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PHIL 1: Introduction to Philosophy

Is there one truth or many? Does science tell us everything there is to know? Can our minds be purely physical? Do we have free will? Is faith rational? Should we always be rational? What is the meaning of life? Are there moral truths? What are truth, reality, rationality, and knowledge? How can such questions be answered? Intensive introduction to theories and techniques in philosophy from various contemporary traditions. Students must enroll in lecture AND and one of the discussion sections listed.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lawlor, K. (PI)

PHIL 3N: Randomness: Computational and Philosophical Approaches (CS 57N)

Is it ever reasonable to make a decision randomly? For example, would you ever let an important choice depend on the flip of a coin? Can randomness help us answer difficult questions more accurately or more efficiently? What is randomness anyway? Can an object be random? Are there genuinely random processes in the world, and if so, how can we tell? In this seminar, we will explore these questions through the lenses of philosophy and computation. By the end of the quarter students should have an appreciation of the many roles that randomness plays in both humanities and sciences, as well as a grasp of some of the key analytical tools used to study the concept. The course will be self-contained, and no prior experience with randomness/probability is necessary.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 21N: Ethics of Sports (ETHICSOC 121N)

This seminar will be focused on the ethical challenges that are encountered in sport. We will focus on the moral and political issues that affect the world of sport and which athletes, coaches, sports commentators and fans are faced with. For instance, we will ask questions such as: what is a fair game (the ethics of effort, merit, success)? Is it ethical to train people to use violence (the ethics of martial arts)? Are divisions by gender categories justified and what should we think of gender testing? Is the use of animals in sport ever justified? Which forms of performance enhancements are acceptable in sport (the ethics of drug use and enhancements through technologies)? Should we ban sports that damage the players¿ health? Does society owe social support to people who hurt themselves while practicing extreme sports? nnThe class will be structured around small group discussions and exercises as well as brief lectures to introduce key moral and political concepts (such as fairness, equality, freedom, justice, exploitation, etc.). I will also bring guests speakers who are involved in a sport activity at Stanford or who have worked on sports as part of their academic careers. By the end of the seminar, students will have a good understanding of the various ethical challenges that surround the world of sport. They will be able to critically discuss sport activities, norms, modes of assessments and policies (on campus and beyond). They will also be prepared to apply the critical ethical thinking that they will have deployed onto other topics than sports. They will have been introduced to the normative approach to social issues, which consists in asking how things should be rather than describing how things are. They will be prepared to take more advanced classes in ethics, political theory, as well as moral and political philosophy.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Bidadanure, J. (PI)

PHIL 24F: Tutorial: Morality and its Critics

What is morality? Why be moral? This course will cover some seminal ideas in ethics from the last 75 years, aimed in one way or another toward these and related questions. Each week we will read a paper widely regarded as a contemporary classic and carefully work through and discuss its arguments, with an aim at locating its broader significance in shaping the landscape of contemporary ethics in (broadly) analytic philosophy. An underlying theme of the course is whether or how morality (including, but not limited to, what we owe to each other) is related to ethics (How should I live?) and practical reason (What should I do?)
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Madigan, T. (PI)

PHIL 49: Survey of Formal Methods

Survey of important formal methods used in philosophy. The course covers the basics of propositional and elementary predicate logic, probability and decision theory, game theory, and statistics, highlighting philosophical issues and applications. Specific topics include the languages of propositional and predicate logic and their interpretations, rationality arguments for the probability axioms, Nash equilibrium and dominance reasoning, and the meaning of statistical significance tests. Assessment is through a combination of problems designed to solidify competence with the mathematical tools and short-answer questions designed to test conceptual understanding.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Chipman, J. (PI)

PHIL 60: Introduction to Philosophy of Science (HPS 60, STS 200S)

This course introduces students to tools for the philosophical analysis of science. We will cover issues in observation, experiment, and reasoning, questions about the aims of science, scientific change, and the relations between science and values. STS majors cannot take STS 200S if they have previously taken PHIL 60. Priority is given to STS seniors.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Longino, H. (PI)

PHIL 99: Minds and Machines (LINGUIST 35, PSYCH 35, SYMSYS 1, SYMSYS 200)

(Formerly SYMSYS 100). An overview of the interdisciplinary study of cognition, information, communication, and language, with an emphasis on foundational issues: What are minds? What is computation? What are rationality and intelligence? Can we predict human behavior? Can computers be truly intelligent? How do people and technology interact, and how might they do so in the future? Lectures focus on how the methods of philosophy, mathematics, empirical research, and computational modeling are used to study minds and machines. Undergraduates considering a major in symbolic systems should take this course as early as possible in their program of study.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lassiter, D. (PI)

PHIL 100: Greek Philosophy (CLASSICS 40)

We shall cover the major developments in Greek philosophical thought, focusing on Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic schools (the Epicureans, the Stoics, and the Skeptics). Topics include epistemology, metaphysics, psychology, ethics and political theory. No prereqs, not repeatable.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bobonich, C. (PI)

PHIL 108B: Aristotle's Physics Book One (PHIL 208B)

A chapter by chapter analysis of Aristotle's introductory discussions of physical theory. Topics to be considered include Aristotle's treatment of Eleatic monism, the role of opposites in pre-Socratic physics, the role of matter in physics, and an analysis of the elements of changing objects into form, privation and a subject.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Code, A. (PI)

PHIL 115: PreSocratics (PHIL 215)

Exploration of the Greek philosophical inquiry undertaken in the roughly two hundred years before Socrates. This Presocratic period saw vibrant and varied treatment of a wide range of areas, including physics, metaphysics, epistemology, cosmology, theology, biology, and ethics. We will proceed chronologically through the major Presocratic philosophers and schools, carefully examining the fragmentary evidence on each and discussing the interpretation of their doctrines from this evidence. Focus will be on the Presocratics in their own right, though their influence upon later thought, especially Plato and Aristotle, will also receive considerable attention. Consideration of how the ideas of the Presocratics were transmitted and manipulated in the ancient tradition, as well as of the nature and development of Western philosophy itself.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pinto, R. (PI)

PHIL 121: History of Political Philosophy (ETHICSOC 121, PHIL 221)

Nation-states issue legal commands, and wield overwhelming power to coercively enforce them. On one hand, this allows states to protect people from each other. On the other hand, what protects people from the state, even if is democratic, when it facilitates domination and oppression of some citizens by others? In this course we are introduced to authors grappling with these issues in the evolving canon of Western political philosophy from ancient Greece to the 20th century. This takes us through questions about obligation, the state, consent, rights, democracy, property, free speech, socialism, gender, race. Authors whose arguments we will study and scrutinize include Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, Mill, Wollstonecraft, Douglass, and Rawls, along with critics and commentators.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Estlund, D. (PI)

PHIL 133S: Heidegger and Mysticism (RELIGST 181)

A close reading of Heidegger's Being and Time in light of the new paradigm for reading his work, as well as a study of his long-standing interest in mysticism and the question of the divine.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sheehan, T. (PI)

PHIL 137: Wittgenstein (PHIL 237)

(Graduate students register for 237.) An exploration of Wittgenstein's changing views about meaning, mind, knowledge, and the nature of philosophical perplexity and philosophical insight, focusing on the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus and Philosophical Investigations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hills, D. (PI)

PHIL 150: Mathematical Logic (PHIL 250)

An introduction to the concepts and techniques used in mathematical logic, focusing on propositional, modal, and predicate logic. Highlights connections with philosophy, mathematics, computer science, linguistics, and neighboring fields.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Icard, T. (PI)

PHIL 155: Topics in Mathematical Logic: Non-Classical Logic (PHIL 255)

This year's topic is Non-Classical Logic. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Briggs, R. (PI)

PHIL 171: Justice (ETHICSOC 171, POLISCI 103, POLISCI 336S, PUBLPOL 103C, PUBLPOL 307)

In this course, we explore three sets of questions relating to justice and the meaning of a just society: (1) Liberty: What is liberty, and why is it important? Which liberties must a just society protect? (2) Equality: What is equality, and why is it important? What sorts of equality should a just society ensure? (3) Reconciliation: Are liberty and equality in conflict? If so, how should we respond to the conflict between them? We approach these topics by examining competing theories of justice including utilitarianism, libertarianism/classical liberalism, and egalitarian liberalism. The class also serves as an introduction to how to do political philosophy, and students approaching these topics for the first time are welcome. Political Science majors taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 103.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 175B: Philosophy of Public Policy (ETHICSOC 175X, PHIL 275B, POLISCI 135E, POLISCI 235E, PUBLPOL 177)

From healthcare to voting reforms, social protection and educational policies, public policies are underpinned by moral values. When we debate those policies, we typically appeal to values like justice, fairness, equality, freedom, privacy, and safety. A proper understanding of those values, what they mean, how they may conflict, and how they can be weighed against each other is essential to developing a competent and critical eye on our complex political world. We will ask questions such as: Is compulsory voting justified? Should children have the right to vote? Is affirmative action just? What is wrong with racial profiling? What are the duties of citizens of affluent countries towards migrants? Do we have a right to privacy? Is giving cash to all unconditionally fair? This class will introduce students to a number of methods and frameworks coming out of ethics and political philosophy and will give students a lot of time to practice ethically informed debates on public policies. At the end of this class, students should have the skills to critically examine a wide range of diverse policy proposals from the perspective of ethics, moral and political philosophy. There are no prerequisites. Undergraduates and graduates from all departments are welcome to attend.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Bidadanure, J. (PI)

PHIL 180: Metaphysics

This is an undergraduate only class. Intensive introduction to core topics in contemporary metaphysics. What is the fundamental structure of reality? Is it objective? How can there be truths about what is possible or necessary, if only the actual exists? Do we have free will? What is it for an event to be determined by its causes? Is the only thing that exists the current instance of time? Is the world purely physical? Does science answer all of these questions? Prerequisites: 1, 80 and background in logic.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Peacocke, A. (PI)

PHIL 186: Philosophy of Mind (PHIL 286)

(Graduate students register for 286.) This is an advanced introduction to core topics in the philosophy of mind. Prerequisite: PHIL 80
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cao, R. (PI)

PHIL 194D: Capstone Seminar

Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Crimmins, M. (PI)

PHIL 198: The Dualist Undergraduate Journal

Weekly meeting of the editorial board of The Dualist, a national journal of undergraduate work in philosophy. Open to all undergraduates. May be repeated.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kim, H. (PI)

PHIL 208B: Aristotle's Physics Book One (PHIL 108B)

A chapter by chapter analysis of Aristotle's introductory discussions of physical theory. Topics to be considered include Aristotle's treatment of Eleatic monism, the role of opposites in pre-Socratic physics, the role of matter in physics, and an analysis of the elements of changing objects into form, privation and a subject.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Code, A. (PI)

PHIL 215: PreSocratics (PHIL 115)

Exploration of the Greek philosophical inquiry undertaken in the roughly two hundred years before Socrates. This Presocratic period saw vibrant and varied treatment of a wide range of areas, including physics, metaphysics, epistemology, cosmology, theology, biology, and ethics. We will proceed chronologically through the major Presocratic philosophers and schools, carefully examining the fragmentary evidence on each and discussing the interpretation of their doctrines from this evidence. Focus will be on the Presocratics in their own right, though their influence upon later thought, especially Plato and Aristotle, will also receive considerable attention. Consideration of how the ideas of the Presocratics were transmitted and manipulated in the ancient tradition, as well as of the nature and development of Western philosophy itself.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pinto, R. (PI)

PHIL 221: History of Political Philosophy (ETHICSOC 121, PHIL 121)

Nation-states issue legal commands, and wield overwhelming power to coercively enforce them. On one hand, this allows states to protect people from each other. On the other hand, what protects people from the state, even if is democratic, when it facilitates domination and oppression of some citizens by others? In this course we are introduced to authors grappling with these issues in the evolving canon of Western political philosophy from ancient Greece to the 20th century. This takes us through questions about obligation, the state, consent, rights, democracy, property, free speech, socialism, gender, race. Authors whose arguments we will study and scrutinize include Plato, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, Mill, Wollstonecraft, Douglass, and Rawls, along with critics and commentators.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Estlund, D. (PI)

PHIL 229: Plotinus and Augustine (PHIL 329, RELIGST 269, RELIGST 369)

Professor's permission required to register. A reading course focused on the influence of Plotinus Enneads on Augustine's Confessions, early dialogues, and sections on reason and memory in the De trinitate. Proficiency in Greek and Latin will be helpful but is not required. Professor's prior permission required, interested students should contact the professor about course schedule: tsheehan@stanford.edu . Undergraduates register for 200-level for 5 units. Graduate students register for 300-level for 3-5 units.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sheehan, T. (PI)

PHIL 231: Introduction to Philosophy of Education (EDUC 204, ETHICSOC 204)

How to think philosophically about educational problems. Recent influential scholarship in philosophy of education. No previous study in philosophy required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Callan, E. (PI)

PHIL 237: Wittgenstein (PHIL 137)

(Graduate students register for 237.) An exploration of Wittgenstein's changing views about meaning, mind, knowledge, and the nature of philosophical perplexity and philosophical insight, focusing on the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus and Philosophical Investigations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hills, D. (PI)

PHIL 239: Teaching Methods in Philosophy

For Ph.D. students in their first or second year who are or are about to be teaching assistants for the department. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Slabon, T. (PI)

PHIL 250: Mathematical Logic (PHIL 150)

An introduction to the concepts and techniques used in mathematical logic, focusing on propositional, modal, and predicate logic. Highlights connections with philosophy, mathematics, computer science, linguistics, and neighboring fields.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Icard, T. (PI)

PHIL 255: Topics in Mathematical Logic: Non-Classical Logic (PHIL 155)

This year's topic is Non-Classical Logic. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Briggs, R. (PI)

PHIL 275B: Philosophy of Public Policy (ETHICSOC 175X, PHIL 175B, POLISCI 135E, POLISCI 235E, PUBLPOL 177)

From healthcare to voting reforms, social protection and educational policies, public policies are underpinned by moral values. When we debate those policies, we typically appeal to values like justice, fairness, equality, freedom, privacy, and safety. A proper understanding of those values, what they mean, how they may conflict, and how they can be weighed against each other is essential to developing a competent and critical eye on our complex political world. We will ask questions such as: Is compulsory voting justified? Should children have the right to vote? Is affirmative action just? What is wrong with racial profiling? What are the duties of citizens of affluent countries towards migrants? Do we have a right to privacy? Is giving cash to all unconditionally fair? This class will introduce students to a number of methods and frameworks coming out of ethics and political philosophy and will give students a lot of time to practice ethically informed debates on public policies. At the end of this class, students should have the skills to critically examine a wide range of diverse policy proposals from the perspective of ethics, moral and political philosophy. There are no prerequisites. Undergraduates and graduates from all departments are welcome to attend.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Bidadanure, J. (PI)

PHIL 286: Philosophy of Mind (PHIL 186)

(Graduate students register for 286.) This is an advanced introduction to core topics in the philosophy of mind. Prerequisite: PHIL 80
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cao, R. (PI)

PHIL 300: Proseminar

Topically focused seminar. Required of all first year Philosophy PhD students. This seminar is limited to first-year Ph.D. students in Philosophy. We will focus on some major work over roughly the past 60 years on inter-related issues about practical reason, responsibility, agency, and sociality.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Crimmins, M. (PI)

PHIL 301: Dissertation Development Proseminar

A required seminar for third year philosophy PhD students, designed to extend and consolidate work done in the dissertation development seminar the previous summer.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; De Pierris, G. (PI)

PHIL 317: Topics in Plato: Plato on Practical Rationality

Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bobonich, C. (PI)

PHIL 329: Plotinus and Augustine (PHIL 229, RELIGST 269, RELIGST 369)

Professor's permission required to register. A reading course focused on the influence of Plotinus Enneads on Augustine's Confessions, early dialogues, and sections on reason and memory in the De trinitate. Proficiency in Greek and Latin will be helpful but is not required. Professor's prior permission required, interested students should contact the professor about course schedule: tsheehan@stanford.edu . Undergraduates register for 200-level for 5 units. Graduate students register for 300-level for 3-5 units.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sheehan, T. (PI)

PHIL 333: Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts Core Seminar (DLCL 333, ENGLISH 333, MUSIC 332)

This course serves as the Core Seminar for the PhD Minor in Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts. It introduces students to a wide range of topics at the intersection of philosophy with literary and arts criticism. The seminar is intended for graduate students. It is suitable for theoretically ambitious students of literature and the arts, philosophers with interests in value theory, aesthetics, and topics in language and mind, and other students with strong interest in the psychological importance of engagement with the arts. May be repeated for credit. In this year¿s installment, we focus on how artistic kinds or genres help set the terms on which individual works are experienced, understood, and valued, with special attention to lyric poetry and music.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 368: Philosophy of Biology: Learning and Evolution

Graduate seminar. 2 unit option for Philosophy PhDs beyond the second year only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cao, R. (PI)

PHIL 371E: New Themes in Democratic Theory

After a tradition of skepticism about democracy, and then a period mostly in the 20th century of virtually unquestioned approval of it, normative democratic theory recently is showing (collectively) more ambivalence. After an introduction to the period in which ¿deliberative democracy¿ was the most influential paradigm, we will look closely at developments beginning with the ¿epistemic¿ variant of that approach (Estlund, Landemore), an ensuing reaction on epistemic grounds against democracy (Brennan, Mulligan), and then two new approaches that are influential: the case for (and against) choosing ¿representatives¿ by lottery rather than voting (Guerrero, Saunders), and the idea that the model for democratic equality is nothing like majoritarianism or agents who act on behalf of constituents but the idea of a social and institutional world in which no class or category of citizens is generally above the others, increasingly called ¿relational equality¿ (Pettit, Anderson, Scheffler, Kolodny).
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Estlund, D. (PI)

PHIL 371W: Speaking for Others (CSRE 271)

Graduate seminar. In this course, we will work together to develop a detailed and comprehensive understanding of the concept(s) of political representation. We will do so by examining a number of historical and contemporary theories of political representation developed within philosophy and cognate fields. 2 unit option only for Phil PhDs beyond the second year.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Salkin, W. (PI)

PHIL 376A: Shared Agency and Organized Institutions

What is the relation between small scale shared intentional agency - as when we sing a duet together - and broader social norms and larger organized institutions, such as a business organization or a legal system? Can such organized institutions themselves be (perhaps, accountable) intentional agents? Limited to graduate students in Philosophy and to others by permission of the instructor. 2 unit option available only to PhD students beyond the second year.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bratman, M. (PI)

PHIL 383: Advanced Topics in Epistemology

May be repeated for credit. 2 unit option is only for Phil PhD students beyond the second year.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lawlor, K. (PI)

PHIL 384W: The Liar Paradox

This is a graduate seminar on the liar and related paradoxes. We will go over recent approaches, starting with Kripke's 1975 approach. Work on the liar by Field, McGee, Priest, and others will be discussed. We will cover both technical and philosophical issues related to the liar. This class is open to graduate students in philosophy, all others need explicit permission. 2 unit option is for 3rd year Philosophy PhDs only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Warren, J. (PI)

PHIL 391: Seminar on Logic & Formal Philosophy (MATH 391)

Research seminar for graduate students working in logic and formal philosophy. Presentations on contemporary topics by seminar participants and outside visitors. Maybe be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Icard, T. (PI)

PHIL 500: Advanced Dissertation Seminar

Presentation of dissertation work in progress by seminar participants. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Malmgren, A. (PI)
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