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AFRICAAM 223: Literature and Human Experimentation (COMPLIT 223, CSRE 123B, HUMBIO 175H, MED 220)

This course introduces students to the ways literature has been used to think through the ethics of human subjects research and experimental medicine. We will focus primarily on readings that imaginatively revisit experiments conducted on vulnerable populations: namely groups placed at risk by their classification according to perceived human and cultural differences. We will begin with Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818), and continue our study via later works of fiction, drama and literary journalism, including Toni Morrison's Beloved, David Feldshuh's Miss Evers Boys, Hannah Arendt's Eichmann and Vivien Spitz's Doctors from Hell, Rebecca Skloot's Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, and Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go. Each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical and policy writings of the period; and our ultimate goal will be to understand modes of ethics deliberation that are possible via creative uses of the imagination, and literature's place in a history of ethical thinking about humane research and care.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ikoku, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 229: Literature and Global Health (AFRICAST 229, COMPLIT 229, CSRE 129B, FRENCH 229, HUMBIO 175L, MED 234)

This course examines the ways writers in literature and medicine have used the narrative form to explore the ethics of care in what has been called the developing world. We will begin with a call made by the editor-in-chief of The Lancet for a literature of global health, namely fiction modeled on the social reform novels of the nineteenth century, understood to have helped readers develop a conscience for public health as the field emerged as a modern medical specialty. We will then spend the quarter understanding how colonial, postcolonial, and world literatures have answered and complicated this call. Readings will include prose fiction by Albert Camus, Joseph Conrad, Tsitsi Dangaremgba, Amitav Ghosh, Susan Sontag as well as physician memoirs featuring Frantz Fanon, Albert Schweitzer, Abraham Verghese, Paul Farmer. And each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical, and policy writings that deeply inform the field of global health.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ikoku, A. (PI)

AFRICAST 48S: History of Health, Science and Medicine in 20th Century Africa (ANTHRO 48S, HISTORY 48S)

This course will examine the impact of colonial policies and post-colonial development on patterns of sickness, wellness and health care in twentieth century sub-Saharan Africa. Some topics will include: the role of colonial science in the formulation of ideas about race, colonial epidemics, labor migration and disease, urban health, encounters between African healers and biomedicine, histories of HIV/AIDS, the impact of debt and Structural Adjustment Programs on public health, and the politics of humanitarian interventions in African health. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hill, R. (PI)

AFRICAST 135: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

AFRICAST 141A: Science, Technology, and Medicine in Africa (ANTHRO 141A)

Africa is often depicted as a place simply in need of science, technology, andnmedicine. This class will introduce students to the culture and politics of science innsub-Saharan Africa: to the diverse and rich traditions, histories and contemporarynpredicaments of knowledge practices on the continent. We will consider the rolenof science in the colonial period, covering the expansion of European empires intonAfrica and the forms of technical knowledge that colonial governments encountered, especially as they relate to health and the environment. We will examine the role of science at African independence and in international development work. Finally, we will discuss the techno-politics of medical training and research, resource extraction, and the internet in contemporary Africa. This course will provide some important background for those with an applied interest in Africa as well as provide an introduction to a growing area of scholarship. Course materials include historical and ethnographic works, as well as primary sources and films emphasizing scientific practice in the context of geopolitical relations of power and inequality.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

AFRICAST 229: Literature and Global Health (AFRICAAM 229, COMPLIT 229, CSRE 129B, FRENCH 229, HUMBIO 175L, MED 234)

This course examines the ways writers in literature and medicine have used the narrative form to explore the ethics of care in what has been called the developing world. We will begin with a call made by the editor-in-chief of The Lancet for a literature of global health, namely fiction modeled on the social reform novels of the nineteenth century, understood to have helped readers develop a conscience for public health as the field emerged as a modern medical specialty. We will then spend the quarter understanding how colonial, postcolonial, and world literatures have answered and complicated this call. Readings will include prose fiction by Albert Camus, Joseph Conrad, Tsitsi Dangaremgba, Amitav Ghosh, Susan Sontag as well as physician memoirs featuring Frantz Fanon, Albert Schweitzer, Abraham Verghese, Paul Farmer. And each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical, and policy writings that deeply inform the field of global health.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ikoku, A. (PI)

AFRICAST 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

AMSTUD 106: SPECTACULAR TRIALS: SEX, RACE AND VIOLENCE IN MODERN AMERICAN CULTURE (CSRE 66)

This course will use the phenomenon of the spectacular trial as a framework for exploring the intersections of sex, race, and violence in the formation of modern American culture. Beginning in the late nineteenth century and continuing through the 1990s, we will focus our inquiry on a number of notorious cases, some associated with familiar names¿the ¿Scottsboro Boys,¿ Emmett Till, O.J. Simpson¿others involving once-infamous actors¿like Joan Little and Inez Garcia¿whose ordeals have receded into historical memory, considering a range of questions arising from this thematic nexus. For instance, in what ways are sexual transgressions racialized and gendered? What are the practical and theoretical ramifications of the seemingly inextricable conjunction of sex and violence in legal and popular discourse? And what insights might such spectacles afford when broached as an arena in which sexual meanings, identities, and practices are refracted and ultimately constructed? We will also examine the role of the pertinent professions in the evolution of these events, in particular how the interplay of law, medicine, psychiatry, and forensic science helped define the shifting boundaries of legality, and how print, radio, and television journalism operated not only in sensationalizing, but also in reflecting, modeling, and shaping prevailing attitudes and behaviors. Our study of this vital facet of our ¿society of the spectacle¿ will draw on a series of compelling secondary readings complemented by a diverse array of primary sources¿from contemporaneous pamphlets and newspaper accounts to photographs, letters, trial testimony, and psychological commentary¿that will enable class members to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of different textual genres, experiment with alternative methods of fashioning historical interpretations, and contemplate the ways history might be employed to illuminate the persistent problems of racial bias, reflexive sexualization, and the packaging of trials as mass entertainment in the present day.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cardyn, L. (PI)

AMSTUD 156H: Women and Medicine in US History: Women as Patients, Healers and Doctors (FEMGEN 156H, HISTORY 156G)

Women's bodies in sickness and health, and encounters with lay and professional healers from the 18th century to the present. Historical consttruction of thought about women's bodies and physical limitations; sexuality; birth control and abortion; childbirth; adulthood; and menopause and aging. Women as healers, including midwives, lay physicians, the medical profession, and nursing.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Horn, M. (PI)

ANES 206: 3D Printing and Biofabrication

Focus is on medical possibilities of 3D printing. Additive manufacturing, often termed 3D printing, uses automated techniques to produce physical objects using layer-by-layer construction methods. Biofabrication applies these same techniques to print physical objects from biological cells. Such techniques hold great promise to transform health and medicine to deliver more personalized care solutions for patients. This colloquium course explores the future of 3D printing and its impact on health and medicine. See http://medicinex.stanford.edu/anes206/. Students enrolling for 2 units prepare a final paper.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

ANES 207: Medical Acupuncture

Acupuncture is part of a comprehensive system of traditional Chinese Medicine developed over the past two millennia. This course reviews the history and theoretical basis of acupuncture for the treatment of various diseases as well as for the alleviation of pain. Issues related to the incorporation of acupuncture into the current health care system and the efficacy of acupuncture in treating various diseases are addressed. Includes practical, hands-on sections.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Golianu, B. (PI)

ANES 243: Introduction to Integrative Medicine (FAMMED 243)

Presentations by local, national, and international experts in various modalities of integrative medicine commonly used by patients in the US, including mind-body medicine (biofeedback, clinical hypnosis, meditation, yoga); traditional whole systems of medicine (traditional Chinese medicine, Ayurveda); biological therapies (botanical medicine, supplements, herbal medicine); manipulative therapies (chiropractic, massage); and acupuncture. Lectures focus on evidence supporting the potential value of various treatment modalities and explanations of both the traditional and proposed scientific mechanisms of actions. Most classes include an experiential portion.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

ANTHRO 48S: History of Health, Science and Medicine in 20th Century Africa (AFRICAST 48S, HISTORY 48S)

This course will examine the impact of colonial policies and post-colonial development on patterns of sickness, wellness and health care in twentieth century sub-Saharan Africa. Some topics will include: the role of colonial science in the formulation of ideas about race, colonial epidemics, labor migration and disease, urban health, encounters between African healers and biomedicine, histories of HIV/AIDS, the impact of debt and Structural Adjustment Programs on public health, and the politics of humanitarian interventions in African health. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hill, R. (PI)

ANTHRO 82: Medical Anthropology (ANTHRO 282, HUMBIO 176A)

Emphasis is on how health, illness, and healing are understood, experienced, and constructed in social, cultural, and historical contexts. Topics: biopower and body politics, gender and reproductive technologies, illness experiences, medical diversity and social suffering, and the interface between medicine and science.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 137A: Traditional Medicine in the Modern World

This class considers "traditional medicine" in contemporary times. We will survey major systems of traditional medicine while considering their broader social, cultural, and political contexts. The class will study the symbolic uses of traditional medicine, the role of traditional medicines in early modern medical knowledge, the place of indigenous knowledge in bioprospecting, health-seeking behavior and medical pluralism, and the WHO's approach to traditional medicine and how it has affected government health policies. The class emphasizes a critical approach to the concepts of tradition and modernity, and an understanding of traditional medicine as a changing, flexible, and globalized category of healing.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 138: Medical Ethics in a Global World: Examining Race, Difference and Power in the Research Enterprise (ANTHRO 238, CSRE 138)

This course will explore historical as well as current market transformations of medical ethics in different global contexts. We will examine various aspects of the research enterprise, its knowledge-generating and life-saving goals, as well as the societal, cultural, and political influences that make medical research a site of brokering in need of oversight and emergent ethics.nThis seminar will provide students with tools to explore and critically assess the various technical, social, and ethical positions of researchers, as well as the role of the state, the media, and certain publics in shaping scientific research agendas. We will also examine how structural violence, poverty, global standing, and issues of citizenship also influence issues of consent and just science and medicine.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 140: Ethnography of Africa

This course is an exploration of some central themes and issues in contemporary African society through close readings of a selection of recent ethnographies. It aims to understand Africa as a place where many of the most challenging issues of a modern, globalized world are being thought about in exciting and creative ways, both by ethnographers and by the people about whom they write. Among the key issues that the course seeks to address are: the history and politics of colonial domination; the ways that medicine and government intersect; the increasing use of humanitarian frames of reference in understanding African realities; the changing meanings of HIV/AIDS, sex, and love; and the role of mass media in enabling cultural and imaginative production to take form.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 141A: Science, Technology, and Medicine in Africa (AFRICAST 141A)

Africa is often depicted as a place simply in need of science, technology, andnmedicine. This class will introduce students to the culture and politics of science innsub-Saharan Africa: to the diverse and rich traditions, histories and contemporarynpredicaments of knowledge practices on the continent. We will consider the rolenof science in the colonial period, covering the expansion of European empires intonAfrica and the forms of technical knowledge that colonial governments encountered, especially as they relate to health and the environment. We will examine the role of science at African independence and in international development work. Finally, we will discuss the techno-politics of medical training and research, resource extraction, and the internet in contemporary Africa. This course will provide some important background for those with an applied interest in Africa as well as provide an introduction to a growing area of scholarship. Course materials include historical and ethnographic works, as well as primary sources and films emphasizing scientific practice in the context of geopolitical relations of power and inequality.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 147A: Folklore, Mythology, and Islam in Central Asia (REES 247A)

Central Asian cults, myths, and beliefs from ancient time to modernity. Life crisis rites, magic ceremonies, songs, tales, narratives, taboos associated with childbirth, marriage, folk medicine, and calendrical transitions. The nature and the place of the shaman in the region. Sources include music from the fieldwork of the instructor and the Kyrgyz epoch Manas. The cultural universe of Central Asian peoples as a symbol of their modern outlook.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 171: The Biology and Evolution of Language (ANTHRO 271, HUMBIO 145L)

Lecture course surveying the biology, linguistic functions, and evolution of the organs of speech and speech centers in the brain, language in animals and humans, the evolution of language itself, and the roles of innateness vs. culture in language. Suitable both for general education and as preparation for further studies in anthropology, biology, linguistics, medicine, psychology, and speech & language therapy. Anthropology concentration: CS, EE. No prerequisites.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fox, J. (PI)

ANTHRO 175: Human Skeletal Anatomy (ANTHRO 275, BIO 174, BIO 274, HUMBIO 180)

Study of the human skeleton (a. k. a. human osteology), as it bears on other disciplines, including medicine, forensics, archaeology, and paleoanthropology (human evolution). Basic bone biology, anatomy, and development, emphasizing hands-on examination and identification of human skeletal parts, their implications for determining an individual¿s age, sex, geographic origin, and health status, and for the evolutionary history of our species. Three hours of lecture and at least three hours of supervised and independent study in the lab each week.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Klein, R. (PI)

ANTHRO 176: Cultures, Minds, and Medicine (ANTHRO 276)

This workshop aims to bring together scholars from the social sciences, humanities, medicine and bio-science and technology to explore the ways that health and illness are made through complex social forces. We aim for informal, interactive sessions, full of debate and good will. Dates of meetings will be listed in the notes section in the time schedule.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Luhrmann, T. (PI)

ANTHRO 178A: Culture, Narrative, and Medicine (HUMBIO 177C)

This course examines the ways in which medicine is practiced in diverse cultural contexts with narrative skills of recognizing, interpreting and being moved by the stories of illness. It is an examination of the human experience of illness and healing through narratives as presented in literature, film, and storytelling. We explore how cultural resources enable and empower healing and how narrative medicine can guide the practice of culturally competent medical care.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 179A: Health, Illness, and Healing in South Asia (ANTHRO 279A)

This course has three related goals pertinent to medicine and healing in South Asia. The first is to understand the experiences of illness, and therapy in ordinary South Asian communities. How do social and economic inequality, religious commitments, available healing traditions, and community and family contexts shape the experience of illness and healing? The second goal is to think about South Asian medical systems using a broad historical perspective. How had biomedicine been used during the colonial period to manage the health of native populations? What is the legacy of this colonial history on current practices? What happens when South Asian medical traditions (such as Ayurveda) become global? Third, we will explore crucial health problems in South Asia from the perspective of medical anthropology. Possible topics for the third portion of the course include: child birth and maternal health, sex-selection technologies, malnutrition, metabolic diseases, the selling of organs, medical tourism, tuberculosis, HIV, suicide, and schizophrenia.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 182A: Down and Out: Marginal Lives and Institutional Technologies (ANTHRO 282A)

This course examines the neglect and management of socially marginalized persons including the mentally ill, youth runaways, child wards of the state, drug addicts and prisoners. In this course, we will approach the concept of marginality by investigating the spaces and institutions of decay, neglect and rehabilitation to which unwanted and indigent individuals are relegated. Readings are focused on qualitative research conducted within institutions of health, welfare, and reform. There will be two comparative public mental health sections in this course: one focused on South Asia and the second on Africa. This course is relevant for students interested in medical anthropology, applied anthropology, public health policy, or clinical careers in medicine, psychology, or social work.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 184: Spirituality and Healing (HUMBIO 179S)

The puzzle of symbolic healing. How have societies without the resources of modern medicine approached healing? Why do these rituals have common features around the world? Shamanism, spirit possession, prayer, and the role of placebos in modern biomedicine. Students do ethnographic work and practical explorations along with more traditional scholarly approaches to learning.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 185A: Race and Biomedicine (ASNAMST 185A)

Race, identity, culture, biology, and political power in biomedicine. Biological theories of racial ordering, sexuality and the medicalization of group difference. Sources include ethnography, film, and biomedical literature. Topics include colonial history and medicine, the politics of racial categorization in biomedical research, the protection of human subjects and research ethics, immigration health and citizenship, race-based models in health disparities research and policy, and recent developments in human genetic variation research.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 187: Nuclear Cultures

This course examines the new cultural forms that arose out of the use of nuclear technology. Subjects covered will include: The Manhattan Project, nuclear activism, nuclear experimentation in medicine, pre-nuclear history, nuclear energy, and nuclear waste and trade.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 238: Medical Ethics in a Global World: Examining Race, Difference and Power in the Research Enterprise (ANTHRO 138, CSRE 138)

This course will explore historical as well as current market transformations of medical ethics in different global contexts. We will examine various aspects of the research enterprise, its knowledge-generating and life-saving goals, as well as the societal, cultural, and political influences that make medical research a site of brokering in need of oversight and emergent ethics.nThis seminar will provide students with tools to explore and critically assess the various technical, social, and ethical positions of researchers, as well as the role of the state, the media, and certain publics in shaping scientific research agendas. We will also examine how structural violence, poverty, global standing, and issues of citizenship also influence issues of consent and just science and medicine.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 271: The Biology and Evolution of Language (ANTHRO 171, HUMBIO 145L)

Lecture course surveying the biology, linguistic functions, and evolution of the organs of speech and speech centers in the brain, language in animals and humans, the evolution of language itself, and the roles of innateness vs. culture in language. Suitable both for general education and as preparation for further studies in anthropology, biology, linguistics, medicine, psychology, and speech & language therapy. Anthropology concentration: CS, EE. No prerequisites.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fox, J. (PI)

ANTHRO 275: Human Skeletal Anatomy (ANTHRO 175, BIO 174, BIO 274, HUMBIO 180)

Study of the human skeleton (a. k. a. human osteology), as it bears on other disciplines, including medicine, forensics, archaeology, and paleoanthropology (human evolution). Basic bone biology, anatomy, and development, emphasizing hands-on examination and identification of human skeletal parts, their implications for determining an individual¿s age, sex, geographic origin, and health status, and for the evolutionary history of our species. Three hours of lecture and at least three hours of supervised and independent study in the lab each week.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Klein, R. (PI)

ANTHRO 276: Cultures, Minds, and Medicine (ANTHRO 176)

This workshop aims to bring together scholars from the social sciences, humanities, medicine and bio-science and technology to explore the ways that health and illness are made through complex social forces. We aim for informal, interactive sessions, full of debate and good will. Dates of meetings will be listed in the notes section in the time schedule.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Luhrmann, T. (PI)

ANTHRO 279A: Health, Illness, and Healing in South Asia (ANTHRO 179A)

This course has three related goals pertinent to medicine and healing in South Asia. The first is to understand the experiences of illness, and therapy in ordinary South Asian communities. How do social and economic inequality, religious commitments, available healing traditions, and community and family contexts shape the experience of illness and healing? The second goal is to think about South Asian medical systems using a broad historical perspective. How had biomedicine been used during the colonial period to manage the health of native populations? What is the legacy of this colonial history on current practices? What happens when South Asian medical traditions (such as Ayurveda) become global? Third, we will explore crucial health problems in South Asia from the perspective of medical anthropology. Possible topics for the third portion of the course include: child birth and maternal health, sex-selection technologies, malnutrition, metabolic diseases, the selling of organs, medical tourism, tuberculosis, HIV, suicide, and schizophrenia.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 282: Medical Anthropology (ANTHRO 82, HUMBIO 176A)

Emphasis is on how health, illness, and healing are understood, experienced, and constructed in social, cultural, and historical contexts. Topics: biopower and body politics, gender and reproductive technologies, illness experiences, medical diversity and social suffering, and the interface between medicine and science.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 282A: Down and Out: Marginal Lives and Institutional Technologies (ANTHRO 182A)

This course examines the neglect and management of socially marginalized persons including the mentally ill, youth runaways, child wards of the state, drug addicts and prisoners. In this course, we will approach the concept of marginality by investigating the spaces and institutions of decay, neglect and rehabilitation to which unwanted and indigent individuals are relegated. Readings are focused on qualitative research conducted within institutions of health, welfare, and reform. There will be two comparative public mental health sections in this course: one focused on South Asia and the second on Africa. This course is relevant for students interested in medical anthropology, applied anthropology, public health policy, or clinical careers in medicine, psychology, or social work.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 337B: Anthropological Approaches to Health Issues in Contemporary Latin America

The purpose of this course is to examine the anthropological and ethnographic research on emerging health issues and sufferings in Latin America. In particular, the class explores how anthropologists understand and ponder social, economic, political, environmental, spatial processes that shape patterns of health, suffering and death, and the strategies to address them. By analyzing paradigmatic case studies, we will discuss theoretical concepts and social perspectives, as well as ethnographic dilemmas and methods.nnTaking a critical perspective, this class will not only explore the standard topics on Latin American health (hunger, infectious disease, mental health, etc.). We will also focus on emerging sufferings (drug use, epidemics, environmental discomforts and sufferings, etc.). Both standard and emerging topics are examined with respect to the changes in political economy, medical institutions and policy approaches, models of care and caregiving, gender violence, circulation and appropriation of expert knowledge, contamination, migration, spatial segregation, violence, marginalization, abandonment, justice and human rights.nnInterdisciplinary investigation is conducted into most of these health issues, not only in the global health field. They are addressed by the South American Social Medicine and Collective Health approaches. This class will include a description and critical analysis of their theoretical frameworks and core concepts, as well as their relationships to international and local medical anthropological theory and research.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Epele, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 344: Graphic Medicine

In this course students will study medical cultures through visual communication ranging from x-rays and PET scans to graphic novels. Course will also include literature on visual theory.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 348: Representing Medicine

The seminar will offer the opportunity to discuss the recent work of a series of 9 scholars known for their innovation in writing and research. The seminar will offer professional networking as well as the opportunity to engage authors in questions of writing, approaches to fieldwork, strategies for career advancement, and brainstorming on how to structure relevant arguments. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 352: Foucault: The Question of Method

Foucault as methodological exemplar for historical and social research. Emphasis is on his historical studies of clinical medicine, prisons, and sexuality, and on applying his methods to empirical studies of topics such as colonialism, race, and liberal governmental rationality.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ASNAMST 185A: Race and Biomedicine (ANTHRO 185A)

Race, identity, culture, biology, and political power in biomedicine. Biological theories of racial ordering, sexuality and the medicalization of group difference. Sources include ethnography, film, and biomedical literature. Topics include colonial history and medicine, the politics of racial categorization in biomedical research, the protection of human subjects and research ethics, immigration health and citizenship, race-based models in health disparities research and policy, and recent developments in human genetic variation research.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 4N: Peopleomics: The science and ethics of personalized genomic medicine

Exploration of the new field of personalized genomic medicine. Personalized medicine is based on the idea that each person's unique genome sequence can be used to predict risk of acquiring specific diseases, and to make more informed medical choices. The science behind these approaches; where they are heading in the future; and the ethical implications such technology presents. Lectures augmented with hands-on experience in exploring and analyzing a real person's genome.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 14: Bio-logging and Bio-telemetry

Bio-logging is a rapidly growing discipline that includes diverse fields such as consumer electronics, medicine, and marine biology. The use of animal-attached digital tags is a powerful approach to study the movement and ecology of individuals over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. This course is an introduction to bio-logging methods and analysis. Using whales as a model system, students will learn how use multi-sensor tags to study behavioral biomechanics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIO 109B: The Human Genome and Disease: Genetic Diversity and Personalized Medicine (BIOC 109B)

Continuation of 109A/209A. Genetic drift: the path of human predecessors out of Africa to Europe and then either through Asia to Australia or through northern Russia to Alaska down to the W. Coast of the Americas. Support for this idea through the histocompatibility genes and genetic sequences that predispose people to diseases. Guest lectures from academia and pharmaceutical companies. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core. Students with a major, minor or coterm in Biology: 109A/209A or 109B/209B may count toward degree program but not both.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 112: Human Physiology (HUMBIO 133)

Human physiology will be examined by organ systems: cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal and endocrine. Molecular and cell biology and signaling principles that underlie organ development, pathophysiology and opportunities for regenerative medicine are discussed, as well as integrative control mechanisms and fetal development. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kao, P. (PI)

BIO 168: Explorations in Stem Cell Biology

A discussion-based course for advanced undergraduates. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to key topics in stem cell biology and foster the development of strong scientific writing skills. We will review and discuss some landmark and current primary literature in the stem cell field. Topics will include embryonic and adult stem cells, cellular reprogramming and stem cells in disease and regenerative medicine. Students will present a current research paper in their preferred stem cell topic area and compose a novel research proposal. Prerequisites: Biology or Human Biology core. Satisfies WIM in Biology.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIO 174: Human Skeletal Anatomy (ANTHRO 175, ANTHRO 275, BIO 274, HUMBIO 180)

Study of the human skeleton (a. k. a. human osteology), as it bears on other disciplines, including medicine, forensics, archaeology, and paleoanthropology (human evolution). Basic bone biology, anatomy, and development, emphasizing hands-on examination and identification of human skeletal parts, their implications for determining an individual¿s age, sex, geographic origin, and health status, and for the evolutionary history of our species. Three hours of lecture and at least three hours of supervised and independent study in the lab each week.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Klein, R. (PI)

BIO 274: Human Skeletal Anatomy (ANTHRO 175, ANTHRO 275, BIO 174, HUMBIO 180)

Study of the human skeleton (a. k. a. human osteology), as it bears on other disciplines, including medicine, forensics, archaeology, and paleoanthropology (human evolution). Basic bone biology, anatomy, and development, emphasizing hands-on examination and identification of human skeletal parts, their implications for determining an individual¿s age, sex, geographic origin, and health status, and for the evolutionary history of our species. Three hours of lecture and at least three hours of supervised and independent study in the lab each week.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Klein, R. (PI)

BIO 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIOC 459, BIOE 459, CHEM 459, CHEMENG 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Robertson, C. (PI)

BIOC 109B: The Human Genome and Disease: Genetic Diversity and Personalized Medicine (BIO 109B)

Continuation of 109A/209A. Genetic drift: the path of human predecessors out of Africa to Europe and then either through Asia to Australia or through northern Russia to Alaska down to the W. Coast of the Americas. Support for this idea through the histocompatibility genes and genetic sequences that predispose people to diseases. Guest lectures from academia and pharmaceutical companies. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core. Students with a major, minor or coterm in Biology: 109A/209A or 109B/209B may count toward degree program but not both.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOC 118Q: Genomics and Medicine

Preference to sophomores. Knowledge gained from sequencing human genomes and implications for medicine and biomedical research. Novel diagnoses and treatment of diseases, including stem cells, gene therapy and rational drug design. Personal genomics and how it is used to improve health and well being. Social and ethical implications of genetic information such as privacy, discrimination and insurability. Course Webpage: http://biochem118.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Brutlag, D. (PI)

BIOC 200: Applied Biochemistry

Enrollment limited to MD candidates. Fundamental concepts of biochemistry as applied to clinical medicine. Topics include vitamins and cofactors, metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and nucleotides, and the integration of metabolic pathways. Clinical case studies discussed in small-group, problem-based learning sessions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

BIOC 205: Molecular Foundations of Medicine

For medical students. Topics include DNA structure, replication, recombination, and repair; gene expression via transcription and translation; biotechnology; and genomics. Patient presentations, journal clubs, and class presentations discuss the impact of molecular biology on medicine.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

BIOC 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOE 459, CHEM 459, CHEMENG 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Robertson, C. (PI)

BIOE 131: Ethics in Bioengineering

Bioengineering focuses on the development and application of new technologies in the biology and medicine. These technologies often have powerful effects on living systems at the microscopic and macroscopic level. They can provide great benefit to society, but they also can be used in dangerous or damaging ways. These effects may be positive or negative, and so it is critical that bioengineers understand the basic principles of ethics when thinking about how the technologies they develop can and should be applied. On a personal level, every bioengineer should understand the basic principles of ethical behavior in the professional setting. This course will involve substantial writing, and will use case-study methodology to introduce both societal and personal ethical principles, with a focus on practical applications.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOE 229: Advanced Research Topics in Multi-modality Molecular Imaging of Living Subjects

Covers advanced topics and controversies in molecular imaging in the understanding of biology and disease. Lectures will include discussion on instrumentation, probes and bioassays. Topics will address unmet needs for visualization and quantification of molecular pathways in biology as well as for diagnosis and disease management. Areas of unmet clinical needs include those in oncology, neurology, cardiovascular medicine and musculoskeletal diseases. The aim is to identify important problems and controversies in a field and address them by providing background and relevance through review of the relevant primary literature, and then proposing and evaluating innovative imaging strategies that are designed to address the problem. The organization of lectures is similar to the thought process that is necessary for writing an NIH grant proposal in which aims are proposed and supported by background and relevance. The innovation of proposed approaches will be highlighted. An aim of the course is to inform students on how to creatively think about a problem and propose a solution focusing on the key elements of writing a successful grant proposal. Prerequisites: none.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIOE 361: Biomaterials in Regenerative Medicine (MATSCI 381)

Materials design and engineering for regenerative medicine. How materials interact with cells through their micro- and nanostructure, mechanical properties, degradation characteristics, surface chemistry, and biochemistry. Examples include novel materials for drug and gene delivery, materials for stem cell proliferation and differentiation, and tissue engineering scaffolds. Prerequisites: undergraduate chemistry, and cell/molecular biology or biochemistry.
Terms: alternate years, given next year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOE 390: Introduction to Bioengineering Research (MED 289)

Preference to medical and bioengineering graduate students with first preference given to Bioengineering Scholarly Concentration medical students. Bioengineering is an interdisciplinary field that leverages the disciplines of biology, medicine, and engineering to understand living systems, and engineer biological systems and improve engineering designs and human and environmental health. Students and faculty make presentations during the course. Students expected to make presentations, complete a short paper, read selected articles, and take quizzes on the material.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

BIOE 393: Bioengineering Departmental Research Colloquium

Bioengineering department labs at Stanford present recent research projects and results. Guest lecturers. Topics include applications of engineering to biology, medicine, biotechnology, and medical technology, including biodesign and devices, molecular and cellular engineering, regenerative medicine and tissue engineering, biomedical imaging, and biomedical computation. Aut, Win, Spr (Lin, Riedel-Kruse, Barron)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIOE 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOC 459, CHEM 459, CHEMENG 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Robertson, C. (PI)

BIOMEDIN 205: Precision Practice with Big Data

Primarily for M.D. students; open to other graduate students. Provides an overview of how to leverage large amounts of clinical, molecular, and imaging data within hospitals and in cyberspace--big data--to practice medicine more effectively. Lectures by physicians, researchers, and industry leaders survey how the major methods of informatics can help physicians leverage big data to profile disease, to personalize treatment to patients, to predict treatment response, to discover new knowledge, and to challenge established medical dogma and the current paradigm of clinical decision-making based solely on published knowledge and individual physician experience. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: background in biomedicine. Background in computer science can be helpful but not required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

BIOMEDIN 207: Digital Medicine: How health IT is changing the practice of medicine

The widespread use of health IT, such as electronic health records, and of health applications by patients, will radically alter the practice of medicine in the coming decades. This seminar, comprised of guest lectures from industry and academia, will highlight the practical challenges and successes of how health IT has transformed care delivery programs. The seminar will cover current efforts in clinical decision support, patient-centered design, integration with community care, Big Data, and the innovation pipeline for healthcare delivery organizations.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cain, C. (PI)

BIOMEDIN 215: Data Driven Medicine

With the spread of electronic health records and increasingly low cost assays for patient molecular data, powerful data repositories with tremendous potential for biomedical research, clinical care and personalized medicine are being built. But these databases are large and difficult for any one specialist to analyze. To find the hidden associations within the full set of data, we introduce methods for data-mining at the internet scale, the handling of large-scale electronic medical records data for machine learning, methods in natural language processing and text-mining applied to medical records, methods for using ontologies for the annotation and indexing of unstructured content as well as semantic web technologies. Prerequisites: CS 106A; familiarity with statistics and biology. Highly recommended: STATS 216. Recommended: one of CS 246, STATS 305, or CS 229.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIOMEDIN 217: Translational Bioinformatics (CS 275)

Analytic, storage, and interpretive methods to optimize the transformation of genetic, genomic, and biological data into diagnostics and therapeutics for medicine. Topics: access and utility of publicly available data sources; types of genome-scale measurements in molecular biology and genomic medicine; analysis of microarray data; analysis of polymorphisms, proteomics, and protein interactions; linking genome-scale data to clinical data and phenotypes; and new questions in biomedicine using bioinformatics. Case studies. Prerequisites: programming ability at the level of CS 106A and familiarity with statistics and biology.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIOMEDIN 218: Translational Bioinformatics Lectures

Same content as BIOMEDIN 217; for medical and graduate students who attend lectures and participate in limited assignments and final project. Analytic, storage, and interpretive methods to optimize the transformation of genetic, genomic, and biological data into diagnostics and therapeutics for medicine. Topics: access and utility of publicly available data sources; types of genome-scale measurements in molecular biology and genomic medicine; analysis of microarray data; analysis of polymorphisms, proteomics, and protein interactions; linking genome-scale data to clinical data and phenotypes; and new questions in biomedicine using bioinformatics. Case studies. Prerequisites: programming at the level of CS 106A; familiarity with statistics and biology.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIOMEDIN 225: Data Driven Medicine: Lectures

Lectures for BIOMEDIN 215.With the spread of electronic health records and increasingly low cost assays for patient molecular data, powerful data repositories with tremendous potential for biomedical research, clinical care and personalized medicine are being built. But these databases are large and difficult for any one specialist to analyze. To find the hidden associations within the full set of data, we introduce methods for data-mining at the internet scale, the handling of large-scale electronic medical records data for machine learning, methods in natural language processing and text-mining applied to medical records, methods for using ontologies for the annotation and indexing of unstructured content as well as semantic web technologies. Prerequisites: familiarity with statistics (STATS 202) and biology.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIOMEDIN 260: Computational Methods for Biomedical Image Analysis and Interpretation (RAD 260)

The latest biological and medical imaging modalities and their applications in research and medicine. Focus is on computational analytic and interpretive approaches to optimize extraction and use of biological and clinical imaging data for diagnostic and therapeutic translational medical applications. Topics include major image databases, fundamental methods in image processing and quantitative extraction of image features, structured recording of image information including semantic features and ontologies, indexing, search and content-based image retrieval. Case studies include linking image data to genomic, phenotypic and clinical data, developing representations of image phenotypes for use in medical decision support and research applications and the role that biomedical imaging informatics plays in new questions in biomedical science. Includes a project. Enrollment for 3 units requires instructor consent. Prerequisites: programming ability at the level of CS 106A, familiarity with statistics, basic biology. Knowledge of Matlab highly recommended.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Rubin, D. (PI)

BIOS 202: Hippocampal Field Potentials, an Introduction to CNS in Vitro Electrophysiology

Enrollment limited to graduate students in the School of Medicine; undergraduates may enroll with instructor consent. Introduces students to theory and practice of in vitro CNS electrophysiology. Lectures cover basic electrical and electrode theory, hippocampal anatomy, interpretation of these potentials, common pitfalls and misinterpretations, design of experiments using field potentials and other related topics. Practicum is hands on training in obtaining, recording and interpreting field potentials from in vitro hippocampal slices. Students develop skills in data collection, analysis and evaluation, art and design of electrophysiological studies of the brain.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIOS 217: The Ultimate Face Book: Understanding Normal and Abnormal Craniofacial Development

How the face is assembled during embryonic development to gain insights into facial birth defects and new "regenerative medicine" approaches to reconstruct the face following disease or injury. Learn how "a man finds room in the few square inches of the face for the traits of all his ancestors; for the expression of all his history, and his wants."
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

BIOS 234: Personalized Genomic Medicine

Focuses on next-generation sequencing and its implications for personalized genomic medicine. Students gain hands-on experience with popular DNA sequence analysis tools as well as a practical understanding of the underlying algorithms and biomedicine.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

CHEM 10: Exploring Research and Problem Solving Across the Sciences

Development and practice of critical problem solving and study skills using wide variety of scientific examples that illustrate the broad yet integrated nature of current research. Student teams will have the opportunity to explore and present on topics revolving around five central issues: energy, climate change, water resources, medicine, and food & nutrition from a chemical perspective. Course offered in August prior to start of fall quarter.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CHEM 35: Synthetic and Physical Organic Chemistry

The structure and reactivity of mono- and polyfunctionalized molecules; retrosynthetic analysis and multi-step chemical synthesis. Course will emphasize deductive logic and reasoning skills through conceptual learning. Students gain an appreciation for the profound impact of organic chemistry on humankind in fields ranging from biology and medicine to gastronomy, agriculture, and materials science. A three hour lab section provides hands on experience with modern chemical methods for preparative and analytical chemistry. Prerequisite: Chem 33
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHEM 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOC 459, BIOE 459, CHEMENG 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Robertson, C. (PI)

CHEMENG 10: The Chemical Engineering Profession

Open to all undergraduates. Overview of and careers in chemical engineering; opportunities to develop networks with working professionals. Panel discussions on career paths and post-graduation opportunities available. Areas include biotechnology, electronics, energy, environment, management consulting, nanotechnology, and graduate school in business, law, medicine, and engineering.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Frank, C. (PI)

CHEMENG 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOC 459, BIOE 459, CHEM 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Robertson, C. (PI)

CHPR 206: Meta-research: Appraising Research Findings, Bias, and Meta-analysis (HRP 206, MED 206, STATS 211)

Open to graduate, medical, and undergraduate students. Appraisal of the quality and credibility of research findings; evaluation of sources of bias. Meta-analysis as a quantitative (statistical) method for combining results of independent studies. Examples from medicine, epidemiology, genomics, ecology, social/behavioral sciences, education. Collaborative analyses. Project involving generation of a meta-research project or reworking and evaluation of an existing published meta-analysis. Prerequisite: knowledge of basic statistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

CHPR 260: Prevention Across Medical Disciplines

Coordinated seminar series presenting evidence-based health promotion and disease prevention guidelines by research and clinical faculty of multiple divisions of Stanford's Department of Medicine, including cardiovascular medicine, oncology, nephrology, immunology and rheumatology, infectious diseases, endocrinology, gerontology and metabolism, gastroenterology and hepatology, hematology, blood and marrow transplantation, pulmonary and critical care medicine, general medical disciplines (including family medicine). Key prevention issues addressed in primary care and outcomes research, biomedical informatics research and the Stanford Prevention Research Center also presented. Enrollment priority given to CHPR Master's students. CHPR students must enroll for letter grade.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Stefanick, M. (PI)

CLASSICS 14: Greek and Latin Roots of English

(Formerly CLASSGEN 9) Goal is to improve vocabulary, comprehension of written English, and standardized test scores through learning the Greek and Latin components of English. Focus is on patterns and processes in the formation of the lexicon. Terminology used in medicine, business, education, law, and humanities; introduction to principles of language history and etymology. Greek or Latin not required.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sansom, S. (PI)

CLASSICS 34: Ancient Athletics

(Formerly CLASSGEN 34.) How the Olympic Games developed and how they were organized. Many other Greek festivals featured sport and dance competitions, including some for women, and showcased the citizen athlete as a civic ideal. Roman athletics in contrast saw the growth of large-scale spectator sports and professional athletes. Some toured like media stars; others regularly risked death in gladiatorial contests and chariot-racing. We will also explore how large-scale games were funded and how they fostered the development of sports medicine. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required; enroll in sections on coursework.
Terms: given next year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CLASSICS 124: Ancient and Modern Medicine

Imagine a world where the Universe has a built-in purpose and point. How would this belief impact man's place in nature? Imagine a world where natural substances have "powers." How might this impact diet and pharmacology? Magical vs. scientific healing: a clear divide? Disease and dehumanization: epilepsy, rabies. Physical and mental health: black bile and melancholy. The ethical and scientific assumptions hidden in medical language and imagery. How ancient medicine and modern medicine (especially alternative medicine) illuminate each other.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CME 106: Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers (ENGR 155C)

Probability: random variables, independence, and conditional probability; discrete and continuous distributions, moments, distributions of several random variables. Topics in mathematical statistics: random sampling, point estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, non-parametric tests, regression and correlation analyses; applications in engineering, industrial manufacturing, medicine, biology, and other fields. Prerequisite: CME 100/ENGR154 or MATH 51 or 52.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CME 520: Topics in Simulation of Human Physiology & Anatomical Systems (SURG 253)

Biweekly interdisciplinary lecture series on the development of computational tools for modeling and simulation of human physiological and anatomical systems. Lectures by instructors and guest speakers on topics such as surgical simulation, anatomical & surgical Modeling, neurological Systems, and biomedical models of human movement. Group discussions, team based assignments, and project work.nPrerequisite: Medical students, residents or fellows from school of medicine, and computationally oriented students with a strong interest to explore computational and mathematical methods related to the health sciences.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

COMPLIT 223: Literature and Human Experimentation (AFRICAAM 223, CSRE 123B, HUMBIO 175H, MED 220)

This course introduces students to the ways literature has been used to think through the ethics of human subjects research and experimental medicine. We will focus primarily on readings that imaginatively revisit experiments conducted on vulnerable populations: namely groups placed at risk by their classification according to perceived human and cultural differences. We will begin with Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818), and continue our study via later works of fiction, drama and literary journalism, including Toni Morrison's Beloved, David Feldshuh's Miss Evers Boys, Hannah Arendt's Eichmann and Vivien Spitz's Doctors from Hell, Rebecca Skloot's Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, and Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go. Each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical and policy writings of the period; and our ultimate goal will be to understand modes of ethics deliberation that are possible via creative uses of the imagination, and literature's place in a history of ethical thinking about humane research and care.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ikoku, A. (PI)

COMPLIT 229: Literature and Global Health (AFRICAAM 229, AFRICAST 229, CSRE 129B, FRENCH 229, HUMBIO 175L, MED 234)

This course examines the ways writers in literature and medicine have used the narrative form to explore the ethics of care in what has been called the developing world. We will begin with a call made by the editor-in-chief of The Lancet for a literature of global health, namely fiction modeled on the social reform novels of the nineteenth century, understood to have helped readers develop a conscience for public health as the field emerged as a modern medical specialty. We will then spend the quarter understanding how colonial, postcolonial, and world literatures have answered and complicated this call. Readings will include prose fiction by Albert Camus, Joseph Conrad, Tsitsi Dangaremgba, Amitav Ghosh, Susan Sontag as well as physician memoirs featuring Frantz Fanon, Albert Schweitzer, Abraham Verghese, Paul Farmer. And each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical, and policy writings that deeply inform the field of global health.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ikoku, A. (PI)

COMPMED 10SC: Comparative Anatomy and Physiology of Mammals

This class will provide the student with a deeper appreciation for the diversity of the mammalian orders, along with the fundamentals of comparative anatomy, physiology, and basic dissection techniques. In addition to dissection labs, Dr. B has a large collection of skulls, bones and plastinated organs that will facilitate learning mammalian anatomy. A field trip to the California Academy of Sciences will expose the students to the ¿behind the scenes¿ collection of 1000¿s of mammalian species, and a field trip to a local zoo will enable students to appreciate behavior and locomotion of assorted mammals in their ¿native¿ habitats. Course assignments: There will be 1 exam, 1 short presentation on an evolutionary topic and 1 final power point presentation on a human/animal or animal/animal interaction or conflict. The presentations will highlight animals from the students' assigned mammalian orders. Summer reading assignments will help prepare students for this enjoyable but intensive class. Sophomore College course, applications required. Applications due 12 noon April 5, 2015; apply at http://soco.stanford.edu.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bouley, D. (PI)

COMPMED 11SC: Life in the Zoo: Behavior, Welfare and Enrichment

Emphasis is on how animal welfare sciences provide an evidence-based approach to optimize and balance each of these demands so that "good welfare is good business." Topics include how to apply principles of animal behavior to design environmental enrichments beneficial to both animals and complex mission of the zoo; assessing exhibits from the point of view of animal behavior and well-being, educational opportunities and guest experience; developing an enrichment plan; designing and building enrichments for animals; interacting with the public as docents; assessing overall effectiveness of new enrichment. Class includes experience at San Francisco Zoo.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMPMED 80N: Introduction to Animal Behavior

Preference to freshman. Behavior is what makes animals special (thirsty plants don't walk to water), but why do animals behave the way they do? What does their behavior tell us about their inner lives, and about ourselves? What do lipstick and cuckoos and fireflies have in common? Why would nobody want to be a penguin? What do mice say to each other in their pee-mail? Learning how to think about questions like these gives us a unique perspective on the natural world. Format: Discussion and criticism of video examples, documentaries, and research papers. Topics: History and approaches to animal behavior; development of behavior, from genetics to learning; mechanisms of behavior, from neurons to motivation; function of behavior, from honest signals to selfish genes; the phylogeny of behavior, from domestication to speciation; and modern applications of behavior, from abnormal behavior, to conservation, to animal welfare, and animal consciousness.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Garner, J. (PI)

COMPMED 81N: Comparative Anatomy and Physiology of Mammals

Preference to freshmen. Emphasis is on a comparative approach to anatomy and physiology of a wide range of mammals, the unique adaptations of each species in terms of its anatomical, and behavioral characteristics, and how these species interact with human beings and other animals. Dissection required. Class size is limited to 16.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bouley, D. (PI)

COMPMED 83N: Horse Medicine

Preference to freshmen. The most common equine diseases, ranging from colic to lameness are reviewed using problem-oriented approach. Topics include: equine infectious diseases, care of the newborn foal, medical emergencies, and neurological disorders. A lab on the physical and neurological examination of the horse at the Red Barn.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Green, S. (PI)

COMPMED 84Q: Globally Emerging Zoonotic Diseases

Preference to sophomores. Infectious diseases impacting veterinary and human health around the world today. Mechanisms of disease, epidemiology, and underlying diagnostic, treatment and control principles associated with these pathogens.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Felt, S. (PI)

COMPMED 85N: Animal Use in Biomedical Research

Preference to freshmen. How and why animals are used in biomedical science. Addresses human and animal disease entities and how animal research has contributed to the treatment and cure of disease. Significantnportions of this course are devoted to documenting the humane care and treatment of laboratory animals in research, including, but not limited to such topics as laws and ethics, animal behavior, animal modeling, and the animal activist movement. Course topics will also include: What advances have been made as a result of the use of animals in research? Who conducts animal research? Predominant animal species used in biomedical research, facts and myths; the regulation of biomedical research; housing and care of laboratory animals; why new drugs must be tested; animal use in stem cell research, cancer research and genetically engineered mice; career choices in biomedical research.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Albertelli, M. (PI)

COMPMED 87Q: Introduction to the Mouse in Biomedical Research

Preference to sophomores. Focus is on the laboratory mouse, a widely used and important research model. Topics include the ethics of animal use in research; the natural history, origin and husbandry of the mouse; characteristics of key mouse strains; its anatomy and physiology; common diseases and their effects on research; coat color genetics relative to human diseases; immunodeficient mouse models; and genetic engineering of mice. The laboratory includes necropsy, handling, anesthesia, identification methods, and common research techniques using live and dead mice. Enrollment limited to 14 students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Nagamine, C. (PI)

COMPMED 88Q: Blood Cells- The Basics

Preference to sophomores. The essential and constant production of new blood cells by the bone marrow. Focus is on fundamentals of the three blood cell types along with white blood cell subtypes. Topics include the microscopic appearance of blood cells in mammalian and non-mammalian species, common morphologic abnormalities of blood cells, and shifts in blood cells that occur in several major diseases of humans and animals. Ideally suited for premed, prevet and Bio-X students, but no biology specialty background required.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPMED 89Q: Ouch it Hurts! The Comparative Neurobiology of Pain

Preference to sophomores. Focus is on understanding the basic neurobiology of pain pathways. Topics include the physiology, pharmacology, and clinical aspects of effective pain management. In both humans and animals pain is part of the protective mechanisms that prevent further injury to the body. However, if the pain process continues unchecked, it can become extremely detrimental.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pacharinsak, C. (PI)

COMPMED 107: Comparative Brain Evolution (COMPMED 207)

Functional organization and evolution of the vertebrate nervous system. Topics include paleoneurology, cladistic analysis, allometry, mosaic versus concerted evolution, and evolution of brain region structure, connectivity, and neurons. Comparisons between structure and function of vertebrate forebrains including hippocampi. Evolution of the primate visual and sensorimotor central nervous system as related to vocalization, socialization, and intelligence.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

COMPMED 110: Pre-Vet Advisory

For students interested in a career in veterinary medicine. How to meet the academic and practical experience prerequisites for admission to veterinary school. Networking with other pre-vet students. Periodic group meetings with guest speakers presenting career options in veterinary medicine. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

COMPMED 121: Imaging Anatomy in Animal Models

(Same as RADO 121) Introduces engineering and physical science majors to the basic laboratory animal anatomy visualized and targeted with biomedical imaging. Topics include: various imaging modalities (PET, CT, Radiology, MRI, and other optical imaging) and associated depiction of normal organs and skeletal structures in pigs, dogs, rabbits and rodents. Course includes didactic lectures, discussion, imaging labs and gross cadaver examination.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPMED 198: Undergraduate Directed Reading in Comparative Medicine

May be taken as a prelude to research and may also involve participation in a lab or research group seminar and/or library research.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPMED 199: Undergraduate Research

Investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPMED 200: Comparative Medicine Seminar and One Health Journal Club

Focus is on animal modeling and translational research that examines animal and human diseases. Teaches critical reading of scientific papers and presentation skills. Participants report on recent scientific articles and provide updates on their own research projects. Enrollment limited to undergraduate and graduate students currently matriculated or planning to enroll in the MS in Laboratory Animal Science degree program.
Terms: Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hestrin, S. (PI)

COMPMED 201: Neuro-Cellular Core (NEPR 201)

Focuses on fundamental aspects of cellular neurophysiology. Topics include exploration of electrophysiological properties of neurons, synaptic structure and function and synaptic plasticity. The course consists of didactic lectures and student-led discussions of classical papers. Incorporates simulation program Neuron. Enrollment restricted to students enrolled in Neurosciences Graduate Program.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Hestrin, S. (PI)

COMPMED 202: Training in Research and Biomethodology for Laboratory Animal Science

Emphasis is on providing introductory training and practical, hands-on workshops for students interested in learning more about research biomethodology and animal models of human and animal disease. Topics include basic care and principals guiding the use of research animals, animal health and welfare, and research animal enrichment, basic mouse handling, rodent breeding, and the principals of rodent surgery and anesthesia. Content delivered online and in-person.
Terms: Win, by arrangement | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Pacharinsak, C. (PI)

COMPMED 207: Comparative Brain Evolution (COMPMED 107)

Functional organization and evolution of the vertebrate nervous system. Topics include paleoneurology, cladistic analysis, allometry, mosaic versus concerted evolution, and evolution of brain region structure, connectivity, and neurons. Comparisons between structure and function of vertebrate forebrains including hippocampi. Evolution of the primate visual and sensorimotor central nervous system as related to vocalization, socialization, and intelligence.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

COMPMED 209: Laboratory Animal Medicine Seminar

Focuses on husbandry, care and diseases of laboratory animal species; experimental techniques; statistics; factors that influence animal research and behavior. Course content is divided into seminars over a two-year period. Department consent required for enrollment. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Felt, S. (PI)

COMPMED 210: Introduction to Mouse Histopathology

Focus is on anatomy and histology (microscopic anatomy) of the entire mouse, proper instrument handling and dissection technique, proper tissue fixation, trimming and orientation in cassettes, identification of normal organ histology on H & E-stained slides using a light microscope, use of special stains, and digital image acquisition. Basic pathological processes (inflammation, necrosis, apoptosis, hyperplasia, cancer) and how these manifest in different organs comprises the pathology aspect of this course. Participants present the pathology of their lab's mouse models. Preference to graduate students working with mouse models. Dissection labs. Comfort with mouse handling and previous participation in VSC mouse handling and euthanasia workshops recommended.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Bouley, D. (PI)

COMPMED 215: Synaptic Properties and Neuronal Circuits

Focus is on synapses and circuits in the central nervous system. Objective is to demonstrate how the specific properties of different synapses play a role in the function of neuronal circuits. The main types of synapses are covered, including both ionotropic and metabotropic-receptor-dependent synapses and their related circuits in the CNS. Lectures and student presentations. If taken for 3 units qualifies as a Core Course satisfying requirements in Cellular, Molecular & Developmental Neuroscience in the Neurosciences Graduate Program. Students enrolling for 3 units write an NIH-style proposal on a selected synapse, proposing a study of its properties and related function and presenting the proposal to the class for critique and discussion.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

COMPMED 299: Directed Reading in Comparative Medicine

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

COMPMED 370: Medical Scholars Research

Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

COMPMED 399: Graduate Research

Investigations sponsored by individual faculty members.Opportunities are available in comparative medicine and pathology, immuno-histochemistry, electron microscopy, molecular genetics, quantitative morphometry, neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of the hippocampus, pathogenesis of intestinal infections, immunopathology, biology of laboratory rodents, anesthesiology of laboratory animals, gene therapy of animal models of neurodegenerative diseases, and development and characterization of transgenic animal models. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

COMPMED 801: TGR Project

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR

CS 46N: Big Data, Big Discoveries, Big Fallacies

A sea change has occurred in science, technology, medicine, politics, and society as a whole: many of the world's biggest discoveries and decisions are now being made on the basis of analyzing massive data sets, referred to as "big data". Everyday examples include social-network friend recommendations, and weather predictions far more accurate than a decade ago; both use vast collections of data to model the past and predict the future. But it is surprisingly easy to come to false conclusions from data analysis alone. For example, we might conclude that acne medicine prevents heart attacks and strokes, if we forget to factor in the age of the patients. Privacy is a major concern: Target stores analyzed buying patterns to predict with remarkable accuracy which of their shoppers had just become pregnant, but trouble arose when they sent baby ads to the homes of pregnant teens whose parents weren't yet in the know. We will start by surveying the history of data-driven activities, leading up to the recent Big Data explosion. A variety of data analysis techniques will be covered, leading students to appreciate that even simple techniques can go a long way when the data set is large enough. Common stumbling blocks leading to false conclusions will be discussed, and students will be asked to debate the many issues surrounding privacy. In one project, students will see whose analysis techniques can best predict user movie ratings based on past rating behavior. A second project will be individually designed in an area of the student's choosing. The seminar will include a mix of assigned readings, small-scale investigations and assignments, classroom discussions, and two projects. No computer programming or special math skills are required; students will learn the basic techniques and tools they need to complete the data analysis assignments and projects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 102: Big Data: Tools and Techniques, Discoveries and Pitfalls

Aimed primarily at students who may not major in CS but want to learn about big data and apply that knowledge in their areas of study. Many of the world's biggest discoveries and decisions in science, technology, business, medicine, politics, and society as a whole, are now being made on the basis of analyzing massive data sets, but it is surprisingly easy to come to false conclusions from data analysis alone, and privacy of data connected to individuals can be a major concern. This course provides a broad introduction to big data: historical context and case studies; privacy issues; data analysis techniques including databases, data mining, and machine learning; sampling and statistical significance; data analysis tools including spreadsheets, SQL, Python, R; data visualization techniques and tools. Tools and techniques are hands-on but at a cursory level, providing a basis for future exploration and application. Prerequisites: high school AP computer science, CS106A, or other equivalent programming experience; comfort with statistics and spreadsheets helpful but not required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 231N: Convolutional Neural Networks for Visual Recognition

Computer Vision has become ubiquitous in our society, with applications innsearch, image understanding, apps, mapping, medicine, drones, andnself-driving cars. Core to many of these applications are the tasks of image classification, localization and detection. This course is a deep dive into details of neural network architectures with a focus on learning end-to-end models for these tasks, particularly image classification. During the 10-week course, students will learn to implement, train and debug their own neural networks and gain a detailed understanding of cutting-edge research in computer vision. The final assignment will involve training a multi-million parameter convolutional neural network and applying it on the largest image classification dataset (ImageNet). We will focus on teaching how to set up the problem of image recognition, the learning algorithms (e.g. backpropagation), practical engineering tricks for training and fine-tuning the networks and guide the students through hands-on assignments and a final course project. Much of the background and materials of this course will be drawn from the ImageNet Challenge: http://image-net.org/challenges/LSVRC/2014/index. Prerequisites: Proficiency in Python; familiarity with C/C++; CS 131 and CS 229 or equivalents; Math 21 or equivalent, linear algebra.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 275: Translational Bioinformatics (BIOMEDIN 217)

Analytic, storage, and interpretive methods to optimize the transformation of genetic, genomic, and biological data into diagnostics and therapeutics for medicine. Topics: access and utility of publicly available data sources; types of genome-scale measurements in molecular biology and genomic medicine; analysis of microarray data; analysis of polymorphisms, proteomics, and protein interactions; linking genome-scale data to clinical data and phenotypes; and new questions in biomedicine using bioinformatics. Case studies. Prerequisites: programming ability at the level of CS 106A and familiarity with statistics and biology.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

CS 309A: Cloud Computing

For science, engineering, business, medicine, and law students. Cloud computing is bringing information systems out of the back office and making it core to the entire economy. This class is intended for all students who want to begin to understand the implications of this shift in technology. Guest industry experts are public company CEOs who are delivering application, software development, operations management, compute, storage & data center, and network cloud services.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chou, T. (PI)

CS 379C: Computational Models of the Neocortex

Reprisal of course offered spring 2012 of the same name ; see http://www.stanford.edu/class/cs379c/ for more detail ; which emphasized scaling the technologies of systems neuroscience to take advantage of the exponential trend in computational power known as Moore's Law. Course covers many of the same topics but will focus on the near-term prospects for practical advances in health care, prosthetic augmentation, and artificial intelligence inspired by biological systems. Graded pass / no credit on the basis of class participation, a midterm white paper or business prospectus and a final technical report evaluating an appropriate technology selected in collaboration with the instructor. Focus will be on examining the assumptions underlying current claims for realizing the potential benefits of research in neuroscience and identifying real business opportunities, disruptive new technologies and advances in medicine that could substantially benefit patients within the next decade. Technology-minded critical thinkers seriously interested in placing their bets and picking careers in related areas of business, technology and science are welcome. Prerequisites: basic probability theory, algorithms, and statistics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dean, T. (PI)

CS 571: Surgical Robotics Seminar (ME 571)

Surgical robots developed and implemented clinically on varying scales. Seminar goal is to expose students from engineering, medicine, and business to guest lecturers from academia and industry.engineering and clinical aspects connected to design and use of surgical robots, varying in degree of complexity and procedural role. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSP 261: The Organic Chemistry of Life: Understanding Medicine and Drugs

Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 66: SPECTACULAR TRIALS: SEX, RACE AND VIOLENCE IN MODERN AMERICAN CULTURE (AMSTUD 106)

This course will use the phenomenon of the spectacular trial as a framework for exploring the intersections of sex, race, and violence in the formation of modern American culture. Beginning in the late nineteenth century and continuing through the 1990s, we will focus our inquiry on a number of notorious cases, some associated with familiar names¿the ¿Scottsboro Boys,¿ Emmett Till, O.J. Simpson¿others involving once-infamous actors¿like Joan Little and Inez Garcia¿whose ordeals have receded into historical memory, considering a range of questions arising from this thematic nexus. For instance, in what ways are sexual transgressions racialized and gendered? What are the practical and theoretical ramifications of the seemingly inextricable conjunction of sex and violence in legal and popular discourse? And what insights might such spectacles afford when broached as an arena in which sexual meanings, identities, and practices are refracted and ultimately constructed? We will also examine the role of the pertinent professions in the evolution of these events, in particular how the interplay of law, medicine, psychiatry, and forensic science helped define the shifting boundaries of legality, and how print, radio, and television journalism operated not only in sensationalizing, but also in reflecting, modeling, and shaping prevailing attitudes and behaviors. Our study of this vital facet of our ¿society of the spectacle¿ will draw on a series of compelling secondary readings complemented by a diverse array of primary sources¿from contemporaneous pamphlets and newspaper accounts to photographs, letters, trial testimony, and psychological commentary¿that will enable class members to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of different textual genres, experiment with alternative methods of fashioning historical interpretations, and contemplate the ways history might be employed to illuminate the persistent problems of racial bias, reflexive sexualization, and the packaging of trials as mass entertainment in the present day.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cardyn, L. (PI)

CSRE 69M: Race, Science, and Medicine in U.S. History (FEMGEN 69S, HISTORY 69S)

How have scientific ideas about race been shaped by their historical contexts, and what effects do these ideas have on people, institutions, law, and medicine? Is racial science always racist science? How do ideas about race intersect with ideas about gender, class, and disability? This course explores how natural philosophers and scientists have defined, used, and sometimes challenged ideas about race from the eighteenth century to today. Topics include medicine and slavery, eugenics, sociology, psychiatry, race-based medicine, and genetic ancestry. This course fulfills the departmental Sources and Methods requirement. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Spr, offered once only | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; LeBlanc, H. (PI)

CSRE 123B: Literature and Human Experimentation (AFRICAAM 223, COMPLIT 223, HUMBIO 175H, MED 220)

This course introduces students to the ways literature has been used to think through the ethics of human subjects research and experimental medicine. We will focus primarily on readings that imaginatively revisit experiments conducted on vulnerable populations: namely groups placed at risk by their classification according to perceived human and cultural differences. We will begin with Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818), and continue our study via later works of fiction, drama and literary journalism, including Toni Morrison's Beloved, David Feldshuh's Miss Evers Boys, Hannah Arendt's Eichmann and Vivien Spitz's Doctors from Hell, Rebecca Skloot's Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, and Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go. Each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical and policy writings of the period; and our ultimate goal will be to understand modes of ethics deliberation that are possible via creative uses of the imagination, and literature's place in a history of ethical thinking about humane research and care.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ikoku, A. (PI)

CSRE 129B: Literature and Global Health (AFRICAAM 229, AFRICAST 229, COMPLIT 229, FRENCH 229, HUMBIO 175L, MED 234)

This course examines the ways writers in literature and medicine have used the narrative form to explore the ethics of care in what has been called the developing world. We will begin with a call made by the editor-in-chief of The Lancet for a literature of global health, namely fiction modeled on the social reform novels of the nineteenth century, understood to have helped readers develop a conscience for public health as the field emerged as a modern medical specialty. We will then spend the quarter understanding how colonial, postcolonial, and world literatures have answered and complicated this call. Readings will include prose fiction by Albert Camus, Joseph Conrad, Tsitsi Dangaremgba, Amitav Ghosh, Susan Sontag as well as physician memoirs featuring Frantz Fanon, Albert Schweitzer, Abraham Verghese, Paul Farmer. And each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical, and policy writings that deeply inform the field of global health.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ikoku, A. (PI)

CSRE 138: Medical Ethics in a Global World: Examining Race, Difference and Power in the Research Enterprise (ANTHRO 138, ANTHRO 238)

This course will explore historical as well as current market transformations of medical ethics in different global contexts. We will examine various aspects of the research enterprise, its knowledge-generating and life-saving goals, as well as the societal, cultural, and political influences that make medical research a site of brokering in need of oversight and emergent ethics.nThis seminar will provide students with tools to explore and critically assess the various technical, social, and ethical positions of researchers, as well as the role of the state, the media, and certain publics in shaping scientific research agendas. We will also examine how structural violence, poverty, global standing, and issues of citizenship also influence issues of consent and just science and medicine.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 178: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (ETHICSOC 133, HUMBIO 178, PHIL 175A, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D, URBANST 122)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DANCE 100: Dance, Movement and Medicine: Immersion in Dance for PD

Combining actual dancing with medical research, this Cardinal Course investigates the dynamic complementary relationship between two practices, medicine and dance, through the lens of Parkinson's disease (PD), a progressive neurological disease that manifests a range of movement disorders. "Dance for PD" is an innovative approach to dancing --and to teaching dance --for those challenged by PD. Course format consists of: 1. Weekly Lecture/Seminar Presentation: Partial list of instructors include Ms. Frank, Dr. Bronte-Stewart and other Stanford medical experts & research scientists, David Leventhal (Director, "Dance for PD") and Bay Area "Dance for PD" certified master teachers, film-maker Dave Iverson, Damara Ganley, and acclaimed choreographers Joe Goode, Alex Ketley, Judith Smith (AXIS Dance). 2. Weekly Dance Class: Stanford students will fully participate as dancers, and creative partners, in the Stanford Neuroscience Health Center's ongoing "Dance for Parkinson's" community dance class for people with PD. This Community Engaged Learning component provides opportunity to engage meaningfully with people in the PD community. Dancing together weekly, students will experience firsthand the embodied signature values of "Dance for PD" classes: full inclusion, embodied presence, aesthetic and expressive opportunity for creative engagement, and community-building in action. A weekly debriefing session within Friday's class time will allow students to integrate seminar material with their movement experiences.nnnNO PRE-REQUISITES: No prior dance experience required. Beginners are welcome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

DBIO 220: Genomics and Personalized Medicine (GENE 210)

Principles of genetics underlying associations between genetic variants and disease susceptibility and drug response. Topics include: genetic and environmental risk factors for complex genetic disorders; design and interpretation of genome-wide association studies; pharmacogenetics; full genome sequencing for disease gene discovery; population structure and genetic ancestry; use of personal genetic information in clinical medicine; ethical, legal, and social issues with personal genetic testing. Hands-on workshop making use of personal or publicly available genetic data. Prerequisite: GENE 202, Gene 205 or BIOS 200.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

ECON 127: Economics of Health Improvement in Developing Countries (MED 262)

Application of economic paradigms and empirical methods to health improvement in developing countries. Emphasis is on unifying analytic frameworks and evaluation of empirical evidence. How economic views differ from public health, medicine, and epidemiology; analytic paradigms for health and population change; the demand for health; the role of health in international development. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and ECON 102B.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Alsan, M. (PI)

EDUC 135: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 335, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EDUC 205: Biosocial Medicine: The Social, Psychological, and Biological Determinants of Behavior and Wellbeing (HUMBIO 65, SOMGEN 215)

Explores how social forces, psychological influences, and biological systems combine to affect human behavior in early childhood, in the educational experience, and throughout the life course. Examines how behaviors are linked to well-being. Uses a flipped classroom model, in which a series of lectures are available for students to view on-line before class. In-class time then focuses on case studies from published research. Undergraduates enroll for 3 units. Students enrolling for 3 units attend two meetings per week; students enrolling for 2 units attend one meeting per week.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Barr, D. (PI)

EDUC 335: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EE 122B: Introduction to Biomedical Electronics

EE122B is a laboratory course covering the design and realization of key components and architectures of modern biomedical electronics systems, their application in clinical and research measurements, and practical matters in their safe reduction to practice. Material in each topic area begins with an overview of the underlying physiology. Details are presented beginning with the molecular, cellular, organ-level origins of the biosignals, followed by the relevant transduction principles, nature of the signals (amplitude, frequency spectrum, etc.), and their processing and clinical use. Specific engineering topics include safety in biomedical instruments, fundamentals of analog/digital conversion and filtering techniques for biosignals, typical transducers (biopotential, electrochemical, temperature, pressure, acoustic, movement), applications (cardiovascular medicine, neurology, pulmonology, etc.) and interfacing circuits. Prerequisite: EE122A or equivalent hands-on mixed-signal design experience and solid working knowledge of EE122A topics (see course description).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EE 169: Introduction to Bioimaging

Bioimaging is important for both clinical medicine, and medical research. This course will provide a introduction to several of the major imaging modalities, using a signal processing perspective. The course will start with an introduction to multi-dimensional Fourier transforms, and image quality metrics. It will then study projection imaging systems (projection X-Ray), backprojection based systems (CT, PET, and SPECT), systems that use beam forming (ultrasound), and systems that use Fourier encoding (MRI). Prerequisites: EE102A, EE102B
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Nishimura, D. (PI)

EE 202: Electrical Engineering in Biology and Medicine

Open to all. Primarily biological in nature, introduction to the physiological and anatomic aspects of medical instrumentation. Areas include patient monitoring, imaging, medical transducers, the unique aspects of medical electronic systems, the socio-economic impact of technology on medical care, and the constraints unique to medicine. Prerequisite: familiarity with circuit instrumentation techniques as in 101B.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 331: Biophotonics: Light in Medicine and Biology

Current topics and trends in the use of light in medicine and for advanced microscopy. Course begins with a review of relevant optical principles (basic physics required). Key topics include: light-tissue interactions; sensing and spectroscopy; contrast-enhanced imaging; super-resolution and label-free microscopy; medical applications of light for diagnostics, in-vivo imaging, and therapy; nanophotonics and array technologies. Open to non-majors; programming experience (Matlab and/or C) required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 369A: Medical Imaging Systems I

Imaging internal structures within the body using high-energy radiation studied from a systems viewpoint. Modalities covered: x-ray, computed tomography, and nuclear medicine. Analysis of existing and proposed systems in terms of resolution, frequency response, detection sensitivity, noise, and potential for improved diagnosis. Prerequisite: EE 261
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 372: Data Science for High Throughput Sequencing

Extraordinary advances in sequencing technology in the past decade have revolutionized biology and medicine. Many high-throughput sequencing based assays have been designed to make various biological measurements of interest. This course explores the various computational and data science problems that arises from processing, managing and performing predictive analytics on this high throughput sequencing data. Specific problems we will study include genome assembly, haplotype phasing, RNA-Seq assembly, RNA-Seq quantification, single cell RNA-seq analysis, multi-omics analysis,nand genome compression. We attack these problems through a combination of tools from information theory, combinatorial algorithms, machine learning and signal processing. Through this course, the student will also get familiar with various software tools developed for the analysis of real sequencing data. Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of probability at the level of EE 178. Some programming experience.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EMED 5C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 5C, FEMGEN 5C, HISTORY 5C, HUMBIO 178T)

(Same as History 105C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution and labor exploitation, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EMED 105C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 105C, FEMGEN 105C, HISTORY 105C, INTNLREL 105C)

(Same as HISTORY 5C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution and labor exploitation, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EMED 110: Basic Cardiac Life Support for Undergraduates

Preference to undergraduates. Teaches one- and two-rescuer adult CPR and management of an obstructed airway using the American CPR model. Does not satisfy MD student BCLS requirement; MD students take Surgery 201.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lipman, G. (PI)

EMED 111A: Emergency Medical Technician Training (EMED 211A)

Basics of life support outside the hospital setting. Topics include emergency patient assessments for cardiac, respiratory, and neurological emergencies, as well as readiness training for emergencies on and off campus. Lectures, practicals, and applications. Students taking the class for 4 units complete additional FEMA training and additional clinical rotations. Upon completion of SURG 111A,B,C or 211A,B,C, students are eligible to sit for the National Registry EMT licensure exam. Freshmen and Sophomores are highly encouraged to apply. Prerequisites: application (see http://surg211.stanford.edu), and consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EMED 111B: Emergency Medical Technician Training (EMED 211B)

Continuation of 111A/211A. Approach to traumatic injuries. Topics include head, neck, and trunk injuries, bleeding and shock, burn emergencies, and environmental emergencies. Lectures, practicals, and applications. Students taking the class for 4 units complete additional online FEMA training and additional clinical rotations. Upon completion of SURG 111A,B,C or 211A,B,C, students are eligible to sit for the National Registry EMT licensure exam. Prerequisites: 111A/211A, CPR-PR certification, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EMED 111C: Emergency Medical Technician Training (EMED 211C)

Continuation of 111B/211B. Special topics in EMS. Topics include pediatric, obstetric, and gynecologic emergencies, EMS operations, mass casualty incidents, and assault. Lectures, practicals, and applications. Students taking the class for 4 units complete additional online FEMA training and additional clinical rotations. Upon completion of SURG 111A,B,C or 211A,B,C, students are eligible to sit for the National Registry EMT certification exam. Prerequisites: 111B/211B, CPR-PR certification, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EMED 112A: Advanced Training and Teaching for the EMT (EMED 212A)

Ongoing training for current EMS providers. Students practice BLS assessments and medical care through simulated patient encounters. Topics include airway and stroke management, abdominal emergencies, prehospital pharmacology, and teaching skills. Students taking the course for 3 units also serve as teaching assistants for Surgery 111, the Stanford EMT training course. Prerequisites: SURG 111/211 A-C (or equivalent EMT Certification course), CPR-PR certification, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EMED 112B: Advanced Training and Teaching for the EMT (EMED 212B)

Ongoing training for current EMS providers. Students practice BLS assessments and medical care through simulated patient encounters. Topics include assessment and treatment of the undifferentiated trauma patient (including airway management, monitoring, and evaluation) and prehospital care in nontraditional locations. Students taking the course for 3 units also serve as teaching assistants for Surgery 111, the Stanford EMT training course. Prerequisites: SURG 111/211 A-C (or equivalent EMT Certification course), CPR-PR certification, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EMED 112C: Advanced Training and Teaching for the EMT (EMED 212C)

Ongoing training for current EMS providers. Students practice BLS assessments and medical care through simulated patient encounters. Topics include mass casualty incidents, assaults, and pediatric emergencies.Expanded scope topics may be included - ACLS, ultrasound, and suturing. Students taking the course for 3 units also serve as teaching assistants for Surgery 111, the Stanford EMT training course. Prerequisites: SURG 111/211 A-C (or equivalent EMT Certification course), CPR-PR certification, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EMED 122: Biosecurity and Bioterrorism Response (BIOE 122, PUBLPOL 122)

Overview of the most pressing biosecurity issues facing the world today. Guest lecturers have included former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, former Special Assistant on BioSecurity to Presidents Clinton and Bush Jr. Dr. Ken Bernard, Chief Medical Officer of the Homeland Security Department Dr. Alex Garza, eminent scientists, innovators and physicians in the field, and leaders of relevant technology companies. How well the US and global healthcare systems are prepared to withstand a pandemic or a bioterrorism attack, how the medical/healthcare field, government, and the technology sectors are involved in biosecurity and pandemic or bioterrorism response and how they interface, the rise of synthetic biology with its promises and threats, global bio-surveillance, making the medical diagnosis, isolation, containment, hospital surge capacity, stockpiling and distribution of countermeasures, food and agriculture biosecurity, new promising technologies for detection of bio-threats and countermeasures. Open to medical, graduate, and undergraduate students. No prior background in biology necessary. 4 units for twice weekly attendance (Mon. and Wed.); additional 1 unit for writing a research paper for 5 units total maximum. PLEASE NOTE: This class will meet for the first time on Wednesday, March 30.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Trounce, M. (PI)

EMED 125: Social Emergency Medicine and Community Engagement

Stanford Health Advocates and Research in the Emergency Department (SHAR(ED)) is focused on the practical application of and research in social emergency medicine.Emergency Departments (EDs) are the nation's safety nets, for medical as well as social needs. EDs remain the sole access to any medical care for those in need, 24/7, regardless of insurance status. The ED is a unique bridge to the public, and is a compelling site for community partnership, clinical and health services research geared towards impacting population health and policy. Through direct patient contact and community engagement, students help to meet the social needs of ED patients.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EMED 199: Undergraduate Research

Consists of Emergency Medicine focused studies and projects (including Research Projects) in progress. Possible topics include management of trauma patients, common medical and surgical emergencies in pediatric and adult populations, topics in disaster medicine, biosecurity and bioterrorism response, wilderness medicine, international medicine, and others. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EMED 201: Basic Cardiac Life Support for Healthcare Professionals

All medical students must be certified in Basic Cardiac Life Support before the end of the first (autumn) quarter. Students who provide documentation of certification received within six months prior to the date of matriculation will be exempted from the requirement. The course teaches one- and two-rescuer CPR, management of an obstructed airway, and CPR for infants and children. Upon completion of the course, students receive an American Heart Association certificate in BLS.nIn addition to CPR training, we will also teach Question, Persuade, Refer (QPR) which is the CPR equivalent to psychological emergencies. This portion of the course will allow students to master techniques on how to recognize and respond to an individual in psychological distress and to help in suicide prevention. Our faculty are certified QPR instructors and students will become QPR certified during this course through the QPR Institute certification process.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

EMED 205: Film and Television Emergencies: Grasp Emergency Care through Pop Culture

Focus is on exploring emergency medicine through the analysis of themes broadcast in popular culture film and television. Work in small groups to select screening material and identify content for engaging discussion. Topics include the interplay of technical skills, nontechnical skills and communication in the emergency department management of patients of all ages and acuity.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

EMED 210A: Managing Emergencies: What Every Doctor Should Know (Clinical Fundamentals)

Reviews basic but critical concepts in evaluating and managing patients with possible life-threatening emergencies with a special focus on avoiding common errors. Topics include cardiovascular collapse, basic airway management, triage and shock. Teaches skills such as reading an ECG or a chest x-ray to aid students in developing a rapid response to patients with potentially fatal complaints. Class meets online.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Walker, R. (PI)

EMED 210B: Managing Emergencies: What Every Doctor Should Know (High Risk Chief Complaints)

Students learn management of various emergent and traumatic patient presentations. Some topics include advanced airway, trauma, burns, poisoning, and stroke. Key skills and common pitfalls in practice discussed. Providers completing Surg 210A and B will be better prepared to respond effectively with a challenging and urgent case. Class meets online.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Walker, R. (PI)

EMED 211A: Emergency Medical Technician Training (EMED 111A)

Basics of life support outside the hospital setting. Topics include emergency patient assessments for cardiac, respiratory, and neurological emergencies, as well as readiness training for emergencies on and off campus. Lectures, practicals, and applications. Students taking the class for 4 units complete additional FEMA training and additional clinical rotations. Upon completion of SURG 111A,B,C or 211A,B,C, students are eligible to sit for the National Registry EMT licensure exam. Freshmen and Sophomores are highly encouraged to apply. Prerequisites: application (see http://surg211.stanford.edu), and consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EMED 211B: Emergency Medical Technician Training (EMED 111B)

Continuation of 111A/211A. Approach to traumatic injuries. Topics include head, neck, and trunk injuries, bleeding and shock, burn emergencies, and environmental emergencies. Lectures, practicals, and applications. Students taking the class for 4 units complete additional online FEMA training and additional clinical rotations. Upon completion of SURG 111A,B,C or 211A,B,C, students are eligible to sit for the National Registry EMT licensure exam. Prerequisites: 111A/211A, CPR-PR certification, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EMED 211C: Emergency Medical Technician Training (EMED 111C)

Continuation of 111B/211B. Special topics in EMS. Topics include pediatric, obstetric, and gynecologic emergencies, EMS operations, mass casualty incidents, and assault. Lectures, practicals, and applications. Students taking the class for 4 units complete additional online FEMA training and additional clinical rotations. Upon completion of SURG 111A,B,C or 211A,B,C, students are eligible to sit for the National Registry EMT certification exam. Prerequisites: 111B/211B, CPR-PR certification, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EMED 212A: Advanced Training and Teaching for the EMT (EMED 112A)

Ongoing training for current EMS providers. Students practice BLS assessments and medical care through simulated patient encounters. Topics include airway and stroke management, abdominal emergencies, prehospital pharmacology, and teaching skills. Students taking the course for 3 units also serve as teaching assistants for Surgery 111, the Stanford EMT training course. Prerequisites: SURG 111/211 A-C (or equivalent EMT Certification course), CPR-PR certification, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EMED 212B: Advanced Training and Teaching for the EMT (EMED 112B)

Ongoing training for current EMS providers. Students practice BLS assessments and medical care through simulated patient encounters. Topics include assessment and treatment of the undifferentiated trauma patient (including airway management, monitoring, and evaluation) and prehospital care in nontraditional locations. Students taking the course for 3 units also serve as teaching assistants for Surgery 111, the Stanford EMT training course. Prerequisites: SURG 111/211 A-C (or equivalent EMT Certification course), CPR-PR certification, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EMED 212C: Advanced Training and Teaching for the EMT (EMED 112C)

Ongoing training for current EMS providers. Students practice BLS assessments and medical care through simulated patient encounters. Topics include mass casualty incidents, assaults, and pediatric emergencies.Expanded scope topics may be included - ACLS, ultrasound, and suturing. Students taking the course for 3 units also serve as teaching assistants for Surgery 111, the Stanford EMT training course. Prerequisites: SURG 111/211 A-C (or equivalent EMT Certification course), CPR-PR certification, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EMED 217: Critical Cases: Think Like an Experienced Physician

Focus is on the ability to find current, accurate information, and the ability to interpret and translate that information into clinical decisions the most important skill in medicine. Work in small teams to refine essential skills to excel on the wards through case-based learning. Topics include traumatic injuries, altered mental status, severe inefections and other critical Emergency Medicine cases. Students develop knowledge of steps critical to care for these patients while refining skills in diagnostic reasoning, interpreting medical literature, and team-based medical care.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Lippert, S. (PI)

EMED 220: Emergency Medicine: Introduction

An introduction to the specialty of emergency medicine, including the emergency stabilization of patients in both the pre-hospital phase and in the emergency department. The course will include both lectures and hands on practical sessions. Topics consist of management of trauma patients and common medical emergencies, with hands on sessions including how to manage airway emergencies and suturing. 2 units includes two four-hour emergency department shadow shifts.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

EMED 222: Biosecurity and Bioterrorism Response (PUBLPOL 222)

Overview of the most pressing biosecurity issues facing the world today. Guest lecturers have included former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, former Special Assistant on BioSecurity to Presidents Clinton and Bush Jr. Dr. Ken Bernard, Chief Medical Officer of the Homeland Security Department Dr. Alex Garza, eminent scientists, innovators and physicians in the field, and leaders of relevant technology companies. How well the US and global healthcare systems are prepared to withstand a pandemic or a bioterrorism attack, how the medical/healthcare field, government, and the technology sectors are involved in biosecurity and pandemic or bioterrorism response and how they interface, the rise of synthetic biology with its promises and threats, global bio-surveillance, making the medical diagnosis, isolation, containment, hospital surge capacity, stockpiling and distribution of countermeasures, food and agriculture biosecurity, new promising technologies for detection of bio-threats and countermeasures. Open to medical, graduate, and undergraduate students. No prior background in biology necessary. 2 unit option for once weekly attendance (Wed only); 4 unit option for twice weekly attendance (Mon and Wed); 1 additional units (for a maximum of 5 units total) for a research paper.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Trounce, M. (PI)

EMED 223: Wilderness Medicine

Open to all students. Wilderness-related illnesses and injuries; a framework for evaluation and treatment of emergencies in the backcountry. Hands-on clinical skills. Topics include high altitude medicine, hypothermia, envenomations, search and rescue, improvisation, and a day long field trip for hands-on field work. 3 units includes participation in an Emergency Department observation shift.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lipman, G. (PI)

EMED 224: Wilderness First Aid

Provides basic introductory back country and emergency medicine skill development. Topics covered include patient assessment, addressing life threats, shock, spine safety, musculoskeletal injuries, medical emergencies, and environmental emergencies.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Lipman, G. (PI)

EMED 226: Wilderness First Responder

A more advanced and intensive class building on wilderness first aid that teaches first responder skills using improvised resources in varying environmental conditions and extended-care situations. This is used as a framework for learning to respond to medical emergencies in remote wilderness settings. Examines necessary tools to make critical medical and evacuation decisions.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Lipman, G. (PI)

EMED 227: Health Care Leadership

Brings healthcare leaders from a variety of sectors within healthcare to share their personal reflections and insights on effective leadership. Speakers discuss their personal core values, share their lessons learned and their recipe for effective leadership in the healthcare field, including reflection on career and life choices. Speakers include CEOs of healthcare technology, pharmaceutical and other companies, leaders in public health, eminent leaders of hospitals, academia and other health care organizations. Students enrolling for 1 unit attend one lecture per week; students enrolling for 2 units attend two lectures per week. Students enrolled in 2 units are required to complete a project. Open to undergraduate and graduate students. No prerequisites required.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Trounce, M. (PI)

EMED 248: Medical Scribe Training

Focuses on developing knowledge of clinical documentation in order to accompany a physician in patient encounters, including documentation of patient histories, findings, procedures, results, and clinical course. Serves as prerequisite for Surgery 248A, Advanced Medical Scribe Training.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Pierog, J. (PI)

EMED 248A: Advanced Medical Scribe Training

Preparation to become a medical scribe. Focus is on further honing skills of a clinical scribe through ongoing training and education. Lectures, practical application, simulation, interactive skills, and hands-on training. Demonstrating and maintaining an understanding of the team approach to patient care and enhancing skills and knowledge in the promotion of quality documentation. Prerequisite: successful completion of SURG 248 and consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Pierog, J. (PI)

EMED 248X: Introduction to Medical Scribing (Accelerated Course)

Accelerated, three-day intensive focusing on developing knowledge of clinical documentation, medical terminology, electronic medical records and medical record coding in order to accompany a physician during a patient encounter. Topics include documentation of a chief complaint, history of current illness/injuries, past medical, social and family history, review of physical systems, clinical course, procedures, lab results and other pertinent information for a patient visit. Serves as prerequisite for Surgery 248A, Advanced Medical Scribe Training..
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Pierog, J. (PI)

EMED 250: Clinical Skills in Resuscitation

Focus is on transmission of high yield knowledge on how to approach an undifferentiated patient with initial assessment, diagnosis and treatment plan. Learning centers on participating in small group high fidelity simulation, with a focus on bedside ultrasound and procedural skills. Curriculum focuses on 50 common diagnoses seen in the acute care setting with emphasis on critical care and resuscitation. Prior clinical knowledge is not required, and early career medical student enrollment is encouraged. Provides knowledge and practical skill that is applicable to multiple fields and patient types in medicine.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

EMED 280: Early Clinical Experience in Emergency Medicine

Provides an observational experience in an emergency medicine specialty. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Albanese, C. (PI); Auerbach, P. (PI); Barrett, B. (PI); Bonham, C. (PI); Bresler, M. (PI); Bruzoni, M. (PI); Busque, S. (PI); Chang, J. (PI); Chase, R. (PI); Concepcion, W. (PI); Curtin, C. (PI); D'Souza, P. (PI); Dalman, R. (PI); Dannenberg, B. (PI); Dirbas, F. (PI); Duriseti, R. (PI); Dutta, S. (PI); Eisenberg, D. (PI); Emond, S. (PI); Esquivel, C. (PI); Ferguson, I. (PI); Fuchs, J. (PI); Garmel, G. (PI); Gharahbaghian, L. (PI); Gilbert, G. (PI); Girod, S. (PI); Gosling, J. (PI); Govindarajan, P. (PI); Greco, R. (PI); Gregg, D. (PI); Gurtner, G. (PI); Harris, E. (PI); Harter, P. (PI); Hartman, G. (PI); Helms, J. (PI); Hentz, R. (PI); Hernandez-Boussard, T. (PI); Jeffrey, S. (PI); Kahn, D. (PI); Khosla, R. (PI); Klofas, E. (PI); Krams, S. (PI); Krummel, T. (PI); Lau, J. (PI); Lee, G. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Leeper, N. (PI); Lin, J. (PI); Lipman, G. (PI); Longaker, M. (PI); Lorenz, H. (PI); Maggio, P. (PI); Mahadevan, S. (PI); Martinez, O. (PI); Melcher, M. (PI); Mell, M. (PI); Morton, J. (PI); Mueller, C. (PI); Murphy, K. (PI); Norris, R. (PI); Norton, J. (PI); Oberhelman, H. (PI); Perera, P. (PI); Poultsides, G. (PI); Quinn, J. (PI); Raphael, E. (PI); Rhoads, K. (PI); Rivas, H. (PI); Ryan, J. (PI); Salvatierra, O. (PI); Schendel, S. (PI); Schreiber, D. (PI); Shelton, A. (PI); Shen, S. (PI); Smith-Coggins, R. (PI); So, S. (PI); Spain, D. (PI); Srivastava, S. (PI); Staudenmayer, K. (PI); Sternbach, G. (PI); Strehlow, M. (PI); Sylvester, K. (PI); Taleghani, N. (PI); Trounce, M. (PI); Visser, B. (PI); Wan, D. (PI); Wang, N. (PI); Wapnir, I. (PI); Weiss, E. (PI); Welton, M. (PI); Whitmore, I. (PI); Williams, S. (PI); Wren, S. (PI); Yang, G. (PI); Yang, S. (PI); Zafren, K. (PI); Zarins, C. (PI); Zhou, W. (PI)

EMED 370: Medical Scholars Research

Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

EMED 398W: Clinical Elective in Emergency Medicine

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

ENGLISH 113A: Desire, Identity, Modernity

While drawing on classic work in modern queer studies, the course will focus on the role which Renaissance discourses of desire continue to play in our negotiations of homo/erotic subjectivity, identity politics, and sexual and gender difference. We will study Renaissance queerness in relation to the classical tradition on the one hand and the contemporary discourses of religion, medicine, law, and politics on the other. nReadings include diverse genres, from plays and poems to essays, dialogues, letters, etc. Both major and minor authors will be represented"
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lupic, I. (PI)

ENGR 155C: Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers (CME 106)

Probability: random variables, independence, and conditional probability; discrete and continuous distributions, moments, distributions of several random variables. Topics in mathematical statistics: random sampling, point estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, non-parametric tests, regression and correlation analyses; applications in engineering, industrial manufacturing, medicine, biology, and other fields. Prerequisite: CME 100/ENGR154 or MATH 51 or 52.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ETHICSOC 133: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (CSRE 178, HUMBIO 178, PHIL 175A, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D, URBANST 122)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ETHICSOC 301: Conflicts, Ethics, and the Academy

(Same as LAW 684) This course looks at conflicts of interest and ethical issues as they arise within academic work. The participants will be drawn from schools and departments across the University so that the discussion will prompt different examples of, and perspectives on, the issues we discuss. Topics will include the conflicts that arise from sponsored research, including choices of topics, shaping of conclusions, and nondisclosure agreements; issues of informed consent with respect to human subjects research, and the special issues raised by research conducted outside the United States; peer review, co-authorship, and other policies connected to scholarly publication; and the ethics of the classroom and conflicts of interest implicating professor-student relationships. Representative readings will include Marcia Angell's work, Drug Companies and Doctors: A Story of Corruption, N.Y. Rev. Books, Jan. 15, 2009, and Is Academic Medicine for Sale? 342 N. Engl. J. Med. 1516 (2000) (and responses); William R. Freudenburg, Seeding Science, Courting Conclusions: Reexamining the Intersection of Science, Corporate Cash, and the Law, 20 Sociological Forum 3 (2005); Max Weber, Science as a Vocation; legal cases; and conflict-of-interest policies adopted by various universities and professional organizations. The course will include an informal dinner at the end of each session. The goal of the course is to have students across disciplines think about the ethical issues they will confront in an academic or research career. Non-law students should enroll in ETHICSOC 301.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

FAMMED 199: Undergraduate Directed Reading and Research in Family and Community Medicine

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

FAMMED 210: The Healer's Art

Explores the human dimensions of medicine, creating a firm foundation for meeting the challenging demands of medical training and practice. Based on curriculum developed by Dr. Rachel Naomi Remen at UCSF . (For details/evaluations see http://ishiprograms.org/programs-medical_educators.html). Medical students and faculty participate together in an innovative discovery model process that enables an in-depth sharing of experience, beliefs, aspirations and personal truths. Topics include deep listening, presence, acceptance, loss, grief, healing, relationship, encounters with awe and mystery, finding meaning, service, and self-care practices. No papers/exams. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Feldstein, B. (PI)

FAMMED 213: Medical Tai Chi

Tai chi is a recognized form of complimentary and alternative medicine. Class is intended to promote student health and well-being and to decrease stress, depression, and anxiety through tai chi practice. Course focuses on weekly practice and analysis of the literature/research regarding health benefits of tai chi.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

FAMMED 219: Mind-Body Medicine

A small group (8-10) of medical students experientially exploring of the interconnections among human capacities such as thought, emotion, belief, attitudes, and physical health. Review and practice of specific skills (including mindfulness exercises, meditation, imagery, visualization, body awareness, autogenics, and biofeedback) to enhance self-awareness, self-expression, and stress management. Readings relevant to mind-body medicine made available. Anticipated benefits to class participants include discovering and mobilizing their capacity to participate in valuable and proven methods of self knowledge and stress reduction, while dealing with the frustrations and alienation that many students experience in medical school and beyond.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Weinlander, E. (PI)

FAMMED 241: Assistantship in Family and Community Medicine

An in-depth experience with a family physician preceptor following the first year of the pre-clinical curriculum. The student applies during the first year to participate in the summer following completion. Application is through the Center for Family and Community Medicine (avjohn@stanford.edu). Placements with family physicians' practices throughout California.
Terms: by arrangement | Units: 6-12 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

FAMMED 243: Introduction to Integrative Medicine (ANES 243)

Presentations by local, national, and international experts in various modalities of integrative medicine commonly used by patients in the US, including mind-body medicine (biofeedback, clinical hypnosis, meditation, yoga); traditional whole systems of medicine (traditional Chinese medicine, Ayurveda); biological therapies (botanical medicine, supplements, herbal medicine); manipulative therapies (chiropractic, massage); and acupuncture. Lectures focus on evidence supporting the potential value of various treatment modalities and explanations of both the traditional and proposed scientific mechanisms of actions. Most classes include an experiential portion.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

FAMMED 244: Ethnicity and Medicine (HUMBIO 121E)

Weekly lecture series. Examines the linguistic, social class, and cultural factors that impact patient care. Presentations promote culturally sensitive health care services and review contemporary research issues involving minority and underserved populations. Topics include health care inequities and medical practices of African Americans, Asians, Latinos, Native Americans, immigrants, and refugees in both urban and rural settings. 1 unit requires weekly lecture attendance, completion of required readings, completion of response questions; 2 units requires weekly lecture attendance and discussion session, completion of required readings and weekly response questions; additional requirement for 3 units (HUMBIO only) is completion of a significant term paper Only students taking the course for 3 units may request a letter grade. Enrollment limited to students with sophomore academic standing or above.This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Garcia, R. (PI)

FAMMED 245: Women and Health Care

Lecture series. Topics of interest to women as health care consumers and providers. The historical role of women in health care; current and future changes.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Weinlander, E. (PI)

FAMMED 250: Interprofessional Management of Population Health with Advanced Computer Technology

The Interprofessional Management of Population Health with Advanced Computer Technology (IMPACT) Program is designed for MD students who wish to have a sustained early clinical experience during the pre-clerkship years by being part of a primary health care team. Using the EPIC electronic medical record system, the team identifies and targets patients who are overdue for recommended preventive services. Focus is on training students to use health coaching, motivational interviewing, and shared decision-making skills to improve the health of patients through better cancer screening, chronic disease surveillance, immunizations, and medication monitoring. Delivered through the Stanford Healthcare Innovations and Experiential Learning Directive (SHIELD), a curriculum innovation partnership between the Stanford School of Medicine, the Stanford Department of General Medical Disciplines, and the Stanford Office of Community Health. Prerequisite: director consent; brief application, interview required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

FAMMED 250B: Interprofessional Management of Population Health with Advanced Computer Technology II

The second quarter course for students continuing in the The Interprofessional Management of Population Health with Advanced Computer Technology (IMPACT) Program, designed for motivated MD students who wish to have a sustained early clinical experience during the pre-clerkship years by being part of a primary health care team. Students collaborate with the interprofessional team to develop data-driven projects utilizing the EPIC electronic medical record system, and increase patient interaction and application of skills in health coaching, motivational interviewing, and shared decision-making to improve the health of patients through better cancer screening, chronic disease surveillance, immunizations, and medication monitoring. The second of a 3-quarter series delivered across the first year of medical school, with an option to continue in year two, and part of the SHIELD (Stanford Healthcare Innovations and Experiential Learning Directive) Early Clinical Immersion Program. nnInterested MD students should contact the course director, Dr. Amelia Sattler (amelia.sattler@stanford.edu). A 3-quarter commitment is required. Students will enroll in FAMMED250A, FAMMED250B, FAMMED205C. Max enrollment of 6 students. Prerequisite: director consent; brief application, interview required.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Sattler, A. (PI)

FAMMED 250C: Interprofessional Management of Population Health with Advanced Computer Technology III

The third quarter course for students continuing in the The Interprofessional Management of Population Health with Advanced Computer Technology (IMPACT) Program, designed for motivated MD students who wish to have a sustained early clinical experience during the pre-clerkship years by being part of a primary health care team. Students continue their collaboration with the interprofessional team at their clinical site, further develop projects, explore research opportunities, and increase patient interaction and application of skills in health coaching, motivational interviewing, and shared decision-making to improve the health of patients through better cancer screening, chronic disease surveillance, immunizations, and medication monitoring. The third of a 3-quarter series delivered across the first year of medical school, with an option to continue in year two, and part of the SHIELD (Stanford Healthcare Innovations and Experiential Learning Directive) Early Clinical Immersion Program. nnInterested MD students should contact the course director, Dr. Amelia Sattler (amelia.sattler@stanford.edu). A 3-quarter commitment is required. Students will enroll in FAMMED250A, FAMMED250B, FAMMED205C. Max enrollment of 6 students. Prerequisite: director consent; brief application, interview required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Sattler, A. (PI)

FAMMED 251B: Interprofessional Management of Population Health with Advanced Computer Technology (IMPACT)

Population health management is a cornerstone of Stanford Health Care¿s ongoing efforts to redesign primary care delivery and improve the quality of patient care. This is the second part of the 2-quarter series for second year medial students, which enables a continuity experience for students in the Interprofessional Management of Population Health with Advanced Computer Technology (IMPACT) Program. Students will apply skills in health coaching, motivational interviewing, and shared decision-making skills to improve the health of patients through better cancer screening, chronic disease surveillance, immunizations, and medication monitoring, and further develop clinical quality improvement and scholarship projects begun in their first year. This 2-quarter series is part of the SHIELD (Stanford Healthcare Innovations and Experiential Learning Directive) Early Clinical Immersion Program. nnInterested MD students should contact the course director, Dr. Amelia Sattler (amelia.sattler@stanford.edu). A 2-quarter commitment is required. Students will enroll in FAMMED251A and FAMMED251B. Max enrollment of 6 students. Prerequisite: director consent; brief application, interview required.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

FAMMED 251C: Interprofessional Management of Population Health with Advanced Computer Technology VI

The Interprofessional Management of Population Health with Advanced Computer Technology (IMPACT) Program is designed for MD students who wish to have a sustained early clinical experience during the pre-clerkship years by being part of a primary health care team. Using the EPIC electronic medical record system, the team identifies and targets patients who are overdue for recommended preventive services. Focus is on training students to use health coaching, motivational interviewing, and shared decision-making skills to improve the health of patients through better cancer screening, chronic disease surveillance, immunizations, and medication monitoring. Delivered through the Stanford Healthcare Innovations and Experiential Learning Directive (SHIELD), a curriculum innovation partnership between the Stanford School of Medicine, the Stanford Department of General Medical Disciplines, and the Stanford Office of Community Health. Enrollment limited to second year MD students only. Prerequisite: director consent; brief application, interview required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Sattler, A. (PI)

FAMMED 252: Medicine & Horsemanship: An Outdoor, Equine Assisted Learning Course for Doctor-Patient Relationship

Medicine and Horsemanship is a unique outdoor experience working with horses to develop interpersonal skills, leadership qualities, and self-care techniques. A challenge throughout a clinical career is to conduct relationships with patients and colleagues in a manner that is professional, perceptive, confident, and authentic. Horses mirror and magnify our intentions and behaviors. Working with horses requires sensitivity to nonverbal cues, discrimination in the quality and amount of physical contact, and an awareness of one's emotional state, all important skills for relating to patients. Horses give non-judgmental feedback about our personal communication styles and our ability to operate from a place of empathy and kindness. The course also teaches how to recognize subjectivity in judgment and how to overcome fear and immobility in the face of uncertainty. No riding is required and no previous horse experience is assumed. Limit 12 students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

FAMMED 280: Early Clinical Experience in Family and Community Medicine

Provides an observational experience for pre-clinical students as determined by the instructor and student. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

FAMMED 281A: L-CHAMP Longitudinal Community Health Advocacy Medical Partnership

This course is designed for students who wish to have sustained early clinical experience throughout their pre-clerkship years. The Longitudinal Community Health Advocacy Medical Partnership (L-CHAMP) is part of the SHIELD program. The course initiates with one-hour intensive health coaching training sessions, quarterly skill-based sessions, such as motivational interviewing, medication reconciliation, and leadership, as well as monthly seminars on topics, including health coaching integration, service projects, and patient-centered care, etc. L-CHAMP is a collaborative effort between Center for Education and Research in Family and Community Medicine and the Office of Community Health. Enrollment limited to first-year MD students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

FAMMED 281B: L-CHAMP Longitudinal Community Health Advocacy Medical Partnership

This course is designed for students who wish to have sustained early clinical experience throughout their pre-clerkship years. The Longitudinal Community Health Advocacy Medical Partnership (L-CHAMP) is part of the SHIELD program. The course initiates with one-hour intensive health coaching training sessions, quarterly skill-based sessions, such as motivational interviewing, medication reconciliation, and leadership, as well as monthly seminars on topics, including health coaching integration, service projects, and patient-centered care, etc. L-CHAMP is a collaborative effort between Center for Education and Research in Family and Community Medicine and the Office of Community Health. Enrollment limited to first-year MD students. Prerequisite: FAMMED 281A.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

FAMMED 281C: L-CHAMP Longitudinal Community Health Advocacy Medical Partnership

This course is designed for students who wish to have sustained early clinical experience throughout their pre-clerkship years. The Longitudinal Community Health Advocacy Medical Partnership (L-CHAMP) is part of the SHIELD program. The course initiates with one-hour intensive health coaching training sessions, quarterly skill-based sessions, such as motivational interviewing, medication reconciliation, and leadership, as well as monthly seminars on topics, including health coaching integration, service projects, and patient-centered care, etc. L-CHAMP is a collaborative effort between Center for Education and Research in Family and Community Medicine and the Office of Community Health. Enrollment limited to first-year MD students. Prerequisite: FAMMED 281A, FAMMED 281B.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

FAMMED 282A: L-CHAMP Longitudinal Community Health Advocacy Medical Partnership IV

Continuation of FAMMED 281A-C. This course is designed for students who wish to have sustained early clinical experience throughout their pre-clerkship years. The Longitudinal Community Health Advocacy Medical Partnership (L-CHAMP) is part of the SHIELD program. The course initiates with one-hour intensive health coaching training sessions, quarterly skill-based sessions, such as motivational interviewing, medication reconciliation, and leadership, as well as monthly seminars on topics, including health coaching integration, service projects, and patient-centered care, etc. L-CHAMP is a collaborative effort between Center for Education and Research in Family and Community Medicine and the Office of Community Health. Enrollment limited to second-year and beyond MD students. Prerequisite: FAMMED 281A-C.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

FAMMED 282B: L-CHAMP Longitudinal Community Health Advocacy Medical Partnership V

This course is designed for students who wish to have sustained early clinical experience throughout their pre-clerkship years. The Longitudinal Community Health Advocacy Medical Partnership (L-CHAMP) is part of the SHIELD program. The course initiates with one-hour intensive health coaching training sessions, quarterly skill-based sessions, such as motivational interviewing, medication reconciliation, and leadership, as well as monthly seminars on topics, including health coaching integration, service projects, and patient-centered care, etc. L-CHAMP is a collaborative effort between Center for Education and Research in Family and Community Medicine and the Office of Community Health. Enrollment limited to second-year MD students. Prerequisite: FAMMED 281A-C and FAMMED 282A.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

FAMMED 292: Clinical Skills Maintenance Experience

(Formerly FAMMED 311) For MSTP students and other Stanford Medical students obtaining combined M.D./Ph.D. degrees through non-MSTP programs only. Students are assigned to a primary care clinic within medicine, family medicine or pediatrics, or a specialty clinic that can offer similar experiences. Continuity of mentorship is the first priority and is desired for reinforcement of basic medical skills; continuity of patients is also desirable, but second priority. Students attend clinic one morning or afternoon per week for two contiguous quarters of the year in which they defend their Ph.D.theses (minimum 10 clinics per quarter). Each four hour clinic session the student: (1) obtains the history of a clinic patient; (2) conducts a physical exam; (3) formulates a differential diagnosis or problem list; (4) presents the patient to her/his clinic preceptor; and (5) prepares a write-up of the case. The clinic preceptor observes and provides guidance for the student's history taking and physical examination skills and critiques the differential diagnosis, verbal presentation, and write-up. The student is guided in the use of the computerized medical record and is asked to progressively integrate this information into the review of the patient history. The clinical preceptor reviews the results of the student's Micro-CPX, Mini-CPX, POM course evaluations, and E4C Mentor evaluations and uses this information to address any perceived weaknesses. The preceptor provides verbal and written performance evaluations to the student and a standardized evaluation becomes part of the student's record. The director of the E4C-MSTP program reviews, on a regular basis, the written performance evaluations of each student taking this course. Deficits are to be identified and addressed before the student enters clinical training.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

FAMMED 299: Directed Reading in Family and Community Medicine

Students organize an individualized study program in family and community medicine. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

FAMMED 370: Medical Scholars Research

Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

FAMMED 399: Graduate Research

Students interested in conducting research in a specific area of family and community medicine undertake investigations sponsored by the faculty instructor. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

FEMGEN 69S: Race, Science, and Medicine in U.S. History (CSRE 69M, HISTORY 69S)

How have scientific ideas about race been shaped by their historical contexts, and what effects do these ideas have on people, institutions, law, and medicine? Is racial science always racist science? How do ideas about race intersect with ideas about gender, class, and disability? This course explores how natural philosophers and scientists have defined, used, and sometimes challenged ideas about race from the eighteenth century to today. Topics include medicine and slavery, eugenics, sociology, psychiatry, race-based medicine, and genetic ancestry. This course fulfills the departmental Sources and Methods requirement. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Spr, offered once only | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; LeBlanc, H. (PI)

FEMGEN 124: Challenging Sex and Gender Dichotomies in Medicine (FEMGEN 224, SOMGEN 257)

Explores and challenges the traditional physiological bases for distinguishing human males from females, as well as the psychosocial factors that play a role in experiencing and expressing gender and sexuality. Topics include the influence of sociocultural (gender) norms and behaviors on human biology, the interactions of sex and gender on medical outcomes, the importance of understanding the spectrum of sex, gender, and sexuality in clinical practice.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

FEMGEN 144: Women and Gender in Science, Medicine and Engineering (HISTORY 144)

(Same as HISTORY 44. Majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in HISTORY 144.) Men's and women's roles in science, medicine, and engineering over the past 200 years with a focus on the present. What efforts are underway globally to transform research institutions so that both men's and women's careers can flourish? How have science and medicine studied and defined males and females? How can we harness the creative power of gender analysis to enhance knowledge and spark innovation?
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

FEMGEN 156H: Women and Medicine in US History: Women as Patients, Healers and Doctors (AMSTUD 156H, HISTORY 156G)

Women's bodies in sickness and health, and encounters with lay and professional healers from the 18th century to the present. Historical consttruction of thought about women's bodies and physical limitations; sexuality; birth control and abortion; childbirth; adulthood; and menopause and aging. Women as healers, including midwives, lay physicians, the medical profession, and nursing.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Horn, M. (PI)

FEMGEN 224: Challenging Sex and Gender Dichotomies in Medicine (FEMGEN 124, SOMGEN 257)

Explores and challenges the traditional physiological bases for distinguishing human males from females, as well as the psychosocial factors that play a role in experiencing and expressing gender and sexuality. Topics include the influence of sociocultural (gender) norms and behaviors on human biology, the interactions of sex and gender on medical outcomes, the importance of understanding the spectrum of sex, gender, and sexuality in clinical practice.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

FEMGEN 260X: Journeys in Women's Health and Sex and Gender in Medicine (INDE 260)

Sponsored by the Stanford WSDM Center. Course focuses on health research on women and sex differences in medicine, acknowledges the "wisdom" of research and education on sex (e.g. chromosomes, gonads, gonadal hormones) and gender (sociocultural) factors influencing health. Brings alumni to share their professional journeys in the world of Women and Sex Differences in Medicine. Meets Women's Health Scholarly Concentration Requirement.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

FEMGEN 344F: Gender Methods in History, Medicine, and Technology (HISTORY 344F)

Explores classics and new work in gender methods for historical research, medical research, science and technology. The course is robustly interdisciplinary and welcomes students from the humanities, social science, science, and engineering. We analyze the theory and practice of gender through weekly reading and discussion. Students will be asked to write a review paper or research paper that advances their own work. Seminar explores the creative power of gender analysis to create new knowledge.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Schiebinger, L. (PI)

FEMGEN 444: Graduate Research Seminar: Gender in Science, Medicine, and Engineering (HISTORY 444)

Theory and practice of gender in STEM. 1. "Fix the Numbers of Women" focuses on increasing women's participation; 2. "Fix the Institutions" promotes gender equality in careers through structural change in research organizations; 3. "Fix the Knowledge" or "gendered innovations" stimulates excellence in science and technology by integrating gender analysis into research. Seminar explores harnessing the creative power of gender analysis to enhance knowledge and spark innovation.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

FRENCH 75N: Narrative Medicine and Near-Death Experiences (ITALIAN 75N)

Even if many of us don't fully believe in an afterlife, we remain fascinated by visions of it. This course focuses on Near-Death Experiences and the stories around them, investigating them from the many perspectives pertinent to the growing field of narrative medicine: medical, neurological, cognitive, psychological, sociological, literary, and filmic. The goal is not to understand whether the stories are veridical but what they do for us, as individuals, and as a culture, and in particular how they seek to reshape the patient-doctor relationship. Materials will span the 20th century and come into the present. Taught in English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wittman, L. (PI)

FRENCH 219: The Renaissance Body in French Literature and Medicine (FRENCH 319)

If the Renaissance is famous for discovering unknown continents and ancient texts the body too was a new territory of conquest. How did literature respond to the rise of an anatomical gaze in the arts and in medicine and how did it stage the aesthetic religious philosophical and moral issues related to such a promotion or deconstruction of the body? Does literature aim at representing the body or does it use it instead as a ubiquitous signifier for intellectual emotional and political ideas? The locus of desire, pleasure and disease, the body also functioned as a reminder of human mortality and was caught in the web of gender issues, religious controversies and new norms of behavior. Texts from prose fiction (Rabelais) poetry (Scève Ronsard Labé D'Aubigné) essays (Montaigne) and emblem literature. Extra documents include music scores tapestries paintings philosophical and anatomical plates from medical treatises. Taught in English. Visit the Web site: renaissancebodyproject.stanford.edu
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Alduy, C. (PI)

FRENCH 229: Literature and Global Health (AFRICAAM 229, AFRICAST 229, COMPLIT 229, CSRE 129B, HUMBIO 175L, MED 234)

This course examines the ways writers in literature and medicine have used the narrative form to explore the ethics of care in what has been called the developing world. We will begin with a call made by the editor-in-chief of The Lancet for a literature of global health, namely fiction modeled on the social reform novels of the nineteenth century, understood to have helped readers develop a conscience for public health as the field emerged as a modern medical specialty. We will then spend the quarter understanding how colonial, postcolonial, and world literatures have answered and complicated this call. Readings will include prose fiction by Albert Camus, Joseph Conrad, Tsitsi Dangaremgba, Amitav Ghosh, Susan Sontag as well as physician memoirs featuring Frantz Fanon, Albert Schweitzer, Abraham Verghese, Paul Farmer. And each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical, and policy writings that deeply inform the field of global health.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ikoku, A. (PI)

FRENCH 319: The Renaissance Body in French Literature and Medicine (FRENCH 219)

If the Renaissance is famous for discovering unknown continents and ancient texts the body too was a new territory of conquest. How did literature respond to the rise of an anatomical gaze in the arts and in medicine and how did it stage the aesthetic religious philosophical and moral issues related to such a promotion or deconstruction of the body? Does literature aim at representing the body or does it use it instead as a ubiquitous signifier for intellectual emotional and political ideas? The locus of desire, pleasure and disease, the body also functioned as a reminder of human mortality and was caught in the web of gender issues, religious controversies and new norms of behavior. Texts from prose fiction (Rabelais) poetry (Scève Ronsard Labé D'Aubigné) essays (Montaigne) and emblem literature. Extra documents include music scores tapestries paintings philosophical and anatomical plates from medical treatises. Taught in English. Visit the Web site: renaissancebodyproject.stanford.edu
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Alduy, C. (PI)

FRENCH 343: In Defense of Poetry (ITALIAN 345)

Beginning with the account of the quarrel between philosophy and poetry in Plato's Republic, we will read definitions and defenses of poetry by authors such as Cicero, Horace, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Sidney, Shelley, and Pound, among others. While we will try to historicize these authors' defenses as much as possible, we will also read them from the perspective of contemporary efforts to defend literature and the humanities. Topics of central concern will be the connection between poetry and ethics, the conflict between poetry and the professions of business, law, and medicine, poetry's place in the university, the political role of the poet, questions of poetic language and form, and the relevance of defenses of poetry to literary theory.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lummus, D. (PI)

GENE 202: Human Genetics

Utilizes lectures and small group activities to develop a working knowlege of human genetics as applicable to clinical medicine. Basic principles of inheritance, risk assessment, and population genetics are illustrated using examples drawn from diverse areas of medical genetics practice including prenatal, pediatric, adult and cancer genetics. Practical aspects of molecular and cytogenetic diagnostic methods are emphasized. Existing and emerging treatment strategies for single gene disorders are also covered. Prerequisites: basic genetics. Only available to MD and MOM students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Bernstein, J. (PI)

GENE 210: Genomics and Personalized Medicine (DBIO 220)

Principles of genetics underlying associations between genetic variants and disease susceptibility and drug response. Topics include: genetic and environmental risk factors for complex genetic disorders; design and interpretation of genome-wide association studies; pharmacogenetics; full genome sequencing for disease gene discovery; population structure and genetic ancestry; use of personal genetic information in clinical medicine; ethical, legal, and social issues with personal genetic testing. Hands-on workshop making use of personal or publicly available genetic data. Prerequisite: GENE 202, Gene 205 or BIOS 200.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

GENE 217: Translational Bioinformatics

(Same as BIOMEDIN 217, CS 275) Analytic, storage, and interpretive methods to optimize the transformation of genetic, genomic, and biological data into diagnostics and therapeutics for medicine. Topics: access and utility of publicly available data sources; types of genome-scale measurements in molecular biology and genomic medicine; analysis of microarray data; analysis of polymorphisms, proteomics, and protein interactions; linking genome-scale data to clinical data and phenotypes; and new questions in biomedicine using bioinformatics. Case studies. Prerequisites: programming ability at the level of CS 106A and familiarity with statistics and biology.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

GENE 286C: Advanced Genetic Counseling Seminar

Continuation of 286A/B. For genetic counseling students only. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic counseling cases are discussed through presentation of cases that students have seen throughout their training. Professional development topics including: the expanding roles of genetic counselors; billing, reimbursement, and licensing; the role of genetic counseling in the changing healthcare system; the incorporation of genetics into all areas of medicine and public health; and implications of direct-to-consumer genetic testing. Prerequisites: GENE 285 A,B,C and 276.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

GERMAN 128N: Medicine, Modernism, and Mysticism in Thomas Mann's the Magic Mountain

Published in 1924, The Magic Mountain is a novel of education, tracing the intellectual growth of a budding engineer through a maze of intellectual encounters during a seven- year sojourn in a sanatorium set high in the Swiss Alps. It engages with the key themes of modernism: the relativity of time, the impact of psychoanalysis, the power of myth, and an extended dispute between an optimistic belief in progress and a pessimistic vision of human nature. Through its detailed discussion of disease (tuberculosis), this remarkable text connects the study of medicine to the humanities. There will be an exploration of this rich and profound novel both as a document of early twentieth-century Europe and as a commentary on the possibilities of education that are urgent for liberal arts education today. Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 12: Medicine and Disease in the Ancient World

(Same as HISTORY 112. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 112.) This course explores medicine and disease through case studies from civilizations of the ancient world such as Egypt, Greece, and Peru. We will discuss how these cultures conceptualized disease, and in turn, how they contended with illnesses. Lectures will address different forms of illness through medical texts, art, and human remains. Weekly discussion will incorporate evidence from these sources to explore both their potential and their limitations.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 31: Leonardo's World: Science, Technology, and Art in the Renaissance (HISTORY 131)

What did Leonardo actually know? How did he acquire that knowledge? Explores Leonardo's interests and accomplishments in such fields as painting, architecture, engineering, physics, mathematics, geology, anatomy, and physiology, and more generally the nature of Renaissance science, art, and technology. Considers the nrelationship between the society of fifteenth century Italy and the work of the man nfrom Vinci: why did this world produce a Leonardo? How might we use him to understand creativity, innovation, and invention in the Renaissance and beyond? What was his legacy and how did he become a myth? Designed both for students interested in the history of science, medicine, and technology and for students interested in the history and art of Renaissance Italy.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Brege, B. (PI)

HISTORY 40: World History of Science

(Same as HISTORY 140. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 140.) The earliest developments in science, the prehistoric roots of technology, the scientific revolution, and global voyaging. Theories of human origins and the oldest known tools and symbols. Achievements of the Mayans, Aztecs, and native N. Americans. Science and medicine in ancient Greece, Egypt, China, Africa, and India. Science in medieval and Renaissance Europe and the Islamic world including changing cosmologies and natural histories. Theories of scientific growth and decay; how science engages other factors such as material culture and religions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Proctor, R. (PI)

HISTORY 44: Women and Gender in Science, Medicine and Engineering

(Same as HISTORY 144. Majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in HISTORY 144.) Men's and women's roles in science, medicine, and engineering over the past 200 years with a focus on the present. What efforts are underway globally to transform research institutions so that both men's and women's careers can flourish? How have science and medicine studied and defined males and females? How can we harness the creative power of gender analysis to enhance knowledge and spark innovation?
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 44Q: Gendered Innovations in Science, Medicine, Engineering, and Environment

Section 1 focuses on the history of women in science, medicine, and engineering. Section 2 looks at transforming research institutions so that both men and women can flourish. Section 3 explores how sex and gender analysis can enhance creativity. We discuss concrete examples of how taking gender into account has yielded new research results. Stanford University currently has a multiple year collaboration with the European Commission for Gendered Innovations, and this class will be part of that project. This course fulfills the second level Writing and Rhetoric Requirement (WRITE 2) and will emphasize oral and multimedia presentation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Schiebinger, L. (PI)

HISTORY 48S: History of Health, Science and Medicine in 20th Century Africa (AFRICAST 48S, ANTHRO 48S)

This course will examine the impact of colonial policies and post-colonial development on patterns of sickness, wellness and health care in twentieth century sub-Saharan Africa. Some topics will include: the role of colonial science in the formulation of ideas about race, colonial epidemics, labor migration and disease, urban health, encounters between African healers and biomedicine, histories of HIV/AIDS, the impact of debt and Structural Adjustment Programs on public health, and the politics of humanitarian interventions in African health. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hill, R. (PI)

HISTORY 69S: Race, Science, and Medicine in U.S. History (CSRE 69M, FEMGEN 69S)

How have scientific ideas about race been shaped by their historical contexts, and what effects do these ideas have on people, institutions, law, and medicine? Is racial science always racist science? How do ideas about race intersect with ideas about gender, class, and disability? This course explores how natural philosophers and scientists have defined, used, and sometimes challenged ideas about race from the eighteenth century to today. Topics include medicine and slavery, eugenics, sociology, psychiatry, race-based medicine, and genetic ancestry. This course fulfills the departmental Sources and Methods requirement. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Spr, offered once only | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; LeBlanc, H. (PI)

HISTORY 112: Medicine and Disease in the Ancient World

(Same as HISTORY 12. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for HISTORY 112.) This course explores medicine and disease through case studies from civilizations of the ancient world such as Egypt, Greece, and Peru. We will discuss how these cultures conceptualized disease, and in turn, how they contended with illnesses. Lectures will address different forms of illness through medical texts, art, and human remains. Weekly discussion will incorporate evidence from these sources to explore both their potential and their limitations.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 130A: In Sickness and In Health: Medicine and Society in the United States: 1800-Present

Explores the history of medical institutions, ideas and practices in the United States from the early nineteenth century to the present. How are ideas of illness and health historically rooted and socially constructed? How did scientific and medical discoveries lead to the rise of scientific medicine, and how were these innovations adopted within the American cultural landscape? Topics include the transformation of therapeutics and technologies, medicine and the scientific ideal in the U.S., gender and race and medicine, the history of public health, and the professionalization and specialization of American medical practice.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Horn, M. (PI)

HISTORY 131: Leonardo's World: Science, Technology, and Art in the Renaissance (HISTORY 31)

What did Leonardo actually know? How did he acquire that knowledge? Explores Leonardo's interests and accomplishments in such fields as painting, architecture, engineering, physics, mathematics, geology, anatomy, and physiology, and more generally the nature of Renaissance science, art, and technology. Considers the nrelationship between the society of fifteenth century Italy and the work of the man nfrom Vinci: why did this world produce a Leonardo? How might we use him to understand creativity, innovation, and invention in the Renaissance and beyond? What was his legacy and how did he become a myth? Designed both for students interested in the history of science, medicine, and technology and for students interested in the history and art of Renaissance Italy.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Brege, B. (PI)

HISTORY 140: World History of Science

(Same as HISTORY 40. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 140.) The earliest developments in science, the prehistoric roots of technology, the scientific revolution, and global voyaging. Theories of human origins and the oldest known tools and symbols. Achievements of the Mayans, Aztecs, and native N. Americans. Science and medicine in ancient Greece, Egypt, China, Africa, and India. Science in medieval and Renaissance Europe and the Islamic world including changing cosmologies and natural histories. Theories of scientific growth and decay; how science engages other factors such as material culture and religions.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Proctor, R. (PI)

HISTORY 144: Women and Gender in Science, Medicine and Engineering (FEMGEN 144)

(Same as HISTORY 44. Majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in HISTORY 144.) Men's and women's roles in science, medicine, and engineering over the past 200 years with a focus on the present. What efforts are underway globally to transform research institutions so that both men's and women's careers can flourish? How have science and medicine studied and defined males and females? How can we harness the creative power of gender analysis to enhance knowledge and spark innovation?
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 156G: Women and Medicine in US History: Women as Patients, Healers and Doctors (AMSTUD 156H, FEMGEN 156H)

Women's bodies in sickness and health, and encounters with lay and professional healers from the 18th century to the present. Historical consttruction of thought about women's bodies and physical limitations; sexuality; birth control and abortion; childbirth; adulthood; and menopause and aging. Women as healers, including midwives, lay physicians, the medical profession, and nursing.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Horn, M. (PI)

HISTORY 243C: People, Plants, and Medicine: Colonial Science and Medicine (HISTORY 343C)

Explores the global exchange of knowledge, technologies, plants, peoples, disease, and medicines. Considers primarily Africans, Amerindians, and Europeans in the eighteenth-century West but also takes examples from other knowledge traditions. Readings treat science and medicine in relation to voyaging, colonialism, slavery, racism, plants, and environmental exchange. Colonial sciences and medicines were important militarily and strategically for positioning emerging nation states in global struggles for land and resources.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Schiebinger, L. (PI)

HISTORY 244C: The History of the Body in Science, Medicine, and Culture (HISTORY 444C)

The human body as a natural and cultural object, historicized. The crosscultural history of the body from the 18th century to the present. Topics include: sciences of sex and race; medical discovery of particular body parts; human experimentation, foot binding, veiling, and other bodily coverings; thinness and obesity; notions of the body politic.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 343C: People, Plants, and Medicine: Colonial Science and Medicine (HISTORY 243C)

Explores the global exchange of knowledge, technologies, plants, peoples, disease, and medicines. Considers primarily Africans, Amerindians, and Europeans in the eighteenth-century West but also takes examples from other knowledge traditions. Readings treat science and medicine in relation to voyaging, colonialism, slavery, racism, plants, and environmental exchange. Colonial sciences and medicines were important militarily and strategically for positioning emerging nation states in global struggles for land and resources.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Schiebinger, L. (PI)

HISTORY 344F: Gender Methods in History, Medicine, and Technology (FEMGEN 344F)

Explores classics and new work in gender methods for historical research, medical research, science and technology. The course is robustly interdisciplinary and welcomes students from the humanities, social science, science, and engineering. We analyze the theory and practice of gender through weekly reading and discussion. Students will be asked to write a review paper or research paper that advances their own work. Seminar explores the creative power of gender analysis to create new knowledge.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Schiebinger, L. (PI)

HISTORY 444: Graduate Research Seminar: Gender in Science, Medicine, and Engineering (FEMGEN 444)

Theory and practice of gender in STEM. 1. "Fix the Numbers of Women" focuses on increasing women's participation; 2. "Fix the Institutions" promotes gender equality in careers through structural change in research organizations; 3. "Fix the Knowledge" or "gendered innovations" stimulates excellence in science and technology by integrating gender analysis into research. Seminar explores harnessing the creative power of gender analysis to enhance knowledge and spark innovation.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 444C: The History of the Body in Science, Medicine, and Culture (HISTORY 244C)

The human body as a natural and cultural object, historicized. The crosscultural history of the body from the 18th century to the present. Topics include: sciences of sex and race; medical discovery of particular body parts; human experimentation, foot binding, veiling, and other bodily coverings; thinness and obesity; notions of the body politic.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 492B: Origins of Technical Medicine in the Han Dynasty

How medicine as a technical, text-based art monopolized by specialists was established under the Han Dynasty in competition with practices aimed at nourishing life and securing longevity.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HRP 89Q: Introduction to Cross Cultural Issues in Medicine

Preference to sophomores. Introduction to social factors that impact health care delivery, such as ethnicity, immigration, language barriers, and patient service expectations. Focus is on developing a framework to understand culturally unique and non-English speaking populations in the health care system.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Corso, I. (PI)

HRP 206: Meta-research: Appraising Research Findings, Bias, and Meta-analysis (CHPR 206, MED 206, STATS 211)

Open to graduate, medical, and undergraduate students. Appraisal of the quality and credibility of research findings; evaluation of sources of bias. Meta-analysis as a quantitative (statistical) method for combining results of independent studies. Examples from medicine, epidemiology, genomics, ecology, social/behavioral sciences, education. Collaborative analyses. Project involving generation of a meta-research project or reworking and evaluation of an existing published meta-analysis. Prerequisite: knowledge of basic statistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

HRP 210: Health Law and Policy

(Same as Law 313) Open to law , medicine, business, and graduate students. Focus this term is on the physician/patient relationship, medical ethics, and public health law.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

HRP 212: Cross Cultural Medicine

Developing interviewing and behavioral skills needed to facilitate culturally relevant health care across all population groups. Discussions focus on explicit and implicit cultural influences operating in formal and informal medical contexts.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Corso, I. (PI)

HRP 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

HRP 238: Genes and Environment in Disease Causation: Implications for Medicine and Public Health (HUMBIO 159)

The historical, contemporary, and future research and practice among genetics, epidemiology, clinical medicine, and public health as a source of insight for medicine and public health. Genetic and environmental contributions to multifactorial diseases; multidisciplinary approach to enhancing detection and diagnosis. The impact of the Human Genome Project on analysis of cardiovascular and neurological diseases, and cancer. Ethical and social issues in the use of genetic information. Prerequisite: basic course in genetics; for undergraduates, Human Biology core or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Popat, R. (PI)

HRP 263: Advanced Decision Science Methods and Modeling in Health (MED 263)

Advanced methods currently used in published model-based cost-effectiveness analyses in medicine and public health, both theory and technical applications. Topics include: Markov and microsimulation models, model calibration and evaluation, and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Prerequisites: a course in probability, a course in statistics or biostatistics, a course on cost-effectiveness such as HRP 392, a course in economics, and familiarity with decision modeling software such as TreeAge.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

HRP 296: Current Topics in Bioethics

(Same as LAW 596) Explores the ethical, legal, and public policy issues arising from recent advances in biomedicine and the biosciences. Approaches to bioethical reasoning including casuistry, social justice, resource allocation, and individual rights in areas such as refusal of treatment conception. Topics include: the use of forensic genetics in criminal law, neuroscience and national security, race and ethnicity in genetic research,k experimentation on human subjects and prisoners, privacy of medical and genetic information in the information age, synthetic biology, and do-it-yourself medical and genetic testing. No prior knowledge in science, medicine, philosophy or related disciplines is required.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

HRP 299: Directed Reading in Health Research and Policy

Epidemiology, health services research, preventive medicine, medical genetics, public health, economics of medical care, occupational or environmental medicine, international health, or related fields. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

HRP 391: Health Law: Finance and Insurance (PUBLPOL 231)

(SAME AS LAW 348, MGTECON 331) Provides the legal, institutional, and economic background necessary to understand the financing and production of health services in the U.S. Potential topics include: health reform, health insurance (Medicare and Medicaid, employer-sponsored insurance, the uninsured), medical malpractice and quality regulation, pharmaceuticals, the corporate practice of medicine, regulation of fraud and abuse, and international comparisons.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

HUMBIO 26: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HRP 235, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

HUMBIO 27: Traditional Chinese Medicine

The philosophy and history behind traditional Chinese medicine. Concepts such as Qi, Yin/Yang, meridians, Chinese organs, and the 5 elements. How these concepts are applied through techniques such as acupuncture, herbal medicine, Qi gong, and massage. How traditional Chinese medicine is understood from a scientific standpoint. Political and socioeconomic implications. Observation of an acupuncturist. Readings on the integration of Eastern and Western medicine and on traditional Chinese medicine.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Golianu, B. (PI)

HUMBIO 50SI: Computational Frontiers in Biology

The advent of modern computing has brought forward a myriad of practical applications to the world of biology. From Nex-Gen Sequencing to machine learning in diagnostic medicine, advances in computational sciences have forever changed the way we approach the life sciences. This survey course will be a breadth-wise exploration into this biotech revolution; each week, we will cover one simple computational topic, one simple biological process, and show how putting these concepts together gives rise to extremely powerful new analytical tools.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

HUMBIO 65: Biosocial Medicine: The Social, Psychological, and Biological Determinants of Behavior and Wellbeing (EDUC 205, SOMGEN 215)

Explores how social forces, psychological influences, and biological systems combine to affect human behavior in early childhood, in the educational experience, and throughout the life course. Examines how behaviors are linked to well-being. Uses a flipped classroom model, in which a series of lectures are available for students to view on-line before class. In-class time then focuses on case studies from published research. Undergraduates enroll for 3 units. Students enrolling for 3 units attend two meetings per week; students enrolling for 2 units attend one meeting per week.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

HUMBIO 88: Introduction to Statistics for the Health Sciences

Students will learn the statistical tools used to describe and analyze data in the fields of medicine and epidemiology. This very applied course will rely on current research questions and publicly available data. Students will gain proficiency with Stata to do basic analyses of health-related data, including linear and logistic regression, and will become sophisticated consumers of health-related statistical results.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HUMBIO 97Q: Sport, Exercise, and Health: Exploring Sports Medicine (ORTHO 97Q)

Preference to sophomores. Sports medicine is the practice of clinical medicine at the interface between health and performance, competition and well-being. While sports medicine had its origins in providing care to athletes, medical advances developed in care of athletes exerted a great effect on the nature and quality of care to the broader community. Topics include sports injuries, medical conditions associated with sport and exercise, ethics, coaching, women's issues, fitness and health, and sports science. Case studies.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: Writing 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Matheson, G. (PI)

HUMBIO 121E: Ethnicity and Medicine (FAMMED 244)

Weekly lecture series. Examines the linguistic, social class, and cultural factors that impact patient care. Presentations promote culturally sensitive health care services and review contemporary research issues involving minority and underserved populations. Topics include health care inequities and medical practices of African Americans, Asians, Latinos, Native Americans, immigrants, and refugees in both urban and rural settings. 1 unit requires weekly lecture attendance, completion of required readings, completion of response questions; 2 units requires weekly lecture attendance and discussion session, completion of required readings and weekly response questions; additional requirement for 3 units (HUMBIO only) is completion of a significant term paper Only students taking the course for 3 units may request a letter grade. Enrollment limited to students with sophomore academic standing or above.This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Garcia, R. (PI)

HUMBIO 129S: Global Public Health

The class is an introduction to the fields of international public health and global medicine. It focuses on resource poor areas of the world and explores major global health problems and their relation to policy, economic development and human rights. The course is intended for students interested in global health, development studies, or international relations, and provides opportunities for in-depth discussion and interaction with experts in the field. .
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HUMBIO 133: Human Physiology (BIO 112)

Human physiology will be examined by organ systems: cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal and endocrine. Molecular and cell biology and signaling principles that underlie organ development, pathophysiology and opportunities for regenerative medicine are discussed, as well as integrative control mechanisms and fetal development. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kao, P. (PI)

HUMBIO 139E: Sport and Exercise Medicine

This is an upper division course taught by the course directors and guest lecturers (experts from the field of sports and exercise medicine), with a common theme of injury and illness prevention in sport and physical activity. The course is organized into three modules: Disease Prevention by Design, Concussion in Sport, and Injury Prevention in Sport and Exercise. The topics include wellness and the prevention of chronic disease, the balance point between health and harm in sports, clinical and sports biomechanics, injury prevention theories, ethical issues in return-to-play decisions, the role of sports medicine in the prevention of chronic disease through exercise, and common sports injuries and illnesses. Students will develop critical reading and thinking skills as well as oral presentation skills and the confidence to engage in verbal exchange. Every other class session is a discussion class involving hands-on activities and group discussions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HUMBIO 145L: The Biology and Evolution of Language (ANTHRO 171, ANTHRO 271)

Lecture course surveying the biology, linguistic functions, and evolution of the organs of speech and speech centers in the brain, language in animals and humans, the evolution of language itself, and the roles of innateness vs. culture in language. Suitable both for general education and as preparation for further studies in anthropology, biology, linguistics, medicine, psychology, and speech & language therapy. Anthropology concentration: CS, EE. No prerequisites.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fox, J. (PI)

HUMBIO 146D: Developmental Disabilities: From Biology to Policy (PEDS 246)

Fifteen percent of US children have disabilities. While advances in medicine and technology have increased life expectancy for these children, health care delivery, education, and public attitudes have not kept pace. Students in this course will learn the possibilities and limitations of new biomedical treatments of Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, and autism. Students will also evaluate the impact of public policy initiatives, such as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and Americans with Disabilities Act on inclusion and participation in society.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 159: Genes and Environment in Disease Causation: Implications for Medicine and Public Health (HRP 238)

The historical, contemporary, and future research and practice among genetics, epidemiology, clinical medicine, and public health as a source of insight for medicine and public health. Genetic and environmental contributions to multifactorial diseases; multidisciplinary approach to enhancing detection and diagnosis. The impact of the Human Genome Project on analysis of cardiovascular and neurological diseases, and cancer. Ethical and social issues in the use of genetic information. Prerequisite: basic course in genetics; for undergraduates, Human Biology core or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Popat, R. (PI)

HUMBIO 174: Foundations of Bioethics

Classic articles, legal cases, and foundational concepts. Theoretical approaches derived from philosophy. The ethics of medicine and research on human subjects, assisted reproductive technologies, genetics, cloning, and stem cell research. Ethical issues at the end of life. Prerequisite: Human Biology core or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Magnus, D. (PI)

HUMBIO 175H: Literature and Human Experimentation (AFRICAAM 223, COMPLIT 223, CSRE 123B, MED 220)

This course introduces students to the ways literature has been used to think through the ethics of human subjects research and experimental medicine. We will focus primarily on readings that imaginatively revisit experiments conducted on vulnerable populations: namely groups placed at risk by their classification according to perceived human and cultural differences. We will begin with Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818), and continue our study via later works of fiction, drama and literary journalism, including Toni Morrison's Beloved, David Feldshuh's Miss Evers Boys, Hannah Arendt's Eichmann and Vivien Spitz's Doctors from Hell, Rebecca Skloot's Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, and Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go. Each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical and policy writings of the period; and our ultimate goal will be to understand modes of ethics deliberation that are possible via creative uses of the imagination, and literature's place in a history of ethical thinking about humane research and care.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ikoku, A. (PI)

HUMBIO 175L: Literature and Global Health (AFRICAAM 229, AFRICAST 229, COMPLIT 229, CSRE 129B, FRENCH 229, MED 234)

This course examines the ways writers in literature and medicine have used the narrative form to explore the ethics of care in what has been called the developing world. We will begin with a call made by the editor-in-chief of The Lancet for a literature of global health, namely fiction modeled on the social reform novels of the nineteenth century, understood to have helped readers develop a conscience for public health as the field emerged as a modern medical specialty. We will then spend the quarter understanding how colonial, postcolonial, and world literatures have answered and complicated this call. Readings will include prose fiction by Albert Camus, Joseph Conrad, Tsitsi Dangaremgba, Amitav Ghosh, Susan Sontag as well as physician memoirs featuring Frantz Fanon, Albert Schweitzer, Abraham Verghese, Paul Farmer. And each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical, and policy writings that deeply inform the field of global health.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ikoku, A. (PI)

HUMBIO 176A: Medical Anthropology (ANTHRO 82, ANTHRO 282)

Emphasis is on how health, illness, and healing are understood, experienced, and constructed in social, cultural, and historical contexts. Topics: biopower and body politics, gender and reproductive technologies, illness experiences, medical diversity and social suffering, and the interface between medicine and science.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HUMBIO 177C: Culture, Narrative, and Medicine (ANTHRO 178A)

This course examines the ways in which medicine is practiced in diverse cultural contexts with narrative skills of recognizing, interpreting and being moved by the stories of illness. It is an examination of the human experience of illness and healing through narratives as presented in literature, film, and storytelling. We explore how cultural resources enable and empower healing and how narrative medicine can guide the practice of culturally competent medical care.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 178: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (CSRE 178, ETHICSOC 133, PHIL 175A, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D, URBANST 122)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 179S: Spirituality and Healing (ANTHRO 184)

The puzzle of symbolic healing. How have societies without the resources of modern medicine approached healing? Why do these rituals have common features around the world? Shamanism, spirit possession, prayer, and the role of placebos in modern biomedicine. Students do ethnographic work and practical explorations along with more traditional scholarly approaches to learning.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 180: Human Skeletal Anatomy (ANTHRO 175, ANTHRO 275, BIO 174, BIO 274)

Study of the human skeleton (a. k. a. human osteology), as it bears on other disciplines, including medicine, forensics, archaeology, and paleoanthropology (human evolution). Basic bone biology, anatomy, and development, emphasizing hands-on examination and identification of human skeletal parts, their implications for determining an individual¿s age, sex, geographic origin, and health status, and for the evolutionary history of our species. Three hours of lecture and at least three hours of supervised and independent study in the lab each week.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Klein, R. (PI)

INDE 200: The Future of Academic Medicine

Required for and limited to first-year MSTP students. Presentations of research directions and opportunities by chairs of basic science, clinical departments, and PhD programs. Prerequisite: instructor consent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

INDE 201: Practice of Medicine I

Six quarter series extending throughout the first two years of the MD program, interweaving core skills training in medical interviewing and the physical examination with other major threads addressing the context of medical practice: information literacy, nutrition principles, clinical epidemiology and biostatistics, evidence-based practice, psychiatry, biomedical ethics, health policy, population health. Core clinical skills are acquired through hands-on practice, and evaluated through an extensive program of simulated medical encounters, in which students interview, examine, and manage patients in a mock clinic. The information literacy thread introduces students to informatics and knowledge management, biomedical informatics, and evidence-based medicine searching. Nutrition principles are acquired through interactive, web-based instruction, and reinforced through problem-based learning cases, which run in parallel to the basic science components over the first year. In epdemiology students learn the taxonomy of epidemiological studies, how to critically read a journal article, and how to recognize and understand the concepts behind different clinical study designs. Topics include bias, confounding, diagnostic testing and screening, and "how statistics can lie." Psychiatry introduces students to the unique role of medical students in talking with patients, the difference between process and content in patient communication, how to respond to breaks in the patient-physician relationship, and the relationship between the quality of the patient-physician interaction and health outcomes. Health care policy covers such topics as health insurance, physician payment, health care costs, access, measurement and improvement of quality, regulation and health care reform. Biomedical ethics includes important ethical issues in medical practice, such as confidentiality, privacy, and ethical issues relating to medical students. The population health curriculum exposes students to concepts of public health, community action, and advocacy, and includes a year-long, community-based project. At the end of this quarter students participate in a performance-based assessment of the medical interview skills.
Terms: Aut | Units: 11 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

INDE 202: Practice of Medicine II

Medical interview and physical examination skills, information literacy, nutrition principles, evidence-based practice, health policy, and population health are covered. At the end of this quarter, students participate in a performance-based assessment of their medical interview and physical examination skills. See INDE 201 for a complete description of the Practice of Medicine course series.
Terms: Win | Units: 8 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

INDE 203: Practice of Medicine III

Medical interview and physical examination skills, biomedical literature retrieval and appraisal, nutrition principles, evidence-based practice, biomedical ethics, and population health are covered. Students begin clinical problem-solving sessions to learn the approach to common and important clinical problems. Cases integrate other course themes of population health, evidence-based practice, clinical ethics, nutrition, health policy, and behavioral medicine. Students begin transition from comprehensive to problem-focused patient encounters. Students also gain exposure to geriatrics, pediatrics, and interprofessional healthcare teams, and practice mental health interview skills. At the end of this quarter, students participate in a performance-based assessment of their medical interview and physical examination skills. See INDE 201 for a complete description of the Practice of Medicine course series.
Terms: Spr | Units: 8 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

INDE 204: Practice of Medicine IV

The second year of the Practice of Medicine series (INDE 204 and 205) emphasizes clinical reasoning, clinical practicum, and clinical procedures. Students continue clinical problem-solving sessions to learn the approach to common and important clinical problems. Cases integrate other course themes of population health, evidence-based practice, clinical ethics, nutrition, health policy, and behavioral medicine. Students spend one-half day per week in a clinical setting, practicing medical interview, physical examination skills, oral presentations, and clinical note-writing under the mentorship of a clinical tutor. In the practicum, students also gain experience with other practical aspects of patient care. The Clinical Procedures segment introduces common and important procedures in clinical practice, including phlebotomy, intravenous line insertion, and electrocardiography.
Terms: Aut | Units: 10 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

INDE 205: Practice of Medicine V

Continued emphasis on clinical reasoning, clinical practicum, and clinical procedures. Students continue clinical problem-solving sessions to learn the approach to common and important clinical problems Cases integrate other course themes of population health, evidence-based practice, clinical ethics, nutrition, health policy, and behavioral medicine. Students spend one-half day per week in a clinical setting, practicing medical interview, physical examination skills, oral presentations, and clinical note-writing under the mentorship of a clinical tutor. In the practicum, students also gain experience with other practical aspects of patient care. For the Clinical Procedures segment, students will have an opportunity in the Emergency Department to practice performing procedures learned in the previous quarter. At the end of this quarter, students participate in a comprehensive four-station objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) performance-based assessment of their medical interview, physical examination, and clinical problem-solving skills.
Terms: Win | Units: 8 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

INDE 206: Practice of Medicine VI

This last segment of the Practice of Medicine series is an intensive, four-week learning experience to consolidate clinical skills from prior quarters, and a final preparation for transition to clerkships. An extensive series of workshops covers topics such as dermatology, ophthalmology, advanced clinical reasoning, advanced presentations, bedside skills, ethics, palliative medicine, advanced sexual history, electronic medical record, ekg interpretation, intravenous fluid and electrolyte management. Students practice clinical procedures with task trainers and on a cadaver. This quarter also includes a professionalism series to prepare students for entry into clinical practice. Special clinical practice sessions are held as a capstone to clinical skills preparation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 9 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

INDE 207A: Medical Mandarin I: Beginning

Develops conversational communication skills and essential medical vocabularies. Teaches in pinyin pronunciation system, which provides an accessible method of learning basic phrases. The foundations of taking a comprehensive patient history in Mandarin and doing medical interviews at individual hospital divisions, including making introductions, soliciting symptoms, explaining health concepts (e.g. diseases and prescriptions) as well as daily survival conversations. Main goals are to improve rapport with Chinese patients through Mandarin fluency in the medical setting and to promote understanding of Chinese culture in the context of health care as well as daily life. Students registering for 3 units participate in clinic visits and field activities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Chang, S. (PI); Wang, X. (PI)

INDE 207B: Medical Mandarin II: Intermediate

For students who already have a basic command of spoken Chinese. Conversational communication skills practiced in a more advanced setting, including more sophisticated assessment of patient history and different tasks such as giving medical instructions and doing labs and tests. Builds working vocabulary for organ system, disease assessment to conduct a full physical exam, and to describe treatment modalities for Chinese-speaking patients (diagnostic and therapeutic). Students registering for 3 units participate in clinic visits and field activities. Prerequisite: one year of college-level Chinese or instructor assessment of fluency.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Chang, S. (PI); Wang, X. (PI)

INDE 207C: Medical Mandarin III: Advanced

Access advanced professional medical vocabulary, conduct medical research, and engage in discussions in Chinese. Aims at a proficiency level of medical interpreting or doing other independent work in Chinese. Students are also assisted in doing a project or projects related to a specific field of medicine. Students registering for 3 units participate in clinic visits, field activities or projects. Prerequisite: completion of Medical Mandarin II, or advanced Chinese proficiency.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Wang, X. (PI); So, S. (SI)

INDE 207D: Professional Mandarin I

Designed for students who seek professional development via Mandarin. Coursework includes lectures, online classes, language partnerships, selected topics, projects and field activities. Goal is to enhance students' language abilities as professionals and facilitate a career. Students choose to enroll for 2 units or 3 units depending upon an agreed- upon workload approved by the instructor. Prerequisite: sound preparation in Mandarin as assessed by the instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Wang, X. (PI); So, S. (SI)

INDE 208A: Medical Mandarin I: Beginning

Continuation of 207A. See description for 207A. Students participating in classroom and online instruction only register for 2 units. Students registering for 3 units participate in clinic visits and field activities as well.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Chang, S. (PI); Wang, X. (PI)

INDE 208B: Medical Mandarin II: Intermediate

Continuation of 207B. See description for 207B. Students participating in classroom and online instruction only register for 2 units. Students registering for 3 units participate in clinic visits and field activities as well.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Chang, S. (PI); Wang, X. (PI)

INDE 208C: Medical Mandarin III: Advanced

Access advanced professional medical vocabulary, conduct medical research, and engage in discussions in Chinese. Aims at a proficiency level of medical interpreting or doing other independent work in Chinese. Students are also assisted in doing a project or projects related to a specific field of medicine. 3 units Includes clinic visits and field activities. Prerequisite: completion of 207C, or advanced Chinese proficiency.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Chang, S. (PI); Wang, X. (PI)

INDE 208D: Professional Mandarin II

Continuation of INDE 207D. Designed for students who seek professional development via Mandarin. Coursework includes lectures, online classes, language partnerships, selected topics, projects and field activities. Goal is to enhance students' language abilities as professionals and facilitate a career. Students choose to enroll for 2 units or 3 units depending upon an agreed- upon workload approved by the instructor. Prerequisite: INDE 207D.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Chang, S. (PI); Wang, X. (PI)

INDE 209A: Medical Mandarin III: Beginning

Continuation of 207A/208A. See description for 207A. Students participating only in classroom and online instruction register for 2 units. Students registering for 3 units participate in clinic visits and field activities as well.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Chang, S. (PI); Wang, X. (PI)

INDE 209B: Medical Mandarin III: Intermediate

Continuation of 207B/208B. See description for 207B. Students participating only in classroom and online instruction register for 2 units. Students registering for 3 units participate in clinic visits and field activities as well.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Chang, S. (PI); Wang, X. (PI)

INDE 209C: Medical Mandarin III: Advanced

Access advanced professional medical vocabulary, conduct medical research, and engage in discussions in Chinese. Aims at a proficiency level of medical interpreting or doing other independent work in Chinese. Students are also assisted in doing a project or projects related to a specific field of medicine. 3 units Includes clinic visits and field activities. Prerequisite: completion of 208C or advanced Chinese proficiency.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Chang, S. (PI); Wang, X. (PI)

INDE 209D: Professional Mandarin III

Continuation of INDE 208D. Designed for students who seek professional development via Mandarin. Coursework includes lectures, online classes, language partnerships, selected topics, projects and field activities. Goal is to enhance students' language abilities as professionals and facilitate a career. Students choose to enroll for 2 units or 3 units depending upon an agreed- upon workload approved by the instructor. Prerequisite: INDE 208D.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Chang, S. (PI); Wang, X. (PI)

INDE 211: Creative Writing

For medical students - all levels of writing skill. Examines uses of creative writing, including understanding the experience of medical training. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Shafer, A. (PI)

INDE 212: Medical Humanities and the Arts

The interdisciplinary field of medical humanities: the use of the arts and humanities to examine medicine in personal, social, and cultural contexts. Topics include the doctor/patient relationship, the patient perspective, the meaning of doctoring, and the meaning of illness. Sources include visual and performing arts, film, and literary genres such as poetry, fiction, and scholarly writing. Designed for medical students in the Biomedical Ethics and Medical Humanities Scholarly Concentration, but all students are welcome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Shafer, A. (PI)

INDE 214: Stanford Medical Student Journal

Provides an opportunity for editors of all levels to cultivate their skills and assist in preparing pieces submitted by colleagues for publication in the Stanford Medical Student Journal. Students enrolled in the course work closely with student authors as well as other editors. Editors examine multiple categories of writing, including opinion pieces, poetry, memoirs, book reviews, case reports and investigative reports. The Journal is published two to three times per year and highlights the diverse talents of Stanford medical students in both scientific writing and the humanities.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Shafer, A. (PI)

INDE 215: Queer Health & Medicine

Explores specific, pertinent, and timely issues impacting the health of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community; examines the role of the primary care physician in addressing the health care needs of this community. Guest lecturers provide a gender-sensitive approach to the medical care of the LGBT patient, breaking down homophobic barriers and reaffirming patient diversity. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

INDE 216: Cells to Tissues

Focuses on the cell biology and structural organization of human tissues as self-renewing systems. Topics include identification and differentiation of stem cells, regulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis in normal and cancerous cells, cell adhesion and polarity in epithelial tissues, intracellular transport, and cell migration. Histology laboratory sessions examine normal and abnormal samples of blood, epithelia, connective tissue, muscle, bone and cartilage. Patient presentations and small group discussions of current medical literature illustrate how cell biology influences medical practice.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Salmi, D. (PI)

INDE 217: Physician Scientist Hour

Enrollment is limited to MD, PhD, or MD-PhD students interested in careers as physician scientists. Focus is on aspects of developing careers in biomedical research through a mix of research lectures, clinical case presentations, and physician-scientist guest speakers.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Porteus, M. (PI); Utz, P. (PI)

INDE 221: Human Health and Disease I

First course in three-sequence Human Health and Disease block. Focus is on structure, function, disease, and therapeutics of the respiratory system and the cardiovascular system. The Human Health and Disease block presents organ system-based histology, pathology, physiology, pharmacology, and infectious disease in a sequence of interdisciplinary courses. Each organ-specific integrated course includes a review of the anatomy and related histology, normal function of that organ system, how the organ system is affected by and responds to disease including infection, and how diseases of that organ system are treated (therapeutics).
Terms: Spr | Units: 12 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

INDE 222: Human Health and Disease III

Structure, function, disease, and therapeutics of the renal/genito-urinary system, the gastrointestinal system, the endocrine system, male and female reproductive systems, and women's health. See INDE 220 for a description of the Human Health and Disease block .
Terms: Aut | Units: 15 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Regula, D. (PI)

INDE 223: Human Health and Disease IV

Structure, function, disease, and therapeutics of the central nervous system, hematologic system and multi-systemic diseases. See INDE 220 for a description of the Human Health and Disease block.
Terms: Win | Units: 11 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

INDE 225: Popular and Clinical Nutrition: Food Facts, Fads, and Pharmacology

Designed for medical students and other health care professionals. Lunchtime lectures review the epidemiological and clinical research related to eating patterns and misconceptions of the public, the mechanisms of pharmacological effects of food, and related topics common to patient nutritional concerns. Topics include fad diets, the impact of dietary addiction, longevity associated with caloric restriction, toxins in foods and the action of phytonutirents. Epidemiological, clinical, and biochemical studies are reviewed in the discussion of these and other topics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

INDE 226: History of Medicine Online

Via Internet. Topics include: ancient medicine, Egypt and Babylonia, ancient Greece and Rome, Europe in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, 18th-century schools of thought, and technological medicine. Sources include Kleinman's core clinical functions, and text, pictures, hypertext links, and sound clips. For assistance accessing the course, email: cwpsupport@lists.stanford.edu. Enroll in Axess, then ask cwpsupport to be added to the course site as a student
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Shafer, A. (PI)

INDE 227: Careers in Medicine: Pathways in the Medical Sciences

Open to medical students, graduate and undergraduate students. Interactive, seminar-style sessions expose students to diverse career opportunities and the challenges of developing work-life balance in medicine. Recognized experts in clinical medicine and biomedical research who have been innovators in their careers discuss their work, decision-points in their career pathways, and lifestyle aspects of their choices.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

INDE 228: Career Transition Planning: Taking Action Today for a Successful Tomorrow

Open to School of Medicine MD and graduate students; post-docs and clinical fellows may audit by consent of instructor. How to prioritize career goals and develop an effective job search campaign. Topics: translating scientific and clinical training into a variety of workplace environmennts, professional network development, professional interest assessment, recruiters' perspectives, credentials development, and creating a marketing plan. Guest speakers from myriad career fields. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

INDE 229: Managing Difficult Conversations

(Same as GSBGEN 568) Dealing effectively with difficult interpersonal situations in medical contexts. Focus is on improving students' judgment as to how to prepare for and confront difficult discussions in medical situations. Relevant principles of professionalism, leadership, and psychology underlie the course pedagogy. Case-based; student-to-student and student-to-instructor role-playing in actual medical situations. Patient and physician-expert participation as class guests. Enrollment limited to 20 medical students (2nd year and beyond) and 15 2nd year MBA students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

INDE 230: Topics in Scientific Management

Designed for postdocs and advanced graduate students. Reviews management skills necessary for successfully assuming leadership roles in scientific research. Addresses some of the most difficult aspects of developing, directing, and managing people and projects and running a research group, especially issues that new faculty have traditionally learned by trial and error over a number of years. Topics include: the faculty job search process and strategies, key elements in starting a lab, basic principles regarding legal dimensions of scientific activity (intellectual property, royalties, links with industry), team science, research ethics, communication and negotiation skills, and writing and securing grants.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

INDE 231A: Career Transitions: Academia

Preference to PhD students in their fourth year or beyond and postdocs/fellows in their intended final year. Restricted to students in Biosciences and the School of Medicine. Focus is on practical, hands-on preparation of application materials (including interview and job talk) for academic positions. Provides practical, hands-on preparation for Bioscience PhD students, postdoctoral fellows and research/clinical trainees ready to apply to academic positions. It not only previews the academic hiring process, including tips from experienced faculty from different types of institutions, but also guides participants in the preparation and polishing of their application materials for success on the job market.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

INDE 231B: Career Prep and Practice: Academia

Open to all Biosciences PhD students, postdocs/fellows and medical students/residents/fellows planning to pursue academic careers. Focus is on gaining a deeper understanding of faculty roles and responsibilities. Topics include how to balance teaching, research, service, lab set-up, grantwriting and publishing at different types of institutions. Features panels of experienced faculty members from different academic environments. More information available on course website: web.stanford.edu/class/inde231b.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

INDE 232: Introduction to Academic Medicine for Physician-Scientists

Open only to accepted MSTP students. Presentations by Stanford faculty on professional development topics, including: choosing a dissertation advisor, giving oral presentations, writing a grant proposal, attending scientific meetings, developing a research career. Substantial writing component.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

INDE 233: Medical Education Seminar Series

For pre-clinical and clinical medical students. A series of sessions rotating among the following formats: Medical Education journal club; education works-in-progress; topics in medical education design, implementation, and evaluation; teaching M&M; hot topics and controversies in medical education. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

INDE 234: Introduction to Writing Research Proposals

Practical instruction in research proposal writing. Suitable for advanced graduate students. Substantial writing component. Enrollment by instructor approval only.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

INDE 235: Wilderness Leadership and Mentorship Skills for Medical Students

For MD/Master of Medicine wilderness pre-orientation trip (SWEAT) leaders. Training to engage with and prepare incoming first-year medical students for the rigors of medical school. Topics include: fundamentals of wilderness survival, wilderness equipment use, wilderness first aid, camping, outdoor leadership, mentorship, team building, improvisation, risk management, cultural competency, professionalism as a physician, reflection and resiliency, first-year curriculum, stress management and coping. Guest lectures from Stanford faculty, emergency medicine physicians, National Outdoor Leadership School wilderness instructors, learning strategy specialists, and mentorship development specialists.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Smith-Coggins, R. (PI)

INDE 236: Introduction to Teaching and Mentoring

Enrollment limited to medical students. An introduction to medical education teaching priniciples and skills. Topics include assessment of current teaching skills, reviews of performance, giving appropriate learner feedback, and best practices for interactive teaching. Also introduces the literature around the value of peer mentoring in the medical setting and how to apply this information. Recommended for medical students interested in or currently serving as teaching assistants or interested in future academic positions.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

INDE 255A: Health Policy, Finance and Economics I

Open to medical students and resident physicians. Introduction to basic concepts and current issues in health policy, health finance, and health economics. Goals are to promote understanding of the forces that shape healthcare; to integrate medical students with graduate medical education (residents); to motivate participants to pursue further scholarly activity in these subjects through coursework, graduate programs or research . Team taught by world-renowned experts in their respective fields. Prerequisite: instructor consent.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

INDE 255B: Health Policy, Finance and Economics II

Continuation of INDE 255A. Open to medical students and resident physicians. Introduction to basic concepts and current issues in health policy, health finance, and health economics. Goals are to promote understanding of the forces that shape healthcare; to integrate medical students with graduate medical education (residents); to motivate participants to pursue further scholarly activity in these subjects through coursework, graduate programs or research . Team taught by world-renowned experts in their respective fields. For medical students 255A is not prerequisite to 255B. Prerequisite: instructor consent.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

INDE 260: Journeys in Women's Health and Sex and Gender in Medicine (FEMGEN 260X)

Sponsored by the Stanford WSDM Center. Course focuses on health research on women and sex differences in medicine, acknowledges the "wisdom" of research and education on sex (e.g. chromosomes, gonads, gonadal hormones) and gender (sociocultural) factors influencing health. Brings alumni to share their professional journeys in the world of Women and Sex Differences in Medicine. Meets Women's Health Scholarly Concentration Requirement.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

INDE 263: Microbiology and Infectious Diseases I

First course in a two-course series exploring microbiology, pathogenesis, and clinical issues associated with infectious diseases. Patient cases springboard discussion on viral, bacterial, fungal, protozoal and helminthic pathogens. Online videos and self-assessments followed by interactive sessions and problem sets.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

INDE 273: Medical Improvisation

Medicine, like theater, is both a skill set and an art form. The practice of medicine demands exceptional communicative, cognitive, and interpersonal skills in order to respond to unpredictable situations while interacting with a wide variety of individuals. Improvisational theater skills have a surprising and substantial overlap with those required of clinicians. Improv is a genre of performance art grounded in principles of spontaneity, adaptability, collaboration, and skilled listening. In this course, the principles and training techniques of improvisational theater are used to highlight and improve awareness, communication, and teamwork in the field of medicine. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

INDE 290A: The Stanford Healthcare Innovations and Experiential Learning Directive (SHIELD)

The Stanford Healthcare Innovations and Experiential Learning Directive (SHIELD) program is designed for motivated first year MD students who wish to have a sustained early clinical experience during the preclerkship years by being embedded into a health care team. Focus is on training students to perform targeted patient care tasks including health coaching, motivational interviewing, and medication reconciliation. Students will have opportunities to engage in experiences such as patient navigation, home visits, telehealth care, and post-operative follow-up. The program enlists students as change agents, and emphasizes health systems science, a culture of quality improvement, scholarship, and leadership. Through an application and selection process, students are matched to an experience at a clinical site, with a dedicated mentor, within the first 30 days of the program. A one-year commitment required. Interested students should contact the program director, Dr. Erika Schillinger (erikas@stanford.edu).nnPrerequisite: director consent; brief application, interview required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

INDE 290B: The Stanford Healthcare Innovations and Experiential Learning Directive (SHIELD)

The second quarter course for students continuing in the SHIELD program, designed for motivated MD students who wish to have a sustained early clinical experience during the preclerkship years by being embedded into a health care team. The second of a 3-quarter series delivered across the first year of medical school, with an option to continue in year two. Students will continue training and application of skills in health coaching, motivational interviewing, and medication reconciliation, and begin projects at their clinical site. Interested students should contact the program director, Dr. Erika Schillinger (erikas@stanford.edu).nnPrerequisite: INDE 290A
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

INDE 290C: The Stanford Healthcare Innovations and Experiential Learning Directive (SHIELD)

The third quarter course for students continuing in the SHIELD program, designed for motivated MD students who wish to have a sustained early clinical experience during the preclerkship years by being embedded into a health care team. The third of a 3-quarter series delivered across the first year of medical school, with an option to continue in year two. Students will continue training and application of skills in health coaching, motivational interviewing, and medication reconciliation, and continue projects at their clinical site. Interested students should contact the program director, Dr. Erika Schillinger (erikas@stanford.edu).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

INDE 291A: The Stanford Healthcare Innovations and Experiential Learning Directive (SHIELD)

The first quarter course for second year students continuing in the SHIELD program, designed for motivated MD students who wish to have a sustained early clinical experience during the preclerkship years by being embedded into a health care team. Second year students will continue with regular half-day sessions at their clinical site, and further develop their project and scholarship. Interested students should contact the program director, Dr. Erika Schillinger (erikas@stanford.edu).nnPrerequisite: director consent; continuing SHIELD students
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

INDE 291B: The Stanford Healthcare Innovations and Experiential Learning Directive (SHIELD)

The second quarter course for second year students continuing in the SHIELD program, designed for motivated MD students who wish to have a sustained early clinical experience during the preclerkship years by being embedded into a health care team. Second year students will continue with regular half-day sessions at their clinical site, and further develop their project and scholarship. Interested students should contact the program director, Dr. Erika Schillinger (erikas@stanford.edu).nnPrerequisite: INDE 291A
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

INDE 295: Bioethics and Anthropology Interdisciplinary Directed Individual Study

Supervised individualized study in bioethics and anthropology for a qualifying paper, research proposal, or project with an individual faculty member. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Lee, S. (PI); Magnus, D. (SI)

INDE 297: Reflections, Research, and Advances in Patient Care

Required for all MD students enrolled in clerkships at Stanford affiliated sites. Two-year curriculum designed to provide structured time for students to step back from clerkships, in order to promote reflection on and reinforcement for their learning in the clinical environment. Goals are: to discuss and reflect upon critical experiences in clerkships; to provide continuity of instruction in translational science topics across the curriculum; to reinforce and extend the study of behavioral, cultural, ethical, social and socioeconomic topics introduced in the Practice of Medicine course sequence; to expose students to recent advances in medical discoveries, emphasizing their application to clinical practice (translational medicine); and to develop research and critical thinking skills, acquiring new information in areas related to the Scholarly Concentrations. Components of this curriculum include Doctoring with CARE small groups, the Advances and Reflections in Medicine lecture/seminar series, and Scholarly Concentration breakout groups. The Friday afternoon lecture/seminars explore advances in biomedical sciences with applications to medical practice (translational medicine) as well as faculty career pathways, reflections on doctoring, and the context of medicine in society. All students in clinical clerkships must participate in all aspects of RRAP Days. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in clinical clerkships.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

INDE 298: Women's Health Independent Project

Women's Health Scholarly Concentration. Students pursue individual projects under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

ITALIAN 75N: Narrative Medicine and Near-Death Experiences (FRENCH 75N)

Even if many of us don't fully believe in an afterlife, we remain fascinated by visions of it. This course focuses on Near-Death Experiences and the stories around them, investigating them from the many perspectives pertinent to the growing field of narrative medicine: medical, neurological, cognitive, psychological, sociological, literary, and filmic. The goal is not to understand whether the stories are veridical but what they do for us, as individuals, and as a culture, and in particular how they seek to reshape the patient-doctor relationship. Materials will span the 20th century and come into the present. Taught in English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wittman, L. (PI)

ITALIAN 345: In Defense of Poetry (FRENCH 343)

Beginning with the account of the quarrel between philosophy and poetry in Plato's Republic, we will read definitions and defenses of poetry by authors such as Cicero, Horace, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Sidney, Shelley, and Pound, among others. While we will try to historicize these authors' defenses as much as possible, we will also read them from the perspective of contemporary efforts to defend literature and the humanities. Topics of central concern will be the connection between poetry and ethics, the conflict between poetry and the professions of business, law, and medicine, poetry's place in the university, the political role of the poet, questions of poetic language and form, and the relevance of defenses of poetry to literary theory.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lummus, D. (PI)

ITALIC 91: Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture

ITALIC is a new residence-based program built around a series of big questions about the historical, critical and practical purposes of art and its unique capacities for intellectual creativity, communication, and expression. This year-long program fosters close exchanges among faculty, students and guest artists and scholars in class, over meals and during excursions to arts events. We trace the challenges that works of art have presented to categories of knowledge ¿ history, politics, culture, science, medicine, law ¿ by turning reality upside-down or inside-out, or just by altering one¿s perspective on the world. The arts become a model for engaging with problem-solving: uncertainty and ambiguity confront art makers and viewers all the time; artworks are experiments that work by different sets of rules. Students will begin to understand and use the arts to create new frameworks for exploring our (and others¿) experience.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ITALIC 92: Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture

ITALIC is a new residence-based program built around a series of big questions about the historical, critical and practical purposes of art and its unique capacities for intellectual creativity, communication, and expression. This year-long program fosters close exchanges among faculty, students and guest artists and scholars in class, over meals and during excursions to arts events. We trace the challenges that works of art have presented to categories of knowledge -- history, politics, culture, science, medicine, law -- by turning reality upside-down or inside-out, or just by altering one's perspective on the world. The arts become a model for engaging with problem-solving: uncertainty and ambiguity confront art makers and viewers all the time; artworks are experiments that work by different sets of rules. Students will begin to understand and use the arts to create new frameworks for exploring our (and others') experience.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ITALIC 93: Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture

ITALIC is a new residence-based program built around a series of big questions about the historical, critical and practical purposes of art and its unique capacities for intellectual creativity, communication, and expression. This year-long program fosters close exchanges among faculty, students and guest artists and scholars in class, over meals and during excursions to arts events. We trace the challenges that works of art have presented to categories of knowledge -- history, politics, culture, science, medicine, law -- by turning reality upside-down or inside-out, or just by altering one's perspective on the world. The arts become a model for engaging with problem-solving: uncertainty and ambiguity confront art makers and viewers all the time; artworks are experiments that work by different sets of rules. Students will begin to understand and use the arts to create new frameworks for exploring our (and others') experience.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ITALIC 95W: Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture, Writing Section

ITALIC is a new residence-based program built around a series of big questions about the historical, critical and practical purposes of art and its unique capacities for intellectual creativity, communication, and expression. This year-long program fosters close exchanges among faculty, students and guest artists and scholars in class, over meals and during excursions to arts events. We trace the challenges that works of art have presented to categories of knowledge ¿ history, politics, culture, science, medicine, law ¿ by turning reality upside-down or inside-out, or just by altering one¿s perspective on the world. The arts become a model for engaging with problem-solving: uncertainty and ambiguity confront art makers and viewers all the time; artworks are experiments that work by different sets of rules. Students will begin to understand and use the arts to create new frameworks for exploring our (and others¿) experience.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 1 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Steichen, J. (PI)

LAW 413Z: Policy Practicum: Endstage Decisions: Health Directives in Law and Practice

Medical decisions toward the end of life can be crucial and difficult for patients, doctors, and the families of patients. Law and medicine have been struggling to find ways to strike a balance between what the patients might want (or say they want), and what makes medical, economic, and ethical sense. People have been encouraged to fill out "Advanced Health Care Directives," which give guidance to doctors and surrogates (usually a family member) on what to do when faced with end-of-life dilemmas. Another form, adopted in just over half the states (including California) is the POLST form (Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment). The two types are supposed to complement each other, but they are different in important ways. The Advanced Health Care Directive expresses what a person wants, or thinks she wants, and/or appoints a surrogate, in case the patient is unable to express her wishes. Anybody can fill out a Directive, at any time of life. Ideally, a copy goes to the surrogate, if one is appointed, and another to the primary care physician. The POLST form is meant for people who are seriously ill. It is a one page form, printed on bright pink paper. It is signed by patient and doctor. The directives (for example "no artificial nutrition by tube") are supposed to be controlling; the patient, of course, can change her mind; but there is no surrogate. It is an agreement between the patient and the doctor. Who uses these forms? How effective are they? To what extent and in what situations are they useful? In what situations are they not useful? Can they be made more useful and, if so, how? There has been research on the subject; and a major report on the end-of-life issue (originally due out in December) will be released this summer. The class will look at some of this literature, but the main point will be to find out what local hospitals and nursing homes are doing. Students will conduct interviews with doctors, nurses, and other health care specialists in order to find out what one might call the living law of the Directive and of Polst. The aim is to get a more realistic picture of the situation in the area: how are these forms used, when are they used, what has the experience of health care professionals been; perhaps also some insight into the experience of patients and family members. The ultimately goal would, one hopes, be policy recommendations for improvements in the forms themselves, and the laws relating to the forms, along with recommendations for ways to improve the way the forms are or can be used; or whether some entirely different approach to the problem might be needed. Stanford Hospital and Clinics will be the client in researching and addressing the above questions. Elements used in grading: Final Paper. NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mixed H/P/R/F or MP/R/F

LAW 414B: Policy Practicum: Analyzing Alternative Laws and Policies for Psychoactive Drugs

Four states have already legalized marijuana, and there is a strong likelihood that California will significantly change its marijuana laws This practicum works closely with a policy client to assess alternative options for California marijuana laws. We will examine possible options through many lenses, including moral philosophy, welfare economics, neuroscience and medicine, criminal justice, and political analysis. Students will gain exposure to such policy analysis methodologies as epidemiology, econometrics, quasi-experimentation, simulation modeling, and cross-national case studies to identify and analyze options and likely tradeoffs to help the client and the citizens of California make informed choices. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments. NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and e-mail the Consent Application Form available on the SLS Registrar's Office website (see Registration and Selection of Classes for Stanford Law Students) to the instructor. See Consent Application Form for submission deadline.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 675: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives

This course offers an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, including trafficking for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ harvesting. In each of these areas, we will focus on human rights violations and remedies. The course aims to: 1. Provide the historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. 2. Analyze current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluate their practical implementation. 3. Examine the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. 4. Stimulate ideas for new interventions. Instruction will combine lectures and small group discussion, and uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should also enroll in History 6W/7W (FemGen 6W/7W), a two-quarter service learning workshop. Elements used in grading: Attendance; participation; written assignments; and final exam. This class is cross-listed with Feminist, Gender and Sexuality Studies (FEMGEN 5C, FEMGEN 105C), History (HISTORY 5C, 105C), Human Biology (HUMBIO 178T), International Relations (INTNLREL 105C) & School of Medicine General (SOMGEN 205).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 681W: When Research Goes Bad

Research is the application of systematic methods for purposes of producing generalizable knowledge. In some cases, individuals research on their own; at other times, they work within a range of organizations, such as business entities, universities or other nonprofits. The products of research have powerful effects: they alter human understanding-how we see ourselves and the world; they influence government, policies, and markets; they also shape lifestyles, diets, education, and medical care. In addition, research findings may bring adulation and wealth to the researchers who produce them. Unethical research processes and false research findings ("bad research") can be extremely damaging. They may set science, medicine, business, and social policy in the wrong direction; they invariably waste money; and, directly or indirectly, they are likely to harm the very people they promise to benefit. Bad research is sometimes the result of intentional wrongdoing, but it may also stem from carelessness, "honest" mistakes, and unconscious biases. Through a selection of intriguing case studies and other accounts, this discussion group will explore instances in which research has taken a wrong turn, or is perceived to have done so. What are the consequences for society? What are the consequences for the researchers and their subjects? What ethical, legal and policy questions arise? And what institutional structures can best address these challenges? Begin in Winter Quarter and run through Spring Quarter. Class meeting dates: The class will meet in the evening. Exact meeting time and dates to be determined by instructor. DISCUSSIONS IN ETHICAL & PROFESSIONAL VALUES COURSES RANKING FORM: To apply for this course, 2L, 3L and Advanced Degree students must complete and submit a Ranking Form available on the SLS Registrar's Office website (see Registration). See Ranking Form for instructions and submission deadline. Elements used in grading: Class attendance at all sessions and class participation.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F

LAW 684: Conflicts, Ethics, and the Academy

This course looks at conflicts of interest and ethical issues as they arise within academic work. The participants will be drawn from schools and departments across the University so that the discussion will prompt different examples of, and perspectives on, the issues we discuss. Topics will include the conflicts that arise from sponsored research, including choices of topics, shaping of conclusions, and nondisclosure agreements; issues of informed consent with respect to human subjects research, and the special issues raised by research conducted outside the United States; peer review, co-authorship, and other policies connected to scholarly publication; and the ethics of the classroom and conflicts of interest implicating professor-student relationships. Representative readings will include Marcia Angell's work, Drug Companies and Doctors: A Story of Corruption, N.Y. Rev. Books, Jan. 15, 2009, and Is Academic Medicine for Sale? 342 N. Engl. J. Med. 1516 (2000) (and responses); William R. Freudenburg, Seeding Science, Courting Conclusions: Reexamining the Intersection of Science, Corporate Cash, and the Law, 20 Sociological Forum 3 (2005); Max Weber, Science as a Vocation; legal cases; and conflict-of-interest policies adopted by various universities and professional organizations. The course will include an informal dinner at the end of each session. The goal of the course is to have students across disciplines think about the ethical issues they will confront in an academic or research career. Elements used in grading: attendance, participation, and two short reflection papers. Cross-listed with Ethics in Society (ETHICSOC 301). Non-law students should enroll in ETHICSOC 301.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F

LAW 727: Health Law: Quality and Safety of Care

Concerns about the quality of health care, along with concerns about its cost and accessibility, are the focal points of American health policy. This course will consider how legislators, courts, and professional groups attempt to safeguard the quality and safety of the health care patients receive. The course approaches "regulation" in a broad sense. We will cover regimes for determining who may deliver health care services (e.g. licensing and accreditation agencies), legal and ethical obligations providers owe to patients (e.g. confidentiality, informed consent), individual and institutional liability for substandard care, and various proposals for reforming the medical malpractice system. We will also discuss the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (aka, "Obamacare"), which is launching many new initiatives aimed at assuring or improving health care quality. Special Instructions: Any student may write a paper in lieu of the final exam with consent of instructor. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Exam or Final Paper. (Cross-listed with School of Medicine - MED 209)
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 744: Moral Minds

Recent psychological advances in our understanding of the cognitive and social origins of morality cast a new light on age-old questions about ethics, such as: How did our moral sense evolve in our species? How does it develop over our lifetime? How much does our culture, religion, or politics determine our moral values? What is the role of intuition and emotion in moral judgment? How "logical" is moral judgment? How do other people's moral choices affect us? Does character matter or is behavior entirely dictated by the situations we find ourselves in? If it is purely situational, are we morally responsible for anything? How far will we go to convince ourselves that we are good and moral? We will review empirical answers to these questions suggested by behavioral research, and explore their implications for ethics. Open to all graduate students, including advanced degree candidates at the professional schools (law, business, medicine, computer science, education, etc.). Enrollment limited to 16 by consent of instructors. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Readings. CONSENT APPLICATION: Students enrolled in the course will be selected through an application process. The application can be found at http://web.stanford.edu/~arnewman/MoralMinds.fb, and is due at 11:59 p.m. on November 14, 2014. Cross-listed with Ethics in Society (ETHICSOC 304) and Psychology (PSYCH 264).
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F

LAW 762: Health Law: Improving Public Health

This course examines how the law can be used to improve the public's health. The major themes explored are, what authority does the government have to regulate in the interest of public health? How are individual rights balanced against this authority? What are the benefits and pitfalls of using laws and litigation to achieve public health goals? The course investigates these issues as they operate in a range of specific contexts in public health, including the control and prevention of infectious disease; laws aimed at preventing obesity and associated noncommunicable diseases; tobacco regulation; ensuring access to medical care; reproductive health; lawsuits against tobacco, food, and gun companies; and public health emergencies. In these contexts, we will ask and answer questions such as, what do the Constitution and key statutes permit? What makes a good public health law? What does public health evidence tell us about the likely effectiveness of particular legal interventions? What ethical and economic arguments justify government intervention to shape individuals' and companies' health-related behaviors? Instruction is through interactive lectures with a significant amount of class discussion and some group exercises. Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Exam. Cross-listed with Medicine (MED 237).
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 782: U.S. Human Rights NGOs and International Human Rights

Many US human rights non-government organizations, including the US philanthropic sector, work on international human rights. The US government also engages with the private sector in "partnerships" that twins US foreign aid human rights action with corporate expertise. This weekly series will feature speakers who lead these human rights NGOs, philanthropic enterprises, and corporate partnerships, and also policy experts and scholars, to explore the pro's and con's of this scenario. Cross-lsited with Ethics in Society (ETHICSOC 15R), International Policy Studies (IPS 271A), Medicine (MED 225) and Political Science (POLISCI 203).
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F

LAWGEN 116N: Guns, Drugs, Abortion, and Empirical Evaluation of Law and Policy

Guns, Drugs, Abortion, Capital Punishment, Policing and Prisons, and Other Uncontroversial Topics in the Empirical Evaluation of Law and Policy Do guns make us safer? Can mass shootings be stopped? What is the true cost of the war on drugs and is legalization the answer? Why does the US have the most prisoners in the world and what are the social ramifications? Did the legalization of abortion reduce crime in the 1990s? Did capital punishment? Is the criminal justice system racially biased? These are some of the questions we will address by reading major empirical studies evaluating the impact of law and policy in the arena of criminal justice. This course has been modified from my law school course so that it is accessible to those with little or no statistical or economic background but who are willing to grapple with the intuitions behind such studies, which will be a main focus of the course readings. The seminar should appeal to anyone interested in understanding core issues in criminal justice policy, the challenges in answering empirical questions with data, and the intuition behind the statistical techniques that define the credibility revolution in empirical evaluation. The goal is to help students be more aware that many beliefs and policy positions are based on factual premises for which the empirical support is weak or nonexistent, or even directly contradictory, and how better to empirically ascertain truths about the world and align them with our policy preferences. Successful completion of the course will enable students to more effectively understand and critically evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the empirical studies that constantly appear in the media and policy discourse, to comprehend the challenges in establishing true causal relationships in the fields of law, policy, and medicine, and to better understand how ideologues and motivated researchers contribute to the vast array of conflicting studies in these domains.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Donohue, J. (PI)

MATSCI 81N: Bioengineering Materials to Heal the Body

Preference to freshmen. How scientists and engineers are designing new materials for surgeon to use in replacing body parts such as heart tissue or the spinal cord. How cells, in the body and transplanted stem cells, communicate with implanted materials. Real-world examples of materials developed for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine therapies. Students identify a clinically important disease or injury that requires a better material, research approaches to the problem, and debate possible engineering solutions.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 381: Biomaterials in Regenerative Medicine (BIOE 361)

Materials design and engineering for regenerative medicine. How materials interact with cells through their micro- and nanostructure, mechanical properties, degradation characteristics, surface chemistry, and biochemistry. Examples include novel materials for drug and gene delivery, materials for stem cell proliferation and differentiation, and tissue engineering scaffolds. Prerequisites: undergraduate chemistry, and cell/molecular biology or biochemistry.
Terms: alternate years, given next year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ME 571: Surgical Robotics Seminar (CS 571)

Surgical robots developed and implemented clinically on varying scales. Seminar goal is to expose students from engineering, medicine, and business to guest lecturers from academia and industry.engineering and clinical aspects connected to design and use of surgical robots, varying in degree of complexity and procedural role. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 1A: Leadership in Multicultural Health

Designed for undergraduates serving as staff for the Stanford Medical Youth Science Summer Residential Program (SRP). Structured opportunitie to learn, observe, participate in, and evaluate leadership development, multicultural health theories and practices, and social advocacy. Utilizes service learning as a pedagogical approach to developing an understanding of the intersections between identity, power and privilege and disparities (health, education, environment), fostering knowledge and skills to become social advocates to address forms of inequities. Students explore approaches for identifying and tackling issues of equity (health and education) as well as learn fundamental skills necessary to implement activities for the Summer Residential Program.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ned, J. (PI)

MED 1B: Identity, Power and Privilege in Multicultural Health

An independent study service learning course designed to develop students' understanding of the intersection between identity, power, privilege, and disparities (health, education, environment). Students submit a written reflective term paper based on their experience as staff for the Summer Residential Program as well as their understanding of how constructs of identity, power and privilege impact low-income and underrepresented students in their pursuit of higher education. Prerequisite MED 1A.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ned, J. (PI)

MED 10SC: Responses to the AIDS Epidemic

This course focuses on the HIV epidemic, contrasting the origin and spread of HIV and AIDS in Africa and the emergence of HIV in the U.S., in particular the history of HIV in San Francisco and the Bay Area. We will meet the people and visit the institutions which played key roles in the Public Health prevention, care, and treatment of HIV in San Francisco and consider the impact of HIV globally in our thinking about epidemic disease and the international responses to HIV. This will include key locations in the City, including the AIDS Grove, San Francisco General Hospital, the San Francisco Department of Public Health, the Castro, and local AIDS service organizations. Students will also hear from patients, physicians, and activists who are living with AIDS. We will also meet with scientists at UCSF, Stanford, and local pharmaceutical companies who are at the forefront of new prevention, therapeutic, and diagnostic research. By examining the relationship between the emergence of Gay activism and AIDS in California and New York and the pandemic in Southern Africa, the course will emphasize the multi-disciplinary and multi-sector approach to epidemic infectious disease. How sis physicians, patients, epidemiologists, pharmaceutical companies, and policymakers develop effective responses to the AIDS epidemic? What are we learning from Africa and what can Africa learn from us about how communities react to deadly threats from infectious disease.nAIDS experts from the Stanford community and Africa are invited to share their perspectives with us. In preparation for the seminar, you will be required to read And the Band Played On and Barnett and Whiteside's AIDS in the Twenty-First Century and selected scientific articles. As part of a group, you will also develop an AIDS-related project of your choice which you will present on the last day of class. Sophomore College course, applications required, due 12noon April 5, 2016. To apply, see http://soco.stanford.edu.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Katzenstein, D. (PI)

MED 23: ASB The Cuisine of Change: Promoting Child Health and Combating Food Insecurity

Topics include obesity rates in America, the health and food education in our schools, the fundamentals of nutrition, the challenges of processed foods, the various lifestyle choices and fads surrounding healthy eating, and the complex ecology of food insecurity and welfare.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gardner, C. (PI)

MED 27SI: Alternative Spring Break: Healthcare of Underserved Communities in Central California

Pre-field group directed reading for Alternative Spring Break: Healthcare of Underserved Communities in Central California.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Garcia, G. (PI)

MED 28SI: Alternative Spring Break: Health Accessibililty

Alternative Spring Break class. Pre-field course for students participating in the Health Accessibility Alternative Spring Break trip. Focuses on the Bay Area and the current state of the U.S. healthcare system, how it has developed, and how it can be transformed to ensure greater accessibility for all.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 50N: Translating Science to Disease Treatment

Investigates how scientific research informs how physicians take care of patients and how clinical research informs how scientific experiments are conducted. Topics include how these two processes have improved health and have resulted in innovation and scientic progress; specific human disease areas in allergy and immunology that affect all ages of patients globally, including food allergy; scientific concepts of research that helped in discovery of novel diagnostics and treatment of disease; ethical roles of physicians and scientists in conducting translational research in human disease.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Nadeau, K. (PI)

MED 50Q: Respiration

Preference to sophomores. Topics include: the biological basis for use of oxygen for aerobic metabolism in animals, human lung physiology and pathophysiology, comparative physiology of respiration in fish, birds and mammals, new insights into mammalian lung development, current challenges in human respiratory health including air pollution and lung cancer. Student presentations on specific topics based on literature research developed in consultation with the instructor. Application required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kao, P. (PI)

MED 51Q: Palliative Medicine, Hospice and End of Life Care for Diverse Americans

Introduces students to changing demographics of the aging and dying population in the United States. Topics include current issues in palliative medicine, hospice and end-of-life care for an increasingly diverse population. Includes simulated video case studies, real patient case discussions and collaborative field project. Application required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MED 70Q: Cancer and the Immune System

Preference to sophomores. Myths and facts surrounding the idea that the immune system is capable of recognizing malignant cells. The biological basis and function of effector arms of the immune system; how these mechanisms may be used to investigate the biological basis and potential therapy of cancer. How the immune system functions.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MED 71N: Hormones in a Performance-Enhanced Society

(Formerly 117Q) Prefersnce to freshmen. Explores how the availability of hormone therapy has affected various aspects of daily lives. Topics include the controversies concerning menopause and its treatment; use of hormones in athletics; cosmetic use of hormones to enhance growth, strength, and libido; use of hormones as anti-aging drugs; and how the hormone system has influenced our notions of gender. Includes the biochemistry and physiology of the human endocrine system; how hormones influence behavior, and how to read a scientific paper.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hoffman, A. (PI)

MED 73N: Scientific Method and Bias

Offers an introduction to the scientific method and common biases in science. Examines theoretical considerations and practical examples where biases have led to erroneous conclusions, as well as scientific practices that can help identify, correct or prevent such biases. Additionally focuses on appropriate methods to interweave inductive and deductive approaches. Topics covered include: Popper¿s falsification and Kuhn¿s paradigm shift, revolution vs. evolution; determinism and uncertainty; probability, hypothesis testing, and Bayesian approaches; agnostic testing and big data; team science; peer review; replication; correlation and causation; bias in design, analysis, reporting and sponsorship of research; bias in the public perception of science, mass media and research; and bias in human history and everyday life. Provides students an understanding of how scientific knowledge has been and will be generated; the causes of bias in experimental design and in analytical approaches; and the interactions between deductive and inductive approaches in the generation of knowledge.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MED 86Q: Seeing the Heart

Introduction to biomedical technology, science, clinical medicine, and public policy through cardiovascular imaging. Invasive and noninvasive techniques to detect early stage heart disease and to see inside the heart and blood vessels. Topics include: common forms of heart disease, how they develop, and why they affect so many people; imaging technologies such as ultrasound, CT, MRI, PET, and optical; a cost-effective public screening program. Field trips to Stanford Medical Center imaging centers.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 87Q: Women and Aging

Preference to sophomores. Biology, clinical issues, social and health policies of aging; relationships, lifestyles, and sexuality; wise women and grandmothers. Sources include scientific articles, essays, poetry, art, and film. Service-learning experience with older women. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MED 88Q: Dilemmas in Current Medical Practice

Preference to sophomores. Social, political, scientific, and economic forces influencing medical practice. Spiraling costs, impaired access to health care, and disillusionment toward the health care system. Attempts by government and medical insurers to control costs through managed care and health maintenance organizations. Medical education and how it has affected the practice of medicine. Alternative health care, preventive medicine, and the doctor-patient relationship. The paradox of health in America: why do so many people who are healthy feel unhealthy? Mandatory observation of instructors in their medical practices.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Croke, J. (PI); Jones, H. (PI)

MED 94Q: Hormones, Health, and Disease

Preference to sophomores. The role of hormones in maintaining health; how abnormalities in hormones cause disease. Topics include: the pituitary, the master gland; thyroid hormones and metabolism; insulin and diabetes; adrenal steroids and hypertension; vitamin D, parathyroid hormone, and osteoporosis; sex hormones, birth control, pregnancy, and menopause; androgens, erectile dysfunction, and athletic performance; cholesterol, obesity, and cardiovascular risk. Recommended: background in human biology and physiology.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MED 108Q: Human Rights and Health

Preference to sophomores. History of human-rights law. International conventions and treaties on human rights as background for social and political changes that could improve the health of groups and individuals. Topics such as: regional conflict and health, the health status of refugees and internally displaced persons; child labor; trafficking in women and children; HIV/AIDS; torture; poverty, the environment and health; access to clean water; domestic violence and sexual assault; and international availability of drugs. Possible optional opportunities to observe at community sites where human rights and health are issues. Guest speakers from national and international NGOs including Doctors Without Borders; McMaster University Institute for Peace Studies; UC Berkeley Human Rights Center; Kiva. PowerPoint presentation on topic of choice required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Laws, A. (PI)

MED 120N: Pathophysiology of Diseases of the Heart

Preference to freshmen. Introduces students to the anatomy, physiology, pathology and clinical aspects that comprise the discipline of cardiovascular medicine. Topics will include explanations of such pathologic states as heart attack, stroke, congestive heart failure, cardiac rhythm disturbances, and sudden cardiac death. Introduction to the underlying principles of diagnosis and treatment of heart disease are included in the syllabus.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Stertzer, S. (PI)

MED 121: Translational Research and Applied Medicine (MED 221)

(Same as MED 121; undergraduate students enroll in MED 121) Open to graduate students and medical students, this course enables students to learn basic principles in the design, performance and analysis of translational medical research studies. The course includes both didactic seminars from experts in translational medicine as well as the opportunity to design and present a translational research project. Students enrolling for 3 units are paired with a TRAM translational research project and work as a team with TRAM trainees and faculty on a weekly basis, as arranged by the instructor, and present a final project update at the end of the quarter.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 121: Translational Research and Applied Medicine

(Same as MED 221; graduate and medical students enroll in MED 221) Open to undergraduate students, this course enables students to learn basic principles in the design, performance and analysis of translational medical research studies. The course includes both didactic seminars from experts in translational medicine as well as the opportunity to design and present a translational research project.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MED 129: Health Care Systems Around the World (HUMBIO 129W)

This course will explore the role of health care systems in societies around the world, identifying the common challenges facing health care systems and how different institutional structures in different countries perform in response to these challenges. We will structure the course around general conceptual frameworks related to key health system institutions (including financing, insurance, provider payment, patient cost-sharing, and the regulation of medical technology). From this foundation, we will draw on the experience of individual countries (high and low income, with heavy chronic disease and infectious disease burdens) to illustrate the function of these institutions under real-world circumstances observed around the globe.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MED 130: Yesplus: Meditation practices for wellbeing

The Practice of Happiness is a 1-unit credit course that provides students with tools and strategies to develop a sustainable approach to their happiness and well-being. Students will learn breathwork- and meditation-based processes to decrease stress and increase happiness and peace. In addition, students will also engage in community-building group discussions, interactive processes, and study happiness-based research to discover for themselves what happiness is, and how it can be sustained as a personal practice. In addition to weekly sessions, there are 3 mandatory back-to-back sessions over a weekend in the quarter- hours will be Friday: 6:30pm - 10pm; Saturday/Sunday: 1pm - 5pm (exact dates TBD). See yesplus.stanford.edu for further insight into the program. Enrollment limited; priority to residents of Castano Hall; others selected by application.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 143A: Patient Health Education in Community Clinics (MED 243A)

Open to undergraduate, graduate, and medical students. Principles of health education, health coaching, theories of behavior change, methods for risk reduction. Presentations of health education modules, focusing on topics prevalent among underserved populations. Students apply theoretical frameworks to health education activities in the Cardinal Free Clinics. Application required.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 143B: Patient Health Education in Community Clinics - Practicum (MED 243B)

Open to undergraduate, graduate, and medical students. For students who have completed MED 143A/243A and currently volunteer in one of the course-affiliated clinic sites. Objective is to expand health education skills, discuss more complex health education topics, and reflect upon experiences in the clinic. Includes readings and online reflections. Prerequisite: successful completion of MED 143A/243A.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 143C: Patient Health Education in Community Clinics - Practicum (MED 243C)

Open to undergraduate, graduate, and medical students. For students currently volunteering in one of the course-affiliated clinic sites. Objective is to expand health education skills, discuss more complex health education topics, and reflect upon experiences in the clinic. Includes readings and online reflections. Pre-requisites: MED 143A/243A, Med 143B/243B.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 145: Alternative Spring Break: Confronting HIV/AIDS in San Francisco

Preparation for the Alternative Spring Break trip. Current issues regarding HIV/AIDS worldwide and in the United States, with a specific focus on San Francisco. Topics include biology, transmission, prevention, pharmaceutical development, discrimination, stigma, access to health care, and perspectives of affected communities. Students enrolling for 3 units attend both Monday and Wednesday sections; medical students who can only attend Wednesday session have option to enroll for 2 units. See asb.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Katzenstein, D. (PI)

MED 147: Methods in Community Assessment, Evaluation, and Research (CHPR 247, MED 247)

Development of pragmatic skills for design, implementation, and analysis of structured interviews, focus groups, survey questionnaires, and field observations. Topics include: principles of community-based participatory research, including importance of dissemination; strengths and limitations of different study designs; validity and reliability; construction of interview and focus group questions; techniques for moderating focus groups; content analysis of qualitative data; survey questionnaire design; and interpretation of commonly-used statistical analyses.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Kiernan, M. (PI)

MED 149: Medical Interpreting at the Cardinal Free Clinics: The Qualified Bilingual Student Program

The quality of health care often depends as much on the interpreter as the provider. This foundation courses prepares bilingual students to work as medical interpreters in hospital and clinic settings. Students learn basic interpreting skills; ethics; communication techniques; medical vocabulary; key healthcare information; communication skills for advocacy; how to draft practical, working solutions, and professional development. By application only; must be an accepted Cardinal Free Clinic (CFC) interpreter volunteer. Applications accepted in Fall for Winter quarter and in Winter for Spring quarter. Students registering for this 2-unit course are required to interpret at the clinic a minimum of 2 weekend sessions; upon completion of this course, students can continue to volunteer at CFC for academic credit.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 150: Clinical Foundations for Patient Navigators at Arbor Free Clinic

Addresses key areas of learning for patient navigator volunteers at Arbor Free Clinic. Prepares patient navigators for their clinical role. Enrollment limited to current, active patient navigator volunteers.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 157: Foundations for Community Health Engagement

Open to undergraduate, graduate, and MD students. Examination and exploration of community health principles and their application at the local level. Designed to prepare students to make substantive contributions in a variety of community health settings (e.g. clinics, government agencies, non-profit organization, advocacy groups). Topics include community health assessment; health disparities; health promotion and disease prevention; strategies for working with diverse, low-income, and underserved populations; and principles of ethical and effective community engagement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Garcia, G. (PI)

MED 158A: From Foodies to Freegans: Food Popular Topics in the Silicon Valley

This is a discussion-based survey course to introduce the complexities of many "pop topics" in food, such as obesity, sustainability, and local vs. organic food. Course offered over two quarters; second part is MED 158B. The course focuses on Silicon Valley and is taught through a food justice lens. The goal is to provide knowledge and new frameworks for conceptualizing food that transform the way students think about, eat, and purchase food. Furthermore, course content is aligned with Community Engaged Learning (CEL) so that students have the opportunity to collaborate with local partners to complete community-based projects relevant to course topics. Coursework involves class participation, critical reflection, and three papers written for different audiences in the food space.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 158B: From Foodies to Freegans Practicum

Students work toward making change in the food system. This course matches students with a community partner in the local area who is working to address food issues, broadly defined. There are many ways to make meaningful impact, including working at Second Harvest Food Bank as a Health Ambassador, or to assist with the Healthy Cornerstore initiatives or Garden to Table with the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. Provides students with the opportunity to apply their academic area of concentration within a community-based context that fits their interests. Med 158A highly recommended but not required as a prerequisite.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 159A: Service-Learning in Migrant Health

Examines the intersection of migration, poverty and health; provides opportunities for engagement directly with community partners working with Bay Area Mexican migrant populations. Weekly knowledge and skills-building sessions covering the process of migration; the demographic characteristics of the local migrant population; the health and socioeconomic status of local migrant populations; current initiatives to improve their quality of life and well-being. Service opportunities include participation in community organizing; health education seminars; and health screening activities. Prerequisite: intermediate/advanced level of Spanish language proficiency.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MED 159B: Service-Learning in Migrant Health

Second quarter of two-quarter series. Examines the intersection of migration, poverty and health; provides opportunities for engagement directly with community partners working with Bay Area Mexican migrant populations. Weekly knowledge and skills-building sessions covering the process of migration; the demographic characteristics of the local migrant population; the health and socioeconomic status of local migrant populations; current initiatives to improve their quality of life and well-being. Service opportunities include participation in community organizing; health education seminars; and health screening activities. Prerequisites: intermediate/advanced level of Spanish language proficiency, MED 159A.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MED 160: Physician Shadowing: Stanford Immersion in Medicine Series (SIMS)

Undergraduates are paired with a physician mentor at Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, or the Veteran's Administration Hospital. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Application and acceptance to the SIMS program.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 182: Early Clinical Experience at the Cardinal Free Clinics (MED 282)

The Cardinal Free Clinics, consisting of Arbor and Pacific Free Clinic, provide culturally appropriate, high quality transitional medical care for undeserved patient populations in the Bay Area. Students volunteer in various clinic roles to offer services including health education, interpretation, referrals, and labs. Clinical students are guided in the practice of medical interviews, history-taking and physical examinations as appropriate, and work with attending physicians to arrive at a diagnosis and management plan. By application only. Visit http://cfc.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 184A: Team Leadership in the Cardinal Free Clinics I (MED 284A)

Introduction to skills for effective leadership, including: conflict resolution, team dynamics, leadership styles, personality types, giving and receiving feedback, and group decision-making. Utilizes hands-on-activities and real-life clinic scenarios. Applied learning through shifts at the Cardinal Free Clinics and related project work. Enrollment limited to Cardinal Free Clinic Managers.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Caceres, W. (PI); Lin, S. (PI)

MED 184B: Team Leadership in the Cardinal Free Clinics II (MED 284B)

Continuation of MED 184A/MED 284A. Introduction to skills for effective leadership, including: conflict resolution, team dynamics, leadership styles, personality types, giving and receiving feedback, and group decision-making. Utilizes hands-on-activities and real-life clinic scenarios. Applied learning through shifts at the Cardinal Free Clinics and related project work. Enrollment limited to Cardinal Free Clinic Managers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 184C: Team Leadership in the Cardinal Free Clinics III (MED 284C)

Continuation of MED 184A/MED 284A and MED 184B/MED284B. Introduction to skills for effective leadership, including: conflict resolution, team dynamics, leadership styles, personality types, giving and receiving feedback, and group decision-making. Utilizes hands-on-activities and real-life clinic scenarios. Applied learning through shifts at the Cardinal Free Clinics and related project work. Enrollment limited to Cardinal Free Clinic Managers.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Caceres, W. (PI); Lin, S. (PI)

MED 199: Undergraduate Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Advani, R. (PI); Ahmed, A. (PI); Ahuja, N. (PI); Akatsu, H. (PI); Al-Ahmad, A. (PI); Alizadeh, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Andrews, J. (PI); Annes, J. (PI); Arai, S. (PI); Artandi, M. (PI); Artandi, S. (PI); Asch, S. (PI); Ashley, E. (PI); Assimes, T. (PI); Ayoub, W. (PI); Baiocchi, M. (PI); Banerjee, S. (PI); Barry, M. (PI); Basaviah, P. (PI); Basina, M. (PI); Basu, S. (PI); Behal, R. (PI); Bendavid, E. (PI); Benjamin, J. (PI); Berube, C. (PI); Bhalla, V. (PI); Bhatt, A. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blackburn, B. (PI); Blaschke, T. (PI); Blayney, D. (PI); Blish, C. (PI); Bollyky, P. (PI); Bouvier, D. (PI); Boxer, L. (PI); Braddock, C. (PI); Brinton, T. (PI); Brown, W. (PI); Bulow, K. (PI); Carlson, R. (PI); Cartwright, C. (PI); Chan, D. (PI); Chan, G. (PI); Chang, C. (PI); Chang, S. (PI); Chen, A. (PI); Chertow, G. (PI); Cheung, R. (PI); Chi, J. (PI); Cho-Phan, C. (PI); Chu, G. (PI); Chua, K. (PI); Chung, L. (PI); Clarke, M. (PI); Clusin, W. (PI); Colevas, A. (PI); Colloff, E. (PI); Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI); Cooke, J. (PI); Cooper, A. (PI); Coutre, S. (PI); Crapo, L. (PI); Crump, C. (PI); Cullen, M. (PI); Das, A. (PI); Dash, R. (PI); Daugherty, T. (PI); David, S. (PI); Dawson, L. (PI); Deresinski, S. (PI); Desai, M. (PI); Desai, T. (PI); Dhillon, G. (PI); Dorman, J. (PI); Dosiou, C. (PI); DuBose, A. (PI); Edwards, L. (PI); Einav, S. (PI); Farquhar, J. (PI); Fathman, C. (PI); Fearon, W. (PI); Feldman, D. (PI); Felsher, D. (PI); Fisher, G. (PI); Fitzgerald, P. (PI); Ford, J. (PI); Ford, P. (PI); Fowler, M. (PI); Frayne, S. (PI); Friedland, S. (PI); Fries, J. (PI); Froelicher, V. (PI); Gabiola, J. (PI); Ganjoo, K. (PI); Garcia, G. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gardner, P. (PI); Gavi, B. (PI); Genovese, M. (PI); Gerson, L. (PI); Gesundheit, N. (PI); Giacomini, J. (PI); Glaseroff, A. (PI); Glenn, J. (PI); Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. (PI); Goldstein, M. (PI); Goodman, S. (PI); Goronzy, J. (PI); Gotlib, J. (PI); Gray, G. (PI); Greenberg, H. (PI); Greenberg, P. (PI); Gregory, P. (PI); Habtezion, A. (PI); Hallenbeck, J. (PI); Harman, S. (PI); Harrington, R. (PI); Harshman, L. (PI); Haskell, W. (PI); Heaney, C. (PI); Heidenreich, P. (PI); Henri, H. (PI); Ho, D. (PI); Hoffman, A. (PI); Holman, H. (PI); Holodniy, M. (PI); Hopkins, J. (PI); Horning, S. (PI); Hsia, H. (PI); Hunt, S. (PI); Ioannidis, J. (PI); Isom, R. (PI); Jernick, J. (PI); Ji, H. (PI); Johnston, L. (PI); Jones, E. (PI); Kahn, J. (PI); Kao, P. (PI); Kastelein, M. (PI); Katz, R. (PI); Katzenstein, D. (PI); Kenny, K. (PI); Khatri, P. (PI); Khazeni, N. (PI); Khush, K. (PI); Killen, J. (PI); Kim, S. (PI); Kohrt, H. (PI); Kraemer, F. (PI); Krishnan, E. (PI); Kummar, S. (PI); Kunz, P. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Kurian, A. (PI); Kuschner, W. (PI); Ladabaum, U. (PI); Lafayette, R. (PI); Laport, G. (PI); Laws, A. (PI); Lee, D. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Lee, P. (PI); Leung, L. (PI); Levitt, L. (PI); Levy, R. (PI); Levy, S. (PI); Liang, D. (PI); Liedtke, M. (PI); Lindsay, A. (PI); Lorig, K. (PI); Lowe, A. (PI); Lowsky, R. (PI); Luby, S. (PI); Lutchman, G. (PI); Majeti, R. (PI); McConnell, M. (PI); McLaughlin, T. (PI); Medeiros, B. (PI); Meyer, T. (PI); Miklos, D. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Milstein, A. (PI); Mitchell, B. (PI); Mohabir, P. (PI); Montoya, J. (PI); Morioka-Douglas, N. (PI); Musen, M. (PI); Narayan, S. (PI); Neal, J. (PI); Negrin, R. (PI); Nevins, A. (PI); Nguyen, L. (PI); Nguyen, M. (PI); Nguyen, P. (PI); Nicolls, M. (PI); O' Callahan, P. (PI); Osterberg, L. (PI); Owens, D. (PI); Pao, A. (PI); Parnes, J. (PI); Parsonnet, J. (PI); Pasricha, P. (PI); Pegram, M. (PI); Periyakoil, V. (PI); Petersen, J. (PI); Pinto, H. (PI); Pompei, P. (PI); Popp, R. (PI); Posley, K. (PI); Price, E. (PI); Prochaska, J. (PI); Quertermous, T. (PI); Raffin, T. (PI); Rehkopf, D. (PI); Relman, D. (PI); Rizk, N. (PI); Robinson, B. (PI); Rockson, S. (PI); Rohatgi, R. (PI); Rosas, L. (PI); Rosen, G. (PI); Rosenberg, S. (PI); Rudd, P. (PI); Ruoss, S. (PI); Rydel, T. (PI); Scandling, J. (PI); Schnittger, I. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Schroeder, J. (PI); Shafer, R. (PI); Shah, N. (PI); Shah, S. (PI); Sharp, C. (PI); Shen, K. (PI); Shieh, L. (PI); Shizuru, J. (PI); Shoor, S. (PI); Sikic, B. (PI); Singh, B. (PI); Singh, U. (PI); Skeff, K. (PI); Spiekerkoetter, E. (PI); Srinivas, S. (PI); Stafford, R. (PI); Stefanick, M. (PI); Stertzer, S. (PI); Stevens, D. (PI); Stockdale, F. (PI); Strober, S. (PI); Studdert, D. (PI); Tai, J. (PI); Tamura, M. (PI); Tan, J. (PI); Telli, M. (PI); Tepper, R. (PI); Tompkins, L. (PI); Tremmel, J. (PI); Triadafilopoulos, G. (PI); Tsao, P. (PI); Upadhyay, D. (PI); Utz, P. (PI); Vagelos, R. (PI); Valantine, H. (PI); Verghese, A. (PI); Wakelee, H. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warvariv, V. (PI); Weill, D. (PI); Weinacker, A. (PI); Weng, K. (PI); Weng, W. (PI); Weyand, C. (PI); Wiedmann, T. (PI); Winkelmayer, W. (PI); Winkleby, M. (PI); Winograd, C. (PI); Winslow, D. (PI); Winter, T. (PI); Witteles, R. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Yabu, J. (PI); Yang, P. (PI); Yeung, A. (PI); Yock, P. (PI); Zamanian, R. (PI); Zehnder, J. (PI); Zei, P. (PI); Zolopa, A. (PI); Zulman, D. (PI); de Jesus Perez, V. (PI); Gardner, C. (SI); Yang, J. (GP)

MED 200: Primary Care Presentations

This course is a lecture series offered during the winter quarter. The aim of this seminar is to allow medical students to experience the mindset of primary care physicians in real time. Classes feature presentations of patient cases submitted by Stanford faculty. Faculty presenters are provided with the diagnostic information for the cases in a sequential manner during and not in advance of each class, allowing students to learn from the thought process of physicians in real time as they put together the differential diagnosis, interpret diagnostic information, deliberate treatment and management options, and discuss other thoughts about the cases.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 200: The Medical Device Entrepreneur's Course Primer

This course provides students and entrepreneurs a solid understanding of the complex US regulatory framework governing medical devices, in vitro diagnostics and drug-device combination products. Through class lectures, research and team assignments, class participants learn the key regulatory, clinical and ethical issues in biomedical product innovation. Focuses specifically on US investigational and marketing submission types and preparation of submission outlines, key steps to develop a product that will meet US regulatory requirements and development of regulatory strategy for a novel product. While there are no technical prerequisites, the course projects are challenging, and thus are more suitable for graduate and advanced undergraduate students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gardner, P. (PI)

MED 200A: Practical Applications for Qualitative Data Analysis

(Same as PEDS 202A) First quarter of a two-quarter course. Gain experience analyzing qualitative data using qualitative analysis software (i.e. Nvivo, Dedoose). Conduct analysis using your own or existing data sources. Explore multiple qualitative data analysis topics through class lectures, foundational readings and hands-on learning. Core topics include: grounded theory, qualitative data analysis approaches, software-based analysis, cleaning and coding of data, and interpreting data. Note: Preference will be given to medical students and undergraduate students that have successfully completed an introductory qualitative methods course. Enrollment in subsequent MED 202B required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 200B: Practical Applications for Qualitative Data Analysis

(Same as PEDS 202B) Second quarter of a two-quarter course provides hands-on experience summarizing qualitative data and describing findings for dissemination. Final course product will be a draft manuscript for submission with students listed as co-authors. Core topics include: identifying themes and representative quotes, community-engaged dissemination, abstract submission, posters, oral presentations, manuscript writing, and journal selection. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MED 202A.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 201: Internal Medicine: Body as Text

Body as Text refers to the idea that every patient's body tells a story. The narrative includes the past and present of a person's social and medical condition; it is a demonstration of the phenotype. The art of reading the body as text was at its peak in the first half of the 20th century, but as technology has become ascendant, bedside skills and the ability to read the text have faded. Beyond scientific knowledge and medical facts, it is this often forgotten craft which is at the heart of the excitement of being an internist. This course introduces students to the art of the clinical exam, to developing a clinical eye, and learning to see the body in a completely different way.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 202: Alternative Spring Break: Rosebud Resilience: Community, Health and Learning in Lakota Nation

Open to MD, graduate, and undergraduate students. Classroom preparation followed by a one week spring break service learning experience on a reservation in South Dakota. Introduces students to the challenges and promise of Native American and rural health care, and the role of communities as leaders and problem solvers. Includes lectures, discussion and readings pertaining to Native American culture, current research in Native American health, and the methods and practice of community based participatory research.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Garcia, G. (PI)

MED 203: Patient Partner Skills: in Care Transitions

A clinical and quality improvement experience for pre-clerkship medical students. The course provides early clinical experience for pre-clerkship medical students, to engage with patients in multiple healthcare environments (inpatient medicine/outpatient medicine/skilled nursing facilities/patients¿ homes). Students gain an understanding of the challenges patients face during the transitions, and learn and help design quality improvement initiatives to improve patient outcomes and reduce readmissions. Course features include working as part of an interdisciplinary healthcare team and promoting patient empowerment. Students work closely with Stanford Department of Medicine faculty and with Stanford Internal Medicine residents, and are trained to use health coaching, motivational interviewing, and shared decision-making skills.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 204: Access and Delivery of Essential Medicines to Poor and Underserved Communities

Student initiated lecture series. Guest speakers. Topics include: neglected diseases, underserved and impoverished markets, disease profiles of lower and middle income countries, pricing and distribution of biomedical end products, intellectual property in medicine and its effect on delivery of healthcare.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 206: Meta-research: Appraising Research Findings, Bias, and Meta-analysis (CHPR 206, HRP 206, STATS 211)

Open to graduate, medical, and undergraduate students. Appraisal of the quality and credibility of research findings; evaluation of sources of bias. Meta-analysis as a quantitative (statistical) method for combining results of independent studies. Examples from medicine, epidemiology, genomics, ecology, social/behavioral sciences, education. Collaborative analyses. Project involving generation of a meta-research project or reworking and evaluation of an existing published meta-analysis. Prerequisite: knowledge of basic statistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 207: History of Medicine

Begins with studying Shamanistic medicine, practiced by humans throughout the globe, for millennia. Covers magico-religious medicine developed in ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia and Greece; the 4th Century BC with Hippocrates beginning to separate medicine from religion and magic; the slow progress in ancient Rome, the medieval period, and during the Renaissance; and the acceleration in the pace of discoveries In the last few centuries, as medicine became more scientific, complex, and specialized as Pasteur developed the germ theory of disease, Darwin and Mendel publications begin the development of Evolution and of Genetics, Watson and Crick solved the mystery of DNA structure, organ transplants began, and imaging procedures such as CT and MRI came into being. Lectures are profusely illustrated, and, for the sake of comparison, two equally ancient systems of medicine, the traditional Chinese and the Vedic, are briefly reviewed.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; CAMARGO, C. (PI)

MED 209: Health Law: Quality and Safety of Care

(Same as LAW 727) Concerns about the quality of health care, along with concerns about its cost and accessibility, are the focal points of American health policy. Considers how legislators, courts, and professional groups attempt to safeguard the quality and safety of the health care patients receive. The course approaches "regulation" in a broad sense. Focuses on regimes for determining who may deliver health care services (e.g. licensing and accreditation agencies), legal and ethical obligations providers owe to patients (e.g. confidentiality, informed consent), individual and institutional liability for substandard care, and various proposals for reforming the medical malpractice system. Includes discussion of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (aka, "Obamacare"), which is launching many new initiatives aimed at assuring or improving health care quality.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 212: Methods for Health Care Delivery Innovation, Implementation and Evaluation (CHPR 212, HRP 218)

Preference given to postgraduate fellows and graduate students. Focus is on implementation science and evaluation of health care delivery innovations. Topics include implementation science theory, frameworks, and measurement principles; qualitative and quantitative approaches to designing and evaluating new health care models; hybrid design trials that simultaneously evaluate implementation and effectiveness; distinction between quality improvement and research, and implications for regulatory requirements and publication; and grant-writing strategies for implementation science and evaluation. Students will develop a mock (or actual) grant proposal to conduct a needs assessment or evaluate a Stanford/VA/community intervention, incorporating concepts, frameworks, and methods discussed in class. Priority for enrollment for CHPR 212 will be given to CHPR master's students.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 213: Compassion Cultivation for the Physician-in-Training

Provides mentored practice and growth in students' knowledge, skills and attitudes in compassion cultivation for one's self and others. Integrates traditional contemplative practices with contemporary psychology and scientific research on compassion.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Hallenbeck, J. (PI)

MED 215A: Health Policy PhD Core Seminar I--First Year (HRP 201A)

Seminar series is the core tutorial for first-year Health Policy and Health Services Research graduate students. Major themes in fields of study including health insurance, healthcare financing and delivery, health systems and reform and disparities in the US and globally, health and economic development, health law and policy, resource allocation, efficiency and equity, healthcare quality, measurement and the efficacy and effectiveness of interventions. Blocks of session led by Stanford expert faculty in particular fields of study.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 215B: Health Policy PhD Core Seminar II--First Year (HRP 201B)

Second in a three-quarter seminar series is the core tutorial for first-year Health Policy and Health Services Research graduate students. Major themes in fields of study including health insurance, healthcare financing and delivery, health systems and reform and disparities in the US and globally, health and economic development, health law and policy, resource allocation, efficiency and equity, healthcare quality, measurement and the efficacy and effectiveness of interventions. Blocks of session led by Stanford expert faculty in particular fields of study.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 215C: Health Policy PhD Core Seminar III--First Year (HRP 201C)

Third in a three-quarter seminar series is the core tutorial for first-year Health Policy and Health Services Research graduate students. Major themes in fields of study including health insurance, healthcare financing and delivery, health systems and reform and disparities in the US and globally, health and economic development, health law and policy, resource allocation, efficiency and equity, healthcare quality, measurement and the efficacy and effectiveness of interventions. Blocks of session led by Stanford expert faculty in particular fields of study.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 220: Literature and Human Experimentation (AFRICAAM 223, COMPLIT 223, CSRE 123B, HUMBIO 175H)

This course introduces students to the ways literature has been used to think through the ethics of human subjects research and experimental medicine. We will focus primarily on readings that imaginatively revisit experiments conducted on vulnerable populations: namely groups placed at risk by their classification according to perceived human and cultural differences. We will begin with Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818), and continue our study via later works of fiction, drama and literary journalism, including Toni Morrison's Beloved, David Feldshuh's Miss Evers Boys, Hannah Arendt's Eichmann and Vivien Spitz's Doctors from Hell, Rebecca Skloot's Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, and Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go. Each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical and policy writings of the period; and our ultimate goal will be to understand modes of ethics deliberation that are possible via creative uses of the imagination, and literature's place in a history of ethical thinking about humane research and care.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ikoku, A. (PI)

MED 221: Translational Research and Applied Medicine (MED 121)

(Same as MED 121; undergraduate students enroll in MED 121) Open to graduate students and medical students, this course enables students to learn basic principles in the design, performance and analysis of translational medical research studies. The course includes both didactic seminars from experts in translational medicine as well as the opportunity to design and present a translational research project. Students enrolling for 3 units are paired with a TRAM translational research project and work as a team with TRAM trainees and faculty on a weekly basis, as arranged by the instructor, and present a final project update at the end of the quarter.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 222: The Medical Malpractice System

Focus is on policy and law pertaining to the medical malpractice system in the U.S. Readings include a mix of articles from the medical, law and health policy literatures, as well as some legal cases. Includes problem-based learning and small group work.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 223: Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Sciences Seminar

Focus is to fine tune critical thinking skills by analyzing original publications and understanding the current complexities of the cardiovascular system. Students attend a lecture series presented by prominent external speakers one day of the week and learn new approaches and medical advances from Stanford faculty during the other class meeting. Medical and graduate students interested in cardiovascular medicine and research, technology development, genetics and immunology are encouraged to enroll.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 225: U.S. Human Rights NGOs and International Human Rights (ETHICSOC 15R, IPS 271A, POLISCI 203)

(Same as LAW 782) Many US human rights non-government organizations, including the US philanthropic sector, work on international human rights. The US government also engages with the private sector in "partnerships" that twins US foreign aid human rights action with corporate expertise. This weekly series will feature speakers who lead these human rights NGOs, philanthropic enterprises, and corporate partnerships, and also policy experts and scholars, to explore the pro's and con's of this scenario.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 226: Practical Approaches to Global Health Research (HRP 237, IPS 290)

Enrollment limited to graduate students; undergraduates in their junior or senior year may enroll with consent of instructor only. Introduces research methods for conducting studies involving health in low-income context. Focuses on developing a concept note to support a funding proposal. addressing research question of student's interest. Skills developed include developing a compelling research question; synthesizing a focused literature review; selecting and adapting appropriate study design, target population, sampling methods, data collection and analysis; addressing human subject issues; developing productive cross-collaboration.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Luby, S. (PI)

MED 227: Bedside Ultrasound

For preclinical or clinical medical students, and others with permission. Introduces students to diagnostic ultrasound at the bedside. The normal anatomy of the heart, abdomen, and pelvis pertinent to ultrasound is taught. Some pathology involving these areas is also introduced. As the students' proficiency increases, those electing to can visit the Pacific Free Clinic to be introduced to scanning patients. 1 unit for class attendance only 2 units for class attendance and observation in Stanford Echo Labs.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Thompson, N. (PI)

MED 228: Physicians and Social Responsibility

Social and political context of the roles of physicians and health professionals in social change; policy, advocacy, and shaping public attitudes. How physicians have influenced governmental policy on nuclear arms proliferation; environmental health concerns; physicians in government; activism through research; the effects of poverty on health; homelessness; and gun violence. Guest speakers from national and international NGOs.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Laws, A. (PI)

MED 229: Introduction to Global Health

Provides an overview of global health and how it is similar to and different from public health and tropical medicine. Topics include the evolution, economics, politics of global health, major players in global health, and issues of geography, politics, humanitarianism, human rights, science, research, culture and disease.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Spira, A. (PI)

MED 232: Discussions in Global Health

The goal of this interactive series is to encourage students to think broadly about the variety of activities encompassed within global health and the roles of various entities, including NGOs, governments, and healthcare providers, in responding to large-scale health crises, building health systems, and caring for patients in developing countries. Examines challenges in global health such as organizing medical responses to natural disasters, providing healthcare to societies in conflict, and integrating traditional and modern approaches to healing. Case studies are used to critique strategies employed by organizations that work to improve medical care in poor settings.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 233: Global Health: Beyond Diseases and International Organizations

Provides multidisciplinary trainees insight into over-arching themes of global health. Topics include systemic issues affecting healthcare progress globally, ethical and thoughtful approaches to solving these issues, as well as economics, water sanitation, public health, organizations in global health, human rights, involvement in NGOs, ethics of overseas work, and other non-medical aspects of this subject. This course will cover some of the essentials of patient care while working in the field as well including child health care, malaria, TB, and HIV.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 234: Literature and Global Health (AFRICAAM 229, AFRICAST 229, COMPLIT 229, CSRE 129B, FRENCH 229, HUMBIO 175L)

This course examines the ways writers in literature and medicine have used the narrative form to explore the ethics of care in what has been called the developing world. We will begin with a call made by the editor-in-chief of The Lancet for a literature of global health, namely fiction modeled on the social reform novels of the nineteenth century, understood to have helped readers develop a conscience for public health as the field emerged as a modern medical specialty. We will then spend the quarter understanding how colonial, postcolonial, and world literatures have answered and complicated this call. Readings will include prose fiction by Albert Camus, Joseph Conrad, Tsitsi Dangaremgba, Amitav Ghosh, Susan Sontag as well as physician memoirs featuring Frantz Fanon, Albert Schweitzer, Abraham Verghese, Paul Farmer. And each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical, and policy writings that deeply inform the field of global health.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ikoku, A. (PI)

MED 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 236: Economics of Infectious Disease and Global Health (HUMBIO 124E)

Introduction to global health topics such as childhood health, hygiene, drug resistance, and pharmaceutical industries from an economic development perspective. Introduces economic concepts including decision-making over time, externalities, and incentives as they relate to health.
Terms: alternate years, given next year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MED 237: Health Law: Improving Public Health

(Same as Law 762) Examines how the law can be used to improve the public's health. Major themes explored include: what authority does the government have to regulate in the interest of public health? How are individual rights balanced against this authority? What are the benefits and pitfalls of using laws and litigation to achieve public health goals? Investigates these issues in several contexts, including the control and prevention of infectious disease, laws aimed at preventing obesity and associated noncommunicable diseases, tobacco regulation, ensuring access to medical care, reproductive health, lawsuits against tobacco, food and gun companies, and public health emergencies.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 240: Sex and Gender in Human Physiology and Disease (FEMGEN 241, HUMBIO 140)

(HumBio students must enroll in HumBio 140.) Chromosomal, hormonal and environmental influences that lead to male and female reproductive systems and neuroendocrine regulation and intersex variants. Masculinizing and feminizing effects of endogenous and exogenous sex hormones and other factors, in particular gender, on the musculoskeletal, neurological, cardiovascular, immunological and other systems and tissues, e.g. adipose, skin, etc. over the lifecourse, from conception to puberty, through reproductive phases (including changes during the menstrual cycle up to and beyond menopause in women, and with aging in both sexes). Transgender health issues. Guest lecturers. Prerequisite: Human Biology core or equivalent, or consent of instructor. HUMBIO students must enroll for 3 units.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Stefanick, M. (PI)

MED 241: Clinical Skills for Patient Care in Free Clinics

Enrollment in this course is by application only for advanced volunteers at the Cardinal Free Clinics. Focus is on preparing students to gain early clinical experience by teaching basic skills such as taking patient histories, working with interpreters, providing motivational interviewing, and presenting cases to medical students or physicians. Students learn through classroom lectures and practice sessions. Upon successful completion of a competency assessment, students are able to serve in a clinic role in the Cardinal Free Clinics. Prerequisite: Advanced standing as a volunteer at the Cardinal Free Clinics.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 242: Physicians and Human Rights

Weekly lectures on how human rights violations affect health. Topics include: regional conflict and health, the health status of refugees and internally displaced persons; child labor; trafficking in women and children; HIV/AIDS; torture; poverty, the environment and health; access to clean water; domestic violence and sexual assault; and international availability of drugs. Guest speakers from national and international NGOs including Doctors Without Borders; McMaster University Institute for Peace Studies; UC Berkeley Human Rights Center; Kiva.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Laws, A. (PI)

MED 243A: Patient Health Education in Community Clinics (MED 143A)

Open to undergraduate, graduate, and medical students. Principles of health education, health coaching, theories of behavior change, methods for risk reduction. Presentations of health education modules, focusing on topics prevalent among underserved populations. Students apply theoretical frameworks to health education activities in the Cardinal Free Clinics. Application required.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 243B: Patient Health Education in Community Clinics - Practicum (MED 143B)

Open to undergraduate, graduate, and medical students. For students who have completed MED 143A/243A and currently volunteer in one of the course-affiliated clinic sites. Objective is to expand health education skills, discuss more complex health education topics, and reflect upon experiences in the clinic. Includes readings and online reflections. Prerequisite: successful completion of MED 143A/243A.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 243C: Patient Health Education in Community Clinics - Practicum (MED 143C)

Open to undergraduate, graduate, and medical students. For students currently volunteering in one of the course-affiliated clinic sites. Objective is to expand health education skills, discuss more complex health education topics, and reflect upon experiences in the clinic. Includes readings and online reflections. Pre-requisites: MED 143A/243A, Med 143B/243B.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 246: The Medical Interview for Spanish Speakers

Student led forum for practicing and learning medical Spanish related specifically to the medical interview. Prepares clinical students to interact more effectively with Spanish speaking patients in clinics. Classes are topical; each class includes a demonstration, medical vocabulary practice, and conversational practice on the topic of the day.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Garcia, G. (PI)

MED 247: Methods in Community Assessment, Evaluation, and Research (CHPR 247, MED 147)

Development of pragmatic skills for design, implementation, and analysis of structured interviews, focus groups, survey questionnaires, and field observations. Topics include: principles of community-based participatory research, including importance of dissemination; strengths and limitations of different study designs; validity and reliability; construction of interview and focus group questions; techniques for moderating focus groups; content analysis of qualitative data; survey questionnaire design; and interpretation of commonly-used statistical analyses.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Kiernan, M. (PI)

MED 248: Student Rounds

Teams of preclinical students meet weekly with a clinical student to hear the history and physical of a recent case the clinical student encountered on the wards. Following the presentation, the preclinical students work together under the guidance of the clinical student to develop a problem list and plan, which are then compared with the problem list, plan, and orders made by the actual admitting team. In the course of presenting the cases, the clinical student describes personal experiences and practical components of ward work and daily clinical routine.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Kenny, K. (PI)

MED 252: Outcomes Analysis (BIOMEDIN 251, HRP 252)

Methods of conducting empirical studies which use large existing medical, survey, and other databases to ask both clinical and policy questions. Econometric and statistical models used to conduct medical outcomes research. How research is conducted on medical and health economics questions when a randomized trial is impossible. Problem sets emphasize hands-on data analysis and application of methods, including re-analyses of well-known studies. Prerequisites: one or more courses in probability, and statistics or biostatistics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 253: Applied Grant-Writing Skills for Community and Clinical Research

Skill-building in writing scientific research proposals. Topics include: grant proposal preparation; scientific literature review; developing research aims; decision-making on study design & methodology; planning statistical analyses; determining research compliances, timelines and resources. Students develop drafts of potential projects, peer-review and critique writing samples, and receive detailed feedback from instructor on all aspects of research projects.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 255: The Responsible Conduct of Research

Forum. How to identify and approach ethical dilemmas that commonly arise in biomedical research. Issues in the practice of research such as in publication and interpretation of data, and issues raised by academic/industry ties. Contemporary debates at the interface of biomedical science and society regarding research on stem cells, bioweapons, genetic testing, human subjects, and vertebrate animals. Completion fulfills NIH/ADAMHA requirement for instruction in the ethical conduct of research. Prerequisite: research experience recommended.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 255C: The Responsible Conduct of Research for Clinical and Community Researchers (CHPR 255)

Engages clinical researchers in discussions about ethical issues commonly encountered during their clinical research careers and addresses contemporary debates at the interface of biomedical science and society. Graduate students required to take RCR who are or will be conducting clinical research are encouraged to enroll in this version of the course. Prequisite: research experience recommended.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 257A: Community Health Advocacy

First of a three-quarter course series providing students with knowledge and concrete skills for working with and advocating for underserved populations. Through coursework and placements in community health clinics and social service organizations, students broaden and deepen their understanding of the social and economic determinants of health, how they impact underserved populations, and the various levels at which these challenges can be addressed. Fellows engage in structured activities centered around supporting the mission of placement organizations. Students must apply and be accepted into the program the winter preceding enrollment; application information at och.stanford.edu. Additional prerequisites: Med 157 or equivalent coursework. Spanish language proficiency required for most placements.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 257B: Community Health Advocacy

Second of a three-quarter course series that provides students with knowledge and concrete skills for working with and advocating for underserved populations. Through coursework and placements in community health clinics and social service organizations, student will broaden and deepen their understanding of the social and economic determinants of health, how they impact underserved populations, and the various levels at which these challenges can ¿ and should ¿ be addressed. Student will engage in structured activities that center around supporting the mission of their placement organization: direct service with clients and design and implementation of a capacity-building project. Weekly Monday evening classroom meetings serve as a forum for teaching and training, discussion of class readings and placement experiences, project development, and troubleshooting and support. Prerequisites: MED 257A.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 257C: Community Health Advocacy

Third of a three-quarter course series that provides students with knowledge and concrete skills for working with and advocating for underserved populations. Through coursework and placements in community health clinics and social service organizations, students broaden and deepen their understanding of the social and economic determinants of health, how they impact underserved populations, and the various levels at which these challenges can ¿ and should ¿ be addressed. Student engage in structured activities that center around supporting the mission of their placement organization: direct service with clients and design and implementation of a capacity-building project. Weekly evening classroom meetings serve as a forum for teaching and training, discussion of class readings and placement experiences, project development, and troubleshooting and support. Prerequisites: MED 257A/B.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Garcia, G. (PI)

MED 258A: Policy Advocacy in Community Health

In order to affect broad-based change in the health of populations, advocates must look upstream to the social and economic factors that impact health. Most powerful among these factors are the policies that shape our lives and the context in which we make individual and collective decisions. This course gives students the skills and tools to influence the policy process through various avenues, including legislative and media advocacy. Students select a current community health issue of interest and track relevant policy initiatives and media coverage of the issue to serve as the foundation for the application of real-time advocacy strategies. Prerequisites: MED 257A or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 259: Oaxacan Health on Both Sides of the Border

Required for students participating in the Community Health in Oaxaca summer program. Introduction to the health literacy and health-seeking behaviors of Oaxacan and other Mexican migrants; the health challenges these groups face. Through discussion and reflection, students prepare for clinical work and community engagement in Oaxaca, while also gaining knowledge and insight to make connections between their experiences in Mexico and their health-related work with Mexican immigrants in the Bay Area. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). Prerequisite: application and acceptance into the Community Health in Oaxaca Summer Program (http://och.stanford.edu/oaxaca.html).
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Garcia, G. (PI)

MED 260: HIV: The Virus, the Disease, the Research (IMMUNOL 260)

Open to medical students, graduate students in biological sciences, undergraduates with strong biological background. Topics: immunopathogenesis immune deficits, opportunistic infections including TB, and malignancies; genomics viral genetic analyses that have traced the origin of HIV-1 and HIV-2 to primates, dated the spread of infection in humans, and characterized the evolution of the virus within infected individuals; antiretroviral drug development identification of drug targets, structure-based drug design, overcoming drug resistance, pivotal clinical trials, and role of community activism; clinical management solutions in high- and low-income countries; vaccine development learning from past failures and the future of engineering the human immune response. 4 units includes a final project assigned in consultation with the instructor to fit the individual student's background and area of HIV interest.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Shafer, R. (PI)

MED 262: Economics of Health Improvement in Developing Countries (ECON 127)

Application of economic paradigms and empirical methods to health improvement in developing countries. Emphasis is on unifying analytic frameworks and evaluation of empirical evidence. How economic views differ from public health, medicine, and epidemiology; analytic paradigms for health and population change; the demand for health; the role of health in international development. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and ECON 102B.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Alsan, M. (PI)

MED 263: Advanced Decision Science Methods and Modeling in Health (HRP 263)

Advanced methods currently used in published model-based cost-effectiveness analyses in medicine and public health, both theory and technical applications. Topics include: Markov and microsimulation models, model calibration and evaluation, and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Prerequisites: a course in probability, a course in statistics or biostatistics, a course on cost-effectiveness such as HRP 392, a course in economics, and familiarity with decision modeling software such as TreeAge.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 264: Social Epidemiology

Preference to graduate students with prior coursework in Epidemiology. Focuses on understanding the theory and empirical evidence that shows support for the relationships between social environments and health. Covers four main topics: the historical development of social epidemiology, and a survey of the major theories in social epidemiology; the three main empirical approaches used to generate new knowledge in social epidemiology: traditional observational studies, quasi-experimental studies and experimental approaches; how the constructs of social class, race/ethnicity and gender are used in social epidemiology; new emerging empirical approaches within the field including the application of causal, machine learning and complex systems methods.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Rehkopf, D. (PI)

MED 271: Global Biodesign: Medical Technology in an International Context (BIOE 371)

This course (BIOE 371, OIT 587, MED 271) examines the challenges and opportunities of developing and implementing innovative medical technologies to help patients around the world. Faculty and guest speakers discuss the status of the global health technology industry, as well as trends and issues affecting health technology innovation in seven primary geographic regions: Africa, China, Europe, India, Japan, Latin America, and the United States. Students explore key differences between the covered geographies, which range from emerging markets with vast bottom-of-the-pyramid and growing middle class populations, to well-established markets with sophisticated demands and shifting demographics. The course utilizes real-world case studies and class projects to promote engagement and provide a hands-on learning experience. Students work in multidisciplinary teams with real-world companies to develop a plan for bringing an existing product to a new global market. Teams will interact with representatives from their chosen company throughout the quarter, as well as with a faculty mentor, and present their recommendations at the conclusion of spring term.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 272A: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation (BIOE 374A, ME 368A)

In this two-quarter course series (BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new medtech products to address them, and plan for their development into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2017), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2017), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent medtech experts and investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case demonstrations, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of more than 40 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 272B: Biodesign Innovation: Concept Development and Implementation (BIOE 374B, ME 368B)

In this two-quarter course series (BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new medtech products to address them, and plan for their development into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2017), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2017), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent medtech experts and investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case demonstrations, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of more than 40 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 273: BIODESIGN FOR MOBILE HEALTH (BIOE 273)

This seminar examines the emerging mobile health industry. Mobile health is the provision of health services and information via mobile technologies such as mobile phones and wearable sensors. Faculty from Stanford University and other academic institutions and guest lecturers from the mobile health industry discuss the driving needs, opportunities and challenges that characterize the emerging mobile health innovation landscape, and present an overview of the technologies, initiatives and companies that are transforming the way we access health care today.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 274: Design for Service Innovation (BIOE 372, HRP 274)

(Same as OIT 343/01) Open to graduate students from all schools and departments. An experiential project course in which students work in multidisciplinary teams to design new services to address the needs of medically patients. Project teams partner with "safety net" hospitals and clinics to find better ways to deliver care to the low income and uninsured patients these institutions serve. Students learn proven innovation processes from experienced GSB, d. school, and SoM faculty, interface with students from across the university, and have the opportunity to see their ideas translated into improvements in the quality and efficiency of healthcare in the real world. Prerequisite: admission to the course is by application only. Applications available at http://DesignForService.stanford.edu. Applications must be submitted by November 16, 2011.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 275B: Biodesign: Medical Technology Innovation

An introduction to medical technology design, ideation and prototyping. Students will work in teams on open-ended technology design projects that aim to address areas of under-met clinical need. Lecture topics will also include regulatory affairs, intellectual property, marketing and venture capital. Final deliverables include presentation of needs and solutions to an outside panel of experts in medical technology. This course is open to engineering and non-engineering students of all levels.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Fan, R. (PI); Wall, J. (PI)

MED 282: Early Clinical Experience at the Cardinal Free Clinics (MED 182)

The Cardinal Free Clinics, consisting of Arbor and Pacific Free Clinic, provide culturally appropriate, high quality transitional medical care for undeserved patient populations in the Bay Area. Students volunteer in various clinic roles to offer services including health education, interpretation, referrals, and labs. Clinical students are guided in the practice of medical interviews, history-taking and physical examinations as appropriate, and work with attending physicians to arrive at a diagnosis and management plan. By application only. Visit http://cfc.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 284A: Team Leadership in the Cardinal Free Clinics I (MED 184A)

Introduction to skills for effective leadership, including: conflict resolution, team dynamics, leadership styles, personality types, giving and receiving feedback, and group decision-making. Utilizes hands-on-activities and real-life clinic scenarios. Applied learning through shifts at the Cardinal Free Clinics and related project work. Enrollment limited to Cardinal Free Clinic Managers.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Caceres, W. (PI); Lin, S. (PI)

MED 284B: Team Leadership in the Cardinal Free Clinics II (MED 184B)

Continuation of MED 184A/MED 284A. Introduction to skills for effective leadership, including: conflict resolution, team dynamics, leadership styles, personality types, giving and receiving feedback, and group decision-making. Utilizes hands-on-activities and real-life clinic scenarios. Applied learning through shifts at the Cardinal Free Clinics and related project work. Enrollment limited to Cardinal Free Clinic Managers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 284C: Team Leadership in the Cardinal Free Clinics III (MED 184C)

Continuation of MED 184A/MED 284A and MED 184B/MED284B. Introduction to skills for effective leadership, including: conflict resolution, team dynamics, leadership styles, personality types, giving and receiving feedback, and group decision-making. Utilizes hands-on-activities and real-life clinic scenarios. Applied learning through shifts at the Cardinal Free Clinics and related project work. Enrollment limited to Cardinal Free Clinic Managers.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Caceres, W. (PI); Lin, S. (PI)

MED 289: Introduction to Bioengineering Research (BIOE 390)

Preference to medical and bioengineering graduate students with first preference given to Bioengineering Scholarly Concentration medical students. Bioengineering is an interdisciplinary field that leverages the disciplines of biology, medicine, and engineering to understand living systems, and engineer biological systems and improve engineering designs and human and environmental health. Students and faculty make presentations during the course. Students expected to make presentations, complete a short paper, read selected articles, and take quizzes on the material.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 290: Independent Study with the Program in Bedside Medicine

Students work with their faculty mentor on projects and studies that are broadly centered around the following questions: How do we teach and emphasize to students, residents, physicians (and beyond) in the medical field the need to master bedside skills? How does bedside medicine effect patient care? How has patient care changed with the omnipresence of technology in our lives? How is bedside medicine going to change in the next few decades, centuries? In investigating these questions, students utilize scientific articles and data, engage patients, and collaborate with BedMed faculty and staff. Independent study projects culminate in a presentation to the BedMed team, with the potential for posters or manuscripts. Students paired with faculty based on their area of interest and faculty/project needs. As the Program in Bedside Medicine emphasizes the human connection with patients, students are encouraged to engage patients within our program for teaching sessions, research studies, among other projects. Most of the faculty students with whom students will work are a part of the Stanford Medicine 25 Initiative: http:/stanfordmedicine25.stanford.edu/about/. Students are encouraged to develop relevant projects with the initiative as a foundation. Enrollment varies with and is limited to faculty need. Repeatable for credit; more than one quarter of commitment expected.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 295: Advanced Cardiac Life Support

(For clinical MD students only) Prepares students to manage the victim of a cardiac arrest. Knowledge and skills necessary for resuscitation of critically ill patients. Clinical scenarios and small group discussions address cardiovascular pharmacology, arrhythmia recognition and therapy, acute coronary syndrome including myocardial infarction, ventricular dysrhythmias and defibrillation, and acute ischemic stroke. Requires pre-course preparation and an intensive two-day session on a Friday and Saturday. Students should get the approval of their Clerkship Coordinator before registering for the course. Recommended prerequisites: Medicine 300A, Pediatrics 300A, or Surgery 300A.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Giacomini, J. (PI)

MED 299: Directed Reading in Medicine

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Advani, R. (PI); Ahmed, A. (PI); Ahuja, N. (PI); Akatsu, H. (PI); Al-Ahmad, A. (PI); Alizadeh, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Andrews, J. (PI); Annes, J. (PI); Arai, S. (PI); Artandi, M. (PI); Artandi, S. (PI); Asch, S. (PI); Ashley, E. (PI); Assimes, T. (PI); Ayoub, W. (PI); Banerjee, S. (PI); Barry, M. (PI); Basaviah, P. (PI); Basina, M. (PI); Basu, S. (PI); Behal, R. (PI); Bendavid, E. (PI); Benjamin, J. (PI); Berube, C. (PI); Bhalla, V. (PI); Bhatt, A. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blackburn, B. (PI); Blaschke, T. (PI); Blayney, D. (PI); Blish, C. (PI); Bollyky, P. (PI); Bouvier, D. (PI); Boxer, L. (PI); Braddock, C. (PI); Brinton, T. (PI); Brown, W. (PI); Bulow, K. (PI); Carlson, R. (PI); Cartwright, C. (PI); Chakravarty, E. (PI); Chan, D. (PI); Chan, G. (PI); Chang, C. (PI); Chang, S. (PI); Chen, A. (PI); Chertow, G. (PI); Cheung, R. (PI); Chi, J. (PI); Cho-Phan, C. (PI); Chu, G. (PI); Chua, K. (PI); Chung, L. (PI); Clarke, M. (PI); Clusin, W. (PI); Colevas, A. (PI); Colloff, E. (PI); Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI); Cooke, J. (PI); Cooper, A. (PI); Coutre, S. (PI); Crapo, L. (PI); Crump, C. (PI); Cullen, M. (PI); Das, A. (PI); Dash, R. (PI); Daugherty, T. (PI); David, S. (PI); Dawson, L. (PI); Deresinski, S. (PI); Desai, M. (PI); Desai, T. (PI); Dhillon, G. (PI); Dorman, J. (PI); Dosiou, C. (PI); DuBose, A. (PI); Edwards, L. (PI); Einav, S. (PI); Farquhar, J. (PI); Fathman, C. (PI); Fearon, W. (PI); Feldman, D. (PI); Felsher, D. (PI); Fisher, G. (PI); Fitzgerald, P. (PI); Ford, J. (PI); Ford, P. (PI); Fowler, M. (PI); Frayne, S. (PI); Friedland, S. (PI); Fries, J. (PI); Froelicher, V. (PI); Gabiola, J. (PI); Ganjoo, K. (PI); Garcia, G. (PI); Garcia, R. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gardner, P. (PI); Gavi, B. (PI); Genovese, M. (PI); Gerson, L. (PI); Gesundheit, N. (PI); Giacomini, J. (PI); Glaseroff, A. (PI); Glenn, J. (PI); Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. (PI); Goldstein, M. (PI); Goodman, S. (PI); Goronzy, J. (PI); Gotlib, J. (PI); Gray, G. (PI); Greenberg, H. (PI); Greenberg, P. (PI); Gregory, P. (PI); Habtezion, A. (PI); Hallenbeck, J. (PI); Harman, S. (PI); Harrington, R. (PI); Harshman, L. (PI); Haskell, W. (PI); Heaney, C. (PI); Heidenreich, P. (PI); Henri, H. (PI); Ho, D. (PI); Hoffman, A. (PI); Holman, H. (PI); Holodniy, M. (PI); Hopkins, J. (PI); Horning, S. (PI); Hsia, H. (PI); Hunt, S. (PI); Ioannidis, J. (PI); Isom, R. (PI); Jernick, J. (PI); Ji, H. (PI); Johnston, L. (PI); Jones, E. (PI); Kahn, J. (PI); Kao, P. (PI); Kastelein, M. (PI); Katz, R. (PI); Katzenstein, D. (PI); Kenny, K. (PI); Khatri, P. (PI); Khazeni, N. (PI); Khush, K. (PI); Killen, J. (PI); Kim, S. (PI); Kohrt, H. (PI); Kraemer, F. (PI); Krishnan, E. (PI); Kummar, S. (PI); Kunz, P. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Kurian, A. (PI); Kuschner, W. (PI); Ladabaum, U. (PI); Lafayette, R. (PI); Laport, G. (PI); Lee, D. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Lee, P. (PI); Leung, L. (PI); Levitt, J. (PI); Levitt, L. (PI); Levy, R. (PI); Levy, S. (PI); Liang, D. (PI); Liedtke, M. (PI); Lin, S. (PI); Lindsay, A. (PI); Lorig, K. (PI); Lowe, A. (PI); Lowsky, R. (PI); Luby, S. (PI); Lutchman, G. (PI); Majeti, R. (PI); McConnell, M. (PI); McLaughlin, T. (PI); Medeiros, B. (PI); Meyer, T. (PI); Miklos, D. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Milstein, A. (PI); Mitchell, B. (PI); Mohabir, P. (PI); Montoya, J. (PI); Morioka-Douglas, N. (PI); Musen, M. (PI); Narayan, S. (PI); Neal, J. (PI); Negrin, R. (PI); Nevins, A. (PI); Nguyen, L. (PI); Nguyen, M. (PI); Nguyen, P. (PI); Nicolls, M. (PI); O' Callahan, P. (PI); Osterberg, L. (PI); Owens, D. (PI); Pao, A. (PI); Parnes, J. (PI); Parsonnet, J. (PI); Pasricha, P. (PI); Pegram, M. (PI); Periyakoil, V. (PI); Petersen, J. (PI); Pinto, H. (PI); Pompei, P. (PI); Popp, R. (PI); Posley, K. (PI); Price, E. (PI); Prochaska, J. (PI); Quertermous, T. (PI); Raffin, T. (PI); Rehkopf, D. (PI); Relman, D. (PI); Rizk, N. (PI); Robinson, B. (PI); Rockson, S. (PI); Rohatgi, R. (PI); Rosas, L. (PI); Rosen, G. (PI); Rosenberg, S. (PI); Rudd, P. (PI); Ruoss, S. (PI); Rydel, T. (PI); Scandling, J. (PI); Schillinger, E. (PI); Schnittger, I. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Schroeder, J. (PI); Shafer, R. (PI); Shah, N. (PI); Shah, S. (PI); Sharp, C. (PI); Shen, K. (PI); Shieh, L. (PI); Shizuru, J. (PI); Shoor, S. (PI); Sikic, B. (PI); Singh, B. (PI); Singh, U. (PI); Skeff, K. (PI); Spiekerkoetter, E. (PI); Srinivas, S. (PI); Stafford, R. (PI); Stefanick, M. (PI); Stertzer, S. (PI); Stevens, D. (PI); Stockdale, F. (PI); Strober, S. (PI); Studdert, D. (PI); Tai, J. (PI); Tamura, M. (PI); Tan, J. (PI); Telli, M. (PI); Tepper, R. (PI); Tompkins, L. (PI); Tremmel, J. (PI); Triadafilopoulos, G. (PI); Tsao, P. (PI); Upadhyay, D. (PI); Utz, P. (PI); Vagelos, R. (PI); Valantine, H. (PI); Verghese, A. (PI); Wakelee, H. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warvariv, V. (PI); Weill, D. (PI); Weinacker, A. (PI); Weng, K. (PI); Weng, W. (PI); Weyand, C. (PI); Wiedmann, T. (PI); Winkelmayer, W. (PI); Winkleby, M. (PI); Winter, T. (PI); Witteles, R. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Yabu, J. (PI); Yang, P. (PI); Yeung, A. (PI); Yock, P. (PI); Zamanian, R. (PI); Zehnder, J. (PI); Zei, P. (PI); Zolopa, A. (PI); Zulman, D. (PI); de Jesus Perez, V. (PI); Mendoza, F. (SI); Jezmir, J. (TA); Johnson, A. (GP)

MED 370: Medical Scholars Research

Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Advani, R. (PI); Ahmed, A. (PI); Ahuja, N. (PI); Akatsu, H. (PI); Al-Ahmad, A. (PI); Alizadeh, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Andrews, J. (PI); Annes, J. (PI); Arai, S. (PI); Artandi, M. (PI); Artandi, S. (PI); Asch, S. (PI); Ashley, E. (PI); Assimes, T. (PI); Ayoub, W. (PI); Banerjee, S. (PI); Barry, M. (PI); Basaviah, P. (PI); Basina, M. (PI); Basu, S. (PI); Behal, R. (PI); Bendavid, E. (PI); Benjamin, J. (PI); Berube, C. (PI); Bhalla, V. (PI); Bhatt, A. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blackburn, B. (PI); Blaschke, T. (PI); Blayney, D. (PI); Blish, C. (PI); Bollyky, P. (PI); Bouvier, D. (PI); Boxer, L. (PI); Braddock, C. (PI); Brinton, T. (PI); Brown, W. (PI); Bulow, K. (PI); Carlson, R. (PI); Cartwright, C. (PI); Chan, D. (PI); Chan, G. (PI); Chang, C. (PI); Chang, S. (PI); Chen, A. (PI); Chertow, G. (PI); Cheung, L. (PI); Cheung, R. (PI); Chi, J. (PI); Cho-Phan, C. (PI); Chu, C. (PI); Chu, G. (PI); Chua, K. (PI); Chung, L. (PI); Clarke, M. (PI); Clusin, W. (PI); Colevas, A. (PI); Colloff, E. (PI); Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI); Cooke, J. (PI); Cooper, A. (PI); Coutre, S. (PI); Crapo, L. (PI); Crump, C. (PI); Cullen, M. (PI); Das, A. (PI); Dash, R. (PI); Daugherty, T. (PI); David, S. (PI); Dawson, L. (PI); Deresinski, S. (PI); Desai, M. (PI); Desai, T. (PI); Dhillon, G. (PI); Dorman, J. (PI); Dosiou, C. (PI); DuBose, A. (PI); Edwards, L. (PI); Einav, S. (PI); Farquhar, J. (PI); Fathman, C. (PI); Fearon, W. (PI); Feldman, D. (PI); Felsher, D. (PI); Fisher, G. (PI); Fitzgerald, P. (PI); Ford, J. (PI); Ford, P. (PI); Fowler, M. (PI); Frayne, S. (PI); Friedland, S. (PI); Fries, J. (PI); Froelicher, V. (PI); Gabiola, J. (PI); Ganjoo, K. (PI); Garcia, G. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gardner, P. (PI); Gavi, B. (PI); Genovese, M. (PI); Gerson, L. (PI); Gesundheit, N. (PI); Giacomini, J. (PI); Glaseroff, A. (PI); Glenn, J. (PI); Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. (PI); Goldstein, M. (PI); Goodman, S. (PI); Goronzy, J. (PI); Gotlib, J. (PI); Gray, G. (PI); Greenberg, H. (PI); Greenberg, P. (PI); Gregory, P. (PI); Habtezion, A. (PI); Hallenbeck, J. (PI); Harman, S. (PI); Harrington, R. (PI); Harshman, L. (PI); Haskell, W. (PI); Heaney, C. (PI); Heidenreich, P. (PI); Henri, H. (PI); Ho, D. (PI); Hoffman, A. (PI); Holman, H. (PI); Holodniy, M. (PI); Hopkins, J. (PI); Horning, S. (PI); Hsia, H. (PI); Hunt, S. (PI); Ioannidis, J. (PI); Isom, R. (PI); Jernick, J. (PI); Ji, H. (PI); Johnston, L. (PI); Jones, E. (PI); Kahn, J. (PI); Kao, P. (PI); Kastelein, M. (PI); Katz, R. (PI); Katzenstein, D. (PI); Kenny, K. (PI); Khatri, P. (PI); Khazeni, N. (PI); Khush, K. (PI); Killen, J. (PI); Kim, S. (PI); King, A. (PI); Kohrt, H. (PI); Kraemer, F. (PI); Krishnan, E. (PI); Kummar, S. (PI); Kunz, P. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Kurian, A. (PI); Kuschner, W. (PI); Ladabaum, U. (PI); Lafayette, R. (PI); Laport, G. (PI); Lee, D. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Lee, P. (PI); Leung, L. (PI); Levitt, L. (PI); Levy, R. (PI); Levy, S. (PI); Liang, D. (PI); Liedtke, M. (PI); Lindsay, A. (PI); Lorig, K. (PI); Lowe, A. (PI); Lowsky, R. (PI); Luby, S. (PI); Lutchman, G. (PI); Majeti, R. (PI); McConnell, M. (PI); McLaughlin, T. (PI); Medeiros, B. (PI); Meyer, T. (PI); Miklos, D. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Milstein, A. (PI); Mitchell, B. (PI); Mohabir, P. (PI); Montoya, J. (PI); Morioka-Douglas, N. (PI); Musen, M. (PI); Narayan, S. (PI); Neal, J. (PI); Negrin, R. (PI); Nevins, A. (PI); Nguyen, L. (PI); Nguyen, M. (PI); Nguyen, P. (PI); Nicolls, M. (PI); O' Callahan, P. (PI); Osterberg, L. (PI); Owens, D. (PI); Pao, A. (PI); Parnes, J. (PI); Parsonnet, J. (PI); Pasricha, P. (PI); Pegram, M. (PI); Periyakoil, V. (PI); Petersen, J. (PI); Pinto, H. (PI); Pompei, P. (PI); Popp, R. (PI); Posley, K. (PI); Price, E. (PI); Prochaska, J. (PI); Qi, S. (PI); Quertermous, T. (PI); Raffin, T. (PI); Ramchandran, K. (PI); Rehkopf, D. (PI); Relman, D. (PI); Rizk, N. (PI); Robinson, B. (PI); Rockson, S. (PI); Rohatgi, R. (PI); Rosas, L. (PI); Rosen, G. (PI); Rosenberg, S. (PI); Rudd, P. (PI); Ruoss, S. (PI); Rydel, T. (PI); Scandling, J. (PI); Schnittger, I. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Schroeder, J. (PI); Shafer, R. (PI); Shah, N. (PI); Shah, S. (PI); Sharp, C. (PI); Shen, K. (PI); Shieh, L. (PI); Shizuru, J. (PI); Shoor, S. (PI); Sikic, B. (PI); Singh, B. (PI); Singh, U. (PI); Skeff, K. (PI); Spiekerkoetter, E. (PI); Srinivas, S. (PI); Stafford, R. (PI); Stefanick, M. (PI); Stertzer, S. (PI); Stevens, D. (PI); Stockdale, F. (PI); Strober, S. (PI); Studdert, D. (PI); Svec, D. (PI); Tai, J. (PI); Tamura, M. (PI); Tan, J. (PI); Telli, M. (PI); Tepper, R. (PI); Tompkins, L. (PI); Tremmel, J. (PI); Triadafilopoulos, G. (PI); Tsao, P. (PI); Turakhia, M. (PI); Upadhyay, D. (PI); Utz, P. (PI); Vagelos, R. (PI); Valantine, H. (PI); Verghese, A. (PI); Wakelee, H. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warvariv, V. (PI); Weill, D. (PI); Weinacker, A. (PI); Weng, K. (PI); Weng, W. (PI); Weyand, C. (PI); Winkelmayer, W. (PI); Winkleby, M. (PI); Winter, T. (PI); Witteles, R. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Yabu, J. (PI); Yang, P. (PI); Yeung, A. (PI); Yock, P. (PI); Zamanian, R. (PI); Zehnder, J. (PI); Zei, P. (PI); Zolopa, A. (PI); Zulman, D. (PI); de Jesus Perez, V. (PI); Cullen, M. (SI)

MED 399: Graduate Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Advani, R. (PI); Ahmed, A. (PI); Ahuja, N. (PI); Akatsu, H. (PI); Al-Ahmad, A. (PI); Alizadeh, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Andrews, J. (PI); Annes, J. (PI); Arai, S. (PI); Artandi, M. (PI); Artandi, S. (PI); Asch, S. (PI); Ashley, E. (PI); Assimes, T. (PI); Ayoub, W. (PI); Banerjee, S. (PI); Barry, M. (PI); Basaviah, P. (PI); Basina, M. (PI); Basu, S. (PI); Behal, R. (PI); Bendavid, E. (PI); Benjamin, J. (PI); Berube, C. (PI); Bhalla, V. (PI); Bhatt, A. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blackburn, B. (PI); Blaschke, T. (PI); Blayney, D. (PI); Blish, C. (PI); Bollyky, P. (PI); Bouvier, D. (PI); Boxer, L. (PI); Braddock, C. (PI); Brinton, T. (PI); Brown, W. (PI); Bulow, K. (PI); Carlson, R. (PI); Cartwright, C. (PI); Chan, D. (PI); Chan, G. (PI); Chang, C. (PI); Chang, S. (PI); Chen, A. (PI); Chertow, G. (PI); Cheung, R. (PI); Chi, J. (PI); Cho-Phan, C. (PI); Chu, G. (PI); Chua, K. (PI); Chung, L. (PI); Clarke, M. (PI); Clusin, W. (PI); Colevas, A. (PI); Colloff, E. (PI); Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI); Cooke, J. (PI); Cooper, A. (PI); Coutre, S. (PI); Crapo, L. (PI); Crump, C. (PI); Cullen, M. (PI); Das, A. (PI); Dash, R. (PI); Daugherty, T. (PI); David, S. (PI); Dawson, L. (PI); Deresinski, S. (PI); Desai, M. (PI); Desai, T. (PI); Dhillon, G. (PI); Dorman, J. (PI); Dosiou, C. (PI); DuBose, A. (PI); Einav, S. (PI); Farquhar, J. (PI); Fathman, C. (PI); Fearon, W. (PI); Feldman, D. (PI); Felsher, D. (PI); Fisher, G. (PI); Fitzgerald, P. (PI); Ford, J. (PI); Ford, P. (PI); Fowler, M. (PI); Frayne, S. (PI); Friedland, S. (PI); Fries, J. (PI); Froelicher, V. (PI); Gabiola, J. (PI); Ganjoo, K. (PI); Garcia, G. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gardner, P. (PI); Gavi, B. (PI); Genovese, M. (PI); Gerson, L. (PI); Gesundheit, N. (PI); Giacomini, J. (PI); Glaseroff, A. (PI); Glenn, J. (PI); Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. (PI); Goldstein, M. (PI); Goodman, S. (PI); Goronzy, J. (PI); Gotlib, J. (PI); Gray, G. (PI); Greenberg, H. (PI); Greenberg, P. (PI); Gregory, P. (PI); Habtezion, A. (PI); Hallenbeck, J. (PI); Harman, S. (PI); Harrington, R. (PI); Harshman, L. (PI); Haskell, W. (PI); Heaney, C. (PI); Heidenreich, P. (PI); Henri, H. (PI); Ho, D. (PI); Hoffman, A. (PI); Holman, H. (PI); Holodniy, M. (PI); Hopkins, J. (PI); Horning, S. (PI); Hsia, H. (PI); Hunt, S. (PI); Ioannidis, J. (PI); Isom, R. (PI); Jernick, J. (PI); Ji, H. (PI); Johnston, L. (PI); Jones, E. (PI); Kahn, J. (PI); Kao, P. (PI); Kastelein, M. (PI); Katz, R. (PI); Katzenstein, D. (PI); Kenny, K. (PI); Khatri, P. (PI); Khazeni, N. (PI); Khush, K. (PI); Killen, J. (PI); Kim, S. (PI); Kohrt, H. (PI); Kraemer, F. (PI); Krishnan, E. (PI); Kummar, S. (PI); Kunz, P. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Kurian, A. (PI); Kuschner, W. (PI); Ladabaum, U. (PI); Lafayette, R. (PI); Laport, G. (PI); Lee, D. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Lee, P. (PI); Leung, L. (PI); Levitt, L. (PI); Levy, R. (PI); Levy, S. (PI); Liang, D. (PI); Liedtke, M. (PI); Lindsay, A. (PI); Lorig, K. (PI); Lowe, A. (PI); Lowsky, R. (PI); Luby, S. (PI); Lutchman, G. (PI); Majeti, R. (PI); McConnell, M. (PI); McLaughlin, T. (PI); Medeiros, B. (PI); Meyer, T. (PI); Miklos, D. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Milstein, A. (PI); Mitchell, B. (PI); Mohabir, P. (PI); Montoya, J. (PI); Morioka-Douglas, N. (PI); Musen, M. (PI); Narayan, S. (PI); Neal, J. (PI); Negrin, R. (PI); Nevins, A. (PI); Nguyen, L. (PI); Nguyen, M. (PI); Nguyen, P. (PI); Nicolls, M. (PI); O' Callahan, P. (PI); Osterberg, L. (PI); Owens, D. (PI); Pao, A. (PI); Parnes, J. (PI); Parsonnet, J. (PI); Pasricha, P. (PI); Pegram, M. (PI); Periyakoil, V. (PI); Petersen, J. (PI); Pinto, H. (PI); Pompei, P. (PI); Popp, R. (PI); Posley, K. (PI); Price, E. (PI); Prochaska, J. (PI); Quertermous, T. (PI); Raffin, T. (PI); Rehkopf, D. (PI); Relman, D. (PI); Rizk, N. (PI); Robinson, B. (PI); Rockson, S. (PI); Rohatgi, R. (PI); Rosas, L. (PI); Rosen, G. (PI); Rosenberg, S. (PI); Rudd, P. (PI); Ruoss, S. (PI); Rydel, T. (PI); Scandling, J. (PI); Schnittger, I. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Schroeder, J. (PI); Shafer, R. (PI); Shah, N. (PI); Shah, S. (PI); Sharp, C. (PI); Shen, K. (PI); Shieh, L. (PI); Shizuru, J. (PI); Shoor, S. (PI); Sikic, B. (PI); Singh, B. (PI); Singh, U. (PI); Skeff, K. (PI); Spiekerkoetter, E. (PI); Srinivas, S. (PI); Stafford, R. (PI); Stefanick, M. (PI); Stertzer, S. (PI); Stevens, D. (PI); Stockdale, F. (PI); Strober, S. (PI); Studdert, D. (PI); Tai, J. (PI); Tamura, M. (PI); Tan, J. (PI); Telli, M. (PI); Tepper, R. (PI); Tompkins, L. (PI); Tremmel, J. (PI); Triadafilopoulos, G. (PI); Tsao, P. (PI); Upadhyay, D. (PI); Utz, P. (PI); Vagelos, R. (PI); Valantine, H. (PI); Verghese, A. (PI); Wakelee, H. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warvariv, V. (PI); Weill, D. (PI); Weinacker, A. (PI); Weng, K. (PI); Weng, W. (PI); Weyand, C. (PI); Winkelmayer, W. (PI); Winkleby, M. (PI); Winter, T. (PI); Witteles, R. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Yabu, J. (PI); Yang, P. (PI); Yeung, A. (PI); Yock, P. (PI); Zamanian, R. (PI); Zehnder, J. (PI); Zei, P. (PI); Zolopa, A. (PI); Zulman, D. (PI); de Jesus Perez, V. (PI)

MGTECON 331: Health Law: Finance and Insurance

This course provides the legal, institutional, and economic background necessary to understand the financing and production of health services in the US. Potential topics include: health reform, health insurance (Medicare and Medicaid, employer-sponsored insurance, the uninsured), medical malpractice and quality regulation, pharmaceuticals, the corporate practice of medicine, regulation of fraud and abuse, and international comparisons.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

MS&E 252: Decision Analysis I: Foundations of Decision Analysis

Coherent approach to decision making, using the metaphor of developing a structured conversation having desirable properties, and producing actional thought that leads to clarity of action. Socratic instruction; computational problem sessions. Emphasis is on creation of distinctions, representation of uncertainty by probability, development of alternatives, specification of preference, and the role of these elements in creating a normative approach to decisions. Information gathering opportunities in terms of a value measure. Relevance and decision diagrams to represent inference and decision. Principles are applied to decisions in business, technology, law, and medicine. See 352 for continuation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MUSIC 39A: Music, Health, and Medicine

Explore how music relates to health and medicine surveying recent medical literature. Review different techniques in music therapy, music-related health problems, and issues related to educational and medical applications. Course materials are chosen to clearly identify music as a component of health related activity or occupation, to describe responses to music in our mind and body, and to think about the roles of music in our health. The seminars also discuss related basics in psychology and neurology. Students learn how to do literature search and write essays about relevant topics.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

NBIO 206: The Nervous System

Structure and function of the nervous system, including neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and systems neurobiology. Topics include the properties of neurons and the mechanisms and organization underlying higher functions. Framework for general work in neurology, neuropathology, clinical medicine, and for more advanced work in neurobiology. Lecture and lab components must be taken together.
Terms: Win | Units: 8 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

NBIO 221: Frontiers in Translational Medicine

Small group course for first year MSTP and Master's in Medicine students only. Focus is on pathways for combining science and medicine during graduate and postdoctoral training and in one's career, and practical aspects of translational medicine. Guest lecturers are physician-scientists who have advanced the frontiers of translational medicine. Previous lecturers have included Drs. Gilbert Chu, Jamie Topper, Irv Weissman, Beverly Mitchell, Geoff Duyk, William Mobley, Judy Shizuru, Carla Shatz, Linda Boxer and David Cox. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

NBIO 227: Understanding Techniques in Neuroscience

Topics include molecular, genetic, behavioral, electrophysiological, imaging, and computational approaches used in the field of neuroscience. Presentations and discussions led by senior graduate students, assigned readings from the primary neuroscience literature, and optional laboratory demonstrations. Intended for graduate students from any discipline and for advanced undergraduates in the biosciences, engineering, or medicine.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

NENS 204: Stroke Seminar

Standing at the intersection of many fields of medicine, including neurology, internal medicine, cerebrovascualr surgery, diagnostic and interventional radiology, and emergency medicine, as the third leading cause of death and the leading cause of disability, stroke is a critical topic for all practitioners of medicine. This seminar draws upon Stanford's leaders in stroke research to present and discuss the causes, presentation, treatment, and imaging characteristics of the disease.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lansberg, M. (PI)

OBGYN 282: Pregnancy, Birth, and Infancy (PEDS 282)

Comprehensive clinical experience where pre-clinical medical students follow pregnant women receiving care at Stanford hospitals to attend prenatal visits, delivery, and postnatal visits. Continuity clinic format, combined with didactic lessons and discussion seminars. Students are exposed to clinical activities in a meaningful context, bolstering classroom studies in anatomy, physiology, embryology and human development, and emphasizing social, economic, and personal issues related to medicine. This program spans one quarter, covering topics related to pregnancy, labor and delivery and newborn care. In addition to clinic experiences, students are expected to spend 1-2 hours/week in lectures and to complete a reflection of their experiences in the course. Prerequisite: pre-clinical medical student.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; El-Sayed, Y. (PI); He, J. (TA)

OIT 344: Design for Service Innovation

Design for service innovation is an experiential course in which students work in multidisciplinary teams to design new services (including but not limited to web services) that will address the needs of an underserved population of users. Through a small number of lectures and guided exercises, but mostly in the context of specific team projects, students will learn to identify the key needs of the target population and to design services that address these needs. Our projects this year will focus on services for young adult survivors of severe childhood diseases. For the first time ever, children who have cystic fibrosis, rheumatoid arthritis, major cardiac repairs, organ transplants, genetic metabolic disorders, and several forms of cancer are surviving. The first wave of these survivors is reaching young adulthood (ages 18-25). Many aspects of the young adult world are not yet user-friendly for them: applying to and then entering college, adherence to required medication and diet, prospects for marriage and parenthood, participation in high school or college sports, driving, drinking, drugs, and more. Our aspiration is to develop services to improve these young adults? options for a fulfilling and satisfying life. The course is open to graduate students from all schools and departments: business (MBA1, MBA2, PhD, Sloan), Medicine (medical students, residents, fellows and postdocs), engineering (MS and PhD), humanities, sociology, psychology, education, and law. Students can find out more about this course at: http://DesignForService.stanford.edu; GSB Winter Elective BBL Jan 10th, 12 noon - 1 pm; D-School Course Exposition Feb 3rd, time TBA. Admission into the course by application only. Applications will be available at http://DesignForService.stanford.edu on Jan 13th. Applications must be submitted by Feb 4th midnight. Students will be notified about acceptance to the course by Feb 7th . Accepted students will need to reserve their slot in the course by completing an online privacy training course. Details about online training will be provide to accepted students. The training is related to the protection of our partners' privacy. Application Deadline: Noon, Feb 4th.
Units: 4 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

ORTHO 97Q: Sport, Exercise, and Health: Exploring Sports Medicine (HUMBIO 97Q)

Preference to sophomores. Sports medicine is the practice of clinical medicine at the interface between health and performance, competition and well-being. While sports medicine had its origins in providing care to athletes, medical advances developed in care of athletes exerted a great effect on the nature and quality of care to the broader community. Topics include sports injuries, medical conditions associated with sport and exercise, ethics, coaching, women's issues, fitness and health, and sports science. Case studies.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: Writing 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Matheson, G. (PI)

ORTHO 110: Practical Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Exam (ORTHO 210)

Designed for students considering a career in sports medicine, orthopaedics, physical medicine and rehabilitation, emergency medicine, internal medicine, family practice, or physical therapy. Focus is on diagnosis and treatment of the most common injuries encountered in sports medicine, from head to toe and from acute trauma to chronic overuse. Students gain competence performing an efficient sports medicine exam, developing a differential diagnosis, and a treatment plan on how to safely return athletes back to their sport. Focused physical exam skills are taught for the neck, shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand, low back, hip, knee, leg, ankle and foot. Most sessions consist of anatomy review, case discussion, and hands-on exam practice in small groups. A few sessions cover specific hot topics in sports medicine such as concussion, athletic heart syndrome, and advanced performance techniques. Students enrolling for two units prepare an in-class presentation or short review paper.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fredericson, M. (PI)

ORTHO 120: Introduction to Lifestyle Medicine (ORTHO 220)

Lifestyle medicine is an exciting new movement to empower practicing clinicians and aspiring physicians to facilitate behavioral change and promote a culture of health and wellness in patients. Focus is on both concrete, evidence-based findings and tangible, practical tools to readily translate into everyday clinical practice. A series of leading experts and guest lectures guide students through interactive, patient-focused activities in topics including, but not limited to: nutrition, exercise, sleep, motivational interviewing, meditation, and acupuncture. Students enrolling for 2 units use a fitness and lifestyle monitoring wristband and prepare a report on your results.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

ORTHO 210: Practical Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Exam (ORTHO 110)

Designed for students considering a career in sports medicine, orthopaedics, physical medicine and rehabilitation, emergency medicine, internal medicine, family practice, or physical therapy. Focus is on diagnosis and treatment of the most common injuries encountered in sports medicine, from head to toe and from acute trauma to chronic overuse. Students gain competence performing an efficient sports medicine exam, developing a differential diagnosis, and a treatment plan on how to safely return athletes back to their sport. Focused physical exam skills are taught for the neck, shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand, low back, hip, knee, leg, ankle and foot. Most sessions consist of anatomy review, case discussion, and hands-on exam practice in small groups. A few sessions cover specific hot topics in sports medicine such as concussion, athletic heart syndrome, and advanced performance techniques. Students enrolling for two units prepare an in-class presentation or short review paper.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fredericson, M. (PI)

ORTHO 220: Introduction to Lifestyle Medicine (ORTHO 120)

Lifestyle medicine is an exciting new movement to empower practicing clinicians and aspiring physicians to facilitate behavioral change and promote a culture of health and wellness in patients. Focus is on both concrete, evidence-based findings and tangible, practical tools to readily translate into everyday clinical practice. A series of leading experts and guest lectures guide students through interactive, patient-focused activities in topics including, but not limited to: nutrition, exercise, sleep, motivational interviewing, meditation, and acupuncture. Students enrolling for 2 units use a fitness and lifestyle monitoring wristband and prepare a report on your results.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

OSPCPTWN 43: Public and Community Health in Sub-Saharan Africa

Introduction to concept of public health as compared with clinical medicine. Within a public health context, the broad distribution of health problems in sub-Saharan Africa as compared with U.S. and Europe. In light of South Africa's status as a new democracy, changes that have occurred in health legislation, policy, and service arenas in past 16 years. Topics include: sector health care delivery, current distribution of infectious and chronic diseases, and issues related to sexual and reproductive health in South Africa. Site visits to public sector health services and health related NGOs.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

OSPOXFRD 27: Medical Ethics through Literature and Film

Readings by authors who were or are physicians including Anton Chekhov, Mikhail Bulgakov, William Carlos Williams, Audry Shafer, and Atul Gawande - poems, short and long fiction. Works about medicine or characters who have medical conditions affecting their lives and interactions with others. Practice of medicine and its effects on both physicians and patients, with attention to the ethical and moral issues intrinsic to health and disease. We will also consider movies and plays. Topics: doctor patient relationship; infectious disease such as plague and TB; mental illness; death and dying; disability; surgery.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

OSPOXFRD 94: Directed Reading in the History of Neurology and Neuroscience

Readings will cover aspects of how thinking about the brain and the functions of thought and sensation evolved from ancient times to the present, including the influence of political and religious history on scientific development. There will be a focus on the period of the 17th century when developments in Oxford were a major force in the birth and early development of modern medicine and physiology. In Oxford, Thomas Willis played a central role in the birth of neurology as a field within medicine. Readings can include works about Thomas Willis and the natural philosophers with whom he interacted. Selected topics in modern neuroscience and the role of new techniques in addressing questions in brain function can be explored.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

OSPPARIS 10B: Biology and Bio-Engineering Research Internship

Laboratory of the National Museum of Natural History. Work with international research team on project elucidating the origin of the diversity of animal form. Modern techniques in functional genomics. Applied questions on human development in an environment where embryology, paleontology and medicine converge. Two days a week commitment required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 6 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Halevi, E. (GP)

PE 201: Social Aspects of Sport

Of all the social institutions that social scientists study - family, religion, government, medicine, race - sport is arguably the least studied in proportion to its societal impact. Sport plays a pervasive role in almost of of our lives as fans, players, and consumers. Despite this omnipresence, sports remain an understudied topic. This course will attempt to analyze the ubiquity and impact of sports. We will explore the topic of sport from a critical perspective focusing especially on inequalities in gender, race, class, and power. The course will jointly examine sports as a social mirror that reflects status inequalities as well as the role of sports in perpetuating social inequalities.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PEDS 51N: How Discovery and Innovation Have Transformed Medicine

Topics include the science behind vaccines and why some refuse vaccination, how antibiotics are discovered and what can be done about increasing resistance to antibiotics, stem cells and their potential use, the role of genomics in modern medicine, development of drugs to treat HIV/AIDS, discovery of surfactant, personal responsibility in health and wellness and how technology relates to the "cost conundrum" of healthcare in the U.S. Appreciate important connections between science, discovery and human health and think critically about the potential impact of new discoveries on life and death, and their ethical and spiritual boundaries.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Pizzo, P. (PI)

PEDS 130: Pediatrics Journal Club (PEDS 230)

Open to MD, graduate, and undergraduate students. Each session focuses on a current article in pediatric medicine. Discussions led by faculty experts in the area covered that session. Topics may range widely, depending on the available lieterature and students' interests. Students are expected to review the chosen article before class and participate in discussion. Discussion includes methodology and statistical analysis of each study and its relevance to pediatric practice.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cohen, R. (PI); Ijaz, N. (GP)

PEDS 230: Pediatrics Journal Club (PEDS 130)

Open to MD, graduate, and undergraduate students. Each session focuses on a current article in pediatric medicine. Discussions led by faculty experts in the area covered that session. Topics may range widely, depending on the available lieterature and students' interests. Students are expected to review the chosen article before class and participate in discussion. Discussion includes methodology and statistical analysis of each study and its relevance to pediatric practice.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cohen, R. (PI); Ijaz, N. (GP)

PEDS 246: Developmental Disabilities: From Biology to Policy (HUMBIO 146D)

Fifteen percent of US children have disabilities. While advances in medicine and technology have increased life expectancy for these children, health care delivery, education, and public attitudes have not kept pace. Students in this course will learn the possibilities and limitations of new biomedical treatments of Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, and autism. Students will also evaluate the impact of public policy initiatives, such as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and Americans with Disabilities Act on inclusion and participation in society.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PEDS 251B: Medical Ethics II

The integration of ethical theory with applications of theory or conceptual issues in medicine, health care, and the life and social sciences. Topic varies by year. Possible topics include: ethical issues in stem cell research; death and dying; genetics and ethics; concepts of health and disease; the ethics of international research; and ethical implications of new reproductive technology.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PEDS 282: Pregnancy, Birth, and Infancy (OBGYN 282)

Comprehensive clinical experience where pre-clinical medical students follow pregnant women receiving care at Stanford hospitals to attend prenatal visits, delivery, and postnatal visits. Continuity clinic format, combined with didactic lessons and discussion seminars. Students are exposed to clinical activities in a meaningful context, bolstering classroom studies in anatomy, physiology, embryology and human development, and emphasizing social, economic, and personal issues related to medicine. This program spans one quarter, covering topics related to pregnancy, labor and delivery and newborn care. In addition to clinic experiences, students are expected to spend 1-2 hours/week in lectures and to complete a reflection of their experiences in the course. Prerequisite: pre-clinical medical student.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; El-Sayed, Y. (PI); He, J. (TA)

PHIL 23K: Feminism Past and Present

"Feminism" is a wide category, encompassing a variety of philosophical positions, but it is also an historical social movement whose meanings and aims have been subject to both change and conflict. This course will explore feminism from a combination of historical, cultural and philosophical perspectives with the overall aim of assessing what "feminism" has meant to various people in the past and what it means today. nnRoughly the first half of the course will focus on major texts (popular and academic) from the 1st-3rd waves of western feminism as well as texts and historical discussion of some non-western feminist movements. The second half will focus on more recent assertions of feminist positions on a few topical issues. Topics will be somewhat flexible based on the interests of the participants and may include reproductive politics; intergenerational, racial, religious and class-based conflicts within feminism; feminism and work; the sex/gender distinction in science and medicine; feminism's relation to other social movements; etc. nnThis course is open to students of all majors, academic levels and viewpoints.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cooper, E. (PI)

PHIL 164A: Central Topics in Philosophy of Science: Causation (PHIL 264A)

(Graduate Students register for 264A.) Establishing causes in science, engineering, and medicine versus establishing them in Anglo-American law, considered in the context of Hume and Mill on causation. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 175A: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (CSRE 178, ETHICSOC 133, HUMBIO 178, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D, URBANST 122)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 264A: Central Topics in Philosophy of Science: Causation (PHIL 164A)

(Graduate Students register for 264A.) Establishing causes in science, engineering, and medicine versus establishing them in Anglo-American law, considered in the context of Hume and Mill on causation. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 275A: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (CSRE 178, ETHICSOC 133, HUMBIO 178, PHIL 175A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D, URBANST 122)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 133: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (CSRE 178, ETHICSOC 133, HUMBIO 178, PHIL 175A, PHIL 275A, PUBLPOL 103D, URBANST 122)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 247G: Governance and Poverty

Poverty relief requires active government involvement in the provision of public services such as drinking water, healthcare, sanitation, education, roads, electricity and public safety. Failure to deliver public services is a major impediment to the alleviation of poverty in the developing world. This course will use an interdisciplinary approach to examining these issues, bringing together readings from across the disciplines of political science, economics, law, medicine and education to increase understanding of the complex causal linkages between political institutions, the quality of governance, and the capacity of developing societies to meet basic human needs. Conceived in a broadly comparative international perspective, the course will examine cross-national and field-based research projects, with a particular focus on Latin America and Mexico.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Magaloni-Kerpel, B. (PI)

PSYC 70N: Mind-Body Medicine: A Global Perspective

Explores ways in which the powerful connection between the brain and the body can be harnessed to maintain health or fight disease.Intended for students who have a general interest in matters of mind and health, and students who are specifically interested in the psychological/biological/medical sciences. Course begins with a historical perspective on how diverse cultures and medical systems from around the world grapple with the concept of the mind-body connection, then goes through a clear and accessible overview of the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems, and then explores mind-body techniques used in modern societies. Investigates the mind-body connection in the context of: western medicine, traditional medical systems of different cultures, health effects of "good" versus "bad" stress, meditation and other stress reduction techniques, positive and negative emotions, medical applications of hypnosis, the placebo and nocebo effects, and disorders such as anxiety and depression.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dhabhar, F. (PI)

PSYC 82Q: Psychosis and Literature

One of the great gifts of literature is its ability to give us insight into the internal worlds of others. Perhaps nowhere is this gift as rare and crucial as in our attempt to understand the experience of mental illness. This is particularly true of that state clinicians call "psychosis." But psychosis is a slippery term, with definitions ranging from being "out of touch with reality" to states of hallucination and delusion, to "disorganization of thought and speech." It is devastating and terrifying both for patients and families, and yet shares many characteristics with other, less pathological states, such as mysticism and creativity. How then can we begin to make sense of it? In this course, we will examine the first-hand experience of psychosis in letters, memoirs and fiction. Our goal will be to learn how to read such texts from multiple perspectives, examining not only clinical, social, and historical aspects of psychosis, but also what they offer as unique literary works of art. We will look at texts as diverse as Shakespeare and the science fiction writer Philip K. Dick, supplementing them with film and paintings. This class is not only for students thinking of careers in medicine, psychology or anthropology, but also readers and writers interested exploring extraordinary texts. Along the way, we will be paying attention to lessons that we take for our own writing. There are no prerequisites necessary; all that is needed is a love of language and a curiosity about the secrets of other minds.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mason, D. (PI)

PSYC 139: Understanding Relationships: A Couples and Family Therapy Perspective (PSYC 239)

Considers the premises of the family-systems approach to intimate and family relationships, drawing on concepts from psychology, psychiatry, neurobiology, anthropology, and organizational behavior. Examines relationship formation and commitment, intimacy and sexuality, family development and structure, interpersonal conflict and communication, historical patterns and legacies, gender and power, and the cultural and larger systemic contexts of close relationships. Frameworks for assessing relationships and tools for changing romantic, family, and social relationships are examined in detail, and case examples illustrate the relationship change strategies of major contributors to the field. Highlights practical applications of the family-systems approach in educational, medical, business, and community settings. Students do not need to have a background in Psychology or Human Biology, and all student levels are welcome (including GSB, Law, Medicine, GSE for PSYC 239).
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rait, D. (PI)

PSYC 212: Pediatric Psychosomatic Medicine: Psychological Issues in the Physically Ill Child

Open to MD and graduate students; qualified undergraduates by consent of instructor. Diagnosis and management of emotional disorders and difficulties in physically ill children and adolescents. Topics include psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic approaches to psychiatric disorders encountered in the pediatric medical health care setting. Oral and multimedia presentations. Prerequisite: familiarity with basic principles of psychopathology.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

PSYC 233: Mindfulness: An Awareness-Based Stress Reduction Program in Medicine

An experiential program in which the participants learn the techniques of mindfulness meditation and its application in the management of stress and in healthcare. Modeled after the MBSR, Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction, started by Jon Kabat-Zinn at UMASS Medical Center. Designed to work with the mind/body relationship to stress and chronic illness teaching open sensitive awareness without judgement of mental or physical reactivity. Requirement for the course is the daily practice of mindfulness meditation, attendance at weekly class meetings and the all day retreat, home reading, and a final paper covering the student's observations.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

PSYC 239: Understanding Relationships: A Couples and Family Therapy Perspective (PSYC 139)

Considers the premises of the family-systems approach to intimate and family relationships, drawing on concepts from psychology, psychiatry, neurobiology, anthropology, and organizational behavior. Examines relationship formation and commitment, intimacy and sexuality, family development and structure, interpersonal conflict and communication, historical patterns and legacies, gender and power, and the cultural and larger systemic contexts of close relationships. Frameworks for assessing relationships and tools for changing romantic, family, and social relationships are examined in detail, and case examples illustrate the relationship change strategies of major contributors to the field. Highlights practical applications of the family-systems approach in educational, medical, business, and community settings. Students do not need to have a background in Psychology or Human Biology, and all student levels are welcome (including GSB, Law, Medicine, GSE for PSYC 239).
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rait, D. (PI)

PSYC 249SI: Psyched: Psychiatry Careers and Mental Health Perspectives for Medicine

In this lunchtime discussion series, students will explore psychiatry subspecialty career through the personal perspectives and narratives of attending psychiatrists from a variety of practice settings. Special discussions of general interest to medical students will include a motivational interviewing workshop, a discussion on physician self-care and burnout. Priority given to MD students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

PSYCH 20N: How Beliefs Create Reality

This seminar will take an interdisciplinary approach to exploring how subjective aspects of the mind (e.g., thoughts, beliefs, and expectations) can fundamentally change objective reality. Over the course of the semester, students will be challenged to think critically about research from psychology, sociology, and medicine, which suggests that what we think, believe and expect plays a significant role in determining our physical health, performance and well-being. Students will explore research on how mindsets about nutrition, exercise, and stress can alter the body¿s response to those phenomena. Students will also uncover how social interactions with friends, family, colleagues and the media influence the perceived quality and impact of cultural products such as art, music, and fashion. And students will learn about the neurological and physiological underpinnings of the placebo effect, a powerful demonstration of expectation that produces real, healing changes in the body. Finally, students will have the opportunity to consider real world applications in disciplines including policy, business, medicine, academics, athletics and public health and consider the ethical implications of those applications. Throughout the class active participation and an open mind will be critical to success. The final weeks of class will be dedicated to student designed studies or interventions aimed to further explore the power of self-fulfilling prophecies, placebo effects, and the social-psychological creation of reality.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Crum, A. (PI)

PSYCH 298: Advanced Studies in Health Psychology

This course provides an overview of the major concepts and questions in the field of health psychology. Through reading, lecture and interactive discussion, students have the opportunity to explore and think critically about a number of psychological and social influences in determining health including: emotions, beliefs, relationships, stress, motivation, behavior change, spirituality, culture, and social influence. Students will also discuss the role of important and current topics in the field of health psychology and medicine such as the changing role of the patient and provider relationship, health-care policy and the environment, placebo effects, wearable health devices, and the use of technology in medicine. Course is offered to graduate students and advanced undergraduates with permission from the instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Crum, A. (PI)

PSYCH 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOC 459, BIOE 459, CHEM 459, CHEMENG 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Robertson, C. (PI)

PUBLPOL 103D: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (CSRE 178, ETHICSOC 133, HUMBIO 178, PHIL 175A, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, URBANST 122)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PUBLPOL 231: Health Law: Finance and Insurance (HRP 391)

(SAME AS LAW 348, MGTECON 331) Provides the legal, institutional, and economic background necessary to understand the financing and production of health services in the U.S. Potential topics include: health reform, health insurance (Medicare and Medicaid, employer-sponsored insurance, the uninsured), medical malpractice and quality regulation, pharmaceuticals, the corporate practice of medicine, regulation of fraud and abuse, and international comparisons.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

PWR 194KD: Topics in Writing and Rhetoric: Technology and Human Values

Pining for a job in Google X but a little afraid of what disrupting the next social system will do to humans when all is said and done? Unsure where the real conversation is happening at Stanford about how to think more carefully and thoughtfully about the tech we are being trained to make? Curious to know what underlying common ground might link fuzzies with techies, humanists with engineers, scientists with philosophers? These are some of the issues we¿ll address in this seminar. You will be able to choose your own current topic¿drones, tech and medicine, Big Data, Cloud applications, AI and consciousness, cybersecurity, tech and the law¿for which you will choose readings and write a seminar paper and then co-lead discussion. The class goals are to know better the ethical value of one¿s tech work and research and to be able to express to scientists and non-scientists alike the ways in which this work contributes to the greater human good (beyond strict convenience or short-term profit). Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For topics, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-pwr-courses.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; DiPirro, K. (PI)

RAD 260: Computational Methods for Biomedical Image Analysis and Interpretation (BIOMEDIN 260)

The latest biological and medical imaging modalities and their applications in research and medicine. Focus is on computational analytic and interpretive approaches to optimize extraction and use of biological and clinical imaging data for diagnostic and therapeutic translational medical applications. Topics include major image databases, fundamental methods in image processing and quantitative extraction of image features, structured recording of image information including semantic features and ontologies, indexing, search and content-based image retrieval. Case studies include linking image data to genomic, phenotypic and clinical data, developing representations of image phenotypes for use in medical decision support and research applications and the role that biomedical imaging informatics plays in new questions in biomedical science. Includes a project. Enrollment for 3 units requires instructor consent. Prerequisites: programming ability at the level of CS 106A, familiarity with statistics, basic biology. Knowledge of Matlab highly recommended.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Rubin, D. (PI)

REES 247A: Folklore, Mythology, and Islam in Central Asia (ANTHRO 147A)

Central Asian cults, myths, and beliefs from ancient time to modernity. Life crisis rites, magic ceremonies, songs, tales, narratives, taboos associated with childbirth, marriage, folk medicine, and calendrical transitions. The nature and the place of the shaman in the region. Sources include music from the fieldwork of the instructor and the Kyrgyz epoch Manas. The cultural universe of Central Asian peoples as a symbol of their modern outlook.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

RELIGST 121: Muslim Bodies: sound, art, food and medicine in Islam

Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SIMILE 91: Science In the Making an Integrated Learning Environment

SIMILE is a new residentially-based program organized around the question of when something we might call "science" identifiably began, what it became, and what it might become. While we may believe that science, technology and medicine represent some of the powerful tools we have for making a difference in the world, SIMILE challenges students to consider these as dynamic and changing fields of knowledge which must be understood in their historical, cultural and social contexts. Only then can we consider how new ideas, interpretations, technological artifacts and systems respond to societal needs within the limits of what is possible but also, importantly, in light of what might even become plausible.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SIMILE 92: Science in the Making Integrated Learning Environment

SIMILE is a new residentially-based program organized around the question of when something we might call "science" identifiably began, what it became, and what it might become. While we may believe that science, technology and medicine represent some of the powerful tools we have for making a difference in the world, SIMILE challenges students to consider these as dynamic and changing fields of knowledge which must be understood in their historical, cultural and social contexts. Only then can we consider how new ideas, interpretations, technological artifacts and systems respond to societal needs within the limits of what is possible but also, importantly, in light of what might even become plausible.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SIMILE 93: Science in the Making Integrated Learning Environment

SIMILE is a new residentially-based program organized around the question of when something we might call "science" identifiably began, what it became, and what it might become. While we may believe that science, technology and medicine represent some of the powerful tools we have for making a difference in the world, SIMILE challenges students to consider these as dynamic and changing fields of knowledge which must be understood in their historical, cultural and social contexts. Only then can we consider how new ideas, interpretations, technological artifacts and systems respond to societal needs within the limits of what is possible but also, importantly, in light of what might even become plausible.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SIMILE 95W: Science In the Making an Integrated Learning Environment, Writing Section

SIMILE is a new residentially-based program organized around the question of when something we might call "science" identifiably began, what it became, and what it might become. While we may believe that science, technology and medicine represent some of the powerful tools we have for making a difference in the world, SIMILE challenges students to consider these as dynamic and changing fields of knowledge which must be understood in their historical, cultural and social contexts. Only then can we consider how new ideas, interpretations, technological artifacts and systems respond to societal needs within the limits of what is possible but also, importantly, in light of what might even become plausible.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 1 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SIS 120Q: Stanford Introductory Seminar: Horse Medicine

Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SIS 157Q: Stanford Introductory Seminar: Computer Technology in Modern Medicine

Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SIS 160Q: Stanford Introductory Seminar: Impact of Molecular Biology and Genetics on the Practice of Medicine

Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SIS 243Q: Stanford Introductory Seminar: Cross-Cultural Issues in Medicine

Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SIS 250Q: Stanford Introductory Seminar: Sport, Exercise, and Medicine: Exploring the Relationships

Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SIS 259Q: Stanford Introductory Seminar: Decision Making in Law and Medicine

Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

SIS 302Q: Stanford Introductory Seminar: Genomics, Bioinformatics, and Medicine

Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 20N: What counts as "race," and why?

Preference to freshmen. Seminar discussion of how race is conceptualized and how categorizations are determined across a range of disciplines and institutions in U.S. society. Course materials survey approaches from history, demography, law, sociology, psychology, genetics, and medicine. Students will read original social science research, learn to conduct and analyze in-depth interviews, and use library resources to support legal/archival case studies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Saperstein, A. (PI)

SOC 105D: Sociology of Health and Illness

This course examines the social causes and context of health, illness, and health care in the United States. Who stays healthy and who gets sick? How do individuals experience and make sense of illness? How docontextual factors (including socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity, culture, social networks, and hospital quality) shape health and health care? What constitutes quality medical care and who gets it? To what degree do the spaces we inhabit and the relationships we form shape our health? What avenues exist for improving health care and reducing health disparities?In examining these questions, we will consider how social scientists, epidemiologists, public health experts, and physicians address them in research and in the field. Reflecting both qualitative and quantitative approaches, we will draw on literatures in social science, public health, and medicine. nBy the end of the course, students will: 1) have insight into the various ways of defining and measuring health, including mortality, morbidity, physical functioning, and quality of life; 2) understand how a person¿s socio-demographic characteristics influence his or her health, including his or her ability to access resources vital to maintaining health and receiving treatment; 3) understand how researchersemploy theory and make causal inferences based on observational and experimental data; 4) comprehendhow patients and practitioners understand health and illness and their roles in the health care process; and 5) understand the role of medical care in the distribution of health outcomes across the population.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fielding-Singh, P. (PI)

SOC 114: Economic Sociology (SOC 214)

(Graduate students register for 214.) The sociological approach to production, distribution, consumption, and markets, emphasizing the impact of norms, power, social structure, and institutions on the economy. Comparison of classic and contemporary approaches to the economy among the social science disciplines. Topics: consumption, labor markets, organization of professions such as law and medicine, the economic role of informal networks, industrial organization, including the structure and history of the computer and popular music industries, business alliances, capitalism in non-Western societies, and the transition from state socialism in E. Europe and China.
Terms: not given next year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 214: Economic Sociology (SOC 114)

(Graduate students register for 214.) The sociological approach to production, distribution, consumption, and markets, emphasizing the impact of norms, power, social structure, and institutions on the economy. Comparison of classic and contemporary approaches to the economy among the social science disciplines. Topics: consumption, labor markets, organization of professions such as law and medicine, the economic role of informal networks, industrial organization, including the structure and history of the computer and popular music industries, business alliances, capitalism in non-Western societies, and the transition from state socialism in E. Europe and China.
Terms: not given next year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOMGEN 130: Sexual Diversity and Function Across Medical Disciplines (FEMGEN 230X)

(Same as SOMGEN 230/FEMGEN 230). Focus is on development of personal and professional skills to interact with people across the diverse range of human sexuality, from childhood (pediatric) to older ages (geriatric), with consideration of gender identity, sexual orientation, sociocultural (predominantly U.S., not global) and religious values, and selected medical issues (e.g. hormonal therapy, disabilities, e.g. spinal cord injury, etc. with discussion of sexual taboos and unusual sexual practices that you might encounter in a general medical setting. For the additional unit, students will undertake an additional weekly activity (e.g., shadowing in a clinic) approved by the instructor and submit a weekly written reflection about that activity.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOMGEN 140: Preventive Medicine

(Same as CHPR 240) Features the research of faculty in the Stanford Prevention Research Center and focuses on key health issues over the life course (prenatal through childhood, young to middle-aged, older and elderly adults). Topics include chronic disease (global and U.S.) epidemiology; application of behavioral science to risk reduction; nutrition; weight management; physical activity; stopping smoking; public health; community health and community-based prevention; national prevention strategy; applying communication technology to health promotion.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

SOMGEN 202: Authoring Wikipedia Medicine Articles

Course focuses on how to author and edit evidence-based systematic review-style articles for Wikipedia. Topics to include: appraising importance, quality and reliability of Wikipedia medicine article, learning WikiProject Medicine style guidelines, identifying clinical questions and applying relevant evidence to answering them, using secondary literature (systematic reviews, meta-analyses, textbooks, practice guidelines) to edit a Wikipedia Medicine article, publishing Wikipedia Medicine articles in open-access journals. Enrollment limited to MD students in their 4th year.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

SOMGEN 203: Literature and Writing for Military Affiliated Students

Focus is on military literature and workshopping students' writing about their military experiences. Texts and guest faculty and writers vary each quarter. Dinner and course materials provided free for all students.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

SOMGEN 204: Mobile Health Without Borders

Overview of innovations in mobile health, global health, and entrepreneurship. Each class features lectures from multiple world leaders on themes, challenges, opportunities in m-health. Content delivered in hybrid in-person seminar and webinar format connecting participants from around the world in class discussions and assignments.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

SOMGEN 206: Global Medical Issues Affecting Women (FEMGEN 206)

This course probes the principal issues affecting women and girls medically around the world. Through interactive discussions, guest lectures, case studies, and academic readings, students become acquainted with the most critical challenges to women¿s health globally, and use selected analytical tools to assess how these may be addressed efficiently, cost-effectively, and sustainably. Topics include women¿s cancer, birth control, infertility, female genital mutilation, midwifery, obstetric fistula, breastfeeding, violence against women, and women's representation in biomedical research. The aim is to cultivate in students a nuanced appreciation of women¿s unique needs, roles, and challenges in the contemporary global health landscape.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

SOMGEN 207: Theories of Change in Global Health

Open to graduate students studying in any discipline whose research work or interest engages global health. Upper-class undergraduates who have completed at least one of the prerequisite courses and who are willing to commit the preparatory time for a graduate level seminar class are welcome. The course undertakes a critical assessment of how different academic disciplines frame global health problems and recommend pathways toward improvements. Focuses on evaluating examples of both success and failure of different theories of change in specific global health implementations. Prerequisites: ECON 118, CEE 265D, HUMBIO 129S or HUMBIO 124C.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Luby, S. (PI)

SOMGEN 208: Preparation and Practice: Law

Focus is on everyday activities of patent practitioners (patent agents, patent associates, and patent partners) and applying skills learned in medical, biosciences and physical sciences graduate studies to careers in Patent Law. Topics include: applying for positions, the importance of IP protection, licensing, overview of the patent process, drafting applications and litigation. Seminar lead by leaders from Morrison and Foerster.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

SOMGEN 209: Preparation & Practice: Management Consulting

This course combines guest lectures with case study and hands-on projects to examine the necessary skills and practical steps necessary to provide businesses with strategic advice and facilitate organizational change. Students will interface with expert practitioners to gain practical insight into the mechanics and practices of the consulting field, and the variety of roles and responsibilities available to them. They will also be exposed to key players and business concepts from myriad industries.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

SOMGEN 210A: EMPOWERING EMERGING SCIENTISTS I

First half of a two-quarter sequence. A practical guide for career development, which includes training on career direction, communication, and the development and leveraging of relationships, all skills that are also easily translatable to many areas of life. Through conversations, self-analysis, and writing exercises, each participant designs a fulfilling and impactful vision for their career and life as a whole. Participants learn a practical, step-by-step process for living a more inspired and productive life.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

SOMGEN 210B: EMPOWERING EMERGING SCIENTISTS II

Second half of a two-quarter sequence. A practical guide for career development, which includes training on career direction, communication, and the development and leveraging of relationships, all skills that are also easily translatable to many areas of life. Through conversations, self-analysis, and writing exercises, each participant designs a fulfilling and impactful vision for their career and life as a whole. Participants learn a practical, step-by-step process for living a more inspired and productive life. Prerequisite: SOMGEN 210A.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

SOMGEN 212: Humanities and Arts in Medicine for Clinical Students

Designed for clinical students in their final year of medical school, this clerkship combines classroom sessions, fieldtrips, and workshops in the arts and humanities to facilitate reflection on health, illness, healthcare and medical training. Utilizing disciplines such as film studies, architecture, creative writing, visual and performing arts, medical anthropology, history, literature and ethics, students will explore the culture of medicine, the human condition, and the context of medicine in society. Each student will design, research and present a project which examines and interprets a particular intersection of the arts/humanities and medicine of the student¿s choice.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

SOMGEN 213: The Art of Observation: Enhancing Clinical Skills Through Visual Analysis

Offers medical students the opportunity to enhance their observational and descriptive abilities by analyzing works of art in the Stanford museums. Working with the Cantor Arts Center staff and Stanford Art History PhD candidates, students spend time in each session actively looking at and describing works in the gallery. Discussion with medical school faculty follows, providing a clinical correlate to the gallery session. Classes interrogate a different theme of medical observation and clinical practice and includes opportunities for an applied clinical session in the hospital with course-affiliated physicians.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

SOMGEN 214: Conversations in Social Medicine

Draws on disciplines of medical anthropology, medical sociology, medical humanities, philosophy, and ethics to explore the field of social medicine. Focus is on consideration of medicine as both a biological and social event: how assumptions we have about the body and disease are socially constructed, how medicine exists in rituals and structures, and how considering medicine from this perspective can help us be better doctors. Topics include: organ transplantation, knowledge production, mental illness, and language in medicine.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Shafer, A. (PI)

SOMGEN 215: Biosocial Medicine: The Social, Psychological, and Biological Determinants of Behavior and Wellbeing (EDUC 205, HUMBIO 65)

Explores how social forces, psychological influences, and biological systems combine to affect human behavior in early childhood, in the educational experience, and throughout the life course. Examines how behaviors are linked to well-being. Uses a flipped classroom model, in which a series of lectures are available for students to view on-line before class. In-class time then focuses on case studies from published research. Undergraduates enroll for 3 units. Students enrolling for 3 units attend two meetings per week; students enrolling for 2 units attend one meeting per week.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Barr, D. (PI)

SOMGEN 216: Medical Etymology

A survey of medical eymology and terminology that parallels preclinical medical education. Topics focus on Greek and Latin roots and their appearances in the medical lexicon.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Shafer, A. (PI)

SOMGEN 227: Career Exploration Opportunities (CEO) Internship Development

Restricted to graduate students (year 3 and onward) and postdocs in Stanford Biosciences program. Focus is on career exploration and securing internship opportunities. Covers career exploration tools and exercises to help students and postdocs clarify academic and professional priorities, and empower them to take charge of their careers through hands-on internship experiences fitting their skills, interests, and values. Topics include identifying and planning for career of choice, targeting employers, securing an offer and pathways to on-the-job success. Guest speakers include company representatives and recruiters.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

SOMGEN 227A: Career Exploration Opportunities (CEO) Internship Program Practicum

Restricted to graduate students (year 3 and onward) and postdocs in the Stanford Biosciences program who have completed SOMGEN 227. Focus is on internship progress and future career goals. Topics include update on progress of internship goals, planning for future career goals and return to academic research, internship activities, culture and mentorship.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Eberle, S. (PI)

SOMGEN 230: Sexual Function and Diversity in Medical Disciplines (FEMGEN 230)

(Same as SOMGEN 130/FEMGEN 230X; undergraduates who wish to fulfill the GER requirement should enroll in SOMGEN 130/FEMGEN 230X.) Goal is the development of personal and professional skills to interact with people across the diverse range of human sexuality, including sexual orientation and gender identity, age (pediatric to geriatric), sociocultural & religious values, medical issues (e.g. hormonal therapy, disabilities, such as spinal cord injury, etc). Features guest speakers representing a range of sexualities, including asexuality, polyamory and kink, as well as medical professionals and researchers specializing in a diversity of sexuality topics. Attendance (in-class feedback) requirements. Enrollment for 3 units requires attendance at two sessions per week and in-class presentation requirements; enrollment for 2 units requires attendance at two sessions per week.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Stefanick, M. (PI)

SOMGEN 237: Health and Medical Impact of Sexual Assault across the Lifecourse (FEMGEN 237)

An overview of the acute and chronic physical and psychological health impact of sexual abuse through the perspective of survivors of childhood, adolescent, young and middle adult, and elder abuse, including special populations such as pregnant women, military and veterans, prison inmates, individuals with mental or physical impairments. Also addresses: race/ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, and other demographic and societal factors, including issues specific to college culture. Professionals with expertise in sexual assault present behavioral and prevention efforts such as bystander intervention training, medical screening, counseling and other interventions to manage the emotional trauma of abuse. Undergraduates must enroll for 3 units. Medical and graduate students may enroll for 1 to 3 units.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

SOMGEN 239: Preparation and Practice: Biotechnology Business and Finance

Combines guest lectures with case study and hands-on projects to examine the necessary skills and and practical steps to create a business from biotechnology invention. Students interface with current CEOs, expert practitioners, and investment professionals to gain practical insight ito the mechanics and practices of the biotechnology industry and the variety of roles and responsibilities available to them.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Eberle, S. (PI)

SOMGEN 239: Preparation and Practice for Biotechnology Business and Finance

Open to School of Medicine graduate students, medical students, residents and fellows. Focus on the process of new company development and skills for success in biotechnology business, entrepreneurship and finance, including management/leadership skill development, awareness of business terminology and theory. Topics include: financial analysis, feasibility, IP, case practice.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

SOMGEN 257: Challenging Sex and Gender Dichotomies in Medicine (FEMGEN 124, FEMGEN 224)

Explores and challenges the traditional physiological bases for distinguishing human males from females, as well as the psychosocial factors that play a role in experiencing and expressing gender and sexuality. Topics include the influence of sociocultural (gender) norms and behaviors on human biology, the interactions of sex and gender on medical outcomes, the importance of understanding the spectrum of sex, gender, and sexuality in clinical practice.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

SOMGEN 260: Preparing for Community, Health and Learning through Service in Sri Lanka

Preparation course for students attending the Bing Overseas Study Program in Sri Lanka. Focuses on specific topics relevant to Sri Lanka, including: water issues, effects of war and natural disaster on population health, maternal and child health, and etiquette and basic language skills for visitors. Explores the Sarvodaya model of development together with the World Health Organization's Sustainable Development Goals. Required for BOSP students; open to all students interested in Sri Lanka and global health.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

SOMGEN 272: Narrative Ethics and Medicine

In this course, we will read seminal contributions to the theory and practice of narrative ethics and narrative medicine, with a number of central questions in mind: how, for instance, does literature aid in the understanding of clinical experience? what are the connections between ethics, literary rewriting, and clinical review? in what ways has medicine remained a form of art, and why should providers of care be asked to read fiction, drama, or poetry? We will select theory from physicians (Rita Charon, Arthur Kleinman), recipients of care (Arthur Frank, Susan Sontag, Harriet McBryde), literary critics (WC Booth, JH Miller, Elaine Scarry), and philosophers on narrative (Martha Nussbaum, Judith Butler). We will also select literary readings from practitioners of literature and medicine, which may include Anton Chekhov, William Carlos Williams, Richard Selzer, Oliver Sacks, Perri Klass, Anne Fadiman, Margaret Edson, Jean-Dominique Bauby, and Abraham Verghese. Our seminar discussion and analysis will therefore focus on a history of attempts in the field to re-examine clinical cases, with literary attention as a central mode of ethical practice and care.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOMGEN 275: Leading Value Improvement in Health Care Delivery

Successful leaders on the journey to better care delivery methods with lower total spending inevitably face pivotal crises. What confluence of attitude, strategy, and events allows them to prevail? Contexts will include entrepreneurship and early stage investing, spread of higher value care delivery innovations, health care delivery system management, and private and public policy making to reward value. Guest faculty will include nationally recognized leaders and change agents, who will invite students to recommend alternative approaches to managing pivotal challenges. The course is open to any member of the Stanford community aspiring to lead higher value in health care delivery including graduate students, undergraduates, and postdoctoral candidates, as well as medical center residents and clinical fellows. May be repeated for credit
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

SOMGEN 282: The Startup Garage: Design (CHEMENG 482)

(Same as STRAMGT 356) The Startup Garage is an experiential lab course that focuses on the design, testing and launch of a new venture. Multidisciplinary student teams work through an iterative process of understanding user needs, creating a point of view statement, ideating and prototyping new product and services and their business models, and communicating the user need, product, service and business models to end-users, partners, and investors. In the autumn quarter, teams will: identify and validate a compelling user need and develop very preliminary prototypes for a new product or service and business models. Students form teams, conduct field work and iterate on the combination of business model -- product -- market. Teams will present their first prototypes (business model - product - market) at the end of the quarter to a panel of entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors and faculty.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

SOMGEN 284: The Startup Garage: Testing and Launch (CHEMENG 484)

This is the second quarter of the two-quarter series. In this quarter, student teams expand the field work they started in the fall quarter. They get out of the building to talk to potential customers, partners, distributors, and investors to test and refine their business model, product/service and market. This quarter the teams will be expected to develop and test a minimally viable product, iterate, and focus on validated lessons on: the market opportunity, user need and behavior, user interactions with the product or service, business unit economics, sale and distribution models, partnerships, value proposition, and funding strategies. Teams will interact with customers, partners, distributors, investors and mentors with the end goal of developing and delivering a funding pitch to a panel of entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, angel investors and faculty.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

SOMGEN 299: SPRC Education Program Internship

Internship with Stanford Prevention Research Center Education Programs with focus on program administration and development. SPRC education programs include Women and Sex Differences in Medicine (WSDM), Health 4 All (H4A), and Community Health and Prevention Research (CHPR).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

STATS 211: Meta-research: Appraising Research Findings, Bias, and Meta-analysis (CHPR 206, HRP 206, MED 206)

Open to graduate, medical, and undergraduate students. Appraisal of the quality and credibility of research findings; evaluation of sources of bias. Meta-analysis as a quantitative (statistical) method for combining results of independent studies. Examples from medicine, epidemiology, genomics, ecology, social/behavioral sciences, education. Collaborative analyses. Project involving generation of a meta-research project or reworking and evaluation of an existing published meta-analysis. Prerequisite: knowledge of basic statistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

STATS 245: Data, Models, and Decision Analytics

Statistical models and decision theory. Online A/B testing, comparative effective studies of medical treatments. Introduction to recommender systems in online services, personalized medicine and marketing. Prerequisite or corequisite: STATS 202, or CS 229, or CME 250, or equivalent.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STEMREM 83Q: The Stem Cell: Biological, Social, and Practical Aspects of Stem Cell Research

Preference to sophomores. Ethical, legal, social, and economic dimensions of stem cell research such as the discovery of human embryonic stem cells and the international landscape of public policy. How stem cells work, their role in the upkeep of the human body, and current and future uses in medicine. Issues at the intersection of science and society such as human-animal hybrids, notions of justice in intellectual property law, distribution of health care, and the major ethical frameworks defining the debate. Prerequisite: AP Biology
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

STEMREM 200: Stem Cell Intensive

Open to first year Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine graduate students or consent of Instructor. Hands-on, five-day immersion to learn basic methods of tissue culture, mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) preparation, embryonic stem and induced pluripotent stem (ES/iPS) cell culture, differentiation, DNA isolation, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), sequencing, and basic microscopy.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Sebastiano, V. (PI)

STEMREM 202: Stem Cells and Translational Medicine

For graduate, undergraduate and medical students. Focus is on fundamentals of stem cell biology and regenerative Medicine. Topics include exploration of the well-studied system of hematopoiesis, molecular pathways of pluripotency and tissue-specific stem cells and ends with coverage of aging as related to stem cell dynamics. Features include lectures on the basic science of each topic, followed by clinical applications in order to show the mechanisms and methods to translate findings to therapeutic applications, culminated with construction of a research proposal or business plan in an area of interest, to be further explored in STEMREM 203. Students enrolling for 3 units submit four of seven problem-sets; students enrolling for 4 units submit five of seven problem-sets; students enrolling for 5 units turn in seven of seven problem-sets.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Palmer, T. (PI)

STEMREM 203: Stem Cells Immersion: Applications in Medicine, Business and Law

For graduate and medical students. Provides the clinical, pharmaceutical, biotechnology or business immersion necessary to allow insight into the world of medicine from multiple vantage points, setting the stage for students to translate research successfully beyond the academic sphere and gain the necessary knowledge to move their research proposal/business plan forward (from STEMREM 202). Prerequisites: STEMREM 201A and STEMREM 202.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Palmer, T. (PI)

STEMREM 250: Regenerative Medicine Seminar Series

For graduate, medical and undergraduate students. A forum for Stanford researchers to meet, hear about what is going on in Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine at Stanford, and spark collaborations. Topics include all areas of regenerative medicine, broadly defined, ranging from fundamental biological principles and basic science advances to novel applications in biotechnology, stem cell biology, and human disease.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Palmer, T. (PI)

STEMREM 280: Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine Journal Club

For graduate, medical and undergraduate students. Review of current literature in both basic and translational medicine as it relates to stem cell biology and/or regenerative medicine in a seminar format consisting of both faculty and student presentations. Includes discussions led by faculty experts in the area covered for that particular session. Topics may range widely, depending on the available literature and students' interests. Students are expected to review the chosen article before class presentations and participate in discussion. Discussion includes methodology and statistical analysis of each study and its relevance to stem cell biology and/or regenerative medicine.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Palmer, T. (PI)

STRAMGT 321: Create a New Venture: From Idea to Launch I

This is an integrated lab course in Entrepreneurship designed to teach students the process of creating a new viable venture - from idea to launch. It is a dynamic and interactive course organized around projects undertaken by teams of 3 to 4 registered students from the MSx and MBA programs, together with other graduate students within Stanford who bring expertise of particular relevance to the idea being pursued. This course is designed not only for students with immediate entrepreneurial aspirations, but also for any student considering starting an entrepreneurial venture at some point in his or her career. The course is a two quarter class, with admission to the class by team and idea. In the winter quarter, teams will research, craft, and morph their idea into a viable business concept. In the spring quarter they will further refine their concept and develop a strategy and plan to attract financial, human and other resources. At the end of the spring quarter, teams will present their plan to a panel of experts and potential investors to simulate the funding process. The new course builds on a predecessor course S356 "Evaluating Entrepreneurial Opportunities" and encapsulates new and important research and findings as they relate to the process of new venture creation. The teaching method is primarily learning by doing (LBD) through a structured process and supported by relevant lectures. Learning is further enhanced through meetings with the instructor, coaching by experienced mentors and review by peers. Field research as well as prototype product development are integral to the course. Since admittance to S321/S322 is by team and the quality of their idea, team formation takes place during the autumn quarter. Informal student mixers and seminars will be held to facilitate team formation and idea generation. Each team of 3-4 students should preferably consist of 1 or more MSx students and graduate students from the MBA program or other Schools - Engineering, Medicine, Law, Science, Education - to bring diversity and depth to the team. The application-selection process is described on the S321/S322 website.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded

STRAMGT 322: Create a New Venture: From Idea to Launch II

This is an integrated lab course in Entrepreneurship designed to teach students the process of creating a new viable venture - from idea to launch. It is a dynamic and interactive course organized around projects undertaken by teams of 3 to 4 registered students from the MSx and MBA programs, together with other graduate students within Stanford who bring expertise of particular relevance to the idea being pursued. This course is designed not only for students with immediate entrepreneurial aspirations, but also for any student considering starting an entrepreneurial venture at some point in his or her career. The course is a two quarter class, with admission to the class by team and idea. In the winter quarter, teams will research, craft, and morph their idea into a viable business concept. In the spring quarter they will further refine their concept and develop a strategy and plan to attract financial, human and other resources. At the end of the spring quarter, teams will present their plan to a panel of experts and potential investors to simulate the funding process. The new course builds on a predecessor course S356 "Evaluating Entrepreneurial Opportunities" and encapsulates new and important research and findings as they relate to the process of new venture creation. The teaching method is primarily learning by doing (LBD) through a structured process and supported by relevant lectures. Learning is further enhanced through meetings with the instructor, coaching by experienced mentors and review by peers. Field research as well as prototype product development are integral to the course. Since admittance to S321/S322 is by team and the quality of their idea, team formation takes place during the autumn quarter. Informal student mixers and seminars will be held to facilitate team formation and idea generation. Each team of 3-4 students should preferably consist of 1 or more MSx students and graduate students from the MBA program or other Schools - Engineering, Medicine, Law, Science, Education - to bring diversity and depth to the team. The application-selection process is described on the S321/S322 website.
Units: 3 | Grading: GSB Letter Graded
Instructors: ; Rohan, D. (PI); Woo, Y. (GP)

STRAMGT 511: Protecting Ideas

At the beginning and usually at the heart of every new business is an idea. Around that core idea talent is assembled, technology is developed, investors are attracted, capital is deployed, business models are evolved, and products and services are created and sold. But what happens if a business'€™ core idea turns out not to be protectable, and can be freely used by competitors, many of whom may have significantly greater resources, pricing power and other competitive advantages? Or conversely, how do you recognize opportunities to enter markets in which incumbent barriers to entry are, from an IP standpoint, weak or illusory? Using hypotheticals premised on reported cases, this course explores the business impact and implications of the rapidly-changing and often confusing law around how to protect what are often the most valuable core assets of a business. In particular, and with the assistance of business executives from impacted companies and institutions, the Supreme Court'€™s recent decisions in Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank International, Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, and Mayo v. Prometheus will be discussed, and their implications for business models and both offensive and defensive strategy in fields such as software development, e-commerce, personalized medicine and medical diagnostics will be explored.nnIt is the objective of this course to help students to recognize and think critically about how the ability or inability to protect, or the scope of the protection available for, new ideas impacts everything from the funding and viability of a new business to the business model and IP strategy selected to advance it.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

STS 103Q: Reading and Writing Poetry about Science

Preference to sophomores. Students will study recent poetry inspired by the phenomena and history of the sciences in order to write such poems themselves. These poems bring sensuous human experience to bear on biology, ecology, astronomy, physics, earth science, and medicine, as well as on technological advances and calamities. Poets such as Linda Bierds, Mark Doty, Albert Goldbarth, Sarah Lindsay, W.S. Merwin, Adrienne Rich, Pattiann Rogers, Tracy K. Smith, Arthur Sze, and C. K. Williams. Grounding in poetics, research in individually chosen areas of science, weekly analytical and creative writing. Fulfills the Creative Expression requirement. Enrollment limited to 12.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SURG 232: Social Emergency Medicine and Service Learning

Focus on understanding the social determinants of health and exploring the relationship between emergency medicine and public health affecting the Emergency Department patient population by: 1) Discussion and critique of relevant literature; 2) Learning about community resources for patient's social needs; 3) Shadowing ED physicians. Topics include how public health initiatives can improve access to hospital and community resources, and how patients receive care in a busy, fast-paced environment. 2 Units. Service learning component (Additional 1 Unit of Credit): Requires prerequisite of Med 157 Community Health Course, a 3-quarter commitment, personal statement and faculty approval. Students conduct screening and intervention for ED patients; Service Learning option requires prerequisite of Med 157 Community Health course, and enrolling for 3 units.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

SURG 253: Topics in Simulation of Human Physiology & Anatomical Systems (CME 520)

Biweekly interdisciplinary lecture series on the development of computational tools for modeling and simulation of human physiological and anatomical systems. Lectures by instructors and guest speakers on topics such as surgical simulation, anatomical & surgical Modeling, neurological Systems, and biomedical models of human movement. Group discussions, team based assignments, and project work.nPrerequisite: Medical students, residents or fellows from school of medicine, and computationally oriented students with a strong interest to explore computational and mathematical methods related to the health sciences.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

SURG 298: Procedure-Based Specialty Capstone Course

Designed for graduating medical students entering a procedure-based internship or residency (e.g. general surgery, surgical sub-specialties, obstetrics-gynecology, anesthesia, and emergency medicine). Prepares students with practical, high-yield clinical and procedural skills. Clinical skills include fielding common calls regarding surgical patients, obtaining informed consent, completing operative dictations, discharging patients, writing prescriptions, running trauma surveys, and interpreting surgically relevant radiology studies. The hands-on portion of the course covers basic open and laparoscopic surgical skills utilizing bench models, laparoscopic box trainers, and full cadaveric simulations. Prerequisite: graduating medical student.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

THINK 48: Reading the Body: How Medicine and Culture Define the Self

How have our perceptions of what is considered normal/abnormal; beautiful/ugly; infected/uninfected changed over time? How do these changing medical and cultural representations of the body reflect larger societal shifts? How does illness change our perceptions of our bodies and our identities? Viewed through the lens of medicine, the body is a text that offers clues to health and illness, yet clinical readings are never entirely objective. Culture informs and distorts how we discern, accept, reject, and analyze our bodies. Looking at literary, medical, ethical, and anthropological texts, we ask how representations of the body affects the way we experience illness, embody gender and racial identities, and understand our rights (or lack of rights) to control our own bodies. We will critically examine our perceptions about the body and debate some of the most complex and sensitive issues surrounding the body, from the ethics of medical research trials to end of life decisions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

URBANST 122: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (CSRE 178, ETHICSOC 133, HUMBIO 178, PHIL 175A, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

WELLNESS 194: Healthy Cooking: Food as Medicine

The class will explore the basics in healthy nutrition and the essentials for a healthy balanced plate. Classes will focus on recipes in East Asia &India, the benefits of foods for certain ailments, super-foods, plant based diets and phyto-nutrients, cleansing foods, the use of foods for skin care and aromatherapy, understanding the link between the foods we eat and the soil they grow in, and lastly healthy comfort foods. This interactive and experiential class will help one to develop a healthy relationship with food and develop some practical cooking skills.
Terms: given next year | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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