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OSPFLOR 2A: Accelerated First-Year Italian, Part 2

Continuation of ITALLANG 1A. Accelerated sequence that completes first-year Italian in two rather than three quarters. For students with previous knowledge of Italian or with a strong background in another Romance language. Prerequisite: Placement Test, ITALLANG 1A or consent of instructor. Fulfills the University language requirement.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPFLOR 2F: First-Year Italian, Second Quarter

Continuation of ITALLANG 1. All-in-Italian communicative and interactive approach. Emphasis is on the development of appropriate discourse in contemporary cultural contexts. Interpretation of authentic materials, written and oral presentations, and plenty of conversational practice. Language lab, multimedia, and online activities. Prerequisite: Placement Test, ITALLANG 2
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPFLOR 3F: First-Year Italian, Third Quarter

Continuation of ITALLANG 2. All-in-Italian communicative and interactive approach. Emphasis is on the development of appropriate discourse in contemporary cultural contexts. Interpretation of authentic materials, written and oral presentations, and plenty of conversational practice. Language lab, multimedia, and online activities. Prerequisite: Placement Test, ITALLANG 2 or consent of instructor. Fulfills the University language requirement.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPFLOR 11: Film, Food and the Italian Identity

Food in Italian cinema staged as an allegory of Italy¿s social, political and cultural milieu. Intersections between food, history and culture as they are reflected in and shaped by Italian cinema from the early 1900s until today. Topics include: farmer's tradition during Fascism; lack of food during WWII and its aftermath; the Economic Miracle; food and the Americanization of Italy; La Dolce Vita; the Italian family; ethnicity, globalization and the re-discovery of regional culinary identity in contemporary Italy. Impact of cinema in both reflecting and defining the relationship between food and culture.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Campani, E. (PI)

OSPFLOR 17: The Evolution of Modern Italian Design

Cultural context that gave rise to the globally recognized phenomenon of "Italian Design" in the 20th century. Historical complexity of Italian design through an analysis of selected case studies. Several on-site visits to important areas of design innovation and production offer students hands-on opportunities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Campani, E. (GP)

OSPFLOR 19: Florence for Foodies: Discovering the Italian Culinary Tradition

Factors that shape modern Italian cuisine such as historical heritage, foreigh influences, and the "Mediterranean diet." Explore the Italian culinary tradition as well as its more modern face, open to innovation and to technology. Four cooking classes, tastings, on-site visits, and meetings with guest speakers who are experts in their fields.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Campani, E. (GP)

OSPFLOR 1A: Accelerated First-Year Italian, Part 1

Accelerated sequence that completes first-year Italian in two rather than three quarters. For students with previous knowledge of Italian or with a strong background in another Romance language. Prerequisite: advanced-level proficiency in another Romance language Prerequisite: Placement .
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPFLOR 1F: First-Year Italian, First Quarter

All-in-Italian communicative and interactive approach. Emphasis is on the development of appropriate discourse in contemporary cultural contexts. Interpretation of authentic materials, written and oral presentations, and plenty of conversational practice. Language lab, multimedia, and online activities.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPFLOR 20: Design Driven Innovation: Italian Excellence

Focus on fashion, furniture and food, the three F¿s of Italian style. Historical knowledge combined with contemporary analysis; tools to understand the role of Italian design and its contribution to the innovation process. Masters and masterpieces of each discipline starting from the point of view of design itself with case studies specifically dedicated to each of the three F¿s. On-site classes complement lectures.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Campani, E. (GP)

OSPFLOR 21F: Accelerated Second-Year Italian, Part A

Review of grammatical structures; grammar in its communicative context. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills practiced and developed through authentic material such as songs, newspaper articles, video clips, and literature. Insight into the Italian culture and crosscultural understanding. Prerequisite: one year of college Italian if completed within two quarters of arriving in Florence, or ITALLANG 21
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPFLOR 22: The Italian Way to Car Design

The history of car design, analysis of the most famous Italian car companies: Alfa Romeo, Lamborghini, Maserati. Car body designers such as Pininfarina, Touring, Castagna and Zagato as well as indivdiual designers. On site visits to relevant historical collections and museums.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPFLOR 22F: Accelerated Second-Year Italian Part B

Grammatical structures, listening, reading, writing, speaking skills, and insight into the Italian culture through authentic materials. Intermediate to advanced grammar. Content-based course, using songs, video, and literature, to provide cultural background for academic courses. Prerequisite: ITALLANG 21 within two quarters of arriving in Florence or ITALLANG 21A or OSPFLOR 21F
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPFLOR 25: Italian Food: A Cultural History

Why is Italian cooking so popular? And why does it play such a key role in the national identity?nObserving a meal, we can explain everything, or almost, about people. Eating is a universal experience. However, not only we do not eat the same things but also the ways, places and times we eat change according to traditions and habits. The culture of food is deeply embedded in history.nThis course will use documentary sources as well as art, literature, cultural studies, statistical data, and movies to describe how meals can paint a fresco of the history of Italians and their food.nEconomy, culture, class, gender, race, geography, international relations: all have a part in depicting the outline of this history of Italian food in the last 150 years. And all raise questions: how can food mark social differences, set cultural boundaries, raise ethical and religious controversies, involve agribusiness and politics, question our own identities? A tasty travel to the very roots of our human sociality.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPFLOR 29: Topics in Medicine and Ethics

Independent study with weekly meetings. Topics: a) Comparative analysis of legislation of human fertilization and embryology in the U.S. and UK; b) History and structure of the health care systems in Italy, Canada, and the U.S.; c) Herbicides, Fungicides, Pesticides in soil and water: a comparative analysis of the State of California and the Toscana. d). Lives of admirable precepts but dubious practice such as Seneca, the Stoics, and Rousseau; e) Promise and pitfalls of genetically modified plant and animal food. Primarily in English, but some topics might require Italian.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Casper, R. (PI)

OSPFLOR 30: Independent Studies on the European Financial Crisis

Research the distinctive aspects of the European Financial crisis on an EU member country of choice. Particularly interesting cases include Greece, Spain, Ireland, Italy, France, Germany. Research the effects on and contributions to the European financial crisis made by accession countries.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pistaferri, L. (PI)

OSPFLOR 31F: Advanced Oral Communication: Italian

Refine language skills and develop insight into Italian culture using authentic materials. Group work and individual meetings with instructor. Minimum enrollment required. Prerequisite: ITALLANG 22A, 23 or placement.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPFLOR 34: The Virgin Mother, Goddess of Beauty, Grand Duchess, and the Lady: Women in Florentine Art

Influence and position of women in the history of Florence as revealed in its art. Sculptural, pictorial, and architectural sources from a social, historical, and art historical point of view. Themes: the virgin mother (middle ages); the goddess of beauty (Botticelli to mannerism); the grand duchess (late Renaissance, Baroque); the lady, the woman (19th-20th centuries).
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPFLOR 41: The Florentine Sketchbook: A Visual Arts Practicum

The ever-changing and multifaceted scene of contemporary art through visual and sensorial stimulation. How art is thought of and produced in Italy today. Hands-on experience. Sketching and exercises on-site at museums and exhibits, plus workshops on techniques. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

OSPFLOR 42: Academic Internship

Mentored internships in banking, education, the fine arts, health, media, not-for-profit organizations, publishing, and retail. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Campani, E. (PI)

OSPFLOR 44: Galileo: Genius, Innovation and the Scientific Revolution

Galileo's life and scientific progress starting from his student years at the University of Pisa. Departure from traditional natural philosophy leading to radical reformation of cosmology and physics, emphasizing the science of motion. His innovative use of observation and measurement instruments, emphasizing the telescope. Cultural and social context.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPFLOR 46: Images of Evil in Criminal Law: Icons and the Visual Representation on Wrongdoing

Iconographic component of criminal law; reasons and functions of the visual representation of criminal wrongdoing. Historical roots of "evil typecasting;" consideration of its variations with respect to common law and civil law systems. Fundamental features of the two legal systems. Sources, actors, enforcement mechanisms of the criminal law compared; study of cases in the area of murder, sex offences, organized crime and terrorism. Different techniques of image typecasting highlighted and discussed. International criminal law, which takes the burden to describe, typecast and punish forms of "enormous, disproportionate evil," such as genocide and other mass atrocities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPFLOR 47: Independent Study in Geological and Environmental Sciences

Potential independent study topics include: Are we living through a mass extinction? What controls the distribution of seismic and volcanic hazard and risk in Italy? Why does Mount Etna contribute 10% of the global volcanic carbon dioxide flux to the atmosphere? How does Italian geology and climate influence the production of Italian wines? Was the collapse of the Roman Empire influenced by long-term soil degradation? Weekly meeting to review progress.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Payne, J. (PI)

OSPFLOR 48: Sharing Beauty in Florence: Collectors, Collections and the Shaping of the Western Museum Tradition

The city's art and theories of how art should be presented. The history and typology of world-class collections. Social, economic, political, and aesthetic issues in museum planning and management. Collections include the Medici, English and American collectors of the Victorian era, and modern corporate and public patrons.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPFLOR 49: On-Screen Battles: Filmic Portrayals of Fascism and World War II

Structural and ideological attributes of narrative cinema, and theories of visual and cinematic representation. How film directors have translated history into stories, and war journals into visual images. Topics: the role of fascism in the development of Italian cinema and its phenomenology in film texts; cinema as a way of producing and reproducing constructions of history; film narratives as fictive metaphors of Italian cultural identity; film image, ideology, and politics of style.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Campani, E. (PI)

OSPFLOR 50M: Introductory Science of Materials

Topics include: the relationship between atomic structure and macroscopic properties of man-made and natural materials; mechanical and thermodynamic behavior of surgical implants including alloys, ceramics, and polymers; and materials selection for biotechnology applications such as contact lenses, artificial joints, and cardiovascular stents. No prerequisite.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Heilshorn, S. (GP)

OSPFLOR 52: Mass Extinctions and the Geology of Italy

Understanding of Earth processes and Earth history as a basis for informed citizen decisions regarding public policies and private actions. How the Earth works; perspective on modern global change through detailed examination of comparable events in Earth's past. Insights focused through the geology of Italy, which provides exceptional exposures of rocks recording ancient mass extinction events as well as opportunities to examine current volcanic and tectonic activities and their impact on nearby human populations. Designed to be open to all undergraduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Payne, J. (PI)

OSPFLOR 54: High Renaissance and Mannerism: the Great Italian Masters of the 15th and 16th Centuries

The development of 15th- and early 16th-century art in Florence and Rome. Epochal changes in the art of Michelangelo and Raphael in the service of Pope Julius II. The impact of Roman High Renaissance art on masters such as Fra' Bartolomeo and Andrea del Sarto. The tragic circumstances surrounding the early maniera: Pontormo and Rosso Fiorentino and the transformation of early Mannerism into the elegant style of the Medicean court. Contemporary developments in Venice.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPFLOR 55: Academy of Fine Arts: Studio Art

Courses through the Academia delle Belle Arti. Details upon arrival. Minimum Autumn and Winter Quarter enrollment required; 1-3 units in Autumn. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Campani, E. (GP)

OSPFLOR 56: University of Florence Courses

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Campani, E. (PI)

OSPFLOR 58: Space as History: Social Vision and Urban Change

A thousand years of intentional change in Florence. Phases include programmatic enlargement of ecclesiastical structures begun in the 11th century; aggressive expansion of religious and civic space in the 13th and 14th centuries; aggrandizement of private and public buildings in the 15th century; transformation of Florence into a princely capital from the 16th through the 18th centuries; traumatic remaking of the city¿s historic core in the 19th century; and development of new residential areas on the outskirts and in neighboring towns in the 20th and 21st centuries.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPFLOR 67: The Celluloid Gaze: Gender, Identity and Sexuality in Cinema

Film in the social construction of gender through the representation of the feminine, the female, and women. Female subjects, gaze, and identity through a historical, technical, and narrative frame. Emphasis is on gender, identity, and sexuality with references to feminist film theory from the early 70s to current methodologies based on semiotics, psychoanalysis, and cultural studies. Advantages and limitations of methods for textual analysis and the theories which inform them. Primarily in Italian.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Campani, E. (PI)

OSPFLOR 69: Abstract Art: Creativity, Self-Expression and Depicting the Unimaginable

Overview of the birth and evolution of abstract art with visual background necessary to produce works of art free of a realistic representation. Movements and trends in abstract art; experimentation with different media and techniques.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

OSPFLOR 71: A Studio with a View: Drawing, Painting and Informing your Aesthetic in Florence

Recent trends in art, current Italian artistic production, differences and the dialogue among visual arts. Events, schools, and movements of the 20th century. Theoretical background and practical training in various media. Work at the Stanford Center and on site at museums, exhibits, and out in the city armed with a sketchbook and camera. Emphasis is on drawing as the key to the visual arts. Workshops to master the techniques introduced. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

OSPFLOR 75: Florence in the Renaissance: Family, Youth and Marriage in the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries

Using a series of texts written by 14th and 15th century Florentines, look at the urban values of the city's citizens. Topics include: thinking about urban space; social relations; the values attached to politics, money, family, religion. How meanings of words such as "state", "government", and "family" might have changed over time.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPFLOR 78: The Impossible Experiment: Politics and Policies of the New European Union

Institutional design of EU, forthcoming changes, and comparison of the old and new designs. Interactions between the EU, member states, organized interests, and public opinion. Major policies of the EU that affect economics such as competition or cohesion policies, market deregulation, and single currency. Consequences of the expansion eastwards. The role of institutions as a set of constraints and opportunities for the economic actors; relationships between political developments and economic change in the context of regional integration; lessons for other parts of the world.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPFLOR 84: Life in the Balance: Knowing how nutrient intake can match energy expenditure

Review of the anatomy and cellular structure of taste, food absorption and digestion, using the anatomical wax models of the "La Specola" Museum of Zoology and Natural History of the University of Florence. Conditions of anorexia nervosa and obesity as illustrations of imbalances in energy intake and output. Genetic contributions to regulating the physiologic and endocrine adaptations to food restriction or overconsumption. Religious fasting practices in Judaism, Christianity and Islam as examples of fine-tuning the energy equilibrium based on cultural traditions. Nutrient imbalances and links to increased rates of metabolic syndrome and cardiac disease. New research findings related to nutrigenetics and the composition of foods beneficial to health and suitable for modulating the balance between food intake and energy expenditure.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Casper, R. (PI)

OSPFLOR 85: Bioethics: the Biotechnological Revolution, Human Rights and Politics in the Global Era

Birth and development of the philosophical field of bioethics based on advances in several fundamental fields of science and technology, including molecular and cell biology, information technology, neurosciences and converging technologies. Challenges for society and ethical and political issues created by new advances and opportunities for individuals and populations. Philosophical approaches developed in the Italian as well as in the European debate; special attention to controversy about the freedom of scientific research, new conditions of procreation, birth, cures, and death. Complexity of the challenges posed by the `biotechnological revolution¿.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPFLOR 86: Stem Cells in Human Development and Regenerative Medicine

Principles and practice of regenerative medicine. Molecular and developmental biology relevant to the understanding of differentiation and development at the molecular, cellular and organismal levels. Production of lines of multipotent and pluripotent stem cells, the conditions necessary to induce their differentiation into specific lineages and cell types, and their clinical applications. State of the art on the development of regenerative therapies for cartilage injury. Aspects of inherited or acquired diseases that could be potentially treated by stem cell therapies. Quality control and quality assurance necessary for the adequate delivery of stem cell based therapies within current legislative frameworks.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPFLOR 98: Origins and Consequences of the European Financial Crisis

Three aspects of the European financial crisis: 1. What are the roots of the European crisis, in particular of its distinctive aspects? What does economics tell us about currency unions, and were economic prescriptions followed? 2. How did the crisis unfold and was it really unstoppable? Economic and policy events that led to, and sometimes exacerbated, the European crisis. 3. What are the consequences of the crisis for Europe itself and for its main trading partners, including the US? Tools that may help forecast the future path(s) of the crisis. Analysis at both macro and micro level.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Pistaferri, L. (PI)

OSPFLOR 111Y: From Giotto to Michelangelo: The Birth and Flowering of Renaissance Art in Florence

Lectures, site visits, and readings reconstruct the circumstances that favored the flowering of architecture, sculpture, and painting in Florence and Italy, late 13th to early 16th century. Emphasis is on the classical roots; the particular relationship with nature; the commitment to human expressiveness; and rootedness in the real-world experience, translated in sculpture and painting as powerful plasticity, perspective space, and interest in movement and emotion.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPFLOR 115Y: Building the Cathedral and the Town Hall: Constructing and Deconstructing Symbols of a Civilization

The history, history of art, and symbolism of the two principal monuments of Florence: the cathedral and the town hall. Common meaning and ideological differences between the religious and civic symbols of Florence's history from the time of Giotto and the first Guelf republic to Bronzino and Giovanni da Bologna and the Grand Duchy.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPFLOR 199A: Directed Reading A

Course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

OSPFLOR 199B: Directed Reading B

Course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

OSPFLOR 199C: Directed Reading C

Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Campani, E. (PI)
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