

Introduction to the properties of solids. Crystal structures and bonding in materials. Momentum-space analysis and diffraction probes. Lattice dynamics, phonon theory and measurements, thermal properties. Electronic structure theory, classical and quantum; free, nearly-free, and tight-binding limits. Electron dynamics and basic transport properties; quantum oscillations. Properties and applications of semiconductors. Reduced-dimensional systems. Undergraduates should register for PHYSICS 172 and graduate students for APPPHYS 272. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 170 and PHYSICS 171, or equivalents.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHYSICS 190: Independent Research and Study

Undergraduate research in experimental or theoretical physics under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisites: superior work as an undergraduate Physics major and consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-9 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHYSICS 199: The Physics of Energy and Climate Change (PHYSICS 201)

Topics include measurements of temperature and sea level changes in the climate record of the Earth, satellite atmospheric spectroscopy, satellite gravity geodesy measurements of changes in water aquifers and glaciers, and ocean changes. The difference between weather fluctuations changes and climate change, climate models and their uncertainties in the context of physical, chemical and biological feedback mechanisms to changes in greenhouse gases and solar insolation will be discussed. Energy efficiency, transmission and distribution of electricity, energy storage, and the physics of harnessing fossil, wind, solar, geothermal, fission and fusion will be covered, along with prospects of future technological developments in energy use and production. Prerequisite: Physics 40 or Physics 60 series.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chu, S. (PI)

PHYSICS 201: The Physics of Energy and Climate Change (PHYSICS 199)

Topics include measurements of temperature and sea level changes in the climate record of the Earth, satellite atmospheric spectroscopy, satellite gravity geodesy measurements of changes in water aquifers and glaciers, and ocean changes. The difference between weather fluctuations changes and climate change, climate models and their uncertainties in the context of physical, chemical and biological feedback mechanisms to changes in greenhouse gases and solar insolation will be discussed. Energy efficiency, transmission and distribution of electricity, energy storage, and the physics of harnessing fossil, wind, solar, geothermal, fission and fusion will be covered, along with prospects of future technological developments in energy use and production. Prerequisite: Physics 40 or Physics 60 series.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chu, S. (PI)

PHYSICS 205: Senior Thesis Research

Long-term experimental or theoretical project and thesis in Physics under supervision of a faculty member. Planning of the thesis project is recommended to begin as early as middle of the junior year. Successful completion of a senior thesis requires a minimum of 3 units for a letter grade completed during the senior year, along with the other formal thesis and physics major requirements. Students doing research for credit prior to senior year should sign up for Physics 190. Prerequisites: superior work as an undergraduate Physics major and approval of the thesis application.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHYSICS 220: Classical Electrodynamics

Special relativity: The principles of relativity, Lorentz transformations, four vectors and tensors, relativistic mechanics and the principle of least action. Lagrangian formulation, charges in electromagnetic fields, gauge invariance, the electromagnetic field tensor, covariant equations of electrodynamics and mechanics, four-current and continuity equation. Noether's theorem and conservation laws, Poynting's theorem, stress-energy tensor. Constant electromagnetic fields: conductors and dielectrics, magnetic media, electric and magnetic forces, and energy. Electromagnetic waves: Plane and monochromatic waves, spectral resolution, polarization, electromagnetic properties of matter, dispersion relations, wave guides and cavities. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 121 and PHYSICS 210, or equivalent; MATH 106 or MATH 116, and MATH 132 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Susskind, L. (PI)

PHYSICS 231: Graduate Quantum Mechanics II

Basis for higher level courses on atomic solid state and particle physics. Problems related to measurement theory and introduction to quantum computing. Approximation methods for time-independent and time-dependent perturbations. Semiclassical and quantum theory of radiation, second quantization of radiation and matter fields. Systems of identical particles and many electron atoms and molecules. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 230.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Shenker, S. (PI)

PHYSICS 252: Introduction to Particle Physics I (PHYSICS 152)

Elementary particles and the fundamental forces. Quarks and leptons. The mediators of the electromagnetic, weak and strong interactions. Interaction of particles with matter; particle acceleration, and detection techniques. Symmetries and conservation laws. Bound states. Decay rates. Cross sections. Feynman diagrams. Introduction to Feynman integrals. The Dirac equation. Feynman rules for quantum electrodynamics and for chromodynamics. Undergraduates register for PHYSICS 152. Graduate students register for PHYSICS 252. (Graduate students will be required to complete additional assignments in a format determined by the instructor.) Prerequisite: PHYSICS 130. Pre- or corequisite: PHYSICS 131.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tompkins, L. (PI)

PHYSICS 261: Introduction to Cosmology and Extragalactic Astrophysics (PHYSICS 161)

What do we know about the physical origins, content, and evolution of the Universe -- and how do we know it? Students learn how cosmological distances and times, and the geometry and expansion of space, are described and measured. Composition of the Universe. Origin of matter and the elements. Observational evidence for dark matter and dark energy. Thermal history of the Universe, from inflation to the present. Emergence of large-scale structure from quantum perturbations in the early Universe. Astrophysical tools used to learn about the Universe. Big open questions in cosmology. Undergraduates register for Physics 161. Graduates register for Physics 261. (Graduate students will be required to complete additional assignments in a format determined by the instructor.) Prerequisite: PHYSICS 121 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Romani, R. (PI)

PHYSICS 268: Physics with Neutrinos

Relativistic fermions, Weyl and Dirac equations, Majorana masses. Electroweak theory, neutrino cross sections, neutrino refraction in matter, MSW effect. Three-flavor oscillations, charge-parity violation, searches for sterile neutrinos, modern long- and short-baseline oscillation experiments. Seesaw mechanism, models of neutrino masses, lepton flavor violation. Neutrinoless double beta decay. Cosmological constraints on neutrino properties. Advanced topics, such as collective oscillations in supernovae or ultrahigh energy neutrinos, offered as optional projects. The material in this course is largely complementary to PHYS 269, focusing on particle physics aspects of neutrinos. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 121, 131 and 171 or equivalent. PHYS 230-231, 269, 152 and 161 or equivalent are helpful, but not required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Friedland, A. (PI)

PHYSICS 291: Practical Training

Opportunity for practical training in industrial labs. Arranged by student with the research adviser's approval. A brief summary of activities is required, approved by the research adviser.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PHYSICS 293: Literature of Physics

Study of the literature of any special topic. Preparation, presentation of reports. If taken under the supervision of a faculty member outside the department, approval of the Physics chair required. Prerequisites: 25 units of college physics, consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Burchat, P. (PI)

PHYSICS 295: Learning & Teaching of Science (EDUC 280, ENGR 295, MED 270, VPTL 280)

This course will provide students with a basic knowledge of the relevant research in cognitive psychology and science education and the ability to apply that knowledge to enhance their ability to learn and teach science, particularly at the undergraduate level. Course will involve readings, discussion, and application of the ideas through creation of learning activities. It is suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students with some science background.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Wieman, C. (PI)

PHYSICS 332: Quantum Field Theory III

Theory of renormalization. The renormalization group and applications to the theory of phase transitions. Renormalization of Yang-Mills theories. Applications of the renormalization group of quantum chromodynamics. Perturbation theory anomalies. Applications to particle phenomenology. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 331.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Silverstein, E. (PI)

PHYSICS 364: Gravitational Radiation, Black Holes and Neutron Stars

General relativistic theory of spinning black holes and neutron stars including accretion, jets and tidal capture. Direct and indirect observation of relativistic effects in active galactic nuclei and stellar sources. Linear theory of the generation and propagation of (non-primordial) gravitational radiation. Detection of gravitational waves by Michelson interferometers, pulsars and atom interferometers. Nonlinear emission by binary black holes. Nuclear equation of state and nucleosynthetic implications of neutron star binaries. Pre-requisite: Ph 262 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Blandford, R. (PI)

PHYSICS 366: Statistical Methods in Astrophysics

Foundations of principled inference from data, primarily in the Bayesian framework, organized around applications in astrophysics and cosmology. Topics include probabilistic modeling of data, parameter constraints and model comparison, numerical methods including Markov Chain Monte Carlo, and connections to frequentist and machine learning frameworks. Hands-on experience with real data through in-class tutorials, problem sets and a final project. Prerequisite: programming in Python or a similar language at the level of CS 106A. Recommended but not required: probability at the level of STATS 116 or PHYSICS 166/266.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHYSICS 367: Special Topics in Astrophysics: Stellar and High Energy Astrophysics

The first 4-weeks will be on stellar physics including observations, structure and evolution of stars from their birth to the main sequence phase and eventual paths to compact stars (white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes). This part will end with observations of compact stars at optical, X- and gamma-rays, and gravitational waves. The second 4-weeks will be on high energy astrophysical sources in particular the processes governing their energizing, and mechanisms of acceleration of particles and the emission characteristics. Radiation transfer and the roles of turbulence and shocks in all above processes will be also reviewed. Prerequisites: Upper undergraduate or graduate level on Mechanics, Electromagnetism including Special Theory of Relativity.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Petrosian, V. (PI)

PHYSICS 490: Research

Open only to Physics graduate students, with consent of instructor. Work is in experimental or theoretical problems in research, as distinguished from independent study of a non-research character in 190 and 293.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Abel, T. (PI); Akerib, D. (PI); Allen, S. (PI); Altman, R. (PI); Baer, T. (PI); Batzoglou, S. (PI); Beasley, M. (PI); Bejerano, G. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blandford, R. (PI); Block, S. (PI); Bloom, E. (PI); Boahen, K. (PI); Boneh, D. (PI); Boxer, S. (PI); Breidenbach, M. (PI); Brodsky, S. (PI); Bryant, Z. (PI); Bucksbaum, P. (PI); Burchat, P. (PI); Burke, D. (PI); Bustamante, C. (PI); Byer, R. (PI); Cabrera, B. (PI); Chao, A. (PI); Chatterjee, S. (PI); Chichilnisky, E. (PI); Chu, S. (PI); Church, S. (PI); Dai, H. (PI); Das, R. (PI); Devereaux, T. (PI); Dimopoulos, S. (PI); Dixon, L. (PI); Doniach, S. (PI); Drell, P. (PI); Dror, R. (PI); Druckmann, S. (PI); Dunne, M. (PI); Ermon, S. (PI); Fan, S. (PI); Fejer, M. (PI); Feldman, B. (PI); Fetter, A. (PI); Fisher, G. (PI); Fisher, I. (PI); Fox, J. (PI); Frank, M. (PI); Friedland, A. (PI); Funk, S. (PI); Gaffney, K. (PI); Ganguli, S. (PI); Glenzer, S. (PI); Glover, G. (PI); Goldhaber-Gordon, D. (PI); Gorinevsky, D. (PI); Graham, P. (PI); Gratta, G. (PI); Graves, E. (PI); Harbury, P. (PI); Harris, J. (PI); Hartnoll, S. (PI); Hastings, J. (PI); Hayden, P. (PI); Heinz, T. (PI); Hewett, J. (PI); Himel, T. (PI); Hogan, J. (PI); Hollberg, L. (PI); Holmes, S. (PI); Huang, Z. (PI); Huberman, B. (PI); Hwang, H. (PI); Inan, U. (PI); Irwin, K. (PI); Jaros, J. (PI); Jones, B. (PI); Kachru, S. (PI); Kahn, S. (PI); Kallosh, R. (PI); Kamae, T. (PI); Kapitulnik, A. (PI); Kasevich, M. (PI); Khemani, V. (PI); Kivelson, S. (PI); Kosovichev, A. (PI); Kundaje, A. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Laughlin, R. (PI); Leith, D. (PI); Lev, B. (PI); Levin, C. (PI); Levitt, M. (PI); Linde, A. (PI); Lipa, J. (PI); Luth, V. (PI); Mabuchi, H. (PI); Macintosh, B. (PI); Madejski, G. (PI); Manoharan, H. (PI); Mao, W. (PI); Markland, T. (PI); Melosh, N. (PI); Michelson, P. (PI); Moerner, W. (PI); Moler, K. (PI); Nelson, T. (PI); Nishi, Y. (PI); Osheroff, D. (PI); Ozgur Aydin, A. (PI); Palanker, D. (PI); Pande, V. (PI); Papanicolaou, G. (PI); Partridge, R. (PI); Pelc, N. (PI); Perl, M. (PI); Peskin, M. (PI); Petrosian, V. (PI); Pianetta, P. (PI); Poon, A. (PI); Prinz, F. (PI); Qi, X. (PI); Quake, S. (PI); Raghu, S. (PI); Raubenheimer, T. (PI); Reed, E. (PI); Reis, D. (PI); Romani, R. (PI); Roodman, A. (PI); Rowson, P. (PI); Rubinstein, A. (PI); Ruth, R. (PI); Safavi-Naeini, A. (PI); Scherrer, P. (PI); Schindler, R. (PI); Schleier-Smith, M. (PI); Schnitzer, M. (PI); Schuster, P. (PI); Schwartzman, A. (PI); Senatore, L. (PI); Shen, Z. (PI); Shenker, S. (PI); Shutt, T. (PI); Sidford, A. (PI); Silverstein, E. (PI); Smith, T. (PI); Spakowitz, A. (PI); Spudich, J. (PI); Stohr, J. (PI); Su, D. (PI); Susskind, L. (PI); Suzuki, Y. (PI); Tanaka, H. (PI); Tantawi, S. (PI); Thomas, S. (PI); Tompkins, L. (PI); Toro, N. (PI); Vuckovic, J. (PI); Vuletic, V. (PI); Wacker, J. (PI); Wagoner, R. (PI); Wechsler, R. (PI); Wein, L. (PI); Weis, W. (PI); Wieman, C. (PI); Wojcicki, S. (PI); Wong, H. (PI); Wootters, M. (PI); Yamamoto, Y. (PI); Yamins, D. (PI); Zhang, S. (PI)

PHYSICS 801: TGR Project

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
Instructors: ; Burke, D. (PI)

PHYSICS 802: TGR Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
Instructors: ; Abel, T. (PI); Allen, S. (PI); Baer, T. (PI); Beasley, M. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blandford, R. (PI); Block, S. (PI); Bloom, E. (PI); Breidenbach, M. (PI); Brodsky, S. (PI); Bucksbaum, P. (PI); Burchat, P. (PI); Burke, D. (PI); Bustamante, C. (PI); Cabrera, B. (PI); Chao, A. (PI); Chichilnisky, E. (PI); Chu, S. (PI); Church, S. (PI); Dai, H. (PI); Devereaux, T. (PI); Dimopoulos, S. (PI); Dixon, L. (PI); Doniach, S. (PI); Drell, P. (PI); Druckmann, S. (PI); Dunne, M. (PI); Fan, S. (PI); Fisher, I. (PI); Funk, S. (PI); Gaffney, K. (PI); Glover, G. (PI); Goldhaber-Gordon, D. (PI); Gorinevsky, D. (PI); Graham, P. (PI); Gratta, G. (PI); Graves, E. (PI); Grill-Spector, K. (PI); Harris, J. (PI); Hartnoll, S. (PI); Hastings, J. (PI); Hayden, P. (PI); Hewett, J. (PI); Hogan, J. (PI); Huang, Z. (PI); Hwang, H. (PI); Inan, U. (PI); Irwin, K. (PI); Jaros, J. (PI); Jones, B. (PI); Kachru, S. (PI); Kahn, S. (PI); Kallosh, R. (PI); Kamae, T. (PI); Kapitulnik, A. (PI); Kasevich, M. (PI); Khemani, V. (PI); Kivelson, S. (PI); Kundaje, A. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Laughlin, R. (PI); Leith, D. (PI); Lev, B. (PI); Levitt, M. (PI); Linde, A. (PI); Luth, V. (PI); Mabuchi, H. (PI); Macintosh, B. (PI); Madejski, G. (PI); Manoharan, H. (PI); Mao, W. (PI); Michelson, P. (PI); Moerner, W. (PI); Moler, K. (PI); Osheroff, D. (PI); Palanker, D. (PI); Peskin, M. (PI); Petrosian, V. (PI); Pianetta, P. (PI); Prinz, F. (PI); Qi, X. (PI); Quake, S. (PI); Raghu, S. (PI); Raubenheimer, T. (PI); Reed, E. (PI); Romani, R. (PI); Roodman, A. (PI); Ruth, R. (PI); Scherrer, P. (PI); Schindler, R. (PI); Schleier-Smith, M. (PI); Schnitzer, M. (PI); Schuster, P. (PI); Schwartzman, A. (PI); Senatore, L. (PI); Shen, Z. (PI); Shenker, S. (PI); Shutt, T. (PI); Silverstein, E. (PI); Smith, T. (PI); Spakowitz, A. (PI); Spudich, J. (PI); Stohr, J. (PI); Su, D. (PI); Susskind, L. (PI); Suzuki, Y. (PI); Tanaka, H. (PI); Tompkins, L. (PI); Vuletic, V. (PI); Wacker, J. (PI); Wechsler, R. (PI); Wieman, C. (PI); Wojcicki, S. (PI); Wong, H. (PI); Yamamoto, Y. (PI); Zhang, S. (PI)
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