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PHYSICS 14N: Quantum Information: Visions and Emerging Technologies

What sets quantum information apart from its classical counterpart is that it can be encoded non-locally, woven into correlations among multiple qubits in a phenomenon known as entanglement. We will discuss paradigms for harnessing entanglement to solve hitherto intractable computational problems or to push the precision of sensors to their fundamental quantum mechanical limits. We will also examine challenges that physicists and engineers are tackling in the laboratory today to enable the quantum technologies of the future.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Schleier-Smith, M. (PI)

PHYSICS 15: Stars and Planets in a Habitable Universe

Is the Earth unique in our galaxy? Students learn how stars and our galaxy have evolved and how this produces planets and the conditions suitable for life. Discussion of the motion of the night sky and how telescopes collect and analyze light. The life-cycle of stars from birth to death, and the end products of that life cycle -- from dense stellar corpses to supernova explosions. Course covers recent discoveries of extrasolar planets -- those orbiting stars beyond our sun -- and the ultimate quest for other Earths. Intended to be accessible to non-science majors, material is explored quantitatively with problem sets using basic algebra and numerical estimates. Sky observing exercise and observatory field trips supplement the classroom work.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Macintosh, B. (PI)

PHYSICS 21: Mechanics, Fluids, and Heat

How are the motions of objects and the behavior of fluids and gases determined by the laws of physics? Students learn to describe the motion of objects (kinematics) and understand why objects move as they do (dynamics). Emphasis on how Newton's three laws of motion are applied to solids, liquids, and gases to describe phenomena as diverse as spinning gymnasts, blood flow, and sound waves. Understanding many-particle systems requires connecting macroscopic properties (e.g., temperature and pressure) to microscopic dynamics (collisions of particles). Laws of thermodynamics provide understanding of real-world phenomena such as energy conversion and performance limits of heat engines. Everyday examples are analyzed using tools of algebra and trigonometry. Problem-solving skills are developed, including verifying that derived results satisfy criteria for correctness, such as dimensional consistency and expected behavior in limiting cases. Physical understanding fostered by peer interaction and demonstrations in lecture, and interactive group problem solving in discussion sections. In order to register for this class students must EITHER have already taken an introductory Physics class (20, 40, or 60 sequence) or have taken the Physics Placement Diagnostic at https://physics.stanford.edu/academics/undergraduate-students/placement-diagnostic. Prerequisite: high school algebra and trigonometry; calculus not required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Nanavati, C. (PI)

PHYSICS 22: Mechanics, Fluids, and Heat Laboratory

Guided hands-on exploration of concepts in classical mechanics, fluids, and thermodynamics with an emphasis on student predictions, observations and explanations. Pre- or corequisite: PHYSICS 21.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Nanavati, C. (PI)

PHYSICS 45: Light and Heat

What is temperature? How do the elementary processes of mechanics, which are intrinsically reversible, result in phenomena that are clearly irreversible when applied to a very large number of particles, the ultimate example being life? In thermodynamics, students discover that the approach of classical mechanics is not sufficient to deal with the extremely large number of particles present in a macroscopic amount of gas. The paradigm of thermodynamics leads to a deeper understanding of real-world phenomena such as energy conversion and the performance limits of thermal engines. In optics, students see how a geometrical approach allows the design of optical systems based on reflection and refraction, while the wave nature of light leads to interference phenomena. The two approaches come together in understanding the diffraction limit of microscopes and telescopes. Discussions based on the language of mathematics, particularly calculus. Physical understanding fostered by peer interaction and demonstrations in lecture, and discussion sections based on interactive group problem solving. In order to register for this class students must EITHER have already taken an introductory Physics class (20, 40, or 60 sequence) or have taken the Physics Placement Diagnostic at https://physics.stanford.edu/academics/undergraduate-students/placement-diagnostic. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 41 or equivalent. MATH 21 or MATH 51 or CME 100 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hartnoll, S. (PI)

PHYSICS 46: Light and Heat Laboratory

Hands-on exploration of concepts in geometrical optics, wave optics and thermodynamics. Pre- or corequisite: PHYSICS 45.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hartnoll, S. (PI)

PHYSICS 59: Frontiers of Physics Research

Recommended for prospective Physics or Engineering Physics majors or anyone with an interest in learning about the big questions and unknowns that physicists tackle in their research at Stanford. Weekly faculty presentations, in some cases followed by tours of experimental laboratories where the research is conducted.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Anderson, L. (PI)

PHYSICS 61: Mechanics and Special Relativity

(First in a three-part advanced freshman physics series: PHYSICS 61, PHYSICS 63, PHYSICS 65.) This course covers Einstein's special theory of relativity and Newtonian mechanics at a level appropriate for students with a strong high school mathematics and physics background, who are contemplating a major in Physics or Engineering Physics, or are interested in a rigorous treatment of physics. Postulates of special relativity, simultaneity, time dilation, length contraction, the Lorentz transformation, causality, and relativistic mechanics. Central forces, contact forces, linear restoring forces. Momentum transport, work, energy, collisions. Angular momentum, torque, moment of inertia in three dimensions. Damped and forced harmonic oscillators. Uses the language of vectors and multivariable calculus. In order to register for this class students must EITHER have already taken an introductory Physics class (20, 40, or 60 sequence) or have taken the Physics Placement Diagnostic at https://physics.stanford.edu/academics/undergraduate-students/placement-diagnostic. Recommended prerequisites: Mastery of mechanics at the level of AP Physics C and AP Calculus BC or equivalent. Corequisite: MATH 51 or MATH 61CM or MATH 61DM.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHYSICS 62: Mechanics Laboratory

Introduction to laboratory techniques, experiment design, data collection and analysis simulations, and correlating observations with theory. Labs emphasize discovery with open-ended questions and hands-on exploration of concepts developed in PHYSICS 61 including Newton's laws, conservation laws, rotational motion. Pre-or corequisite PHYSICS 61
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Devin, J. (PI)

PHYSICS 70: Foundations of Modern Physics

Required for Physics or Engineering Physics majors who completed the PHYSICS 40 series. Introduction to special relativity: reference frames, Michelson-Morley experiment. Postulates of relativity, simultaneity, time dilation. Length contraction, the Lorentz transformation, causality. Doppler effect. Relativistic mechanics and mass, energy, momentum relations. Introduction to quantum physics: atoms, electrons, nuclei. Quantization of light, Planck constant. Photoelectric effect, Compton and Bragg scattering. Bohr model, atomic spectra. Matter waves, wave packets, interference. Fourier analysis and transforms, Heisenberg uncertainty relationships. Schrödinger equation, eigenfunctions and eigenvalues. Particle-in-a-box, simple harmonic oscillator, barrier penetration, tunneling, WKB and approximate solutions. Time-dependent and multi-dimensional solution concepts. Coulomb potential and hydrogen atom structure. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 41, PHYSICS 43. Pre or corequisite: PHYSICS 45. Recommended: prior or concurrent registration in MATH 53.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Silverstein, E. (PI)

PHYSICS 83N: Physics in the 21st Century

Preference to freshmen. This course provides an in-depth examination of frontiers of physics research, including fundamental physics, cosmology, and physics of the future. Questions such as: What is the universe made of? What is the nature of space, time, and matter? What can we learn about the history of the universe and what does it tell us about its future? A large part of 20th century was defined by revolutions in physics ¿ everyday applications of electromagnetism, relativity, and quantum mechanics. What other revolutions can physics bring to human civilization in the 21st century? What is quantum computing? What can physics say about consciousness? What does it take to visit other parts of the solar system, or even other stars? nnWe will also learn to convey these complex topics in engaging and diverse terms to the general public through writing and reading assignments, oral presentations, and multimedia projects. No prior knowledge of physics is necessary; all voices are welcome to contribute to the discussion about these big ideas. Learning Goals: By the end of the quarter you will be able to explain the major questions that drive physics research to your friends and peers. You will understand how scientists study the impossibly small and impossibly large and be able to convey this knowledge in clear and concise terms.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kuo, C. (PI)

PHYSICS 105: Intermediate Physics Laboratory I: Analog Electronics

Introductory laboratory electronics, designed for Physics and Engineering Physics majors but open to all students with science or engineering interests in analog circuits, instrumentation and signal processing. The course is focused on laboratory exercises that build skills needed for measurements, including sensors, amplification and filtering, and fundamentals of noise in physical systems. The hands-on lab exercises include DC circuits, RC and diode circuits, applications of operational amplifiers, non-linear circuits and optoelectronics. The class exercises build towards a lock-in amplifier contest where each lab section designs and builds a synchronous detection system to measure a weak optical signal, with opportunities to understand the limits of the design, build improvements and compare results with the other lab sections. The course focuses on practical techniques and insight from the lab exercises, with a goal to prepare undergraduates for laboratory research. No formal electronics experience is required beyond exposure to concepts from introductory Physics or Engineering courses (Ohm's law, charge conservation, physics of capacitors and inductors, etc.). Recommended prerequisite: Physics 43 or 63, or Engineering 40A or 40M.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pam, R. (PI)

PHYSICS 110: Advanced Mechanics (PHYSICS 210)

Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics. Principle of least action, Euler-Lagrange equations. Small oscillations and beyond. Symmetries, canonical transformations, Hamilton-Jacobi theory, action-angle variables. Introduction to classical field theory. Selected other topics, including nonlinear dynamical systems, attractors, chaotic motion. Undergraduates register for Physics 110 (4 units). Graduates register for Physics 210 (3 units). Prerequisites: MATH 131P or PHYSICS 111, and PHYSICS 112 or MATH elective 104 or higher. Recommended prerequisite: PHYSICS 130.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hayden, P. (PI)

PHYSICS 111: Partial Differential Equations of Mathematical Physics

This course is intended to introduce students to the basic techniques for solving partial differential equations that commonly occur in classical mechanics, electromagnetism, and quantum mechanics. Tools that will be developed include separation of variables, Fourier series and transforms, and Sturm-Liouville theory. Examples (including the heat equation, Laplace equation, and wave equation) will be drawn from different areas of physics. Through examples, students will gain a familiarity with some of the famous special functions arising in mathematical physics. Prerequisite: MATH 53 or 63. Completing PHYSICS 40 or 60 sequences helpful.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kivelson, S. (PI)

PHYSICS 134: Advanced Topics in Quantum Mechanics (PHYSICS 234)

Scattering theory, partial wave expansion, Born approximation. Additional topics may include nature of quantum measurement, EPR paradox, Bell's inequality, and topics in quantum information science; path integrals and applications; Berry's phase; structure of multi-electron atoms (Hartree-Fock); relativistic quantum mechanics (Dirac equation). Undergraduates register for PHYSICS 134 (4 units). Graduate students register for PHYSICS 234 (3 units). Prerequisite: PHYSICS 131.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stanford, D. (PI)

PHYSICS 170: Thermodynamics, Kinetic Theory, and Statistical Mechanics I

Basic probability and statistics for random processes such as random walks. The derivation of laws of thermodynamics from basic postulates; the determination of the relationship between atomic substructure and macroscopic behavior of matter. Temperature; equations of state, heat, internal energy, equipartition; entropy, Gibbs paradox; equilibrium and reversibility; heat engines; applications to various properties of matter; absolute zero and low-temperature phenomena. Distribution functions, fluctuations, the partition function for classical and quantum systems, irreversible processes. Pre- or corequisite: PHYSICS 130.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHYSICS 190: Independent Research and Study

Undergraduate research in experimental or theoretical physics under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisites: superior work as an undergraduate Physics major and consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-9 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHYSICS 205: Senior Thesis Research

Long-term experimental or theoretical project and thesis in Physics under supervision of a faculty member. Planning of the thesis project is recommended to begin as early as middle of the junior year. Successful completion of a senior thesis requires a minimum of 3 units for a letter grade completed during the senior year, along with the other formal thesis and physics major requirements. Students doing research for credit prior to senior year should sign up for Physics 190. Prerequisites: superior work as an undergraduate Physics major and approval of the thesis application.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHYSICS 210: Advanced Mechanics (PHYSICS 110)

Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics. Principle of least action, Euler-Lagrange equations. Small oscillations and beyond. Symmetries, canonical transformations, Hamilton-Jacobi theory, action-angle variables. Introduction to classical field theory. Selected other topics, including nonlinear dynamical systems, attractors, chaotic motion. Undergraduates register for Physics 110 (4 units). Graduates register for Physics 210 (3 units). Prerequisites: MATH 131P or PHYSICS 111, and PHYSICS 112 or MATH elective 104 or higher. Recommended prerequisite: PHYSICS 130.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hayden, P. (PI)

PHYSICS 212: Statistical Mechanics

Principles, ensembles, statistical equilibrium. Thermodynamic functions, ideal and near-ideal gases. Fluctuations. Mean-field description of phase-transitions and associated critical exponents. One-dimensional Ising model and other exact solutions. Renormalization and scaling relations. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 131, 171, or equivalents.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Shenker, S. (PI)

PHYSICS 216: Back of the Envelope Physics

Techniques such as scaling and dimensional analysis, useful to make order-of-magnitude estimates of physical effects in different settings. Goals are to promote a synthesis of physics through solving problems, including problems that are not usually thought of as physics. Applications include properties of materials, fluid mechanics, geophysics, astrophysics, and cosmology. Prerequisites: undergraduate mechanics, statistical mechanics, electricity and magnetism, and quantum mechanics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Madejski, G. (PI)

PHYSICS 234: Advanced Topics in Quantum Mechanics (PHYSICS 134)

Scattering theory, partial wave expansion, Born approximation. Additional topics may include nature of quantum measurement, EPR paradox, Bell's inequality, and topics in quantum information science; path integrals and applications; Berry's phase; structure of multi-electron atoms (Hartree-Fock); relativistic quantum mechanics (Dirac equation). Undergraduates register for PHYSICS 134 (4 units). Graduate students register for PHYSICS 234 (3 units). Prerequisite: PHYSICS 131.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stanford, D. (PI)

PHYSICS 262: General Relativity

Einstein's General Theory of Relativity is a basis for modern ideas of fundamental physics, including string theory, as well as for studies of cosmology and astrophysics. The course begins with an overview of special relativity, and the description of gravity as arising from curved space. From Riemannian geometry and the geodesic equations, to curvature, the energy-momentum tensor, and the Einstein field equations. Applications of General Relativity: topics may include experimental tests of General Relativity and the weak-field limit, black holes (Schwarzschild, charged Reissner-Nordstrom, and rotating Kerr black holes), gravitational waves (including detection methods), and an introduction to cosmology (including cosmic microwave background radiation, dark energy, and experimental probes). Prerequisite: PHYSICS 121 or equivalent including special relativity.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Graham, P. (PI)

PHYSICS 290: Research Activities at Stanford

Required of first-year Physics graduate students; suggested for junior or senior Physics majors for 1 unit. Review of research activities in the department and elsewhere at Stanford at a level suitable for entering graduate students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bucksbaum, P. (PI)

PHYSICS 291: Practical Training

Opportunity for practical training in industrial labs. Arranged by student with the research adviser's approval. A brief summary of activities is required, approved by the research adviser.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

PHYSICS 293: Literature of Physics

Study of the literature of any special topic. Preparation, presentation of reports. If taken under the supervision of a faculty member outside the department, approval of the Physics chair required. Prerequisites: 25 units of college physics, consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Burchat, P. (PI)

PHYSICS 294: Teaching of Physics Seminar

Weekly seminar/discussions on interactive techniques for teaching physics. Practicum which includes class observations, grading and student teaching in current courses. Required of all Teaching Assistants prior to first teaching assignment. Mandatory attendance at weekly in-class sessions during first 5 weeks of the quarter; mandatory successful completion of all practicum activities. Students who do not hold a US Passport must complete the International Teaching/Course Assistant Screening Exam and be cleared to TA before taking the class. Details: https://language.stanford.edu/programs/efs/languages/english-foreign-students/international-teachingcourse-assistant-screening. Enrollment in PHYS 294 is by permission. To get a permission number please complete form: http://web.stanford.edu/~nanavati/294win2020.fb If you have not heard from us by the beginning of class, please come to the first class session.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Nanavati, C. (PI)

PHYSICS 330: Quantum Field Theory I

Lorentz Invariance. S-Matrix. Quantization of scalar and Dirac fields. Feynman diagrams. Quantum electrodynamics. Elementary electrodynamic processes: Compton scattering; e+e- annihilation. Loop diagrams. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 130, PHYSICS 131, or equivalents AND a basic knowledge of Group Theory.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Senatore, L. (PI)

PHYSICS 361: Cosmology and Extragalactic Astrophysics

Intended as a complement to Ph 362 and Ph 364.nGalaxies (including their nuclei), clusters, stars and backgrounds in the contemporary universe. Geometry, kinematics, dynamics, and physics of the universe at large. Evolution of the universe following the epoch of nucleosynthesis. Epochs of recombination, reionization and first galaxy formation. Fluid and kinetic description of the growth of structure with application to microwave background fluctuations and galaxy surveys. Gravitational lensing. The course will feature interleaved discussion of theory and observation. Undergraduate exposure to general relativity and cosmology at the level of Ph 262 and Ph 161 will be helpful but is not essential.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Blandford, R. (PI)

PHYSICS 490: Research

Open only to Physics graduate students, with consent of instructor. Work is in experimental or theoretical problems in research, as distinguished from independent study of a non-research character in 190 and 293.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Abel, T. (PI); Akerib, D. (PI); Allen, S. (PI); Altman, R. (PI); Baer, T. (PI); Batzoglou, S. (PI); Beasley, M. (PI); Bejerano, G. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blandford, R. (PI); Block, S. (PI); Bloom, E. (PI); Boahen, K. (PI); Boneh, D. (PI); Boxer, S. (PI); Breidenbach, M. (PI); Brodsky, S. (PI); Bryant, Z. (PI); Bucksbaum, P. (PI); Burchat, P. (PI); Burke, D. (PI); Bustamante, C. (PI); Byer, R. (PI); Cabrera, B. (PI); Chao, A. (PI); Chatterjee, S. (PI); Chichilnisky, E. (PI); Chu, S. (PI); Church, S. (PI); Dai, H. (PI); Das, R. (PI); Devereaux, T. (PI); Digonnet, M. (PI); Dimopoulos, S. (PI); Dixon, L. (PI); Doniach, S. (PI); Drell, P. (PI); Dror, R. (PI); Druckmann, S. (PI); Dunne, M. (PI); Ermon, S. (PI); Fan, S. (PI); Fejer, M. (PI); Feldman, B. (PI); Fetter, A. (PI); Fisher, G. (PI); Fisher, I. (PI); Fox, J. (PI); Frank, M. (PI); Friedland, A. (PI); Funk, S. (PI); Gaffney, K. (PI); Ganguli, S. (PI); Glenzer, S. (PI); Glover, G. (PI); Goldhaber-Gordon, D. (PI); Gorinevsky, D. (PI); Graham, P. (PI); Gratta, G. (PI); Graves, E. (PI); Harbury, P. (PI); Harris, J. (PI); Hartnoll, S. (PI); Hastings, J. (PI); Hayden, P. (PI); Heinz, T. (PI); Hewett, J. (PI); Himel, T. (PI); Hogan, J. (PI); Hollberg, L. (PI); Holmes, S. (PI); Huang, Z. (PI); Huberman, B. (PI); Hwang, H. (PI); Inan, U. (PI); Irwin, K. (PI); Jaros, J. (PI); Jones, B. (PI); Kachru, S. (PI); Kahn, S. (PI); Kallosh, R. (PI); Kamae, T. (PI); Kapitulnik, A. (PI); Kasevich, M. (PI); Khemani, V. (PI); Kivelson, S. (PI); Kosovichev, A. (PI); Kundaje, A. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Laughlin, R. (PI); Leith, D. (PI); Lev, B. (PI); Levin, C. (PI); Levitt, M. (PI); Linde, A. (PI); Lipa, J. (PI); Luth, V. (PI); Mabuchi, H. (PI); Macintosh, B. (PI); Madejski, G. (PI); Manoharan, H. (PI); Mao, W. (PI); Markland, T. (PI); Melosh, N. (PI); Michelson, P. (PI); Moerner, W. (PI); Moler, K. (PI); Nelson, T. (PI); Nishi, Y. (PI); Osheroff, D. (PI); Ozgur Aydin, A. (PI); Palanker, D. (PI); Pande, V. (PI); Papanicolaou, G. (PI); Partridge, R. (PI); Pelc, N. (PI); Perl, M. (PI); Peskin, M. (PI); Petrosian, V. (PI); Pianetta, P. (PI); Poon, A. (PI); Prinz, F. (PI); Qi, X. (PI); Quake, S. (PI); Raghu, S. (PI); Raubenheimer, T. (PI); Reed, E. (PI); Reis, D. (PI); Romani, R. (PI); Roodman, A. (PI); Rowson, P. (PI); Rubinstein, A. (PI); Ruth, R. (PI); Safavi-Naeini, A. (PI); Scherrer, P. (PI); Schindler, R. (PI); Schleier-Smith, M. (PI); Schnitzer, M. (PI); Schuster, P. (PI); Schwartzman, A. (PI); Senatore, L. (PI); Shen, Z. (PI); Shenker, S. (PI); Shutt, T. (PI); Sidford, A. (PI); Silverstein, E. (PI); Smith, T. (PI); Spakowitz, A. (PI); Spudich, J. (PI); Stohr, J. (PI); Su, D. (PI); Susskind, L. (PI); Suzuki, Y. (PI); Tanaka, H. (PI); Tantawi, S. (PI); Thomas, S. (PI); Tompkins, L. (PI); Toro, N. (PI); Vuckovic, J. (PI); Vuletic, V. (PI); Wacker, J. (PI); Wagoner, R. (PI); Wechsler, R. (PI); Wein, L. (PI); Weis, W. (PI); Wieman, C. (PI); Wojcicki, S. (PI); Wong, H. (PI); Wootters, M. (PI); Yamamoto, Y. (PI); Yamins, D. (PI); Zhang, S. (PI)

PHYSICS 801: TGR Project

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
Instructors: ; Burke, D. (PI)

PHYSICS 802: TGR Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
Instructors: ; Abel, T. (PI); Allen, S. (PI); Baer, T. (PI); Beasley, M. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blandford, R. (PI); Block, S. (PI); Bloom, E. (PI); Breidenbach, M. (PI); Brodsky, S. (PI); Bucksbaum, P. (PI); Burchat, P. (PI); Burke, D. (PI); Bustamante, C. (PI); Cabrera, B. (PI); Chao, A. (PI); Chichilnisky, E. (PI); Chu, S. (PI); Church, S. (PI); Dai, H. (PI); Devereaux, T. (PI); Dimopoulos, S. (PI); Dixon, L. (PI); Doniach, S. (PI); Drell, P. (PI); Druckmann, S. (PI); Dunne, M. (PI); Fan, S. (PI); Fisher, I. (PI); Funk, S. (PI); Gaffney, K. (PI); Glover, G. (PI); Goldhaber-Gordon, D. (PI); Gorinevsky, D. (PI); Graham, P. (PI); Gratta, G. (PI); Graves, E. (PI); Grill-Spector, K. (PI); Harris, J. (PI); Hartnoll, S. (PI); Hastings, J. (PI); Hayden, P. (PI); Hewett, J. (PI); Hogan, J. (PI); Hollberg, L. (PI); Huang, Z. (PI); Hwang, H. (PI); Inan, U. (PI); Irwin, K. (PI); Jaros, J. (PI); Jones, B. (PI); Kachru, S. (PI); Kahn, S. (PI); Kallosh, R. (PI); Kamae, T. (PI); Kapitulnik, A. (PI); Kasevich, M. (PI); Khemani, V. (PI); Kivelson, S. (PI); Kundaje, A. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Laughlin, R. (PI); Leith, D. (PI); Lev, B. (PI); Levitt, M. (PI); Linde, A. (PI); Luth, V. (PI); Mabuchi, H. (PI); Macintosh, B. (PI); Madejski, G. (PI); Manoharan, H. (PI); Mao, W. (PI); Michelson, P. (PI); Moerner, W. (PI); Moler, K. (PI); Osheroff, D. (PI); Palanker, D. (PI); Peskin, M. (PI); Petrosian, V. (PI); Pianetta, P. (PI); Prinz, F. (PI); Qi, X. (PI); Quake, S. (PI); Raghu, S. (PI); Raubenheimer, T. (PI); Reed, E. (PI); Romani, R. (PI); Roodman, A. (PI); Ruth, R. (PI); Scherrer, P. (PI); Schindler, R. (PI); Schleier-Smith, M. (PI); Schnitzer, M. (PI); Schuster, P. (PI); Schwartzman, A. (PI); Senatore, L. (PI); Shen, Z. (PI); Shenker, S. (PI); Shutt, T. (PI); Silverstein, E. (PI); Smith, T. (PI); Spakowitz, A. (PI); Spudich, J. (PI); Stohr, J. (PI); Su, D. (PI); Susskind, L. (PI); Suzuki, Y. (PI); Tanaka, H. (PI); Tompkins, L. (PI); Vuletic, V. (PI); Wacker, J. (PI); Wechsler, R. (PI); Wieman, C. (PI); Wojcicki, S. (PI); Wong, H. (PI); Yamamoto, Y. (PI); Zhang, S. (PI)
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