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NATIVEAM 102: Indigenous Cultural Heritage: Protection, Practice, Repatriation (ANTHRO 102C, ARCHLGY 101, ARCHLGY 202, CSRE 102)

This interdisciplinary seminar explores challenges and avenues for furthering protection of the cultural heritage rights enshrined in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Using an innovative combination of online lectures by Stanford faculty and students, and recorded interviews with Indigenous leaders, artists, performers, scholars and museum professionals, the seminar will explore and problematize: historic and contemporary understandings of "Indigenous cultural heritage" and the impact of colonialism, urbanization and other forces on Indigenous identity and cultural heritage; current and potential domestic and international legal and non-legal frameworks for Indigenous cultural heritage protection and repatriation; past and present museum approaches to Indigenous peoples and their cultural material; and optimal methods of resolving repatriation disputes. While the seminar will cover primarily the situation of Indigenous peoples in North America, comparisons will be drawn with other regions of the globe. The on-campus component of the seminar will involve directed discussions of the online content, the online forum, assigned readings and short writing assignments. Students can choose between a final exam, paper or video project. Lunch is provided.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jessiman, S. (PI)

NATIVEAM 103S: Native American Women, Gender Roles, and Status (CSRE 103S, FEMGEN 103S)

Historical and cultural forces at work in traditional and contemporary Native American women's lives through life stories and literature. How women are fashioning gendered indigenous selves. Focus is on the diversity of Native American communities and cultures.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

NATIVEAM 109A: Federal Indian Law (CSRE 109A)

Cases, legislation, comparative justice models, and historical and cultural material. The interlocking relationships of tribal, federal, and state governments. Emphasis is on economic development, religious freedom, and environmental justice issues in Indian country.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Biestman, K. (PI)

NATIVEAM 111B: Muwekma: Landscape Archaeology and the Narratives of California Natives (ANTHRO 111B, ARCHLGY 111B)

This course explores the unique history of San Francisco Bay Area tribes with particular attention to Muwekma Ohlone- the descendent community associated with the landscape surrounding and including Stanford University. The story of Muwekma provides a window into the history of California Indians from prehistory to Spanish exploration and colonization, the role of Missionaries and the controversial legacy of Junipero Serra, Indigenous rebellions throughout California, citizenship and land title during the 19th century, the historical role of anthropology and archaeology in shaping policy and recognition of Muwekma, and the fight for acknowledgement of Muwekma as a federally recognized tribe. We will visit local sites associated with this history and participate in field surveys of the landscape of Muwekma.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Wilcox, M. (PI)

NATIVEAM 115: Introduction to Native American History

This course surveys Native American history beginning with the forced removal of the Cherokee and other tribes from their eastern homelands to the geographic area of what is now the state of Oklahoma. This course will examine key issues including specific cases, i.e. the Marshall trilogy through a historic lens. The course material will cover Native American history to events leading up to the era of the civil rights movement in the twentieth century. The subject of sovereignty and self-determination will be discussed as part of the historic experience of Native Americans through assigned readings, short films, and other media.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Red Shirt, D. (PI)

NATIVEAM 121: Discourse of the Colonized: Native American and Indigenous Voices (CSRE 121)

Using the assigned texts covering the protest movements in the 20th century to the texts written from the perspective of the colonized at the end of the 20th century, students will engage in discussions on decolonization. Students will be encouraged to critically explore issues of interest through two short papers and a 15-20 minute presentation on the topic of interest relating to decolonization for Native Americans in one longer paper. Approaching research from an Indigenous perspective will be encouraged throughout.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Red Shirt, D. (PI)

NATIVEAM 123A: American Indians and the Cinema (CSRE 123A)

Hollywood and the film industry have had a major influence on American society for nearly a century. Initially designed to provide entertainment, the cinema broadened its impact by creating images perceived as real and essentialist. Hollywood's Indians have been the main source of information about who American Indians are and Hollywood has helped shape inaccurate and stereotypical perceptions that continue to exist today. This course looks chronologically at cinematic interpretations and critically examines accurate portrayals of American Indians and of American history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Anderson, J. (PI)

NATIVEAM 134: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (AMSTUD 134, ARCHLGY 134, ARCHLGY 234, ARTHIST 284B, CSRE 134, EDUC 214)

Students will open the ¿black box¿ of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores ¿museum cultures¿: representations of ¿self¿ and ¿other¿ within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hodge, C. (PI)

NATIVEAM 143A: American Indian Mythology, Legend, and Lore (ENGLISH 43A, ENGLISH 143A)

(English majors and others taking 5 units, register for 143A.) Readings from American Indian literatures, old and new. Stories, songs, and rituals from the 19th century, including the Navajo Night Chant. Tricksters and trickster stories; war, healing, and hunting songs; Aztec songs from the 16th century. Readings from modern poets and novelists including N. Scott Momaday, Louise Erdrich, and Leslie Marmon Silko, and the classic autobiography, "Black Elk Speaks."
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fields, K. (PI)

NATIVEAM 163: Endangered Languages and Language Revitalization (ANTHRO 163A, ANTHRO 263A, LINGUIST 163A, LINGUIST 263)

Languages around the world are dying at such a rapid rate that the next century could see half of the world's 6800 languages and cultures become extinct unless action is taken now. This course looks at how and why languages die, and what is lost from a culture when that occurs. We will investigate how this trend can be reversed by methods of language documentation and description, the use of innovative technologies, multimodal fieldwork, writing dictionaries and grammars for different audiences, language planning, and data creation, annotation, preservation, and dissemination. We will focus on a number of current programs around the world to revitalize languages. Finally, the course will examine ethical modes of fieldwork within endangered language communities, and the possibilities of successful collaborations and capacity building, focusing especially on Northern California Indian peoples and their languages.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ogilvie, S. (PI)

NATIVEAM 200W: Directed Reading

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

NATIVEAM 108S: American Indian Religious Freedom (CSRE 108S)

The persistence of tribal spiritual beliefs and practices in light of legal challenges (sacred geography and the 1st Amendment), treatment of the dead and sacred objects (repatriation), consumerism (New Age commodification), and cultural intellectual property protection (trademark, copyright, patent law). Focus is on contemporary issues and cases, analyzed through interdisciplinary scholarship and practical strategies to protect the fundamental liberty of American Indian religious freedom.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

NATIVEAM 138: American Indians in Comparative Historical Perspective (SOC 138, SOC 238)

(Graduate students register for 238.) Demographic, political, and economic processes and events that shaped relations between Euro-Americans and American Indians, 1600-1890. How the intersection of these processes affected the outcome of conflicts between these two groups, and how this conflict was decisive in determining the social position of American Indians in the late 19th century and the evolution of the doctrine of tribal sovereignty.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

NATIVEAM 139: American Indians in Contemporary Society (SOC 139, SOC 239)

(Graduate students register for 239.) The social position of American Indians in contemporary American society, 1890 to the present. The demographic resurgence of American Indians, changes in social and economic status, ethnic identification and political mobilization, and institutions such as tribal governments and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Recommended: 138 or a course in American history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Snipp, C. (PI)

NATIVEAM 167: Performing Indigeneity on Global Stage (DANCE 167)

Explores how indigeneity is expressed and embodied through performance on the global stage.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

NATIVEAM 200R: Directed Research

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

NATIVEAM 240: Psychology and American Indian Mental Health (EDUC 340)

Western medicine's definition of health as the absence of sickness, disease, or pathology; Native American cultures' definition of health as the beauty of physical, spiritual, emotional, and social things, and sickness as something out of balance. Topics include: historical trauma; spirituality and healing; cultural identity; values and acculturation; and individual, school, and community-based interventions. Prerequisite: experience working with American Indian communities.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; LaFromboise, T. (PI)

NATIVEAM 255: Native American Identity in the American Imagination: 19th Century to Present

Because cultural identity is similar to and overlaps with identity politics, this course will examine Native American identity in current culture through American imagination and perspective as to what it is to be Native American today. Historic perspectives from the 19th century to the present will be covered as well.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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