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OB 205: Managing Groups and Teams

This virtual course introduces you to the science of teams. Particularly, the learning in the course focuses on structures and processes that affect team performance and highlights some of the common pitfalls associated with working in teams. Topics include team composition, team process and member coordination, team decision making, intra-team conflict and creativity, and influence and team leadership. You will participate in a number of exercises to illustrate principles of teamwork and to give you practice not only diagnosing team problems but also taking action to improve total team performance.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

OB 209: Leadership Laboratory

In the Leadership Labs class we ask you to consider the question, "Why would someone follow YOU?" This is a course in which you consider what kind of leader you want to be, what kind of leader you are, and how to align your leadership behavior with your leadership goals. In this class you will have an opportunity to share in the leadership of your squad and, in doing so, to discover your strengths and challenges as a leader. You will receive feedback about your approach to leadership and have the opportunity to try out new skills and tools. Students will be placed into 5-6 person "squads" with the majority of class time spent in these squads. Your squad will complete a project and work on basic leadership challenges (e.g. individual and group dynamics and differences, assessing a team's progress). Working on the project and on weekly Labs assignments will provide you the opportunity to solicit a great deal of feedback so you can achieve a deeper understanding of the impact of your behavior on others. The squads will deliver a project, engage in role-play cases and group exercises designed to help you think more deeply about the dynamics in your workgroup and to allow you to practice and experiment with new ways of leading. In each Lab session, one or two squad members will be the Meeting Lead for the session. MBA1 squad members will rotate through the Meeting Lead position. Your squad will have a dedicated MBA2 Leadership Fellow who will also be present for these meetings in order to provide coaching to the meeting lead and to the squad as whole. A number of activities in the weekly Lab will focus on assessing and reflecting on how you and your squad are working together in the Labs. Finally, the quarter culminates with the Executive Challenge, an opportunity for you to further refine your leadership skills by engaging with alumni judges in role plays that test your ability to lead effectively. The alumni will provide you feedback and evaluate your performance.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

OB 330: Leadership Fellows I

The Arbuckle Leadership Fellows Program plays an integral role in the GSB leadership curriculum by bringing together a group of talented second years to support the leadership development of the first-year class. OB330, an 8 unit two-quarter MBA2 elective course (in combination with OB331), is the academic component of this program and runs the entirety of both Autumn and Winter Quarters. Both quarters must be completed to receive any units of credit. The course is open only to those students who have applied and been accepted into the Leadership Fellows Program. Interested students apply at the start of Winter Quarter of their first year and undergo a competitive application process, after which successful applicants are invited to take part in the program. Informational meetings are held late in Autumn Quarter and during the first week of Winter Quarter and Fellows are selected from the first year class in mid- Winter Quarter. Knowing how to develop others is a crucial leadership competency. In this class, Fellows develop the advanced leadership skills of leading leaders and developing others through coaching and mentoring. Among the competencies developed in this class are: 1) Team Coaching Skills (e.g. facilitating a group, diagnosing group dynamics, debriefing, coaching without undermining the leader), 2) Individual Coaching Skills (e.g. effective inquiry, asking powerful questions, balancing support and challenge, providing effective feedback, holding others accountable, utilizing, valuing and connecting across differences and power differentials, using oneself in service of another's development) and 3) Personal Development Skills (e.g. self-reflection and self-awareness, leveraging strengths, stretching outside one's comfort zone.) In the Autumn Quarter Fellows are assigned to a squad of six MBA1s in Leadership Labs. Fellows guide their MBA1 squad through the learning process in the Labs and provide both individual and team coaching to their MBA1 squad members. In addition to the work with their MBA 1 squad, Fellows provide in-depth 1:1 coaching to three additional MBA1 students who are not members of their squad. This 1:1 coaching begins after Autumn midterms and continues through the end of Winter Quarter. Fellows classes meet twice a week for 105 minutes. There will be a reading list of conceptual material which will be supplemented during class with lectures discussions and activities. Students will apply concepts through role-playing and experiential exercises during class time as well as in their coaching and mentoring of their MBA1 coachees. Additionally, Fellows will attend weekly Leadership Labs with the first year squad to which they have been assigned and meet 1:1 with MBA1 coachees. Fellows meet regularly with five of their peers in "clinics," standing groups led by Leadership Labs Instructors who are also GSB Leadership Coaches. Fellows meet with their Leadership Coach and clinic approximately every other week during regular class time to discuss specific strategies for working with their first year students. Fellows also periodically meet with their Leadership Coach one-on-one to hone their skills and explore their areas for specific improvement. Note: OB374, Interpersonal Dynamics, is a PRE-REQUISITE for this course; students who want to be Fellows are advised to assess whether that is a class they want to take in the spring quarter of their first year. Additionally, signing up for 1:1 coaching by a Fellow as an admit strengthens a MBA1 student's application to the Arbuckle Leadership Fellows program.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

OB 363: Leadership Perspectives

What does it mean to be a principled leader? What role do values play in an organization, and how do successful leaders apply their values in their daily business lives? This course examines the concept of principled leadership and the various ways that leaders try to institutionalize particular values within the organizations they lead. Equally important, it explores the difficult challenges that leaders sometimes face when trying to apply their principles in a tough, fast-paced business environment, where others may not share the same expectations. Through assigned readings, interactive lectures with visiting executives, and weekly small group discussions, students will learn how practicing leaders implement their principles, while reflecting the realities of different cultural expectations and meeting business demands. The course will provide a forum for students to learn directly from practicing leaders and to think introspectively about their own personal values, leadership styles, and long-term aspirations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

OB 374: Interpersonal Dynamics

PRE-QUALIFICATION REQUIRED (see link at bottom of course description). NOTE FOR AY 2020-21: Given current expectations about the need for social distancing, our current plans for Autumn quarter (and potentially Winter and Spring quarters as well) include the following modifications to the course: Lectures will take place virtually on Zoom. T-group meetings during daytime class time will also be virtual. Evening T-group meetings will be in person (with social distancing and masks). Groups will be 7-8 students instead of the usual 12 in order to allow for productive discussions in the context of social distancing. Students who cannot attend evening t-group in person may participate virtually. Beyond these modifications the course remains focused on increasing one's competencies in building more effective relationships. Learning is primarily through interactions with other group members and reflection on those interactions. This course is very involving, and, at times, can be quite emotional. However, this course is not a substitute for therapy. If you are in therapy, please talk this over with your therapist and get their advice before enrolling in this course. Students are divided into t-groups of 7 or 8 students. T-groups meet during part of class-time as well as in the evening. The class has a weekend retreat toward the end of the quarter which will take place on campus. It is very important to note that when you decide to take this course, you make an explicit contract to be actively involved. ATTENDANCE: Because of the highly interactive nature of this course, it is very important that all students attend all sessions. Missing class, class T-group, evening T-group, or any portion of the weekend for an unexcused absence will negatively influence your grade and may result in your grade being dropped one grade level (for each absence). Attendance at the first class is required for all sections and failure to attend the first class will result in an automatic drop. WAITLIST: Waitlisted students must attend the first class to maintain their place on the waitlist and should check with individual instructors on whether attendance at another section can meet this requirement. It is the student's responsibility to notify respective OB 374 faculty of your attendance and wish to fulfill your waitlist requirement. SECTION SPECIFIC INFORMATION: See section schedules for details on class days, T-group evening, and weekend retreat dates; it is your responsibility to make sure you can fulfill all attendance requirements before enrolling. PRE-QUALIFICATION: Students must pre-qualify before taking the class through an assignment on Canvas (due approximately five weeks prior to the quarter). Go to https://canvas.stanford.edu/enroll/H8WJ8X, then select "Enroll in Course".
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5

OB 381: Conflict Management and Negotiation

Conflict is unavoidable in every organization. The key question is how it will be handled: will it escalate to dysfunctional levels or will it be effectively managed? Hence, a first aim of the course is to develop your ability to analyze conflicts, to look beneath the surface rhetoric of a conflict, to isolate the important underlying interests, and to determine what sort of agreement (if any) is feasible. We'll analyze which negotiation strategies are effective in different conflicts. We'll also examine psychological and structural factors that create conflict and often pose a barrier to its resolution. But understanding how to analyze a conflict is not enough. To manage conflict effectively, you need a broad repertoire of behavioral skills. Developing these is the second aim of the course. To achieve this, negotiation exercises are used in every session. When playing a role in a simulated conflict, you will be free to try out tactics that might feel uncomfortable in a real one. You will get feedback from your classmates about how you come across. In sum, you can use this course to expand your repertoire of skills, to hone your skills, and to become more adept in choosing when to apply each skill.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

OB 513: Beyond Disruption: Entrepreneurial Leadership Within Existing Organizations

Why do large, successful companies often have such difficulty in disrupting themselves (e.g., Kodak, Blockbuster, Borders)? How do you maintain an entrepreneurial edge within an existing enterprise? How do you sustain core businesses while simultaneously adapting to disruptive threats? In this course, students will build the skills to spot threats and opportunities earlier and capture them faster. The course will take a look at some of the most successful "creators within corporations" and discern why some strategies succeed when others do not. We will explore the framework that some companies have developed to simultaneously compete in their core business while exploring new ones. To do this we will interact with guests from firms like Walmart, Amazon, General Motors, Flex and IBM as well as venture capitalists and entrepreneurs. Our objective is to help students understand in some detail what it takes to help organizations stay ahead of disruptive threats and to avoid problems that often lead companies into decline.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

OB 581: Negotiations

This course is designed to improve students' skills in all phases of a negotiation: understanding prescriptive and descriptive negotiation theory as it applies to dyadic and multiparty negotiations, to buyer-seller transactions and the resolution of disputes, to the development of negotiation strategy and to the management of integrative and distributive aspects of the negotiation process. The course is based on a series of simulated negotiations in a variety of contexts including one-on-one, multi-party, and team negotiations. When playing a role in a simulated conflict, you will be free to try out tactics that might feel uncomfortable in a real one. You will get feedback from your classmates about how you come across. You will have an opportunity to reflect on your experience in your negotiation paper. In sum, you can use this course to expand your repertoire of conflict management and negotiation skills, to hone your skills, and to become more adept in choosing when to apply each skill. This course represents a shorter, more intense version of OB 381-Conflict Management and Negotiations. Students should not take both courses, as there is considerable overlap in course content. Attendance and participation in the negotiation exercises is mandatory.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2

OB 602: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Academe: Confronting Bias

This seminar will explore the ways in which conscious and unconscious bias impacts the careers of underrepresented minority, LGBTQ, and women academics. We will study topics such as unconscious bias, stereotype threat, ambient belonging, microaggressions, and everyday racism with a lens toward understanding how these impact academics. We will also consider ways to confront bias so that we can design a more equitable and diverse academe for the future.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

OB 630: Social Norms

This course covers research and theory on the origins and function of social norms. Topics include the estimation of public opinion, the function of norms as ideals and standards of judgment, and the impact of norms on collective and individual behavior. In addition to acquainting students with the various forms and functions of social norms the course will provide students with experience in identifying and formulating tractable research questions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

OB 660: Topics in Organizational Behavior: Individual Processes

This course will focus on psychological processes that occur within individuals that cannot be seen but whose existence can be inferred on the basis of people's behavior. Such processes, referred to as individual processes, include personality, emotions, perception, and learning. This course aims to introduce Ph.D. students to both theoretical and applied background on individual processes, with a special emphasis on person vs situation and nature vs nurture debates, evolutionary perspective, and free will. Additionally, we will discuss psychological assessment and its principles, and review both traditional (e.g., tests and questionnaires) and modern (e.g., digital behavioral footprints) approaches to collecting data and measuring psychological constructs. 
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

OB 670: Designing Social Research

This is a course in the design of social research, with a particular emphasis on research field (i.e., non-laboratory) settings. As such, the course is a forum for discussing and developing an understanding of the different strategies social theorists employ to explain social processes, develop theories, and make these theories as believable as possible. In general, these issues will be discussed in the context of sociological research on organizations, but this will not be the exclusive focus of the course. A range of topics will be covered, for example: formulating and motivating research questions; varieties of explanation; experimental and quasi-experimental methods, including natural experiments; counterfactual models; conceptualization and measurement; sampling and case selection; qualitative and quantitative approaches. This course is particularly oriented toward developing an appreciation of the tradeoffs of different approaches. It is well suited to Ph.D. students working on qualifying papers and dissertation proposals.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

OB 672: Organization and Environment

This seminar considers the leading sociological approaches to analyzing relations of organizations and environments, with a special emphasis on dynamics. Attention is given to theoretical formulations, research designs, and results of empirical studies. Prerequisite: Enrollment in a PhD program. Also listed as Sociology 362.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

OB 678: The Design and Process of Experimental Research

This year-long course takes a hands-on approach to learning about experimental research. It will cover the entire process of experimental research from idea and hypothesis generation to study design, analysis, and publication. The topical content will be customized to the specific interests of the enrolled students, but generally will be concerned with questions about behavioral phenomena in organizational contexts.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 30 units total)

OB 691: PhD Directed Reading (ACCT 691, FINANCE 691, GSBGEN 691, HRMGT 691, MGTECON 691, MKTG 691, OIT 691, POLECON 691, STRAMGT 691)

This course is offered for students requiring specialized training in an area not covered by existing courses. To register, a student must obtain permission from the faculty member who is willing to supervise the reading.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit

OB 692: PhD Dissertation Research (ACCT 692, FINANCE 692, GSBGEN 692, HRMGT 692, MGTECON 692, MKTG 692, OIT 692, POLECON 692, STRAMGT 692)

This course is elected as soon as a student is ready to begin research for the dissertation, usually shortly after admission to candidacy. To register, a student must obtain permission from the faculty member who is willing to supervise the research.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit
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