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AA 120Q: Building Trust in Autonomy

Major advances in both hardware and software have accelerated the development of autonomous systems that have the potential to bring significant benefits to society. Google, Tesla, and a host of other companies are building autonomous vehicles that can improve safety and provide flexible mobility options for those who cannot drive themselves. On the aviation side, the past few years have seen the proliferation of unmanned aircraft that have the potential to deliver medicine and monitor agricultural crops autonomously. In the financial domain, a significant portion of stock trades are performed using automated trading algorithms at a frequency not possible by human traders. How do we build these systems that drive our cars, fly our planes, and invest our money? How do we develop trust in these systems? What is the societal impact on increased levels of autonomy?
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA
Instructors: ; Kochenderfer, M. (PI)

AFRICAAM 51A: Race in Science (CEE 151A, COMM 51A, CSRE 51A, HUMBIO 71A, STS 51A)

What are the roles of race and racism in science, technology, and medicine? 3-course sequence; each quarter can be taken independently. Fall quarter focuses on science. What is the science of race and racism? How does race affect scientific work? Weekly guest speakers will address such issues as the psychology and anthropology of race and racism; how race, language, and culture affect education; race in environmental science and environmental justice; the science of reducing police violence; and the role of race in genomic research. Talks will take a variety of forms, from panel discussions to interviews and lectures. Weekly assignments: read a related article and participate in an online discussion.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

AFRICAAM 51B: Race in Technology (BIOE 91B, CEE 151B, COMM 51B, CSRE 51B, HUMBIO 71B, STS 51B)

What are the roles of race and racism in science, technology, and medicine? 3-course sequence; each quarter can be taken independently. Winter quarter focuses on technology. How do race and racism affect the design and social impact of technology, broadly defined? Can new or different technology help to reduce racial bias? Invited speakers will address the role of race in such issues as energy infrastructure, nuclear arms control, algorithmic accountability, machine learning, artificial intelligence, and synthetic biology. Talks will take a variety of forms, ranging from panel discussions to interviews and lectures. Weekly assignments: read a related article and participate in an online discussion.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

AFRICAAM 51C: Race in Medicine (BIOE 91C, CEE 151C, CSRE 51C, HUMBIO 71C, STS 51C)

What are the roles of race and racism in science, technology, and medicine? 3-course sequence; each quarter can be taken independently. Spring quarter focuses on medicine. How do race and racism affect medical research and medical care? What accounts for health disparities among racial groups? What are the history, ethics, legal, and social issues surrounding racialized medical experiments and treatments? Invited speakers will address these and other issues. Talks will take a variety of forms: conversations, interviews, panels, and others. Weekly assignments: read a related article and participate in an online discussion.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Edwards, P. (PI)

AFRICAAM 122F: Histories of Race in Science and Medicine at Home and Abroad (AFRICAST 122F, CSRE 122F, HISTORY 248D)

This course has as its primary objective, the historical study of the intersection of race, science and medicine in the US and abroad with an emphasis on Africa and its Diasporas in the US. By drawing on literature from history, science and technology studies, sociology and other related disciplines, the course will consider the sociological and cultural concept of race and its usefulness as an analytical category. The course will explore how the study of race became its own ¿science¿ in the late-Enlightenment era, the history of eugenics--a science of race aimed at the ostensible betterment of the overall population through the systematic killing or "letting die" of humanity¿s "undesirable" parts, discuss how the ideology of pseudo-scientific racism underpinned the health policies of the French and British Empires in Africa, explore the fraught relationship between race and medicine in the US, discuss how biological notions of race have quietly slipped back into scientific projects in the 21st century and explore how various social justice advocates and scholars have resisted the scientific racisms of the present and future and/or proposed new paths towards a more equitable and accessible science.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | Units: 4

AFRICAST 122F: Histories of Race in Science and Medicine at Home and Abroad (AFRICAAM 122F, CSRE 122F, HISTORY 248D)

This course has as its primary objective, the historical study of the intersection of race, science and medicine in the US and abroad with an emphasis on Africa and its Diasporas in the US. By drawing on literature from history, science and technology studies, sociology and other related disciplines, the course will consider the sociological and cultural concept of race and its usefulness as an analytical category. The course will explore how the study of race became its own ¿science¿ in the late-Enlightenment era, the history of eugenics--a science of race aimed at the ostensible betterment of the overall population through the systematic killing or "letting die" of humanity¿s "undesirable" parts, discuss how the ideology of pseudo-scientific racism underpinned the health policies of the French and British Empires in Africa, explore the fraught relationship between race and medicine in the US, discuss how biological notions of race have quietly slipped back into scientific projects in the 21st century and explore how various social justice advocates and scholars have resisted the scientific racisms of the present and future and/or proposed new paths towards a more equitable and accessible science.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | Units: 4

AFRICAST 135: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, EPI 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAids (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 82 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 3-4

AFRICAST 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, EPI 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAids (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 82 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 3-4

AFRICAST 249: Bodies, Technologies, and Natures in Africa (ANTHRO 348B, HISTORY 349)

This interdisciplinary course explores how modern African histories, bodies, and natures have been entangled with technological activities. Viewing Africans as experts and innovators, we consider how technologies have mediated, represented, or performed power in African societies. Topics include infrastructure, extraction, medicine, weapons, communications, sanitation, and more. Themes woven through the course include citizenship, mobility, labor, bricolage, in/formal economies, and technopolitical geographies, among others. Readings draw from history, anthropology, geography, and social/cultural theory.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | Units: 4-5

AMSTUD 43Q: Body Politics: Health Activism in Modern America

¿Medicare for All¿ has become a rallying cry for those calling for reform of the American health care system. But this slogan is only the most recent political expression of the conviction that health care ought to be a right and not a privilege, part of an ongoing project to expand access to health care to all Americans. This course will examine key moments in the history of health care reform movements in the twentieth-century United States, considering the successes and failures of advocates, activists, and reformers who have sought to transform the medical system and secure equal access to care. Among the topics we will consider as we move through the century are proposals for a national health insurance program; the fight against racial discrimination in public health and medicine; the women¿s health movement; the disability rights movement; and efforts of AIDS activists to reshape the production of biomedical knowledge. Students will work throughout the quarter on a research-based project on a topic of interest to them, culminating in a final paper and presentation.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 3-5

AMSTUD 106: Spectacular Trials: Sex, Race and Violence in Modern American Culture (CSRE 66)

This course will use the phenomenon of the spectacular trial as a framework for exploring the intersections of sex, race, and violence in the formation of modern American culture. Beginning in the late nineteenth century and continuing through the 1990s, we will focus our inquiry on a number of notorious cases, some associated with familiar names¿the ¿Scottsboro Boys,¿ Emmett Till, O.J. Simpson¿others involving once-infamous actors¿like Joan Little and Inez Garcia¿whose ordeals have receded into historical memory, considering a range of questions arising from this thematic nexus. For instance, in what ways are sexual transgressions racialized and gendered? What are the practical and theoretical ramifications of the seemingly inextricable conjunction of sex and violence in legal and popular discourse? And what insights might such spectacles afford when broached as an arena in which sexual meanings, identities, and practices are refracted and ultimately constructed? We will also examine the role of the pertinent professions in the evolution of these events, in particular how the interplay of law, medicine, psychiatry, and forensic science helped define the shifting boundaries of legality, and how print, radio, and television journalism operated not only in sensationalizing, but also in reflecting, modeling, and shaping prevailing attitudes and behaviors. Our study of this vital facet of our ¿society of the spectacle¿ will draw on a series of compelling secondary readings complemented by a diverse array of primary sources¿from contemporaneous pamphlets and newspaper accounts to photographs, letters, trial testimony, and psychological commentary¿that will enable class members to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of different textual genres, experiment with alternative methods of fashioning historical interpretations, and contemplate the ways history might be employed to illuminate the persistent problems of racial bias, reflexive sexualization, and the packaging of trials as mass entertainment in the present day.
Last offered: Winter 2016 | Units: 5

AMSTUD 130A: In Sickness and In Health: Medicine and Society in the United States: 1800-Present

Explores the history of medical institutions, ideas and practices in the United States from the early nineteenth century to the present. How are ideas of illness and health historically rooted and socially constructed? How did scientific and medical discoveries lead to the rise of scientific medicine, and how were these innovations adopted within the American cultural landscape? Topics include the transformation of therapeutics and technologies, medicine and the scientific ideal in the U.S., gender and race and medicine, the history of public health, and the professionalization and specialization of American medical practice.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

AMSTUD 156H: Women and Medicine in US History: Women as Patients, Healers and Doctors (FEMGEN 156H)

This course explores ideas about women's bodies in sickness and health, as well as women's encounters with lay and professional healers in the United States from the eighteenth century to the present. We begin with healthy women and explore ideas about women's life cycle in the past, including women's sexuality, the history of birth control, abortion, childbirth, and aging. We then turn to the history of women healers including midwives, lay physicians, professional physicians and nurses. Finally, we examine women's illnesses and their treatment as well as the lives of women with disabilities in the past. We will examine differences in women's experience with medicine on the basis of race, ethnicity, sexuality and class. We will relate this history to issues in contemporary medicine, and consider the efforts of women to gain control of their bodies and health care throughout US history.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ANES 203: Evaluating New Health Care Ventures: An Everyone Included Approach

With ever-growing innovation in healthcare, how do investors evaluate and fund new ventures in one of the most diverse, operationally complex and regulated industries? Health care investment is unique in its dynamic evolution across decades of scientific, business and regulatory development. How might patients, providers, technologists, and investors¿which we define as our Stanford Medicine X Everyone Included¿ team model ¿help identify the best opportunities for the health care investor? This course focuses on how health care investors think and make strategic decisions, incorporating both changing financial metrics and qualitative investment theses. This colloquium will feature guest speakers including senior investment professionals, visionary business leaders and passionate new voices such as patient experts that have traditionally been absent from investment decisions. Students enrolling for 2 units prepare a final paper.
| Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 8 units total)

ANES 207: Medical Acupuncture

Acupuncture is part of a comprehensive system of traditional Chinese Medicine developed over the past two millennia. This course reviews the history and theoretical basis of acupuncture for the treatment of various diseases as well as for the alleviation of pain. Issues related to the incorporation of acupuncture into the current health care system and the efficacy of acupuncture in treating various diseases are addressed. Includes practical, hands-on sections.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: ; Golianu, B. (PI)

ANES 208A: Data Science for Digital Health and Precision Medicine

How will digital health, low-cost patient-generated and genomic data enable precision medicine to transform health care? This Everyone Included¿ course from Stanford Medicine X and SHC Clinical Inference will provide an overview of data science principles and showcase real world solutions being created to advance precision medicine through implementation of digital health tools, machine learning and artificial intelligence approaches. This class will feature thought leaders and luminaries who are patients, technologists, providers, researchers and leading innovators from academia and industry. This course is open to undergraduate and graduate students. Lunch will be provided.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 6 units total)

ANES 211: Themes in the History of Science and Medicine

Student lead: What exactly is a diagnosis, and what is the history of that term? Why do Institutional Review Boards exist, and what atrocities in human medical experimentation occurred to prompt their creation? What is the role of narrative, social construction, and storytelling in medicine? This course will shed light on the ways physicians and scholars grapple with these and other important questions through a series of lectures from historians and philosophers of science, as well as bioethicists and scholars of narrative medicine. These perspectives on how scientific knowledge emerges and changes over time offer invaluable insights and frameworks for anyone aspiring to practice medicine or contribute to the collective body of scientific knowledge.
| Units: 1

ANES 281: Medicine in Movies: The Illness Experience

Student lead:: This virtual seminar will introduce students to films, documentaries, and shorts with medical and bioethical themes. Viewings will encourage students to examine their own pre-conceptions and evaluate topics that elucidate illness as subjectively experienced by providers, patients and their families. Movies will be viewed first by students, then class will convene via Zoom for discussion. This type of close viewing will not only allow participants to better answer the existential questions that illness provokes - what does it meant to experience suffering? to heal as well as treat? to contemplate morality? - but also encourages these future providers to incorporate effective communication techniques into their practices.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Berek, J. (PI)

ANES 300A: Anesthesia Operating Room Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: This clerkship provides an introduction to the perioperative anesthetic management of the surgical patient. In this clinical setting, and under close faculty and resident supervision, students have an opportunity to learn and apply the principles of preoperative evaluation of patients, intraoperative monitoring techniques, assessment of vital organ status, pharmacology of anesthetic and related drugs, and immediate postoperative management. In addition, students have ample opportunity to learn and practice a variety of technical skills, including airway management and intravenous cannulation, which will be of value in any clinical specialty. Students are assigned to the operating room at the SUMC. Didactic lectures, clinical conferences, as well as anesthesia simulator course, will be offered throughout the rotation. Students will work closely with pre-assigned faculty and residents during the three-week clerkship. Please note: Visiting students must obtain approval from Ms. Yun Tao prior to applying for this clerkship. Please email requests to yuntao@stanford.edu. PREREQUISITES: A major clerkship in medicine or surgery is strongly recommended. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 4-16, full-time for three weeks. 6 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Phillip Wang, M.D. (650-723-6412). CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Yun Tao (650-724-1706), H-3580, Stanford Hospital. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Anesthesia Grand Rounds at Li Ka Shing Center; Time: 6:45 am. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: Stanford Department of Anesthesia Faculty. LOCATION: SUMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

ANES 300B: Anesthesia Operating Room Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: Exposes students to the administration of anesthetics to surgical patients in the operating room. In this clinical setting, at the PAVAMC and under close faculty and resident supervision, students have an opportunity to learn and apply the principles of preoperative evaluation of patients, intraoperative monitoring techniques, assessment of cardiovascular and respiratory status, and the pharmacology of anesthetic and related drugs. In addition, students have ample opportunity to learn and practice a variety of technical skills, including airway management, endotracheal intubation, and intravenous and intra-arterial cannulation which would be of value in any clinical specialty. Please note: Visiting students must obtain approval from Ms. Yun Tao prior to applying for this clerkship. Please email requests to yuntao@stanford.edu. PREREQUISITES: A major clerkship in medicine or surgery is strongly recommended. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 4-16 full-time for three weeks. 2 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Natasha Funck, M.D. (650-493-5000 ext 64216). CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Yun Tao (650-724-1706), H-3583, Stanford Hospital. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: PAVAHCS, Building 101, Room A3-205, 3rd Floor; Time: 8:30 am. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: VAPAMC Anesthesia Faculty. LOCATION: VAPAHCS.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable 1 times (up to 5 units total)

ANES 300C: Anesthesia Operating Room Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: This clerkship is an introductory course to anesthesiology at the Santa Clara Valley Medical Center. Clerkship students will be active participants during anesthesia cases and perform airway managements, intravenous cannulations, and administration of anesthetic agents. Students should expect considerable experiences with vascular cannulation during the first week of this clerkship. The second week will focus on airway management and administration of anesthesia. Please note: This clerkship accepts students from other medical institutions. In order to avoid overbooking, students who wish to do this clerkship MUST get pre-approval from clerkship director Dr. Lin before registering. Please email requests to yuntao@stanford.edu. PREREQUISITES: A major clerkship in medicine or surgery is strongly recommended. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 4B-12, full-time for 2 weeks or 4 weeks. 1 student per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Mark Lin, M.D. (408-885-2604), mark.lin@hhs.sccgov.org. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Yun Tao (650-724-1706), H-3580, Stanford Hospital. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: SCVMC Department of Anesthesia Room 2M106, Kit Hardin (408) 885-3109; Time: 8:00 am. Please email a short statement explaining what you would like to get out of the rotation and what is your interest in Anesthesia to the Director prior to starting rotation. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: SCVMC Anesthesia Faculty. LOCATION: SCVMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)

ANES 300D: Anesthesia Operating Room Clerkship

VISITING: Closed to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: Three weeks are spent learning theoretical and practical anesthetic fundamentals under the supervision of the anesthesiology staff at the Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, Santa Clara. The student will rotate with several anesthesiologists and thus receive a diverse exposure to anesthesia techniques and plans. Teaching during this rotation is intensive, didactic, and most importantly individualized; resulting in a rotation of value both to those considering anesthesiology as a future subspecialty and those who are not. Students on this clerkship are expected to prepare and deliver a presentation at one of the Departmental Noon Conferences, to prepare on a daily basis a topic for informal discussion with the attending anesthesiologist, and to attend all educational conferences offered by the Stanford University Hospital Anesthesiology Department. Basic textbook and supporting materials will be loaned to the student. An exit interview from the clerkship will be conducted to mutually exchange feedback regarding the rotation. PREREQUISITES: A major clerkship in medicine or surgery is required. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for three weeks. 1 student per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Jonathan Chow, M.D., 408-820-0607 pager. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Yun Tao, 650-724-1706, H-3583, Stanford Hospital. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: KPMC, 710 Lawrence Expressway, Dept 384, Santa Clara, CA 95051, 408-851-3836. Report to Susan Krause; Time: 8:00 am. CALL CODE: 2. OTHER FACULTY: Kaiser Santa Clara Anesthesiologist. LOCATION: KPMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

ANES 306P: Critical Care Core Clerkship

VISITING: Closed to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Required. DESCRIPTION: During this rotation, students provide care for critically ill children at Packard Children's Hospital. The rotation consists of a 3-week block in the NICU or the PICU. The Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) is a busy 36-bed academic unit that teaches students to recognize and care for critically ill children. The patients are comprised of medical, surgical, and trauma patients from within LPCH or by referral from other hospitals throughout Northern California. The medical admissions cover a broad range of disease processes and the surgical patients represent diverse pathologies from general and sub-specialty focused procedures. Students will learn the pathophysiology of critical illness in children, understand the many monitoring devices used in the ICU, and become familiar with the various treatment modalities available for organ failure ranging from mechanical ventilation to ECMO. The basic differences in both pathophysiology and management of critically ill children as compared to adults should also become apparent. The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) offers an intensive experience in the management of premature and acutely ill term neonates admitted from the delivery room, community physicians' offices, and an active referral service that draws from throughout Northern and mid-coastal California. The rotation emphasizes delivery room experience and newborn resuscitation skills, daily management of common newborn problems, and the special follow-up needs of NICU graduates. Exposure to advanced therapies including mechanical ventilation, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, nitric oxide therapy, and hypothermia occurs routinely. An active maternal-fetal medicine service, pediatric surgery, and various pediatric subspecialty services support the NICU. Education in both units will occur via daily morning rounds, caring for patients, scheduled didactic sessions, and interactions with ICU attendings, fellows, and residents. Absences during the 306P clerkship: Students must contact the 306P Clerkship Director to obtain explicit advance approval for any planned absence from the clerkship. Students who anticipate missing a week (i.e., 5 weekdays) or more of the 306P Clerkship are encouraged to reschedule this clerkship during a different period. Unanticipated absences for illness or emergency must be communicated to the Clerkship Director as promptly as possible. Students with more than 2 days of unexcused absences (i.e., 3-5 days) will be required to make up one week at a later date. If the absence is longer, the time will be proportionately increased. Taking extra night or weekend call may not be considered a suitable substitute for missing weekdays during the clerkship. Arrangements to make up missed time must be made by the student with the 306P Clerkship Director. Students who miss either of the half-day-long ICU Medical Student Simulator courses will need to make these experiences up at a later date in order to receive a passing grade for this clerkship. Students who are absent from the Death-and-Debriefing required didactic will need to make up this aspect of the curriculum in order to receive a passing grade for this clerkship. PREREQUISITES: Peds 300A and Surg 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: P1-16, full-time for three weeks. Maximum 3 students per period (2 PICU, 1 NICU). CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: NICU-Christine Johnson, M.D., clcjohns@stanford.edu; PICU-Saraswati Kache, M.D., skache@stanford.edu. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Bernadette F. Carvalho, berniec@stanford.edu. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: PICU: If assigned to Team-A, report to on service Attending physician / PICU fellow in PICU, LPCH Main 420 Team room 4th floor; If assigned to Team-B, report to on service Attending physician / PICU fellow in PICU, LPCH Main 320 Team room 3rd floor, NICU: Report to on service Attending physician / NICU fellow in NICU, LPCH West 2nd floor; Time: TBA. CALL CODE: 4. OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: LPCH.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

ANES 340A: Medical-Surgical Intensive Care Unit Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: Designed to give medical students an in-depth exposure to critical care medicine focusing on advancement to the manger level for complex, critically ill patients. It offers students an opportunity to apply physiologic and pharmacologic principles utilizing sophisticated monitoring techniques to the care of critically ill patients. Students will gain exposure to a variety of primary principal problems. Students will participate in daily rounds in which they will serve as the primary provider for their patients. Students will also spend time with the triage team in which they will respond to rapid response calls, code sepsis calls, and code blues. This component of the rotation will allow the student to experience caring for the undifferentiated patient. Students are closely supervised in total patient care and gain experience in a variety of technical skills including bedside ultrasound, venous access, and arterial access. Students will participate in bedside sedation procedures with the perioperative anesthesia service as needed for the care of their patients. Although pulmonary, hemodynamic, and renal aspects of care are stressed, experience in all phases of surgical and medical patient care are provided. Students wishing to do this clerkship must get approval from Bernadette Carvalho first before registering. PREREQUISITES: Anesthesia 306A for Stanford medical students; Internal Medicine and Surgery core clerkship for visiting students. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for three weeks. 1 student per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Erin Hennessey, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Bernadette F. Carvalho, berniec@stanford.edu. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: E2 300P (Medical-Surgical ICU at Stanford); Time: 6:00 am. CALL CODE: 4. OTHER FACULTY: R. Asklakson, G. Dhillon, J. Levitt, J. Lorenzo, F. Mihm, T. Mitarai, P. Mohabir, R. Pearl, M. Ramsay, N. Rizk, A. Rogers, S. Ruoss, A. Weinacker, J. Wilson. LOCATION: SUMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

ANES 340B: Medical-Surgical Intensive Care Unit Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: This clerkship provides experience managing adult patients in a critical care unit at the Palo Alto Veterans Administration Hospital Medical-Surgical ICU Service. Students learn how to optimize care for the acutely ill patient and the multidisciplinary approach to complex patients. The patients admitted to the ICU represent a variety of service lines including primary medicine, neurolology, neurosurgery, general surgery, and cardiothoracic surgery. Teaching emphasizes the review of basic organ physiology, the ability to determine the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in critical illness, and the formulation of a physiologic based treatment plan. Students gain experience with the implementation of monitoring and therapeutic devices used in the intensive care units and begin to become adept at the evaluation, stabilization and management of the most critically ill patients expected to be encountered in today's acute care hospitals. Ward rounds, bedside evaluation and treatment, and individual interactions with attending, fellows and residents are part of the educational process. Students will participate in emergency teams, code teams, and in-situ simulation events. Students wishing to do this clerkship must get approval from Bernadette Carvalho first before registering. PREREQUISITES: Anesthesia 306A for Stanford medical students; Internal Medicine and Surgery core clerkship for visiting students. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for three weeks. 1 student per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Juliana Barr, M.D., 650-493-5000 x64452, Building 1, Room F315, PAVAMC 112A. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Bernadette F. Carvalho, berniec@stanford.edu. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: PAVAMC, MSICU, 3rd Floor; Time: 6:00 am. CALL CODE: 4. OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: PAVAMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

ANTHRO 30N: Does Science Have Culture?

In this course students will engage with the anthropology of science and medicine to explore the how cultural norms shape scientific understandings. Through a series of diverse global case studies, seminar participants will assess how historical conditions yield political possibilities that inflect discoveries. Lastly, students will probe how cultural understandings of nature, human difference and national esteem influence how scientific facts come to cohere as reflections of the societies in which they emerge.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: ; Fullwiley, D. (PI)

ANTHRO 82: Medical Anthropology (ANTHRO 282, HUMBIO 176A)

Emphasis is on how health, illness, and healing are understood, experienced, and constructed in social, cultural, and historical contexts. Topics: biopower and body politics, gender and reproductive technologies, illness experiences, medical diversity and social suffering, and the interface between medicine and science.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 82P: The Literature of Psychosis (HUMBIO 162L, PSYC 82, PSYC 282)

One of the great gifts of literature is its ability to give us insight into the internal worlds of others. This is particularly true of that state clinicians call "psychosis." But psychosis is a complex concept. It can be terrifying and devastating for patients and families, and yet shares characteristics with other, less pathological states, such as mysticism and creativity. How then can we begin to make sense of it? In this course, we will examine the first-hand experience of psychosis. We will approach it from multiple perspectives, including clinical descriptions, works of art, and texts by writers ranging from Shakespeare, to the science fiction writer Philip K. Dick, to patients attempting to describe their experience. This class is not only for students thinking of careers in medicine, psychology or anthropology, but also readers and writers interested exploring extraordinary texts. There are no prerequisites necessary; all that is needed is a love of language and a curiosity about the secrets of other minds.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: ; Mason, D. (PI)

ANTHRO 119B: Tech Ethics and Ethnography: the human in human-computer interaction

Do machines have culture? How do engineers write themselves into their products? Can we better anticipate the unexpected and unwanted consequences of technologies?nnTaking as its point of departure the discipline of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), which examines the design and use of computer technology, this course shifts the focus to the humans creating and utilizing the technology. It invites us to think about computer science and social science together and learn how ethnographic methods can be utilized for ethical thinking and design in technology. This course will combine rigorous theoretical thinking with hands-on in-the-field research. Students will devise and engage in their own ethnographic research projects. This course will be of interest to students from a wide range of disciplines, including: computer science, engineering, medicine, anthropology, sociology, and the humanities. Our aim is to have a truly interdisciplinary and open-ended discussion about one of the most pressing social issues of our time, while giving students skills-based training in qualitative methods.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | Units: 3-5

ANTHRO 137A: Traditional Medicine in the Modern World

This class considers "traditional medicine" in contemporary times. We will survey major systems of traditional medicine while considering their broader social, cultural, and political contexts. The class will study the symbolic uses of traditional medicine, the role of traditional medicines in early modern medical knowledge, the place of indigenous knowledge in bioprospecting, health-seeking behavior and medical pluralism, and the WHO's approach to traditional medicine and how it has affected government health policies. The class emphasizes a critical approach to the concepts of tradition and modernity, and an understanding of traditional medicine as a changing, flexible, and globalized category of healing.
| Units: 3

ANTHRO 138: Medical Ethics in a Global World: Examining Race, Difference and Power in the Research Enterprise (ANTHRO 238, CSRE 138)

This course will explore historical as well as current market transformations of medical ethics in different global contexts. We will examine various aspects of the research enterprise, its knowledge-generating and life-saving goals, as well as the societal, cultural, and political influences that make medical research a site of brokering in need of oversight and emergent ethics.nThis seminar will provide students with tools to explore and critically assess the various technical, social, and ethical positions of researchers, as well as the role of the state, the media, and certain publics in shaping scientific research agendas. We will also examine how structural violence, poverty, global standing, and issues of citizenship also influence issues of consent and just science and medicine.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-ER

ANTHRO 139C: Anthropology of Global Health

Global health has been the contested realm of theoretical debates and praxis in medical anthropology. Rationalities behind global health projects reflected the predominant mode of envisioning health in specific historical moments.nn· In this course, we will first assess the ways in which memories, materiality and institutions of the colonial past persist in the field of global health in Africa.nn· Secondly, we will explore how early medical anthropologists participated in international health projects in order to facilitate implementation of the Western biomedicine in developing countries by investigating cultural barriers under the post-war regime of international development in the efforts of controlling malaria and HIV/AIDS in Latin America. nn· Thirdly, we will examine achievements and limitations of subsequent critical medical anthropologists¿ shift of the focus of analysis on global health from culture to structure, larger political economic conditions that produced vast health inequalities around the world, including World Bank policies under the Cold War and neoliberal reforms that increased the prevalence of TB and other diseases in post-socialist contexts nn· Finally, we will question previous anthropological discourses on global health and propose potential insights by understanding moral imaginations of contemporary global health participants such as WHO or Gates Foundation and humanitarian medicine such as MSF, and continuities and discontinuities of colonial and developmental past in current global health movement.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | Units: 5

ANTHRO 171: The Biology and Evolution of Language (ANTHRO 271)

Lecture course surveying the biology, linguistic functions, and evolution of the organs of speech and speech centers in the brain, language in animals and humans, the evolution of language itself, and the roles of innateness vs. culture in language. Suitable both for general education and as preparation for further studies in anthropology, biology, linguistics, medicine, psychology, and speech & language therapy. Anthropology concentration: CS, EE. No prerequisites.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

ANTHRO 175: Human Skeletal Anatomy (ANTHRO 275, BIO 174, BIO 274, HUMBIO 180)

Study of the human skeleton (a. k. a. human osteology), as it bears on other disciplines, including medicine, forensics, archaeology, and paleoanthropology (human evolution). Basic bone biology, anatomy, and development, emphasizing hands-on examination and identification of human skeletal parts, their implications for determining an individual's age, sex, geographic origin, and health status, and for the evolutionary history of our species. Three hours of lecture and at least three hours of supervised and independent study in the lab each week.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

ANTHRO 176: Cultures, Minds, and Medicine (ANTHRO 276)

This workshop aims to bring together scholars from the social sciences, humanities, medicine and bio-science and technology to explore the ways that health and illness are made through complex social forces. We aim for informal, interactive sessions, full of debate and good will. Dates of meetings will be listed in the notes section in the time schedule.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | Units: 1 | Repeatable 6 times (up to 6 units total)

ANTHRO 178B: History of Medicine

This seminar course will examine medical successes and failures to better understand the politics, economics, and sociality of medicine as a practice and a culture. Examples will be drawn from technical developments such as vaccines; methodological innovations such as randomized control trials; and the study of specific diseases such as yellow fever, cancer, hepatitis, and HIV/AIDS.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

ANTHRO 238: Medical Ethics in a Global World: Examining Race, Difference and Power in the Research Enterprise (ANTHRO 138, CSRE 138)

This course will explore historical as well as current market transformations of medical ethics in different global contexts. We will examine various aspects of the research enterprise, its knowledge-generating and life-saving goals, as well as the societal, cultural, and political influences that make medical research a site of brokering in need of oversight and emergent ethics.nThis seminar will provide students with tools to explore and critically assess the various technical, social, and ethical positions of researchers, as well as the role of the state, the media, and certain publics in shaping scientific research agendas. We will also examine how structural violence, poverty, global standing, and issues of citizenship also influence issues of consent and just science and medicine.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 5

ANTHRO 271: The Biology and Evolution of Language (ANTHRO 171)

Lecture course surveying the biology, linguistic functions, and evolution of the organs of speech and speech centers in the brain, language in animals and humans, the evolution of language itself, and the roles of innateness vs. culture in language. Suitable both for general education and as preparation for further studies in anthropology, biology, linguistics, medicine, psychology, and speech & language therapy. Anthropology concentration: CS, EE. No prerequisites.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | Units: 4-5

ANTHRO 275: Human Skeletal Anatomy (ANTHRO 175, BIO 174, BIO 274, HUMBIO 180)

Study of the human skeleton (a. k. a. human osteology), as it bears on other disciplines, including medicine, forensics, archaeology, and paleoanthropology (human evolution). Basic bone biology, anatomy, and development, emphasizing hands-on examination and identification of human skeletal parts, their implications for determining an individual's age, sex, geographic origin, and health status, and for the evolutionary history of our species. Three hours of lecture and at least three hours of supervised and independent study in the lab each week.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 5

ANTHRO 276: Cultures, Minds, and Medicine (ANTHRO 176)

This workshop aims to bring together scholars from the social sciences, humanities, medicine and bio-science and technology to explore the ways that health and illness are made through complex social forces. We aim for informal, interactive sessions, full of debate and good will. Dates of meetings will be listed in the notes section in the time schedule.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | Units: 1 | Repeatable 6 times (up to 6 units total)

ANTHRO 282: Medical Anthropology (ANTHRO 82, HUMBIO 176A)

Emphasis is on how health, illness, and healing are understood, experienced, and constructed in social, cultural, and historical contexts. Topics: biopower and body politics, gender and reproductive technologies, illness experiences, medical diversity and social suffering, and the interface between medicine and science.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 5

ANTHRO 340A: Fit: The Anthropology of Sports, Medicine, and Debility

Sport has long been a domain in which everyday people, medical professionals and political authorities have interfaced with the making of institutional definitions and social norms regarding fitness and debility. This course will challenge students to reflect on that interface through consideration of recent research findings within sociocultural anthropology and allied fields.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 5

ANTHRO 348B: Bodies, Technologies, and Natures in Africa (AFRICAST 249, HISTORY 349)

This interdisciplinary course explores how modern African histories, bodies, and natures have been entangled with technological activities. Viewing Africans as experts and innovators, we consider how technologies have mediated, represented, or performed power in African societies. Topics include infrastructure, extraction, medicine, weapons, communications, sanitation, and more. Themes woven through the course include citizenship, mobility, labor, bricolage, in/formal economies, and technopolitical geographies, among others. Readings draw from history, anthropology, geography, and social/cultural theory.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | Units: 4-5

ANTHRO 350A: Writing as Intervention: Science, Medicine, and Ethics in Today's World

In this course we will explore contemporary issues of culture and power rooted in science, medicine, technology and futurist proposals to better the human condition with technological fixes. We will investigate anthropological and ethnographic-based theories and methods to propose alternative ethical solutions. These readings will be rooted in examining global stratification, economic metrics of progress, and the routinization of human degradation ranging from norms around sexual power, labor exploits, privacy infringements, data sharing, and automation.nnThe course will be structured as a writing workshop with frequent, short writing assignments to be shared with others in the course. The workshop format will facilitate the course goal of each student producing at least one publishable op-ed, article or other product of intervention at the end of the quarter.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 5

ARTHIST 116N: Making Sense of the World: Art, Medicine, and Science in Venice

In 1500 Venice was the place you wanted to be. It wasn't just the capital of the world: it was also its scientific center. This course explores the conversation between the arts and the sciences in Renaissance Venice, and, thanks to remote teaching, it will do so from Venice! Students will discover the oldest anatomical theatre and many of Venice's arresting paintings to reflect on the blurred distinction between art and science, questioning if such a divide makes sense today.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Lugli, E. (PI)

ASNAMST 287: Survey of Asian Health Issues (MED 287)

In this lecture series, students will explore Asian health topics. Specifically, the chronic disease risk and burden of Asians in the U.S. as a group is considered. Additionally, the necessity of the practice of disaggregation in the study and treatment of Asian Americans is emphasized. Topics will include cardiovascular disease, cancer, population health, precision health, pharmacogenomics and longevity in Asian-Americans. Class format is 30 minute lecture followed by 20 minutes for questions. No required readings. Opportunity to connect with guest speakers for research opportunities. Assignments will include short written reflections on lecture topics. This course is relevant for students interested in basic biology research, epidemiology, and public health policy, or clinical careers in medicine, psychology, or social work. Grading is satisfactory/no credit. All students are welcome, limit 25.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | Units: 1

BIO 8S: Introduction to Human Physiology

Normal functioning and pathophysiology of major organ systems: nervous, respiratory, cardiovascular, renal, digestive, and endocrine. Additional topics include integrative physiology, clinical case studies, and applications in genomics-based personalized medicine.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci
Instructors: ; Goeders, C. (PI)

BIO 25Q: Cystic fibrosis: from medical conundrum to precision medicine success story

The class will explore cystic fibrosis (CF), the most prevalent fatal genetic disease in the US, as a scientific and medical whodunit. Through reading and discussion of medical and scientific literature, we will tackle questions that include: how was life expectancy with CF increased from weeks to decades without understanding the disease mechanism? Why is the disease so prevalent? Is there an advantage to being a carrier? Is CF a single disease or a continuum of physiological variation ¿or- what is a disease? How did research into CF lead to discovery of the underlying cause of most other genetic diseases as well?nnThrough critical reading of the scientific and medical literature, class discussion, field trips and meetings with genetic counselors, caregivers, patients, physicians and researchers, we will work to build a deep understanding of this disease, from the biochemical basis to the current controversies over pathogenic mechanisms, treatment strategies and the ethics and economics of genetic testing and astronomical drug costs.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: ; Kopito, R. (PI)

BIO 89SI: Evolutionary Medicine

Why are body systems prone to disease? This course will explore theories about the evolutionary basis of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and psychiatric disease. Students with a background in genetics, physiology, and evolution will synthesize these fields to better understand human health and disease. The course will involve readings from and discussions about the primary literature.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: ; Rosenberg, N. (PI)

BIO 112: Human Physiology (HUMBIO 133)

Human physiology will be examined by organ systems: cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal and endocrine. Molecular and cell biology and signaling principles that underlie organ development, pathophysiology and opportunities for regenerative medicine are discussed, as well as integrative control mechanisms and fetal development. Prerequisite: Human Biology core or Biology Foundations or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIO 168: Explorations in Stem Cell Biology

A discussion-based course for advanced undergraduates. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to key topics in stem cell biology and foster the development of strong scientific writing skills. We will review and discuss some landmark and current primary literature in the stem cell field. Topics will include embryonic and adult stem cells, cellular reprogramming and stem cells in disease and regenerative medicine. Students will present a current research paper in their preferred stem cell topic area and compose a novel research proposal. Prerequisites: Biology or Human Biology core or BIO 82, 83, 86. Satisfies WIM in Biology.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Imam, J. (PI); You, C. (TA)

BIO 174: Human Skeletal Anatomy (ANTHRO 175, ANTHRO 275, BIO 274, HUMBIO 180)

Study of the human skeleton (a. k. a. human osteology), as it bears on other disciplines, including medicine, forensics, archaeology, and paleoanthropology (human evolution). Basic bone biology, anatomy, and development, emphasizing hands-on examination and identification of human skeletal parts, their implications for determining an individual's age, sex, geographic origin, and health status, and for the evolutionary history of our species. Three hours of lecture and at least three hours of supervised and independent study in the lab each week.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIO 193: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Human Health Research (BIOE 193, CHEM 193, CHEMENG 193)

For undergraduate students participating in the Stanford ChEM-H Undergraduate Scholars Program. This course will expose students to interdisciplinary research questions and approaches that span chemistry, engineering, biology, and medicine. Focus is on the development and practice of scientific reading, writing, and presentation skills intended to complement hands-on laboratory research. Students will read scientific articles, write research proposals, make posters, and give presentations.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 1 | Repeatable 11 times (up to 11 units total)

BIO 274: Human Skeletal Anatomy (ANTHRO 175, ANTHRO 275, BIO 174, HUMBIO 180)

Study of the human skeleton (a. k. a. human osteology), as it bears on other disciplines, including medicine, forensics, archaeology, and paleoanthropology (human evolution). Basic bone biology, anatomy, and development, emphasizing hands-on examination and identification of human skeletal parts, their implications for determining an individual's age, sex, geographic origin, and health status, and for the evolutionary history of our species. Three hours of lecture and at least three hours of supervised and independent study in the lab each week.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 5

BIO 292: Curricular Practical Training

This course is required for international students who are participating in professional internships in organizations (e.g. research institutes, education, medicine, business, policy) with a focus in the biological sciences. Students will be engaged in on-the-job training under the guidance of experienced, on-site supervisors. This course meets the requirements for curricular practical training (CPT) for students with F-1D/S status. Prior to the internship, students are required to submit a concise report detailing the proposed project and work activities. After the internship, students are required to submit a summary of the work completed, skills learned, and reflection of the professional growth gained as a result of the internship. This course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Qualified offer of employment and consent of advisor.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

BIO 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIOC 459, BIOE 459, CHEM 459, CHEMENG 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

BIOC 200: Applied Biochemistry

Enrollment limited to MD candidates. Fundamental concepts of biochemistry as applied to clinical medicine. Topics include vitamins and cofactors, metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and nucleotides, and the integration of metabolic pathways. Clinical case studies discussed in small-group, problem-based learning sessions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

BIOC 205: Molecular Foundations of Medicine

For medical students. The course examines the impact of molecular biology on medicine. Topics include DNA replication, recombination, and repair; genomics; gene transcription; protein translation; and proteins in cell decision-making. Medical impact is examined in patient presentations and small group discussions of papers from the medical literature.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

BIOC 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOE 459, CHEM 459, CHEMENG 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

BIODS 215: Topics in Biomedical Data Science: Large-scale inference

The recent explosion of data generated in the fields of biology and medicine has led to many analytical challenges and opportunities for understanding human health. This graduate-level course focuses on methodology for large-scale inference from biomedical data. Topics include one-dimensional and multidimensional probability distributions; hypothesis testing and model comparison; statistical modeling; and prediction. This course will place a special emphasis on applications of these approaches to i) human genetic data; ii) hospital in-patient and health questionnaire data, which is increasingly available with the emergence of large precision initiatives like the UK Biobank and Precision Medicine Initiative; and iii) wearable and social network data.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3

BIODS 220: Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare (BIOMEDIN 220, CS 271)

Healthcare is one of the most exciting application domains of artificial intelligence, with transformative potential in areas ranging from medical image analysis to electronic health records-based prediction and precision medicine. This course will involve a deep dive into recent advances in AI in healthcare, focusing in particular on deep learning approaches for healthcare problems. We will start from foundations of neural networks, and then study cutting-edge deep learning models in the context of a variety of healthcare data including image, text, multimodal and time-series data. In the latter part of the course, we will cover advanced topics on open challenges of integrating AI in a societal application such as healthcare, including interpretability, robustness, privacy and fairness. The course aims to provide students from diverse backgrounds with both conceptual understanding and practical grounding of cutting-edge research on AI in healthcare. Prerequisites: Proficiency in Python or ability to self-learn; familiarity with machine learning and basic calculus, linear algebra, statistics; familiarity with deep learning highly recommended (e.g. prior experience training a deep learning model)..
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4
Instructors: ; Yeung, S. (PI); Hsu, J. (GP)

BIODS 240: Race, Data Algorithms, and Health (BIOMEDIN 240)

This course studies the interplay between race, data and algorithms in healthcare. The particular viewpoint we want to take is to understand the role of data, data analysis and algorithms in supporting equitable delivery of health care to members of all races. Topics as "representative data", "machine bias", "algorithmic fairness" are going to be central to the discussion. However, we want to stress the uniqueness of the "medicine/health care" viewpoint. For example, while in contexts as loan applications, it is normative that race information (or its proxies) not to be included among the variables used for decision, in healthcare, information on race is routinely collected in the attempt to provide "best" care. One of the goals of the class will be to understand what are the differences between biological populations and social environments that a doctor needs to be aware of as opposed to overly emphasized or imaginary ones. This will provide a context to understand the challenges that data collection and analysis faces to support equitable care.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Sabatti, C. (PI); Zou, J. (PI)

BIODS 248: Clinical Trial Design in the Age of Precision Medicine and Health (BIODS 248P, BIOMEDIN 248, STATS 248)

Overview of requirements, designs, and statistical foundations for traditional Phase I, II, and III clinical trials for medical product approval and Phase IV postmarketing studies for safety evaluation. As these methods cost too much and take too much time in the era of precision medicine and precision health, this course then introduces innovative designs that have been developed for affordable clinical trials, which can be completed within reasonable time constraints and which have been encouraged by regulatory agencies. Prerequisites: Working knowledge of statistics and R.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

BIODS 248P: Clinical Trial Design in the Age of Precision Medicine and Health (BIODS 248, BIOMEDIN 248, STATS 248)

Overview of requirements, designs, and statistical foundations for traditional Phase I, II, and III clinical trials for medical product approval and Phase IV postmarketing studies for safety evaluation. As these methods cost too much and take too much time in the era of precision medicine and precision health, this course then introduces innovative designs that have been developed for affordable clinical trials, which can be completed within reasonable time constraints and which have been encouraged by regulatory agencies. Prerequisites: Working knowledge of statistics and R.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

BIODS 388: Stakeholder Competencies for Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare (BIOMEDIN 388)

Advancements of machine learning and AI into all areas of medicine are now a reality and they hold the potential to transform healthcare and open up a world of incredible promise for everyone. But we will never realize the potential for these technologies unless all stakeholders have basic competencies in both healthcare and machine learning concepts and principles - this will allow successful, responsible development and deployment of these systems into the healthcare domain. The focus of this course is on the key concepts and principles rather than programming or engineering implementation. Those with backgrounds in healthcare, health policy, healthcare system leadership, pharmaceutical, and clinicians as well as those with data science backgrounds who are new to healthcare applications will be empowered with the knowledge to responsibly and ethically evaluate, critically review, and even use these technologies in healthcare. We will cover machine learning approaches, medical use cases in depth, unique metrics to healthcare, important challenges and pitfalls, and best practices for designing, building, and evaluating machine learning in healthcare applications.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3

BIOE 10SC: Needs Finding in Healthcare

Are you on an engineering pathway, but trying to decide if opportunities in healthcare might be of interest to you? Or, are you committed to a career in healthcare, but eager to explore how to incorporate technology innovation into your plans? In either case, Needs Finding in Healthcare is the Sophomore College for you!nnMany courses offered during the regular academic year provide students with the opportunity to understand healthcare problems and invent new technologies to address them. But none give undergraduates the chance to observe the delivery of healthcare in the real world and identify important unmet needs for themselves¿until now! nnNeeds Finding in Healthcare is a new Sophomore College program offered by Professor Paul Yock and the Stanford Biodesign team. We¿re looking for students who are passionate about innovation and interested in how technology can be applied to help make healthcare better for patients everywhere. Over three weeks, you¿ll spend time: learning the fundamentals of the biodesign innovation process for health technology innovation, performing first-hand observations of care delivery in the Stanford¿s hospital and clinics ¿ specifically in surgery and the emergency room ¿ to identify compelling unmet needs, conducting background research and interacting with physicians and patients to understand and prioritize those needs, and brainstorming and building early-stage prototypes to enhance your understanding of the unmet need and critical requirements for solving it. nnIn addition, you¿ll meet experienced innovators from the health technology field and explore different career pathways in this dynamic space. Join us if you want to make a difference at the intersection of medicine and engineering!nnOther requirements/information:nnOver the summer, students will be need to work with Stanford Biodesign to gain medical clearance to perform observations in the Stanford Hospital and Clinics. This will involve completing required paperwork, submitting vaccination records, and making a trip to the School of Medicine badging office. Complete instructions and important deadlines will be provided upon acceptance into the program.
| Units: 2

BIOE 91B: Race in Technology (AFRICAAM 51B, CEE 151B, COMM 51B, CSRE 51B, HUMBIO 71B, STS 51B)

What are the roles of race and racism in science, technology, and medicine? 3-course sequence; each quarter can be taken independently. Winter quarter focuses on technology. How do race and racism affect the design and social impact of technology, broadly defined? Can new or different technology help to reduce racial bias? Invited speakers will address the role of race in such issues as energy infrastructure, nuclear arms control, algorithmic accountability, machine learning, artificial intelligence, and synthetic biology. Talks will take a variety of forms, ranging from panel discussions to interviews and lectures. Weekly assignments: read a related article and participate in an online discussion.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

BIOE 91C: Race in Medicine (AFRICAAM 51C, CEE 151C, CSRE 51C, HUMBIO 71C, STS 51C)

What are the roles of race and racism in science, technology, and medicine? 3-course sequence; each quarter can be taken independently. Spring quarter focuses on medicine. How do race and racism affect medical research and medical care? What accounts for health disparities among racial groups? What are the history, ethics, legal, and social issues surrounding racialized medical experiments and treatments? Invited speakers will address these and other issues. Talks will take a variety of forms: conversations, interviews, panels, and others. Weekly assignments: read a related article and participate in an online discussion.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Edwards, P. (PI)

BIOE 131: Ethics in Bioengineering (ETHICSOC 131X)

Bioengineering focuses on the development and application of new technologies in the biology and medicine. These technologies often have powerful effects on living systems at the microscopic and macroscopic level. They can provide great benefit to society, but they also can be used in dangerous or damaging ways. These effects may be positive or negative, and so it is critical that bioengineers understand the basic principles of ethics when thinking about how the technologies they develop can and should be applied. On a personal level, every bioengineer should understand the basic principles of ethical behavior in the professional setting. This course will involve substantial writing, and will use case-study methodology to introduce both societal and personal ethical principles, with a focus on practical applications.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER
Instructors: ; Endy, D. (PI); Magnus, D. (PI)

BIOE 193: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Human Health Research (BIO 193, CHEM 193, CHEMENG 193)

For undergraduate students participating in the Stanford ChEM-H Undergraduate Scholars Program. This course will expose students to interdisciplinary research questions and approaches that span chemistry, engineering, biology, and medicine. Focus is on the development and practice of scientific reading, writing, and presentation skills intended to complement hands-on laboratory research. Students will read scientific articles, write research proposals, make posters, and give presentations.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 1 | Repeatable 11 times (up to 11 units total)

BIOE 217: Translational Bioinformatics (BIOMEDIN 217, CS 275, GENE 217)

Computational methods for the translation of biomedical data into diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications in medicine. Topics: multi-scale omics data generation and analysis, utility and limitations of public biomedical resources, machine learning and data mining, issues and opportunities in drug discovery, and mobile/digital health solutions. Case studies and course project. Prerequisites: programming ability at the level of CS 106A and familiarity with biology and statistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4

BIOE 222: Physics and Engineering Principles of Multi-modality Molecular Imaging of Living Subjects (RAD 222)

Physics and Engineering Principles of Multi-modality Molecular Imaging of Living Subjects (RAD 222A). Focuses on instruments, algorithms and other technologies for non-invasive imaging of molecular processes in living subjects. Introduces research and clinical molecular imaging modalities, including PET, SPECT, MRI, Ultrasound, Optics, and Photoacoustics. For each modality, lectures cover the basics of the origin and properties of imaging signal generation, instrumentation physics and engineering of signal detection, signal processing, image reconstruction, image data quantification, applications of machine learning, and applications of molecular imaging in medicine and biology research.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

BIOE 229: Advanced Research Topics in Multi-modality Molecular Imaging of Living Subjects

Covers advanced topics and controversies in molecular imaging in the understanding of biology and disease. Lectures will include discussion on instrumentation, probes and bioassays. Topics will address unmet needs for visualization and quantification of molecular pathways in biology as well as for diagnosis and disease management. Areas of unmet clinical needs include those in oncology, neurology, cardiovascular medicine and musculoskeletal diseases. The aim is to identify important problems and controversies in a field and address them by providing background and relevance through review of the relevant primary literature, and then proposing and evaluating innovative imaging strategies that are designed to address the problem. The organization of lectures is similar to the thought process that is necessary for writing an NIH grant proposal in which aims are proposed and supported by background and relevance. The innovation of proposed approaches will be highlighted. An aim of the course is to inform students on how to creatively think about a problem and propose a solution focusing on the key elements of writing a successful grant proposal. Prerequisites: none.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Units: 3-4

BIOE 236: Biophysical Mechanisms of Innate Immunity

Course Description: The innate immune system provides our first line of defense against infections of all kinds as well as cancer; and dysregulation of innate immunity underlies autoimmune conditions. Innate immune effectors, e.g. host defense peptides are deployed by many cell types (neutrophils, macrophages, NK cells, epithelial cells, keratinocytes, others) and attack by biophysical mechanisms. Using primary literature, we will discuss the breadth, evolution, structures, mechanisms, and functions of key cellular and molecular innate immune effectors. Appropriate for grad students and advanced undergrads with knowledge of biochemistry, molecular/cellular biology, biophysics, and/or bioengineering. Objectives: This course teaches key biophysical aspects and mechanisms of the human innate immune system and its cellular and molecular effectors. We discuss the current understanding and hypotheses for how misregulation of innate immunity contribute to inflammatory and autoimmune conditions. Students gain individualized, mentored experience in creative planning and writing of a technical paper on an intriguing topic in medicine using primary literature as a resource, and practice giving lectures about the results of their research to their peers.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Barron, A. (PI)

BIOE 279: Computational Biology: Structure and Organization of Biomolecules and Cells (BIOMEDIN 279, BIOPHYS 279, CME 279, CS 279)

Computational techniques for investigating and designing the three-dimensional structure and dynamics of biomolecules and cells. These computational methods play an increasingly important role in drug discovery, medicine, bioengineering, and molecular biology. Course topics include protein structure prediction, protein design, drug screening, molecular simulation, cellular-level simulation, image analysis for microscopy, and methods for solving structures from crystallography and electron microscopy data. Prerequisites: elementary programming background (CS 106A or equivalent) and an introductory course in biology or biochemistry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

BIOE 361: Biomaterials in Regenerative Medicine (MATSCI 381)

Materials design and engineering for regenerative medicine. How materials interact with cells through their micro- and nanostructure, mechanical properties, degradation characteristics, surface chemistry, and biochemistry. Examples include novel materials for drug and gene delivery, materials for stem cell proliferation and differentiation, and tissue engineering scaffolds. Prerequisites: undergraduate chemistry, and cell/molecular biology or biochemistry.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Heilshorn, S. (PI)

BIOE 390: Introduction to Bioengineering Research (MED 289)

Preference to medical and bioengineering graduate students with first preference given to Bioengineering Scholarly Concentration medical students. Bioengineering is an interdisciplinary field that leverages the disciplines of biology, medicine, and engineering to understand living systems, and engineer biological systems and improve engineering designs and human and environmental health. Students and faculty make presentations during the course. Students expected to make presentations, complete a short paper, read selected articles, and take quizzes on the material.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 5 times (up to 10 units total)

BIOE 393: Bioengineering Departmental Research Colloquium

Required Bioengineering department colloquium for first year Ph.D. and M.S. students. Topics include applications of engineering to biology, medicine, biotechnology, and medical technology, including biodesign and devices, molecular and cellular engineering, regenerative medicine and tissue engineering, biomedical imaging, and biomedical computation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

BIOE 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOC 459, CHEM 459, CHEMENG 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

BIOHOPK 14: Bio-logging and Bio-telemetry

Bio-logging is a rapidly growing discipline that includes diverse fields such as consumer electronics, medicine, and marine biology. The use of animal-attached digital tags is a powerful approach to study the movement and ecology of individuals over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. This course is an introduction to bio-logging methods and analysis. Using whales as a model system, students will learn how use multi-sensor tags to study behavioral biomechanics.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

BIOMEDIN 205: Precision Practice with Big Data

Primarily for M.D. students; open to other graduate students. Provides an overview of how to leverage large amounts of clinical, molecular, and imaging data within hospitals and in cyberspace--big data--to practice medicine more effectively. Lectures by physicians, researchers, and industry leaders survey how the major methods of informatics can help physicians leverage big data to profile disease, to personalize treatment to patients, to predict treatment response, to discover new knowledge, and to challenge established medical dogma and the current paradigm of clinical decision-making based solely on published knowledge and individual physician experience. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: background in biomedicine. Background in computer science can be helpful but not required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

BIOMEDIN 207: Seminar: Health IT in Care Delivery systems

The practice of medicine is reacting quickly to the avalanche of information available from electronic health records and data directly submitted by patients and from the environment. This seminar, comprised of guest lectures from industry and academia, will highlight the practical challenges and successes of how health IT has transformed care delivery programs. The seminar will cover current efforts in clinical decision support, patient-centered design, integration with community care, big data, medical education, and the innovation pipeline for healthcare delivery organizations.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1

BIOMEDIN 215: Data Science for Medicine

The widespread adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) has created a new source of big data namely, the record of routine clinical practice as a by-product of care. This graduate class will teach you how to use EHRs and other patient data to discover new clinical knowledge and improve healthcare. Upon completing this course, you should be able to: differentiate between and give examples of categories of research questions and the study designs used to address them, describe common healthcare data sources and their relative advantages and limitations, extract and transform various kinds of clinical data to create analysis-ready datasets, design and execute an analysis of a clinical dataset based on your familiarity with the workings, applicability, and limitations of common statistical methods, evaluate and criticize published research using your knowledge of 1-4 to generate new research ideas and separate hype from reality. Prerequisites: CS 106A or equivalent, STATS 60 or equivalent. Recommended: STATS 216, CS 145, STATS 305
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

BIOMEDIN 217: Translational Bioinformatics (BIOE 217, CS 275, GENE 217)

Computational methods for the translation of biomedical data into diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications in medicine. Topics: multi-scale omics data generation and analysis, utility and limitations of public biomedical resources, machine learning and data mining, issues and opportunities in drug discovery, and mobile/digital health solutions. Case studies and course project. Prerequisites: programming ability at the level of CS 106A and familiarity with biology and statistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4

BIOMEDIN 220: Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare (BIODS 220, CS 271)

Healthcare is one of the most exciting application domains of artificial intelligence, with transformative potential in areas ranging from medical image analysis to electronic health records-based prediction and precision medicine. This course will involve a deep dive into recent advances in AI in healthcare, focusing in particular on deep learning approaches for healthcare problems. We will start from foundations of neural networks, and then study cutting-edge deep learning models in the context of a variety of healthcare data including image, text, multimodal and time-series data. In the latter part of the course, we will cover advanced topics on open challenges of integrating AI in a societal application such as healthcare, including interpretability, robustness, privacy and fairness. The course aims to provide students from diverse backgrounds with both conceptual understanding and practical grounding of cutting-edge research on AI in healthcare. Prerequisites: Proficiency in Python or ability to self-learn; familiarity with machine learning and basic calculus, linear algebra, statistics; familiarity with deep learning highly recommended (e.g. prior experience training a deep learning model)..
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4
Instructors: ; Yeung, S. (PI); Hsu, J. (GP)

BIOMEDIN 225: Data Driven Medicine: Lectures

Lectures for BIOMEDIN 215.With the spread of electronic health records and increasingly low cost assays for patient molecular data, powerful data repositories with tremendous potential for biomedical research, clinical care and personalized medicine are being built. But these databases are large and difficult for any one specialist to analyze. To find the hidden associations within the full set of data, we introduce methods for data-mining at the internet scale, the handling of large-scale electronic medical records data for machine learning, methods in natural language processing and text-mining applied to medical records, methods for using ontologies for the annotation and indexing of unstructured content as well as semantic web technologies. Prerequisites: familiarity with statistics (STATS 216) and biology.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | Units: 2

BIOMEDIN 240: Race, Data Algorithms, and Health (BIODS 240)

This course studies the interplay between race, data and algorithms in healthcare. The particular viewpoint we want to take is to understand the role of data, data analysis and algorithms in supporting equitable delivery of health care to members of all races. Topics as "representative data", "machine bias", "algorithmic fairness" are going to be central to the discussion. However, we want to stress the uniqueness of the "medicine/health care" viewpoint. For example, while in contexts as loan applications, it is normative that race information (or its proxies) not to be included among the variables used for decision, in healthcare, information on race is routinely collected in the attempt to provide "best" care. One of the goals of the class will be to understand what are the differences between biological populations and social environments that a doctor needs to be aware of as opposed to overly emphasized or imaginary ones. This will provide a context to understand the challenges that data collection and analysis faces to support equitable care.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Sabatti, C. (PI); Zou, J. (PI)

BIOMEDIN 248: Clinical Trial Design in the Age of Precision Medicine and Health (BIODS 248, BIODS 248P, STATS 248)

Overview of requirements, designs, and statistical foundations for traditional Phase I, II, and III clinical trials for medical product approval and Phase IV postmarketing studies for safety evaluation. As these methods cost too much and take too much time in the era of precision medicine and precision health, this course then introduces innovative designs that have been developed for affordable clinical trials, which can be completed within reasonable time constraints and which have been encouraged by regulatory agencies. Prerequisites: Working knowledge of statistics and R.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 3

BIOMEDIN 260: Computational Methods for Biomedical Image Analysis and Interpretation (CS 235, RAD 260)

The latest biological and medical imaging modalities and their applications in research and medicine. Focus is on computational analytic and interpretive approaches to optimize extraction and use of biological and clinical imaging data for diagnostic and therapeutic translational medical applications. Topics include major image databases, fundamental methods in image processing and quantitative extraction of image features, structured recording of image information including semantic features and ontologies, indexing, search and content-based image retrieval. Case studies include linking image data to genomic, phenotypic and clinical data, developing representations of image phenotypes for use in medical decision support and research applications and the role that biomedical imaging informatics plays in new questions in biomedical science. Includes a project. Enrollment for 3 units requires instructor consent. Prerequisites: programming ability at the level of CS 106A, familiarity with statistics, basic biology. Knowledge of Matlab or Python highly recommended.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4

BIOMEDIN 279: Computational Biology: Structure and Organization of Biomolecules and Cells (BIOE 279, BIOPHYS 279, CME 279, CS 279)

Computational techniques for investigating and designing the three-dimensional structure and dynamics of biomolecules and cells. These computational methods play an increasingly important role in drug discovery, medicine, bioengineering, and molecular biology. Course topics include protein structure prediction, protein design, drug screening, molecular simulation, cellular-level simulation, image analysis for microscopy, and methods for solving structures from crystallography and electron microscopy data. Prerequisites: elementary programming background (CS 106A or equivalent) and an introductory course in biology or biochemistry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

BIOMEDIN 304: Clinical Experience Seminar for Students in Biomedical Informatics

This seminar is intended to expose Biomedical Informatics graduate students to clinical environments where informatics is being applied. Students will shadow clinical care and interact with physicians and other allied health professionals throughout Stanford Healthcare and Stanford Children's Health during weekly sessions. Students will be asked to reflect on their experiences and discuss future applications to informatics projects. Preference will be given to senior students. Requires Course Director approval for enrollment - students should register 30 days prior to the first day of class for consideration. Prerequisites: School of Medicine HIPAA Training; Occupational Health clearance; SHC Compliance Attestation. All prerequisites must be submitted 2 weeks before the 1st day in order to ensure hospital compliance.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 1

BIOMEDIN 371: Computational Biology in Four Dimensions (BIOPHYS 371, CME 371, CS 371)

Cutting-edge research on computational techniques for investigating and designing the three-dimensional structure and dynamics of biomolecules, cells, and everything in between. These techniques, which draw on approaches ranging from physics-based simulation to machine learning, play an increasingly important role in drug discovery, medicine, bioengineering, and molecular biology. Course is devoted primarily to reading, presentation, discussion, and critique of papers describing important recent research developments. Prerequisite: CS 106A or equivalent, and an introductory course in biology or biochemistry. Recommended: some experience in mathematical modeling (does not need to be a formal course).
Last offered: Winter 2018 | Units: 3

BIOMEDIN 388: Stakeholder Competencies for Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare (BIODS 388)

Advancements of machine learning and AI into all areas of medicine are now a reality and they hold the potential to transform healthcare and open up a world of incredible promise for everyone. But we will never realize the potential for these technologies unless all stakeholders have basic competencies in both healthcare and machine learning concepts and principles - this will allow successful, responsible development and deployment of these systems into the healthcare domain. The focus of this course is on the key concepts and principles rather than programming or engineering implementation. Those with backgrounds in healthcare, health policy, healthcare system leadership, pharmaceutical, and clinicians as well as those with data science backgrounds who are new to healthcare applications will be empowered with the knowledge to responsibly and ethically evaluate, critically review, and even use these technologies in healthcare. We will cover machine learning approaches, medical use cases in depth, unique metrics to healthcare, important challenges and pitfalls, and best practices for designing, building, and evaluating machine learning in healthcare applications.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3

BIOPHYS 279: Computational Biology: Structure and Organization of Biomolecules and Cells (BIOE 279, BIOMEDIN 279, CME 279, CS 279)

Computational techniques for investigating and designing the three-dimensional structure and dynamics of biomolecules and cells. These computational methods play an increasingly important role in drug discovery, medicine, bioengineering, and molecular biology. Course topics include protein structure prediction, protein design, drug screening, molecular simulation, cellular-level simulation, image analysis for microscopy, and methods for solving structures from crystallography and electron microscopy data. Prerequisites: elementary programming background (CS 106A or equivalent) and an introductory course in biology or biochemistry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

BIOPHYS 371: Computational Biology in Four Dimensions (BIOMEDIN 371, CME 371, CS 371)

Cutting-edge research on computational techniques for investigating and designing the three-dimensional structure and dynamics of biomolecules, cells, and everything in between. These techniques, which draw on approaches ranging from physics-based simulation to machine learning, play an increasingly important role in drug discovery, medicine, bioengineering, and molecular biology. Course is devoted primarily to reading, presentation, discussion, and critique of papers describing important recent research developments. Prerequisite: CS 106A or equivalent, and an introductory course in biology or biochemistry. Recommended: some experience in mathematical modeling (does not need to be a formal course).
Last offered: Winter 2018 | Units: 3

BIOS 202: Hippocampal Field Potentials, an Introduction to CNS in Vitro Electrophysiology

Enrollment limited to graduate students in the School of Medicine; undergraduates may enroll with instructor consent. Introduces students to theory and practice of in vitro CNS electrophysiology. Lectures cover basic electrical and electrode theory, hippocampal anatomy, interpretation of these potentials, common pitfalls and misinterpretations, design of experiments using field potentials and other related topics. Practicum is hands on training in obtaining, recording and interpreting field potentials from in vitro hippocampal slices. Students develop skills in data collection, analysis and evaluation, art and design of electrophysiological studies of the brain.
Last offered: Winter 2013 | Units: 1-3

BIOS 234: Personalized Genomic Medicine

Focuses on next-generation sequencing and its implications for personalized genomic medicine. Students gain hands-on experience with popular DNA sequence analysis tools as well as a practical understanding of the underlying algorithms and biomedicine.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | Units: 1

BIOS 243: Stem Cells, Immunology and Regenerative Medicine

This 3-week course covers fundamentals of hematopoiesis and immune system development and how stem cells can be employed to model hematopoiesis and immune system development in health and disease. We will also explore different applications of stem cells in regenerative medicine and immunotherapy. Topics include: stem cells and differentiation, hematopoiesis, lymphopoiesis, thymus development and function, specific immune defects, T-cell immunotherapies, thymic tissue engineering, and stem cells for immunological research.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

BIOS 251: Biotechnology in the Natural World (SBIO 251)

Life can be found in some of the strangest and most inhospitable places of Earth. Whether in hot springs, oceanic depths, or dense rainforests, living organisms must be natural specialists to survive. This course explores a selection of strange and ingenious biomolecules that natural organisms have evolved in order to survive. Lectures will cover historical background as well as detailed investigations of the structure and function of selected biomolecules of interest. The majority of each lecture and discussion will focus on the adaptation of those molecules for fundamental and innovative approaches in modern biotechnology, especially in medicine and biophotonics. Key biophysical and biochemical techniques will be discussed as they are encountered within primary literature.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | Units: 1

BIOS 285: Rodent Animal Models: Selection, Detection, Dissection, Inspection

This 2-week mini-course will discuss pragmatic approaches to rodent utilization with the aim of empowering graduate students across multiple disciplines to maximize rodent-derived data and minimize the redundant use of animals in biomedical research. Topics will include an introduction to clinical models, practical aspects of rodent blood collection and interpretation, algorithmic approaches to tissue collection for research applications, and an introduction to rodent histopathology, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence. Course instructors include board-certified laboratory animal medicine clinicians and comparative pathologists that are expert h these topics. This course is open to graduate students with or without prior rodent experience.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | Units: 1

BIOS 295: Metals in Biology and Medicine: Structure, Reactivity, Maintenance, and Utility

Transition metals play important roles in many key biological processes, from oxygen sensing and transport to chemical transformations critical for making DNA precursors. This course will focus on how metals in enzymes and proteins effect essential functions in biology and medicine. Emphasis is placed on examining how structures enable function, mechanisms of action, maintenance and homeostasis, and therapeutic or diagnostic opportunities. Using examples from the literature as case studies, students will engage in robust discussions that draw on principles from chemistry and biology. The course will appeal to anyone interested in working at the interface of these two disciplines.
| Units: 1

BIOS 297: COVID-19 Pandemic: Lessons Learned

The Covid-19 pandemic has created unprecedented challenges for individuals, society, medicine and science. The SARS-Cov-2 virus rapidly disseminated since first reports from China on December 31, 2019 and by March 11, 2020 it was declared a global pandemicby the World Health Organization. This course will cover various aspects of Covid-19 including clinical perspectives, public health response, impact of disease modeling, and results of clinical trials and research efforts. As the pandemic evolves the course will discuss the most current data and reflect on successes and ongoing challenges as the world grapples with a pandemic of unmatched proportions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Jagannathan, P. (PI)

BIOS 298: Cinematic Discoveries: A movie-based exploration of research rigor, communication and diversity

Through movie depictions of the vaccine discoveries leading to the first Nobel prizes in medicine, the infamous Tuskegee Study, the first heart surgery for Tetralogy of Fallot, the encephalitis lethargica pandemic, and modern oncology trials, the course will explore interdisciplinary work in biomedical sciences, research rigor, consent, stigma and discrimination, researchers¿ and health professionals¿ communication skills, and fundamentals of cinematography. The course will include a lecture, a movie projection and discussion each day for 5 days.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Goodman, S. (PI)

CEE 151A: Race in Science (AFRICAAM 51A, COMM 51A, CSRE 51A, HUMBIO 71A, STS 51A)

What are the roles of race and racism in science, technology, and medicine? 3-course sequence; each quarter can be taken independently. Fall quarter focuses on science. What is the science of race and racism? How does race affect scientific work? Weekly guest speakers will address such issues as the psychology and anthropology of race and racism; how race, language, and culture affect education; race in environmental science and environmental justice; the science of reducing police violence; and the role of race in genomic research. Talks will take a variety of forms, from panel discussions to interviews and lectures. Weekly assignments: read a related article and participate in an online discussion.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

CEE 151B: Race in Technology (AFRICAAM 51B, BIOE 91B, COMM 51B, CSRE 51B, HUMBIO 71B, STS 51B)

What are the roles of race and racism in science, technology, and medicine? 3-course sequence; each quarter can be taken independently. Winter quarter focuses on technology. How do race and racism affect the design and social impact of technology, broadly defined? Can new or different technology help to reduce racial bias? Invited speakers will address the role of race in such issues as energy infrastructure, nuclear arms control, algorithmic accountability, machine learning, artificial intelligence, and synthetic biology. Talks will take a variety of forms, ranging from panel discussions to interviews and lectures. Weekly assignments: read a related article and participate in an online discussion.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

CEE 151C: Race in Medicine (AFRICAAM 51C, BIOE 91C, CSRE 51C, HUMBIO 71C, STS 51C)

What are the roles of race and racism in science, technology, and medicine? 3-course sequence; each quarter can be taken independently. Spring quarter focuses on medicine. How do race and racism affect medical research and medical care? What accounts for health disparities among racial groups? What are the history, ethics, legal, and social issues surrounding racialized medical experiments and treatments? Invited speakers will address these and other issues. Talks will take a variety of forms: conversations, interviews, panels, and others. Weekly assignments: read a related article and participate in an online discussion.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Edwards, P. (PI)

CHEM 10: Exploring Research and Problem Solving Across the Sciences

Development and practice of critical problem solving and study skills using a wide variety of scientific examples that illustrate the broad yet integrated nature of current research. Students will build a problem solving tool-kit and apply chemical and mathematical concepts to solve problems related to energy, climate change, water resources, medicine, and food & nutrition. Note: course offered in August prior to start of fall quarter, and only Leland Scholar Program participants will register.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

CHEM 31M: Chemical Principles: From Molecules to Solids (MATSCI 31)

A one-quarter course for students who have taken chemistry previously. This course will introduce the basic chemical principles that dictate how and why reactions occur and the structure and properties of important molecules and extended solids that make up our world. As the Central Science, a knowledge of chemistry provides a deep understanding of concepts in fields ranging from materials, environmental science, and engineering to pharmacology and metabolism. Discussions of molecular structure will describe bonding models including Lewis structures, resonance, crystal-field theory, and molecular-orbital theory. We will reveal the chemistry of materials of different dimensionality, with emphasis on symmetry, bonding, and electronic structure of molecules and solids. We will also discuss the kinetics and thermodynamics that govern reactivity and dictate solubility and acid-base equilibria. A two-hour weekly laboratory section accompanies the course to introduce laboratory techniques and reiterate lecture concepts through hands-on activities. Specific discussions will include the structure, properties, and applications of molecules used in medicine, perovskites used in solar cells, and the dramatically different properties of materials with the same composition (for example: diamond, graphite, graphene). There will be three lectures, one two-hour laboratory session, and an optional 80-minute problem solving session each week. The course will assume familiarity with stoichiometry, unit conversions, and gas laws. All students who are interested in taking general chemistry at Stanford must take the Autumn 2020 General Chemistry Placement Test before Autumn quarter begins, regardless of chemistry background. Generally students earning an AP chemistry score of 4 or higher place into 31M. Students earning an AP score of 5 are also welcome to take the Autumn 2020 Chemistry 33 Placement Test to see if Chem33 is a more appropriate placement. Same as: MATSCI 31
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

CHEM 33: Structure and Reactivity of Organic Molecules

An introduction to organic chemistry, the molecular foundation to understanding of life, medicine, imaging, energy, and material science. Students will learn structural and bonding models of organic molecules that provide insights into chemical, physical, and reactivity properties, in addition to their biological activities, collectively contributing to the molecularization and thus advancement of many science disciplines. Combining these models with kinetic and thermodynamic analyses allows molecular conversions to be rationalized. Translation of this knowledge to more complex systems enables the synthesis of novel molecules or materials that can positively impact our science, society and environment. A two-hour weekly lab section accompanies the course to introduce the techniques of separation and identification of organic compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 31B or CHEM 31M
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

CHEM 141: The Chemical Principles of Life I

This is the first course in a two-quarter sequence (Chem 141/143), which will examine biological science through the lens of chemistry. In this sequence students will gain a qualitative and quantitative understanding of the molecular logic of cellular processes, which include expression and transmission of the genetic code, enzyme kinetics, biosynthesis, energy storage and consumption, membrane transport, and signal transduction. Connections to foundational principles of chemistry will be made through structure-function analyses of biological molecules. Integrated lessons in structural, mechanistic, and physical chemistry will underscore how molecular science and molecular innovation have impacted biology and medicine. Prerequisites: CHEM 121, MATH 21 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

CHEM 143: The Chemical Principles of Life II

(Not offered in AY2020-21) This is the second course in a two-quarter sequence (Chem 141/143), which will continue the discussion of biological science through the lens of chemistry. In this sequence students will gain a qualitative and quantitative understanding of the molecular logic of cellular processes, which include expression and transmission of the genetic code, enzyme kinetics, biosynthesis, energy storage and consumption, membrane transport, and signal transduction. Connections to foundational principles of chemistry will be made through structure-function analyses of biological molecules. Integrated lessons in structural, mechanistic, and physical chemistry will underscore how molecular science and molecular innovation have impacted biology and medicine. Prerequisite: Chem 141.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 4

CHEM 193: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Human Health Research (BIO 193, BIOE 193, CHEMENG 193)

For undergraduate students participating in the Stanford ChEM-H Undergraduate Scholars Program. This course will expose students to interdisciplinary research questions and approaches that span chemistry, engineering, biology, and medicine. Focus is on the development and practice of scientific reading, writing, and presentation skills intended to complement hands-on laboratory research. Students will read scientific articles, write research proposals, make posters, and give presentations.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 1 | Repeatable 11 times (up to 11 units total)

CHEM 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOC 459, BIOE 459, CHEMENG 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

CHEMENG 10: The Chemical Engineering Profession

Open to all undergraduates. Overview of and careers in chemical engineering; opportunities to develop networks with working professionals. Panel discussions on career paths and post-graduation opportunities available. Areas include biotechnology, electronics, energy, environment, management consulting, nanotechnology, and graduate school in business, law, medicine, and engineering.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Frank, C. (PI); Mason, E. (TA)

CHEMENG 193: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Human Health Research (BIO 193, BIOE 193, CHEM 193)

For undergraduate students participating in the Stanford ChEM-H Undergraduate Scholars Program. This course will expose students to interdisciplinary research questions and approaches that span chemistry, engineering, biology, and medicine. Focus is on the development and practice of scientific reading, writing, and presentation skills intended to complement hands-on laboratory research. Students will read scientific articles, write research proposals, make posters, and give presentations.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 1 | Repeatable 11 times (up to 11 units total)

CHEMENG 459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences (BIO 459, BIOC 459, BIOE 459, CHEM 459, PSYCH 459)

Students register through their affiliated department; otherwise register for CHEMENG 459. For specialists and non-specialists. Sponsored by the Stanford BioX Program. Three seminars per quarter address scientific and technical themes related to interdisciplinary approaches in bioengineering, medicine, and the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. Leading investigators from Stanford and the world present breakthroughs and endeavors that cut across core disciplines. Pre-seminars introduce basic concepts and background for non-experts. Registered students attend all pre-seminars; others welcome. See http://biox.stanford.edu/courses/459.html. Recommended: basic mathematics, biology, chemistry, and physics.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

CHPR 205: Understanding Evidence-Based Medicine: Hands-on experience (EPI 250, MED 250)

How can one practice evidence-based medicine and make evidence-based decisions for clinical practice and policy making? Using pivotal papers published in the recent scientific literature addressing important clinical questions on diverse medical topics, we will probe a wide range of types of studies, types of targeted therapeutic or preventive interventions, and types of studied outcomes (effectiveness and/or safety), including RCTs, observational studies, epidemiologic surveillance studies, systematic reviews-umbrella reviews-meta-analyses-meta-analyses of individual patient data, studies on the evaluation of diagnostic tests and prognostic models, economic analyses studies, and guidelines. Students enrolled for 4 units will complete an additional project or other engagement approved by the instructor. MD studies enroll for +/-. GR students enroll for Letter grade.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4

CHPR 206: Meta-research: Appraising Research Findings, Bias, and Meta-analysis (EPI 206, MED 206, STATS 211)

Open to graduate, medical, and undergraduate students. Appraisal of the quality and credibility of research findings; evaluation of sources of bias. Meta-analysis as a quantitative (statistical) method for combining results of independent studies. Examples from medicine, epidemiology, genomics, ecology, social/behavioral sciences, education. Collaborative analyses. Project involving generation of a meta-research project or reworking and evaluation of an existing published meta-analysis. Prerequisite: knowledge of basic statistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Ioannidis, J. (PI)

CHPR 230: Sexual Function and Diversity in Medical Disciplines (FEMGEN 230, SOMGEN 230)

This course is a coordinated seminar series that presents evidence-based health promotion and disease prevention guidelines by clinical and translational research and population health science faculty of clinical departments other than Medicine (the focus of CHPR 260) of the Stanford School of Medicine, including; Anesthesiology & Perioperative, & Pain Medicine, Cardiothoracic gy, Emergency Medicine, Neurology & Neurological Sciences, Neurosurgery, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Ophthalmology, Orthopaedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Radiation Oncology, Radiology, Surgery and Urology. CHPR master's program students must enroll in CHPR 230 for a letter grade and priority for enrollment will be given to current CHPR students. For third unit, graduate students attend INDE 215 Queer Health & Medicine and complete assignments for that section. For third unit and WAYs, undergrads enroll in SOMGEN 130. Prerequisites: CHPR 201 or HUMBIO 126/CHPR 226 or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3
Instructors: ; Stefanick, M. (PI)

CHPR 250: Prevention Across Medical Disciplines: Evidence-based Guidelines

Coordinated seminar series presenting evidence-based health promotion and disease prevention guidelines by research and clinical faculty of multiple divisions of Stanford's Department of Medicine, including cardiovascular medicine, oncology, nephrology, immunology and rheumatology, infectious diseases, endocrinology, gerontology and metabolism, gastroenterology and hepatology, hematology, blood and marrow transplantation, pulmonary and critical care medicine, general medical disciplines (including family medicine). Key prevention issues addressed in primary care and outcomes research, biomedical informatics research and the Stanford Prevention Research Center also presented. Enrollment priority given to CHPR Master's students. CHPR students must enroll for letter grade.Prerequisite: CHPR 201 or HUMBIO 126/CHPR 226 or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Stefanick, M. (PI)

CHPR 270: Prevention Across Surgical and Other Medical Disciplines

This course is coordinated seminar series that presents evidence-based health promotion and disease prevention guidelines by clinical and translational research and population health science faculty of clinical departments other than Medicine (the focus of CHPR 260) of the Stanford School of Medicine, including; Anesthesiology & Perioperative, & Pain Medicine, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Dermatology, Emergency Medicine, Neurology & Neurological Sciences, Neurosurgery, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Ophthalmology, Orthopaedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Radiation Oncology, Radiology, Surgery and Urology, CHPR master's program students must enroll for a letter grade and priority for enrollment will be given to current CHPR students. Prerequisites: CHPR 201 or HUMBIO 126/CHPR 226 or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Stefanick, M. (PI)

CLASSICS 14: Greek and Latin Roots of English

(Formerly CLASSGEN 9) Goal is to improve vocabulary, comprehension of written English, and standardized test scores through learning the Greek and Latin components of English. Focus is on patterns and processes in the formation of the lexicon. Terminology used in medicine, business, education, law, and humanities; introduction to principles of language history and etymology. Greek or Latin not required.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3

CLASSICS 34: Ancient Athletics

How the Olympic Games developed and how they were organized. Many other Greek festivals featured sport and dance competitions, including some for women, and showcased the citizen athlete as a civic ideal. Roman athletics in contrast saw the growth of large-scale spectator sports and professional athletes. Some toured like media stars; others regularly risked death in gladiatorial contests and chariot-racing. We will also explore how large-scale games were funded and how they fostered the development of sports medicine. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required; enroll in sections on coursework.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

CLASSICS 124: Ancient and Modern Medicine

Imagine a world where the Universe has a built-in purpose and point. How would this belief impact man's place in nature? Imagine a world where natural substances have "powers." How might this impact diet and pharmacology? Magical vs. scientific healing: a clear divide? Disease and dehumanization: epilepsy, rabies. Physical and mental health: black bile and melancholy. The ethical and scientific assumptions hidden in medical language and imagery. How ancient medicine and modern medicine (especially alternative medicine) illuminate each other.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

CME 106: Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers (ENGR 155C)

Probability: random variables, independence, and conditional probability; discrete and continuous distributions, moments, distributions of several random variables. Numerical simulation using Monte Carlo techniques. Topics in mathematical statistics: random sampling, point estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, non-parametric tests, regression and correlation analyses. Numerous applications in engineering, manufacturing, reliability and quality assurance, medicine, biology, and other fields. Prerequisite: CME100/ENGR154 or Math 51 or 52.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR

CME 279: Computational Biology: Structure and Organization of Biomolecules and Cells (BIOE 279, BIOMEDIN 279, BIOPHYS 279, CS 279)

Computational techniques for investigating and designing the three-dimensional structure and dynamics of biomolecules and cells. These computational methods play an increasingly important role in drug discovery, medicine, bioengineering, and molecular biology. Course topics include protein structure prediction, protein design, drug screening, molecular simulation, cellular-level simulation, image analysis for microscopy, and methods for solving structures from crystallography and electron microscopy data. Prerequisites: elementary programming background (CS 106A or equivalent) and an introductory course in biology or biochemistry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CME 371: Computational Biology in Four Dimensions (BIOMEDIN 371, BIOPHYS 371, CS 371)

Cutting-edge research on computational techniques for investigating and designing the three-dimensional structure and dynamics of biomolecules, cells, and everything in between. These techniques, which draw on approaches ranging from physics-based simulation to machine learning, play an increasingly important role in drug discovery, medicine, bioengineering, and molecular biology. Course is devoted primarily to reading, presentation, discussion, and critique of papers describing important recent research developments. Prerequisite: CS 106A or equivalent, and an introductory course in biology or biochemistry. Recommended: some experience in mathematical modeling (does not need to be a formal course).
Last offered: Winter 2018 | Units: 3

COMM 51A: Race in Science (AFRICAAM 51A, CEE 151A, CSRE 51A, HUMBIO 71A, STS 51A)

What are the roles of race and racism in science, technology, and medicine? 3-course sequence; each quarter can be taken independently. Fall quarter focuses on science. What is the science of race and racism? How does race affect scientific work? Weekly guest speakers will address such issues as the psychology and anthropology of race and racism; how race, language, and culture affect education; race in environmental science and environmental justice; the science of reducing police violence; and the role of race in genomic research. Talks will take a variety of forms, from panel discussions to interviews and lectures. Weekly assignments: read a related article and participate in an online discussion.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

COMM 51B: Race in Technology (AFRICAAM 51B, BIOE 91B, CEE 151B, CSRE 51B, HUMBIO 71B, STS 51B)

What are the roles of race and racism in science, technology, and medicine? 3-course sequence; each quarter can be taken independently. Winter quarter focuses on technology. How do race and racism affect the design and social impact of technology, broadly defined? Can new or different technology help to reduce racial bias? Invited speakers will address the role of race in such issues as energy infrastructure, nuclear arms control, algorithmic accountability, machine learning, artificial intelligence, and synthetic biology. Talks will take a variety of forms, ranging from panel discussions to interviews and lectures. Weekly assignments: read a related article and participate in an online discussion.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

COMM 177C: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Health and Science Journalism (COMM 277C, EARTHSYS 177C, EARTHSYS 277C)

Practical, collaborative, writing-intensive advanced journalistic reporting and writing course in the specific practices and standards of health and science journalism. Science and journalism students learn how to identify and write engaging stories about medicine, global health, science, and related environmental issues; how to assess the quality and relevance of science news; how to cover the health and science beats effectively and efficiently; and how to build bridges between the worlds of journalism and science. Instructed Winter Quarter 2019 by Dr. Seema Yasmin, http://www.seemayasmin.com. nnnLimited enrollment: preference to students enrolled in or considering the Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication Program and the Graduate Journalism Program. Prerequisite: EarthSys 191/291, COMM 104w, or consent of instructor. Admission by application only, available from dr.yasmin@stanford.edu (Meets Earth Systems WIM requirement.)
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5

COMM 277C: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Health and Science Journalism (COMM 177C, EARTHSYS 177C, EARTHSYS 277C)

Practical, collaborative, writing-intensive advanced journalistic reporting and writing course in the specific practices and standards of health and science journalism. Science and journalism students learn how to identify and write engaging stories about medicine, global health, science, and related environmental issues; how to assess the quality and relevance of science news; how to cover the health and science beats effectively and efficiently; and how to build bridges between the worlds of journalism and science. Instructed Winter Quarter 2019 by Dr. Seema Yasmin, http://www.seemayasmin.com. nnnLimited enrollment: preference to students enrolled in or considering the Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication Program and the Graduate Journalism Program. Prerequisite: EarthSys 191/291, COMM 104w, or consent of instructor. Admission by application only, available from dr.yasmin@stanford.edu (Meets Earth Systems WIM requirement.)
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5

COMPMED 11SC: Life in the Zoo: Behavior, Welfare and Enrichment

What makes for a good life in a zoo? For that matter, what makes a good zoo? The psychological and physical wellbeing of the animals? The contribution to research, conservation, and education? The guest experience? Students will learn first-hand how animal welfare science provides an evidence-based approach to optimize and balance each of these demands so that "good welfare is good business." Through a unique experience at San Francisco Zoo students will learn how to apply principles of animal behavior to design environmental enrichments which benefit both the animals and the complex mission of a zoo. Students will be guided through the process of assessing an exhibit from the point of view of the animal's behavior and wellbeing, educational opportunities, and guest experience; developing an enrichment plan; designing and building enrichments for the animals; interacting with the public as docents; and assessing the overall effectiveness of a new enrichment; before finally presenting their work at a "mini-conference." The course will be taught with an emphasis on self-guided learning, student-led class time, hands-on experience, and service-learning. Most days will begin with students presenting what they have learned the previous day to the class, followed by student-led discussion, preparation time for the day's activities, and then time out in the zoo. The course will be taught by Dr. Garner (whose introductory seminar in Animal Behavior is strongly recommended, though not required) and Dr. Watters (Vice President of Animal Wellness and Animal Behavior, San Francisco Zoological Society). [This is a SOPHOMORE COLLEGE course. Visit soco.stanford.edu for full details.]
Last offered: Summer 2019 | Units: 2

COMPMED 23N: Pandemics & Plagues: Biological Causes and Social Effects

Massive scale infections or plagues have often occurred, affecting millions for years or quickly killing thousands. In this seminar, we will use both biological and social lenses to examine infectious agents and the plagues they caused. To provide helpful framework for this exploration, we will begin with a very brief overview of the principles of microbiology and immunology. This will be followed by specific looks at the biological causes and social responses to Black Death, cholera, tuberculosis, the 1918 influenza pandemic, polio, and the ongoing HIV pandemic. We will conclude our seminar with similar looks at some of the infectious agents most likely to cause new pandemics.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Cherpes, T. (PI)

COMPMED 80N: Animal behavior: sex, death, and sometimes food!

Preference to freshman. Behavior is what makes animals special (thirsty plants don't walk to water), but why do animals behave the way they do? What does their behavior tell us about their inner lives, and about ourselves? What do lipstick and cuckoos and fireflies have in common? Why would nobody want to be a penguin? What do mice say to each other in their pee-mail? Learning how to think about questions like these gives us a unique perspective on the natural world. Format: Discussion and criticism of video examples, documentaries, and research papers. Topics: History and approaches to animal behavior; development of behavior, from genetics to learning; mechanisms of behavior, from neurons to motivation; function of behavior, from honest signals to selfish genes; the phylogeny of behavior, from domestication to speciation; and modern applications of behavior, from abnormal behavior, to conservation, to animal welfare, and animal consciousness.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: ; Garner, J. (PI)

COMPMED 81Q: Aardvarks to Zebras: The A to Z of Animal Anatomy

Preference to sophomores. Ever wonder what cats and narwhals have in common? Maybe you haven't, but despite their seemingly different lifestyles and habitats (i.e. sleeping on couches versus swimming in oceans), they are both mammals! In this seminar, students will gain an appreciation for basic mammalian anatomic and physiologic principles that span across multiple species while emphasizing key differences that render each species unique. Through student projects, we will explore evolutionary adaptations that have driven the success of a variety of species within the context of their natural environments. In addition to lecture content, virtual laboratory sessions will reinforce anatomic principles through a combination of rodent cadaver dissection and examination of organ and bone specimens. Students with a passion for science will gain a fundamental understanding of anatomy that is applicable to future careers in medicine, biomedical research, veterinary medicine, and ecology/conservation.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: ; Casey, K. (PI)

COMPMED 84Q: Globally Emerging Zoonotic Diseases

Preference to sophomores. Infectious diseases impacting veterinary and human health around the world today. Mechanisms of disease, epidemiology, and underlying diagnostic, treatment and control principles associated with these pathogens.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: ; Felt, S. (PI)

COMPMED 85N: Animal Use in Biomedical Research

Preference to freshmen. How and why animals are used in biomedical science. Addresses human and animal disease entities and how animal research has contributed to the treatment and cure of disease. Significantnportions of this course are devoted to documenting the humane care and treatment of laboratory animals in research, including, but not limited to such topics as laws and ethics, animal behavior, animal modeling, and the animal activist movement. Course topics will also include: What advances have been made as a result of the use of animals in research? Who conducts animal research? Predominant animal species used in biomedical research, facts and myths; the regulation of biomedical research; housing and care of laboratory animals; why new drugs must be tested; animal use in stem cell research, cancer research and genetically engineered mice; career choices in biomedical research.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Albertelli, M. (PI)

COMPMED 87Q: Laboratory Mouse in Biomedical Research

What is a nude mouse and why is it used in cancer research? How come my mouse pups have a different coat color than their parents? What is a knockout mouse? Answers to these and more are in this introduction to the laboratory mouse, one of the most widely used models in biomedical research. We will explore the natural history and origin of the laboratory mouse; the ethics and regulations on the use of mice in research; the characteristics and nomenclature of commonly used mouse strains; the anatomy, physiology, and husbandry of mice; common mouse diseases and their effects on research; mouse coat color genetics and its relevance to human diseases; immunodeficient mouse models and their uses in research; and the technology for genetically engineering mice (e.g., transgenic mice). Video demonstrations of necropsy, mouse handling, anesthesia and surgery, identification methods, and research techniques will be provided. Each student is expected to read research papers that use the mouse as a research model and give a presentation of a topic of their choice. Students interested in biomedical research and human or veterinary medicine will benefit from this seminar.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: ; Nagamine, C. (PI)

COMPMED 89Q: Ouch it Hurts! The Comparative Neurobiology of Pain

Preference to sophomores. Focus is on understanding the basic neurobiology of pain pathways. Topics include the physiology, pharmacology, and clinical aspects of effective pain management. In both humans and animals pain is part of the protective mechanisms that prevent further injury to the body. However, if the pain process continues unchecked, it can become extremely detrimental.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Pacharinsak, C. (PI)

COMPMED 91N: And that's why cats should never eat garlic!

Did you know that although we love garlic, it could make cats very sick? And how come if a human or a dog gets a heart attack they'll end up with a scar, but some fish can regenerate parts of their hearts? In this course, we will explore how select diseases can manifest themselves similarly or differently in different animal species. This course will be of interest to those looking to pursue careers in biomedical fields including veterinary and human medicine. Oh, and one last thing: don't cook with non-stick pans if you have indoor birds. Why? Sign up for the course to find out!
Terms: Sum | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Vilches-Moure, J. (PI)

COMPMED 107: Vertebrate Brain Evolution (COMPMED 207)

Functional organization and evolution of the vertebrate nervous system. Topics include paleoneurology, cladistic analysis, allometry, mosaic versus concerted evolution, and evolution of brain region structure, connectivity, and neurons. Comparisons between structure and function of vertebrate forebrains including hippocampi.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: ; Buckmaster, P. (PI)

COMPMED 109: Veterinary Clinical Shadowing Experience

Restricted to pre-veterinary students. Priority given to Seniors. The objective of this course is to provide students with practical experience in clinical laboratory animal veterinary medicine by shadowing veterinary staff at Stanford. Experience is gained in areas of laboratory animal veterinary care such as housing systems, husbandry, disease surveillance, enrichment, physical exams and clinical management. Enrolled students will work with multiple species and fully intend to apply to veterinary school. Limited Enrollment. Once registered, students must contact Dr. Sam Baker to create a shadowing schedule.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 4 units total)

COMPMED 110: Pre-Veterinary Advisory

For students interested in a career in veterinary medicine. How to meet the academic and practical experience prerequisites for admission to veterinary school. Networking with other pre-vet students. Periodic group meetings with guest speakers presenting career options in veterinary medicine. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Albertelli, M. (PI)

COMPMED 114: Introduction to Veterinary Medical Terminology

The Introduction to Veterinary Medical Terminology course will introduce students to medical terminology used in the veterinary profession and in biomedical research. This course is designed with the pre-veterinary student in mind, although pre-medical students and students in other fields are welcome. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to review, comprehend, and communicate basic medical reports and clinical assessments. Students can expect to complete 2-4 hours of reading per week, to meet 2 hours per week for lecture and to review cases.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: ; Bentzel, D. (PI)

COMPMED 123: Immunology of Infectious Disease

Course utilizes active learning techniques to explore essential elements of the mammalian host response to infection. Focusing on overriding principles rather than rote learning, course delivers pragmatic understanding of this response. Topics include pathogenesis of clinically relevant pathogens, vital immune system cells and tissues, and how innate and adaptive immunity responses are coordinated to control infection. Integrated into this active learning experience are human and veterinary medicine clinical cases that provide an exciting way for participants to re-enforce understanding of these basic concepts of host defense and challenge their problem-solving abilities. UG prerequisites: Cell Biology or consent of instructor.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 3

COMPMED 198: Undergraduate Directed Reading in Comparative Medicine

May be taken as a prelude to research and may also involve participation in a lab or research group seminar and/or library research.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit

COMPMED 199: Undergraduate Research

Investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit

COMPMED 200: One Health Journal Club

Participants report on and review scientific articles published in peer reviewed journals. Focus is on manuscripts which report basic and mechanistic discoveries, animal modeling and translational research. The objective is to introduce MLAS students to critical scientific review of hypothesis-based research and experimental design, data analysis and interpretation. Enrollment limited to undergraduate and graduate students currently matriculated or planning to enroll in the MS in Laboratory Animal Science degree program.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable 5 times (up to 5 units total)
Instructors: ; Hestrin, S. (PI)

COMPMED 202: Research Biomethodology for Laboratory Animal Science

Emphasis is on providing introductory training and practical, hands-on research animal biomethodology. Topics include basic care and principals guiding the use of research animals, animal health and welfare, enrichment, basic mouse handling, rodent breeding, and the principals of rodent aseptic surgery and anesthesia. The objective of this course is to teach basic skills in animal handling, animal care and biomethodological research techniques. Content delivered online and in-person.
Terms: Aut, Spr, Sum | Units: 2 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 4 units total)
Instructors: ; Huss, M. (PI)

COMPMED 205: Animal Use in Biomedical Research

How and why animals are used in biomedical science. Addresses human and animal disease entities and how animal research has contributed to the treatment and cure of disease. Significant portions of this course are devoted to documenting the humane care and treatment of laboratory animals in research, including, but not limited to such topics as law and ethics, animal behavior, animal modeling, and the animal activist movement. Course topics will also include: history of animals in research, environmental enrichment for research animals, and research animals in the media.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Albertelli, M. (PI)

COMPMED 207: Vertebrate Brain Evolution (COMPMED 107)

Functional organization and evolution of the vertebrate nervous system. Topics include paleoneurology, cladistic analysis, allometry, mosaic versus concerted evolution, and evolution of brain region structure, connectivity, and neurons. Comparisons between structure and function of vertebrate forebrains including hippocampi.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: ; Buckmaster, P. (PI)

COMPMED 209: Laboratory Animal Medicine Seminar

Focuses on husbandry, care and diseases of major laboratory animal species (rodents, fish and amphibians, swine, sheep, rabbits, monkeys); regulatory and compliance, applied principals of animal modeling, and factors that influence animal research, animal behavior and research reproducibility. The objective of this course is to provide students with an overview of the history of laboratory animal science, current industry standards and practices, and the fundamentals of laboratory animal diseases. Department consent required for enrollment. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)
Instructors: ; Nagamine, C. (PI)

COMPMED 210: Form and Funkiness of Lab Animals : Anatomy, Histology, and Pathology

Focus is on anatomy and histology (microscopic anatomy) of the entire mouse, proper instrument handling and dissection technique, proper tissue fixation, trimming and orientation in cassettes, identification of normal organ histology on H & E-stained slides using a light microscope, use of special stains, and digital image acquisition. Basic pathological processes (inflammation, necrosis, apoptosis, hyperplasia, cancer) and how these manifest in different organs comprises the pathology aspect of this course. Participants present the pathology of their lab's mouse models. Preference to graduate students working with mouse models. Dissection labs. Comfort with mouse handling and previous participation in VSC mouse handling and euthanasia workshops recommended.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: ; Vilches-Moure, J. (PI)

COMPMED 210A: Form and Funkiness of Lab Animals I: Anatomy and Histology

Have you ever wondered what dermatitis looks like on a histology slide? Does wondering about what a pancreas really looks like keep you up at night? Wonder no more! This course focuses on the anatomy and histology of laboratory animal species, with a focus on the laboratory mouse. Topics covered include: tissue dissection, tissue preparation for histology (collection, fixation, trimming and orientation), and identification of normal anatomy and histology through brightfield microscopy. This course involves dissection laboratories, and previous participation in the VSC Mouse Handling Workshop is recommended.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 3

COMPMED 210B: Form and Funkiness of Lab Animals II: Introduction to Pathological Principles

Have you ever ever wondered what dermatitis looks like on a histology slide? Have you ever lost sleep thinking about what an infarct really is? Well, it's your lucky quarter! This course focuses on the microscopic assessment of tissue pathology, with a focus on the laboratory mouse. Topics covered include: cell injury and cell death, inflammation, healing, and neoplasia. Common diseases of the laboratory house will also be covered. Prerequisites: COMPMED210A (Form and Funkiness of Laboratory Animals I: Anatomy and Histology).
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 3

COMPMED 211: Biostatistics for the Life Sciences

Emphasis is on real-world experimental design and analysis in the life sciences, with particular focus on modern techniques that maximize power and minimize sample size, and avoiding common errors contributing to false discovery and the reproducibility crisis. This is a flipped-classroom. Class time is devoted to discussion of assigned reading (primarily Grafen & Hails 2002 "Modern statistics for the life sciences"), critique of papers, working through example data sets, and developing analyses for the students' own research data. The objective is to provide MLAS students with a fundamental understanding of basic statistics, particularly as applied to the design and planning of animal-based research projects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: ; Garner, J. (PI)

COMPMED 260: Masters Laboratory Animal Science Practicum/Laboratory Research

Research laboratory and clinical service (pathology, diagnostic laboratory, surgery, husbandry, anesthesiology, aquatics, facility business and management, etc.), quarterly rotations for students enrolled in the Master's of Laboratory Animal Science program. The objective of this course is to provide students with hands on experience in research laboratories using animal models and to provide experience working in the daily operations of a large, veterinary service center. Fulfills the practicum and research requirements of MLAS students.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable 6 times (up to 90 units total)

COMPMED 290: Laboratory Animal Science Professional Development and Career Exploration

Focus is on career development for graduate students and trainees enrolled in a trainee program in the Department of Comparative Medicine. Seminar topics include career pathways in laboratory animal science, resume preparation, manuscript preparation and authorship, life in academics, life in industry and biopharma, regulatory agencies, veterinary and medical school. Speakers include faculty, speakers from industry and pharmaceutical companies, veterinary school and medical school graduates, regulatory and compliance professionals, research scientists, and animal research program/laboratory managers. Students may choose to shadow veterinary clinical faculty or rotate through basic science laboratory, by special arrangement. The objective is to introduce students to the multiple career pathways available to individuals with advanced training in laboratory animal science. May be taken up to six quarters.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 6 times (up to 6 units total)

COMPMED 299: Directed Reading in Comparative Medicine

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit

COMPMED 370: Medical Scholars Research

Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4-18 | Repeatable for credit

COMPMED 399: Graduate Research

Investigations sponsored by individual faculty members.Opportunities are available in comparative medicine and pathology, immuno-histochemistry, electron microscopy, molecular genetics, quantitative morphometry, neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of the hippocampus, pathogenesis of intestinal infections, immunopathology, biology of laboratory rodents, anesthesiology of laboratory animals, gene therapy of animal models of neurodegenerative diseases, and development and characterization of transgenic animal models. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit

CS 58: You Say You Want a Revolution (Blockchain Edition)

This project-based course will give creative students an opportunity to work together on revolutionary change leveraging blockchain technology. The course will provide opportunities for students to become operationally familiar with blockchain concepts, supported by presentation of blockchain fundamentals at a level accessible to those with or without a strong technical background. Specific topics include: incentives, ethics, crypto-commons, values, FOMO 3D, risks, implications and social good. Students will each discover a new possible use-case for blockchain and prototype their vision for the future accordingly. Application and impact areas may come from medicine, law, economics, history, anthropology, or other sectors. Student diversity of background will be valued highly.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | Units: 2

CS 231N: Convolutional Neural Networks for Visual Recognition

Computer Vision has become ubiquitous in our society, with applications in search, image understanding, apps, mapping, medicine, drones, and self-driving cars. Core to many of these applications are visual recognition tasks such as image classification and object detection. Recent developments in neural network approaches have greatly advanced the performance of these state-of-the-art visual recognition systems. This course is a deep dive into details of neural-network based deep learning methods for computer vision. During this course, students will learn to implement, train and debug their own neural networks and gain a detailed understanding of cutting-edge research in computer vision. We will cover learning algorithms, neural network architectures, and practical engineering tricks for training and fine-tuning networks for visual recognition tasks. Prerequisites: Proficiency in Python; CS131 and CS229 or equivalents; MATH21 or equivalent, linear algebra.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4

CS 235: Computational Methods for Biomedical Image Analysis and Interpretation (BIOMEDIN 260, RAD 260)

The latest biological and medical imaging modalities and their applications in research and medicine. Focus is on computational analytic and interpretive approaches to optimize extraction and use of biological and clinical imaging data for diagnostic and therapeutic translational medical applications. Topics include major image databases, fundamental methods in image processing and quantitative extraction of image features, structured recording of image information including semantic features and ontologies, indexing, search and content-based image retrieval. Case studies include linking image data to genomic, phenotypic and clinical data, developing representations of image phenotypes for use in medical decision support and research applications and the role that biomedical imaging informatics plays in new questions in biomedical science. Includes a project. Enrollment for 3 units requires instructor consent. Prerequisites: programming ability at the level of CS 106A, familiarity with statistics, basic biology. Knowledge of Matlab or Python highly recommended.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4

CS 236G: Generative Adversarial Networks

Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) have rapidly emerged as the state-of-the-art technique in realistic image generation. This course presents theoretical intuition and practical knowledge on GANs, from their simplest to their state-of-the-art forms. Their benefits and applications span realistic image editing that is omnipresent in popular app filters, enabling tumor classification under low data schemes in medicine, and visualizing realistic scenarios of climate change destruction. This course also examines key challenges of GANs today, including reliable evaluation, inherent biases, and training stability. After this course, students should be familiar with GANs and the broader generative models and machine learning contexts in which these models are situated. Prerequisites: linear algebra, statistics, CS106B, plus a graduate-level AI course such as: CS230, CS229 (or CS129), or CS221.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Zhou, S. (PI)

CS 271: Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare (BIODS 220, BIOMEDIN 220)

Healthcare is one of the most exciting application domains of artificial intelligence, with transformative potential in areas ranging from medical image analysis to electronic health records-based prediction and precision medicine. This course will involve a deep dive into recent advances in AI in healthcare, focusing in particular on deep learning approaches for healthcare problems. We will start from foundations of neural networks, and then study cutting-edge deep learning models in the context of a variety of healthcare data including image, text, multimodal and time-series data. In the latter part of the course, we will cover advanced topics on open challenges of integrating AI in a societal application such as healthcare, including interpretability, robustness, privacy and fairness. The course aims to provide students from diverse backgrounds with both conceptual understanding and practical grounding of cutting-edge research on AI in healthcare. Prerequisites: Proficiency in Python or ability to self-learn; familiarity with machine learning and basic calculus, linear algebra, statistics; familiarity with deep learning highly recommended (e.g. prior experience training a deep learning model)..
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4
Instructors: ; Yeung, S. (PI); Hsu, J. (GP)

CS 275: Translational Bioinformatics (BIOE 217, BIOMEDIN 217, GENE 217)

Computational methods for the translation of biomedical data into diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications in medicine. Topics: multi-scale omics data generation and analysis, utility and limitations of public biomedical resources, machine learning and data mining, issues and opportunities in drug discovery, and mobile/digital health solutions. Case studies and course project. Prerequisites: programming ability at the level of CS 106A and familiarity with biology and statistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4

CS 279: Computational Biology: Structure and Organization of Biomolecules and Cells (BIOE 279, BIOMEDIN 279, BIOPHYS 279, CME 279)

Computational techniques for investigating and designing the three-dimensional structure and dynamics of biomolecules and cells. These computational methods play an increasingly important role in drug discovery, medicine, bioengineering, and molecular biology. Course topics include protein structure prediction, protein design, drug screening, molecular simulation, cellular-level simulation, image analysis for microscopy, and methods for solving structures from crystallography and electron microscopy data. Prerequisites: elementary programming background (CS 106A or equivalent) and an introductory course in biology or biochemistry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CS 309A: Cloud Computing Seminar

For science, engineering, computer science, business, education, medicine, and law students. Cloud computing is bringing information systems out of the back office and making it core to the entire economy. Furthermore with the advent of smarter machines cloud computing will be integral to building a more precision planet. This class is intended for all students who want to begin to understand the implications of this technology. Guest industry experts are public company CEOs who are either delivering cloud services or using cloud services to transform their businesses.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

CS 337: AI-Assisted Care (MED 277)

AI has been advancing quickly, with its impact everywhere. In healthcare, innovation in AI could help transforming of our healthcare system. This course offers a diverse set of research projects focusing on cutting edge computer vision and machine learning technologies to solve some of healthcare's most important problems. The teaching team and teaching assistants will work closely with students on research projects in this area. Research projects include Care for Senior at Senior Home, Surgical Quality Analysis, AI Assisted Parenting, Burn Analysis & Assessment and more. AI areas include Video Understanding, Image Classification, Object Detection, Segmentation, Action Recognition, Deep Learning, Reinforcement Learning, HCI and more. The course is open to students in both school of medicine and school of engineering.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 1

CS 342: Building for Digital Health (MED 253)

This project-based course will provide a comprehensive overview of key requirements in the design and full-stack implementation of a digital health research application. Several pre-vetted and approved projects from the Stanford School of Medicine will be available for students to select from and build. Student teams learn about all necessary approval processes to deploy a digital health solution (data privacy clearance/I RB approval, etc.) and be guided in the development of front-end and back-end infrastructure using best practices. The final project will be the presentation and deployment of a fully approved digital health research application. CS106A, CS106B, Recommended: CS193P/A, CS142, CS47, CS110. Limited enrollment for this course.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Aalami, O. (PI); Xu, S. (GP)

CS 371: Computational Biology in Four Dimensions (BIOMEDIN 371, BIOPHYS 371, CME 371)

Cutting-edge research on computational techniques for investigating and designing the three-dimensional structure and dynamics of biomolecules, cells, and everything in between. These techniques, which draw on approaches ranging from physics-based simulation to machine learning, play an increasingly important role in drug discovery, medicine, bioengineering, and molecular biology. Course is devoted primarily to reading, presentation, discussion, and critique of papers describing important recent research developments. Prerequisite: CS 106A or equivalent, and an introductory course in biology or biochemistry. Recommended: some experience in mathematical modeling (does not need to be a formal course).
Last offered: Winter 2018 | Units: 3

CS 372: Artificial Intelligence for Disease Diagnosis and Information Recommendations

Artificial intelligence, specifically deep learning, stands out as one of the most transformative technologies of the past decade. AI can already outperform humans in several computer vision and natural language processing tasks. However, we still face some of the same limitations and obstacles that led to the demise of the first AI boom phase five decades ago. This research-oriented course will first review and reveal the limitations (e.g., iid assumption on training and testing data, voluminous training data requirement, and lacking interpretability) of some widely used AI algorithms, including convolutional neural networks (CNNs), transformers, reinforcement learning, and generative adversarial networks (GANs). To address these limitations, we will then explore topics including transfer learning for remedying data scarcity, knowledge-guided multimodal learning for improving data diversity, out of distribution generalization, attention mechanisms for enabling Interpretability, meta learning, and privacy-preserving training data management. The course will be taught through a combination of lecture and project sessions. Lectures on specialized AI applications (e.g., cancer/depression diagnosis and treatment, AI/VR for surgery, and health education) will feature guest speakers from academia and industry. Students will be assigned to work on an extensive project that is relevant to their fields of study (e.g., CS, Medicine, and Data Science). Projects may involve conducting literature surveys, formulating ideas, and implementing these ideas. Example project topics are but not limited to 1) knowledge guided GANs for improving training data diversity, 2) disease diagnosis via multimodal symptom checking, and 3) fake and biased news/information detection.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Chang, E. (PI)

CS 571: Surgical Robotics Seminar (ME 571)

Surgical robots developed and implemented clinically on varying scales. Seminar goal is to expose students from engineering, medicine, and business to guest lecturers from academia and industry. Engineering and clinical aspects connected to design and use of surgical robots, varying in degree of complexity and procedural role. May be repeated for credit.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

CSP 261: The Organic Chemistry of Life: Understanding Medicine and Drugs

| Units: 3

CSRE 18: Antiracism and Health Equity: A project-based community service course

This class will examine the structural racialized bias in medicine, biomedical research and health care delivery by using short form media to address the dismantling of systemic racist practices. In understanding that inequity is a feature and not a flaw of health status and health care delivery in the United States, students will design and deliver creative, serviceable solutions for community partner-generated problems/issues. This course is designed for human biology students but, all majors are welcome.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Shipp, S. (PI)

CSRE 20N: What counts as "race," and why? (SOC 20N)

Preference to freshmen. Seminar discussion of how various institutions in U.S. society employ racial categories, and how race is studied and conceptualized across disciplines. Course introduces perspectives from demography, history, law, genetics, sociology, psychology, and medicine. Students will read original social science research, learn to collect and analyze data from in-depth interviews, and use library resources to conduct legal/archival case studies.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 51A: Race in Science (AFRICAAM 51A, CEE 151A, COMM 51A, HUMBIO 71A, STS 51A)

What are the roles of race and racism in science, technology, and medicine? 3-course sequence; each quarter can be taken independently. Fall quarter focuses on science. What is the science of race and racism? How does race affect scientific work? Weekly guest speakers will address such issues as the psychology and anthropology of race and racism; how race, language, and culture affect education; race in environmental science and environmental justice; the science of reducing police violence; and the role of race in genomic research. Talks will take a variety of forms, from panel discussions to interviews and lectures. Weekly assignments: read a related article and participate in an online discussion.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

CSRE 51B: Race in Technology (AFRICAAM 51B, BIOE 91B, CEE 151B, COMM 51B, HUMBIO 71B, STS 51B)

What are the roles of race and racism in science, technology, and medicine? 3-course sequence; each quarter can be taken independently. Winter quarter focuses on technology. How do race and racism affect the design and social impact of technology, broadly defined? Can new or different technology help to reduce racial bias? Invited speakers will address the role of race in such issues as energy infrastructure, nuclear arms control, algorithmic accountability, machine learning, artificial intelligence, and synthetic biology. Talks will take a variety of forms, ranging from panel discussions to interviews and lectures. Weekly assignments: read a related article and participate in an online discussion.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

CSRE 51C: Race in Medicine (AFRICAAM 51C, BIOE 91C, CEE 151C, HUMBIO 71C, STS 51C)

What are the roles of race and racism in science, technology, and medicine? 3-course sequence; each quarter can be taken independently. Spring quarter focuses on medicine. How do race and racism affect medical research and medical care? What accounts for health disparities among racial groups? What are the history, ethics, legal, and social issues surrounding racialized medical experiments and treatments? Invited speakers will address these and other issues. Talks will take a variety of forms: conversations, interviews, panels, and others. Weekly assignments: read a related article and participate in an online discussion.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Edwards, P. (PI)

CSRE 66: Spectacular Trials: Sex, Race and Violence in Modern American Culture (AMSTUD 106)

This course will use the phenomenon of the spectacular trial as a framework for exploring the intersections of sex, race, and violence in the formation of modern American culture. Beginning in the late nineteenth century and continuing through the 1990s, we will focus our inquiry on a number of notorious cases, some associated with familiar names¿the ¿Scottsboro Boys,¿ Emmett Till, O.J. Simpson¿others involving once-infamous actors¿like Joan Little and Inez Garcia¿whose ordeals have receded into historical memory, considering a range of questions arising from this thematic nexus. For instance, in what ways are sexual transgressions racialized and gendered? What are the practical and theoretical ramifications of the seemingly inextricable conjunction of sex and violence in legal and popular discourse? And what insights might such spectacles afford when broached as an arena in which sexual meanings, identities, and practices are refracted and ultimately constructed? We will also examine the role of the pertinent professions in the evolution of these events, in particular how the interplay of law, medicine, psychiatry, and forensic science helped define the shifting boundaries of legality, and how print, radio, and television journalism operated not only in sensationalizing, but also in reflecting, modeling, and shaping prevailing attitudes and behaviors. Our study of this vital facet of our ¿society of the spectacle¿ will draw on a series of compelling secondary readings complemented by a diverse array of primary sources¿from contemporaneous pamphlets and newspaper accounts to photographs, letters, trial testimony, and psychological commentary¿that will enable class members to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of different textual genres, experiment with alternative methods of fashioning historical interpretations, and contemplate the ways history might be employed to illuminate the persistent problems of racial bias, reflexive sexualization, and the packaging of trials as mass entertainment in the present day.
Last offered: Winter 2016 | Units: 5

CSRE 122F: Histories of Race in Science and Medicine at Home and Abroad (AFRICAAM 122F, AFRICAST 122F, HISTORY 248D)

This course has as its primary objective, the historical study of the intersection of race, science and medicine in the US and abroad with an emphasis on Africa and its Diasporas in the US. By drawing on literature from history, science and technology studies, sociology and other related disciplines, the course will consider the sociological and cultural concept of race and its usefulness as an analytical category. The course will explore how the study of race became its own ¿science¿ in the late-Enlightenment era, the history of eugenics--a science of race aimed at the ostensible betterment of the overall population through the systematic killing or "letting die" of humanity¿s "undesirable" parts, discuss how the ideology of pseudo-scientific racism underpinned the health policies of the French and British Empires in Africa, explore the fraught relationship between race and medicine in the US, discuss how biological notions of race have quietly slipped back into scientific projects in the 21st century and explore how various social justice advocates and scholars have resisted the scientific racisms of the present and future and/or proposed new paths towards a more equitable and accessible science.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | Units: 4

CSRE 133P: Ethics and Politics in Public Service (POLISCI 133Z, PUBLPOL 103Z, URBANST 122Z)

This course examines ethical and political questions that arise in doing public service work, whether volunteering, service learning, humanitarian endeavors overseas, or public service professions such as medicine and teaching. What motives do people have to engage in public service work? Are self-interested motives troublesome? What is the connection between service work and justice? Should the government or schools require citizens or students to perform service work? Is mandatory service an oxymoron?
Last offered: Summer 2020 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER

CSRE 138: Medical Ethics in a Global World: Examining Race, Difference and Power in the Research Enterprise (ANTHRO 138, ANTHRO 238)

This course will explore historical as well as current market transformations of medical ethics in different global contexts. We will examine various aspects of the research enterprise, its knowledge-generating and life-saving goals, as well as the societal, cultural, and political influences that make medical research a site of brokering in need of oversight and emergent ethics.nThis seminar will provide students with tools to explore and critically assess the various technical, social, and ethical positions of researchers, as well as the role of the state, the media, and certain publics in shaping scientific research agendas. We will also examine how structural violence, poverty, global standing, and issues of citizenship also influence issues of consent and just science and medicine.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-ER

CSRE 178: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (ETHICSOC 133, PHIL 175A, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D, URBANST 122)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ER

CTS 225: Stem Cells in Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine

This course consists of didactic lectures and journal club presentations on the basic principles and translational applications of stem cells for treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Another component of the course is peer-to-peer teaching by student-led journal club presentations. To synthesize knowledge gained from the course, the students will prepare a final report in the form of a research proposal. After completion of this course, the students should expect to: 1) Get broad exposure to basic and translational applications of stem cell research to cardiovascular medicine; and 2) Read, interpret, and orally present scientific literature. Prerequisite: Medical of graduate standing; undergraduates require instructor approval.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 4 units total)

DANCE 100: Dance, Movement and Medicine: Immersion in Dance for PD (NENS 222)

Combining actual dancing with medical research, this Cardinal Course investigates the dynamic complementary relationship between two practices, medicine and dance, through the lens of Parkinson's disease (PD), a progressive neurological disease that manifests a range of movement disorders. "Dance for PD" is an innovative approach to dancing --and to teaching dance --for those challenged by PD. Course format consists of: 1. Weekly Lecture/Seminar Presentation: Partial list of instructors include Ms. Frank, Dr. Bronte-Stewart and other Stanford medical experts & research scientists, David Leventhal (Director, "Dance for PD") and Bay Area "Dance for PD" certified master teachers, film-maker Dave Iverson, Damara Ganley, and acclaimed choreographers Joe Goode, Alex Ketley, Judith Smith (AXIS Dance). 2. Weekly Dance Class: Stanford students will fully participate as dancers, and creative partners, in the Stanford Neuroscience Health Center's ongoing "Dance for Parkinson's" community dance class for people with PD. This Community Engaged Learning component provides opportunity to engage meaningfully with people in the PD community. Dancing together weekly, students will experience firsthand the embodied signature values of "Dance for PD" classes: full inclusion, embodied presence, aesthetic and expressive opportunity for creative engagement, and community-building in action. A weekly debriefing session within Friday's class time will allow students to integrate seminar material with their movement experiences.nnnNO PRE-REQUISITES: No prior dance experience required. Beginners are welcome.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | Units: 1-2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit

DBIO 201: Cells and Signaling in Regenerative Medicine

Conserved molecular and cellular pathways regulate tissue and organ homeostasis. Errors in these pathways result in human diseases.nManipulation of key cells and signals is leading to new strategies for stimulating tissue formation and regeneration.nTopics: Stem cells. Molecules regulating stem cell proliferation and differentiation. Signaling pathways. Gene regulation. Embryonic stemncells. Programmed cell death. Cell lineage. Tissue regeneration. Use of stem cells in transplantation. Organoids. Emphasis on links between stem cells, signals, and clinically significant topics including diabetes, bone loss, cancer, and aging.
Terms: Win | Units: 2

DBIO 220: Genomics and Personalized Medicine (GENE 210)

Principles of genetics underlying associations between genetic variants and disease susceptibility and drug response. Topics include: genetic and environmental risk factors for complex genetic disorders; design and interpretation of genome-wide association studies; pharmacogenetics; full genome sequencing for disease gene discovery; population structure and genetic ancestry; use of personal genetic information in clinical medicine; ethical, legal, and social issues with personal genetic testing. Hands-on workshop making use of personal or publicly available genetic data. Prerequisite: GENE 202, Gene 205 or BIOS 200.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | Units: 3

DERM 310B: Advanced Clinical Elective in Dermatology

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: A dermatology advanced clerkship designed for medical students interested in pursuing dermatology residency training. It consists of a 3 week clerkship based at the Stanford Medicine Outpatient Clinic in Redwood City, Stanford Hospital and Clinics in Palo Alto, and the Palo Alto VA. Students work closely with faculty to obtain strong clinical skills in the diagnosis and management of common skin disorders. Students are part of the Stanford and VA dermatology teams, participating in dermatopathology sessions, inpatient consultations, cutaneous oncology, surgery, and general adult dermatology clinics. Students are expected to attend Tuesday morning didactic teaching sessions as well as Dermatology Grand Rounds every Thursday morning. Students will be expected to give a case-based presentation at Grand Rounds during the rotation. Stanford medical students interested in enrolling should contact Averley Mayo at amayo@stanford.edu for more information. Outside Rotators: To apply, please return the application along with your CV, USMLE, and clerkship grades by 12 PM PDT on March 15th to amayo@stanford.edu. Please do not submit applications directly to the Clerkship Office unless instructed to do so by the course directors. The selection of outside rotators will occur at the end of March. Note that this clerkship employs a deadline that differs from that of the Stanford Clerkship Office. Unfortunately, there are no exceptions to the application deadline. You may download the application form for Outside Rotators by visiting the 310B course description tab at : https://med.stanford.edu/dermatology/Education/Medical_Students.html SCORE PROGRAM: This clerkship participates in the SCORE program, a diversity promotion program run by the Stanford Clerkship Office that provides other support for outside rotators. Please note that if you are a minority, you may qualify for this program. Please see the following for further details: https://med.stanford.edu/clerkships/score-program.html. PREREQUISITES: Dermatology 300A for Stanford medical students and an equivalent intro dermatology course for outside rotators. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full time for 3 weeks. 2 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Matthew Lewis, M.D. & Jennifer Chen, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Averley Mayo, 650-497-8006, amayo@stanford.edu. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Palo Alto VA, 3801 Miranda Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94304, Bldg. 100, Dermatology Clinic, Rm D1-227; Time: 8:00 am. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: VA & Stanford dermatology faculty. LOCATION: SUMC, VAPAHCS.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

EARTHSYS 177C: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Health and Science Journalism (COMM 177C, COMM 277C, EARTHSYS 277C)

Practical, collaborative, writing-intensive advanced journalistic reporting and writing course in the specific practices and standards of health and science journalism. Science and journalism students learn how to identify and write engaging stories about medicine, global health, science, and related environmental issues; how to assess the quality and relevance of science news; how to cover the health and science beats effectively and efficiently; and how to build bridges between the worlds of journalism and science. Instructed Winter Quarter 2019 by Dr. Seema Yasmin, http://www.seemayasmin.com. nnnLimited enrollment: preference to students enrolled in or considering the Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication Program and the Graduate Journalism Program. Prerequisite: EarthSys 191/291, COMM 104w, or consent of instructor. Admission by application only, available from dr.yasmin@stanford.edu (Meets Earth Systems WIM requirement.)
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5

EARTHSYS 277C: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Health and Science Journalism (COMM 177C, COMM 277C, EARTHSYS 177C)

Practical, collaborative, writing-intensive advanced journalistic reporting and writing course in the specific practices and standards of health and science journalism. Science and journalism students learn how to identify and write engaging stories about medicine, global health, science, and related environmental issues; how to assess the quality and relevance of science news; how to cover the health and science beats effectively and efficiently; and how to build bridges between the worlds of journalism and science. Instructed Winter Quarter 2019 by Dr. Seema Yasmin, http://www.seemayasmin.com. nnnLimited enrollment: preference to students enrolled in or considering the Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication Program and the Graduate Journalism Program. Prerequisite: EarthSys 191/291, COMM 104w, or consent of instructor. Admission by application only, available from dr.yasmin@stanford.edu (Meets Earth Systems WIM requirement.)
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5

ECON 4: Democracy Matters (PHIL 30, POLISCI 42, PUBLPOL 4)

Should the U.S. close its border to immigrants? What are the ramifications of income inequality? How has COVID-19 changed life as we know it? Why are Americans so politically polarized? How can we address racial injustice? As the 2020 election approaches, faculty members from across Stanford will explore and examine some of the biggest challenges facing society today. Each week will be dedicated to a different topic, ranging from health care and the economy to racial injustice and challenges to democracy. Faculty with expertise in philosophy, economics, law, political science, psychology, medicine, history, and more will come together for lively conversations about the issues not only shaping this election season but also the nation and world at large. There will also be a Q&A following the initial discussion. Attendance and supplemental course readings are the only requirements for the course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

ECON 127: Economics of Health Improvement in Developing Countries (MED 262)

Application of economic paradigms and empirical methods to health improvement in developing countries. Emphasis is on unifying analytic frameworks and evaluation of empirical evidence. How economic views differ from public health, medicine, and epidemiology; analytic paradigms for health and population change; the demand for health; the role of health in international development. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and ECON 102B.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: ; Miller, G. (PI)

EDUC 135: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 335, EPI 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAids (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 82 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 3-4

EDUC 205: Biosocial Medicine: The Social, Psychological, and Biological Determinants of Behavior and Wellbeing (HUMBIO 65, SOMGEN 215)

Explores how social forces, psychological influences, and biological systems combine to affect human behavior in early childhood, in the educational experience, and throughout the life course. Examines how behaviors are linked to well-being. Uses a flipped classroom model, in which a series of lectures are available for students to view on-line before class. In-class time then focuses on case studies from published research. Students must enroll in HUMBIO 65 for a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

EDUC 335: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EPI 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAids (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 82 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 3-4

EE 169: Introduction to Bioimaging

Bioimaging is important for both clinical medicine, and medical research. This course will provide a introduction to several of the major imaging modalities, using a signal processing perspective. The course will start with an introduction to multi-dimensional Fourier transforms, and image quality metrics. It will then study projection imaging systems (projection X-Ray), backprojection based systems (CT, PET, and SPECT), systems that use beam forming (ultrasound), and systems that use Fourier encoding (MRI). Prerequisites: EE102A, EE102B
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Nishimura, D. (PI)

EE 369A: Medical Imaging Systems I

Imaging internal structures within the body using high-energy radiation studied from a systems viewpoint. Modalities covered: x-ray, computed tomography, and nuclear medicine. Analysis of existing and proposed systems in terms of resolution, frequency response, detection sensitivity, noise, and potential for improved diagnosis. Prerequisite: EE 261
Last offered: Winter 2017 | Units: 3

EE 372: Data Science for High Throughput Sequencing

Extraordinary advances in sequencing technology in the past decade have revolutionized biology and medicine. Many high-throughput sequencing based assays have been designed to make various biological measurements of interest. This course explores the various computational and data science problems that arises from processing, managing and performing predictive analytics on this high throughput sequencing data. Specific problems we will study include genome assembly, haplotype phasing, RNA-Seq assembly, RNA-Seq quantification, single cell RNA-seq analysis, multi-omics analysis,nand genome compression. We attack these problems through a combination of tools from information theory, combinatorial algorithms, machine learning and signal processing. Through this course, the student will also get familiar with various software tools developed for the analysis of real sequencing data. Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of probability at the level of EE 178. Some programming experience.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | Units: 3

EMED 101: Emergency Management Skills: Stanford Response Team Training

Addresses personal, community, and organizational response and resilience in emergencies. Learn disaster psychology and self care, personal risk assessment, situational awareness, and preparedness. Obtain the skills needed to deploy as a layperson member of a Community Emergency Response Team (CERT). Learn and practice first aid, light rescue, medical field operations, and experience team building exercises tailored to disaster response. Analyze emergency management concepts and approaches to learn about Stanford's response to a range of scenarios/case studies within the framework of country, state, and federal public health responses. Leave the course prepared to assist in emergency situations meaningfully and confidently.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

EMED 110: Basic Cardiac Life Support & First Aid

Provides fundamental knowledge and skills in managing illness and injury in the first few minutes until professional help arrives. Includes rescuer safety, recognition of emergency, general principles in care, medical and injury emergencies, CPR and AED for adult, child, infant. For those with general interest for community response or who have a duty to respond because of job responsibilities. Open to all. MD students take EMED 201.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)
Instructors: ; Thompson, A. (PI)

EMED 111A: EMED 111A: Emergency Medical Responder Training (EMED 211A)

The Stanford Emergency Medical Responder (EMR) Program (EMED 111A) gives an introduction to those interested in EMS, and provides an overview of the knowledge and skills necessary to manage the scene of an emergency until more highly trained responders arrive.nnnThis theoretical and practical training is a prerequisite and will prepare you for the EMT Program in Winter and Spring quarters (EMED 111B/C). It also allows students to sit for the NREMT exam for First Responders/EMRs once the optional skills session has been successfully completed.nnnThe EMR Skills Session will be hosted for 20 hours over a weekend during the quarter. The exact date will be announced during Week 1 of the course. nnn***For those not present on campus, the Skills Session can be completed any quarter up to one year following completion of the class.***
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-5

EMED 111B: Emergency Medical Technician Training (EMED 211B)

First of two-quarter Stanford Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) Program (EMED 111B/C). Students are trained to provide basic life support and to transport sick and injured patients to the hospital. Topics include patient assessment and management of cardiac, respiratory, neurological and other medical emergencies. Includes both lecture and practical sessions. After completion of the EMED 111 sequence and meeting all class requirements, students can sit for the National Registry EMT cognitive exam and obtain state certification as an EMT. We encourage freshman and sophomores to apply. (ONLY graduate students may enroll for 3 or 4 units with instructor permission).The EMT Skills Session will be hosted for 24 hours over a weekend during the quarter. The exact date will be announced during Week 1 of the course. Optional Friday lab before the EMT Skills Session. ***For those not present on campus, the Skills Session can be completed any quarter up to one year following completion of the class.*** Prerequisites: EMED 111A and application (see http://emt.stanford.edu), or consent of instructor. AHA or Red Cross healthcare provider CPR certification is also required, but can be obtained during the quarter. A one-time course fee of $100 will be assessed to cover required equipment and a uniform shirt. (Financial assistance may be available. Please contact instructor with any concerns.)
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

EMED 111C: Emergency Medical Technician Training (EMED 211C)

Second of two-quarter Stanford Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) Program (EMED 111B/C). Topics include ambulance operations, environmental emergencies, management of trauma including falls, gunshot wounds, orthopedic and blast injuries, mass casualty incidents, vehicle extrication, pediatric and obstetrical emergencies. There will be one class activity on a Saturday or Sunday during the quarter, specific date will be announced during the first week of class. Includes both lecture and practical sessions. (ONLY graduate students may enroll for 3 or 4 units with instructor permission, see EMED 211C.) The EMT Skills Session will be hosted for 24 hours over a weekend during the quarter. The exact date will be announced during Week 1 of the course. Optional Friday lab before the EMT Skills Session. ***For those not present on campus, the Skills Session can be completed any quarter up to one year following completion of the class.***Prerequisites: EMED 111A/211A, 111B/211C and consent of instructor, AHA or RC CPR certification.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5

EMED 112A: Advanced Training and Teaching for the EMT **EMT REFRESHER** (EMED 212A)

EMED 112A/212A is a California and NREMT approved EMT refresher course which provides the equivalent of 24 hours of continuing education for recertification. Topics include both medical and traumatic emergencies as well as skills training. Students taking this course also serve as teaching assistants for EMED 111/211, the initial EMT training course. There will be one class activity on a Saturday or Sunday during the quarter, specific date will be announced during the first few weeks of class.nPrerequisites: Completion of an EMT certification course (such as EMED 111A-C), CPR for Healthcare Providers, and consent of instructor. See http://emt.stanford.edu for more details.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Marxmiller, E. (PI)

EMED 112B: Advanced Training and Teaching for the EMT (EMED 212B)

Advanced topics and teaching in EMS, including assessment and treatment of the undifferentiated trauma patient (including airway management, monitoring, and evaluation) and prehospital care in nontraditional locations. Students taking this course also serve as teaching assistants for EMED 111/211, Stanford's EMT training course.n**THIS IS NOT AN EMT REFRESHER COURSE, only EMED 112A/212A is a California and NREMT approved EMT refresher course.**nPrerequisites: Current EMT certification (state or NREMT), CPR for Healthcare Providers, and consent of instructor. See http://emt.stanford.edu for more details.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit

EMED 112C: Advanced Training and Teaching for the EMT (EMED 212C)

Advanced topics and teaching in EMS, including leadership of MCIs, vehicle extrication, and obstetric and pediatric emergencies. Students taking this course also serve as teaching assistants for EMED 111/211, the Stanford EMT training course. There will be one class activity on a Saturday or Sunday during the quarter, specific date will be announced during the first few weeks of class.n**THIS IS NOT AN EMT REFRESHER COURSE, only EMED 112A/212A is a California and NREMT approved EMT refresher course.**nPrerequisites: Current EMT certification (state or NREMT), CPR for Healthcare Providers, and consent of instructor. See http://emt.stanford.edu for more details.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit

EMED 115: Writing Narrative Medicine (EMED 215)

This course details and models the methods required for the practice of narrative medicine. Students will examine a variety of works, including poetry, short stories, memoirs, and other illness narratives. They will engage in reflective writing exercises that will allow them to draw on the reading material and practice elements of craft that relate to the text. Through this approach, they will build their close reading and reflective writing skills, while analyzing central themes in narrative medicine, including loss, identity, and the construction of personal history.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 4 times (up to 12 units total)
Instructors: ; Merritt, A. (PI)

EMED 121E: Ethnicity and Medicine (HUMBIO 121E)

Weekly lecture series. Examines the linguistic, social class, and cultural factors that impact patient care. Presentations promote culturally sensitive health care services and review contemporary research issues involving minority and underserved populations. Topics include health care inequities and medical practices of African Americans, Asians, Latinos, Native Americans, immigrants, and refugees in both urban and rural settings. 1 unit requires weekly lecture attendance, completion of required readings, completion of response questions; 2 units requires weekly lecture attendance and discussion session, completion of required readings and weekly response questions; 3 units (HUMBIO only) requires completion of a significant term paper. Students must in enroll in HUMBIO 121E for 3 units to receive a letter grade. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units to be eligible for Ways credit. Enrollment limited to students with sophomore academic standing or above.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

EMED 122: BioSecurity and Pandemic Resilience (BIOE 122, EMED 222, PUBLPOL 122, PUBLPOL 222)

Overview of the most pressing biosecurity issues facing the world today, with a special focus on the COVID-19 pandemic. Critical examination of ways of enhancing biosecurity and pandemic resilience to the current and future pandemics. Examination of how the US and the world is able to withstand a pandemic or a bioterrorism attack, how the medical/healthcare field, government, and technology sectors are involved in biosecurity and pandemic or bioterrorism preparedness and response and how they interface; the rise of synthetic biology with its promises and threats; global bio-surveillance; effectiveness of various containment and mitigation measures; hospital surge capacity; medical challenges; development, production, and distribution of countermeasures such as vaccines and drugs; supply chain challenges; public health and policy aspects of pandemic preparedness and response; administrative and engineering controls to enhance pandemic resilience; testing approaches and challenges; promising technologies for pandemic response and resilience, and other relevant topics. Guest lecturers have included former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, former Special Assistant on BioSecurity to Presidents Clinton and Bush Jr. Dr. Ken Bernard, Chief Medical Officer of the Homeland Security Department Dr. Alex Garza, eminent scientists, public health leaders, innovators and physicians in the field, and leaders of relevant technology companies. Open to medical, graduate, and undergraduate students. No prior background in biology necessary.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI
Instructors: ; Trounce, M. (PI)

EMED 123N: Does Social Media Make Better Physicians?

Scientific knowledge doubles every 90 days. Physicians must quickly learn about recent discoveries to remain current in their chosen specialties. How does tech help doctors stay up-to-date? Twitter, Snapchat, lnstagram, and Face book are used to teach physicians and their patients. Online learning systems have replaced most textbooks and social media platforms are now vehicles to disseminate new knowledge. This seminar will explore the best ways to use technology in medical education, with a focus on the application of social media as a key instructional tool. Students will learn about the different stages of education required to become a physician and explore some of the challenges to continuing medical education. Class assignments will include the creation of health education infographics, reading and drafting posts for medical biogs, and critical analysis of medical podcasts. The course will be particularly interesting to pre-medical students who have a background in blogging or pod casting, though such experiences or skills are not prerequisites for enrollment. Throughout the seminar, there will be an emphasis on the impact of digital scholarship. Students will have the opportunity to submit high-quality classwork for possible online publication on several medical education sites made available by the course instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)
Instructors: ; Gisondi, M. (PI)

EMED 124: Wilderness First Aid

Provides basic introductory back country and emergency medicine skill development. Topics covered include patient assessment, addressing life threats, shock, spine safety, musculoskeletal injuries, medical emergencies, and environmental emergencies.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 6 units total)
Instructors: ; Thompson, A. (PI)

EMED 125A: Social Emergency Medicine and Community Engagement

The Stanford Health Advocates and Research in the Emergency Department (SHAR(ED)) program is focused on the practical application of and research in social emergency medicine. Emergency Departments (EDs) are the nation's safety nets for medical as well as social needs. EDs remain the sole access to any medical care for those in need, 24/7, regardless of insurance status. The ED is a unique bridge to the public and is a compelling site for community partnership, clinical and health services research geared towards impacting population health and policy. Through direct patient contact and community engagement, students help to meet the social needs of ED patients. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2
Instructors: ; Wang, N. (PI)

EMED 125B: Social Emergency Medicine Practicum ¿ Screening for Social need in the Emergency Department

This is an experiential course which builds on the fundamentals presented in EMED 125A (Social Emergency Medicine Boot Camp). Students will be trained and supervised to screen for social needs in the Emergency Department. They will follow up with patients, create and maintain partnerships with community partners, and continuously evaluate the program for outcomes and improvement.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 1 times (up to 8 units total)
Instructors: ; Wang, N. (PI)

EMED 126: Wilderness First Responder

A more advanced and intensive class building on wilderness first aid that teaches first responder skills using improvised resources in varying environmental conditions and extended-care situations. This is used as a framework for learning to respond to medical emergencies in remote wilderness settings. Examines necessary tools to make critical medical and evacuation decisions.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 12 units total)
Instructors: ; Thompson, A. (PI)

EMED 127: Health Care Leadership (EMED 227, PUBLPOL 127, PUBLPOL 227)

Healthcare Leadership class brings eminent healthcare leaders from a variety of sectors within healthcare to share their personal reflections and insights on effective leadership. Speakers discuss their personal core values, share lessons learned and their recipe for effective leadership in the healthcare field, including reflection on career and life choices. Speakers include CEOs of healthcare technology, pharmaceutical and other companies, leaders in public health, eminent leaders of hospitals, academia, biotechnology companies and other health care organizations. The class will also familiarize the students with the healthcare industry, as well as introduce concepts and skills relevant to healthcare leadership. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit. Students taking the course Mondays and Wednesdays should enroll for 4 units (exceptions for a 3 unit registration can be made with the consent of instructor to be still eligible for Ways credit). Students taking the course on Wednesdays only should register for 2 units.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit

EMED 128: Wilderness Medicine: Continued practical experience for high-quality care

Ongoing training for current wilderness medicine providers (WFA, AFR, WEMT). Students practice BLS assessment and medical care through outdoor simulations, labs, and workshops. Work in small teams, refine essential skills and garner knowledge, and judgement. Topics include traumatic, environmental, and medical scenarios in a backcountry setting where communication and resources are limited. Pre-requisite is completion of EMED224 or EMED 226 (or equivalent; current certification required) & current CPR certification; or instructor approval.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

EMED 129: Virtual Reality Storytelling (EMED 228)

Do you have a story to tell? Would you like to make an impact on medicine through the most immersive medium available? Virtual reality filmmaking is a cutting edge means of shaping the public's perception of and relationship to healthcare, with enormous potential to act as a vehicle for change. This course will describe and practice the entire virtual reality filmmaking process from preproduction and production through to postproduction completion. Step by step you will learn to tell stories that matter in this immersive medium using both 360 video and computer generated simulations. You will be part of the design team for an exhibited interactive experience with a meaningful story. No prior virtual reality or filmmaking experience required.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 3 times (up to 9 units total)

EMED 134: The Impact of Climate Change on Human Health (EMED 234)

Climate change is one of the most pressing issues facing all subsequent generations of patients and physicians. This nweekly lunch seminar aims to introduce medical trainees to a variety of climate change topics and advanced clinical nskills specific to climate change. Course content will cover climate and disease, sustainable medicine, and advocacy. The course will feature speakers who are leaders in this emerging domain and patient perspectives of climate change. Each class session is designed to be interactive, with a mix of didactic lecture and small group discussion. Optional study materials will supplement each weekly topic for further study. Lunch provided for enrolled students.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)

EMED 199: Undergraduate Research

Consists of Emergency Medicine focused studies and projects (including Research Projects) in progress. Possible topics include management of trauma patients, common medical and surgical emergencies in pediatric and adult populations, topics in disaster medicine, biosecurity and bioterrorism response, wilderness medicine, international medicine, and others. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit

EMED 201: Basic Cardiac Life Support for Healthcare Professionals

All medical students must be certified in Basic Cardiac Life Support before the end of the first (autumn) quarter. Students who provide documentation of certification received within six months prior to the date of matriculation will be exempted from the requirement. The course teaches one- and two-rescuer CPR, management of an obstructed airway, and CPR for infants and children. Upon completion of the course, students receive an American Heart Association certificate in BLS.nIn addition to CPR training, we will also teach Question, Persuade, Refer (QPR) which is the CPR equivalent to psychological emergencies. This portion of the course will allow students to master techniques on how to recognize and respond to an individual in psychological distress and to help in suicide prevention. Our faculty are certified QPR instructors and students will become QPR certified during this course through the QPR Institute certification process.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

EMED 201A: Re-Certification for Basic Cardiac Life Support for Healthcare Professionals

The purpose of this course is to provide medical students re-certification in Basic Cardiac Life Support (BLS), in accordance with guidelines from the American Heart Association. Initial certification ( EMED 201) occurs in the first year and expires 2 years from the initial course. This course will fulfill the requirements of the current BLS certification needed to complete the mandatory Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) training prior to graduation. Student will refresh their skills in one - and two-rescuer CPR for infants and adults, management of an obstructed airway, and use of an automated external defibrillator. This course is offered every quarter on medical school RRAP days and requires a permission code to enroll to allow us to balance students across the four available sessions. If you need to take this course, please email the head TA, Mike Dacre, at dacre@stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)

EMED 211A: EMED 111A: Emergency Medical Responder Training (EMED 111A)

The Stanford Emergency Medical Responder (EMR) Program (EMED 111A) gives an introduction to those interested in EMS, and provides an overview of the knowledge and skills necessary to manage the scene of an emergency until more highly trained responders arrive.nnnThis theoretical and practical training is a prerequisite and will prepare you for the EMT Program in Winter and Spring quarters (EMED 111B/C). It also allows students to sit for the NREMT exam for First Responders/EMRs once the optional skills session has been successfully completed.nnnThe EMR Skills Session will be hosted for 20 hours over a weekend during the quarter. The exact date will be announced during Week 1 of the course. nnn***For those not present on campus, the Skills Session can be completed any quarter up to one year following completion of the class.***
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-5

EMED 211B: Emergency Medical Technician Training (EMED 111B)

First of two-quarter Stanford Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) Program (EMED 111B/C). Students are trained to provide basic life support and to transport sick and injured patients to the hospital. Topics include patient assessment and management of cardiac, respiratory, neurological and other medical emergencies. Includes both lecture and practical sessions. After completion of the EMED 111 sequence and meeting all class requirements, students can sit for the National Registry EMT cognitive exam and obtain state certification as an EMT. We encourage freshman and sophomores to apply. (ONLY graduate students may enroll for 3 or 4 units with instructor permission).The EMT Skills Session will be hosted for 24 hours over a weekend during the quarter. The exact date will be announced during Week 1 of the course. Optional Friday lab before the EMT Skills Session. ***For those not present on campus, the Skills Session can be completed any quarter up to one year following completion of the class.*** Prerequisites: EMED 111A and application (see http://emt.stanford.edu), or consent of instructor. AHA or Red Cross healthcare provider CPR certification is also required, but can be obtained during the quarter. A one-time course fee of $100 will be assessed to cover required equipment and a uniform shirt. (Financial assistance may be available. Please contact instructor with any concerns.)
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

EMED 211C: Emergency Medical Technician Training (EMED 111C)

Second of two-quarter Stanford Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) Program (EMED 111B/C). Topics include ambulance operations, environmental emergencies, management of trauma including falls, gunshot wounds, orthopedic and blast injuries, mass casualty incidents, vehicle extrication, pediatric and obstetrical emergencies. There will be one class activity on a Saturday or Sunday during the quarter, specific date will be announced during the first week of class. Includes both lecture and practical sessions. (ONLY graduate students may enroll for 3 or 4 units with instructor permission, see EMED 211C.) The EMT Skills Session will be hosted for 24 hours over a weekend during the quarter. The exact date will be announced during Week 1 of the course. Optional Friday lab before the EMT Skills Session. ***For those not present on campus, the Skills Session can be completed any quarter up to one year following completion of the class.***Prerequisites: EMED 111A/211A, 111B/211C and consent of instructor, AHA or RC CPR certification.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5

EMED 212A: Advanced Training and Teaching for the EMT **EMT REFRESHER** (EMED 112A)

EMED 112A/212A is a California and NREMT approved EMT refresher course which provides the equivalent of 24 hours of continuing education for recertification. Topics include both medical and traumatic emergencies as well as skills training. Students taking this course also serve as teaching assistants for EMED 111/211, the initial EMT training course. There will be one class activity on a Saturday or Sunday during the quarter, specific date will be announced during the first few weeks of class.nPrerequisites: Completion of an EMT certification course (such as EMED 111A-C), CPR for Healthcare Providers, and consent of instructor. See http://emt.stanford.edu for more details.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Marxmiller, E. (PI)

EMED 212B: Advanced Training and Teaching for the EMT (EMED 112B)

Advanced topics and teaching in EMS, including assessment and treatment of the undifferentiated trauma patient (including airway management, monitoring, and evaluation) and prehospital care in nontraditional locations. Students taking this course also serve as teaching assistants for EMED 111/211, Stanford's EMT training course.n**THIS IS NOT AN EMT REFRESHER COURSE, only EMED 112A/212A is a California and NREMT approved EMT refresher course.**nPrerequisites: Current EMT certification (state or NREMT), CPR for Healthcare Providers, and consent of instructor. See http://emt.stanford.edu for more details.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit

EMED 212C: Advanced Training and Teaching for the EMT (EMED 112C)

Advanced topics and teaching in EMS, including leadership of MCIs, vehicle extrication, and obstetric and pediatric emergencies. Students taking this course also serve as teaching assistants for EMED 111/211, the Stanford EMT training course. There will be one class activity on a Saturday or Sunday during the quarter, specific date will be announced during the first few weeks of class.n**THIS IS NOT AN EMT REFRESHER COURSE, only EMED 112A/212A is a California and NREMT approved EMT refresher course.**nPrerequisites: Current EMT certification (state or NREMT), CPR for Healthcare Providers, and consent of instructor. See http://emt.stanford.edu for more details.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit

EMED 214: Yoga and Wellness for Bioscience and Medical Students

Students will learn and practice yoga techniques and each session will end with a brief guided meditation. The meditation practice is designed for new and experienced meditators and excellent for the overthinking mind. Students will learn to identify signs and symptoms of stress, how anxiety manifests in the body and mind, and yoga and meditation techniques for relief. This course will include yoga and meditation instruction and reflection assignments to enable students to: (1) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (2) Understand and practice the behaviors that contribute to a healthy lifestyle.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable 6 times (up to 6 units total)

EMED 215: Writing Narrative Medicine (EMED 115)

This course details and models the methods required for the practice of narrative medicine. Students will examine a variety of works, including poetry, short stories, memoirs, and other illness narratives. They will engage in reflective writing exercises that will allow them to draw on the reading material and practice elements of craft that relate to the text. Through this approach, they will build their close reading and reflective writing skills, while analyzing central themes in narrative medicine, including loss, identity, and the construction of personal history.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 12 units total)
Instructors: ; Merritt, A. (PI)

EMED 216: Point-Of-Care Ultrasound

Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) has become increasingly utilized and useful in multiple medical specialties, with emergency medicine in the forefront of its use. This course is designed to introduce POCUS to the preclinical medical student, and provide more in-depth and hands-on familiarity with POCUS for a variety of modalities. These skills will better equip students to use these techniques right at the bedside of any patient in any acute setting with greater facility and confidence. It will enhance patient diagnosis and management, procedural guidance, and patient satisfaction. It may even save a life! Primary emphasis will be on developing competent technical skills to enhance image acquisition and interpretation. The applications as defined by the American College of Emergency Medicine will be the main focus. Applications taught will include eFAST, thoracic, renal, RUQ, aorta, limited ECHO and IVC, first trimester pelvic, DVT, orbital, MSK. During the hands-on session, students will serve as model volunteers to be scanned, as well as scan their peers. Students will also have the optional opportunity to participate in scan shifts in the main emergency department when POCUS EM faculty perform ¿scan¿ rounds. Students will have access and be expected to participate in online and computer based learning that will be provided for them as well.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)

EMED 220: Emergency Medicine: Introduction

This course will be an introduction to the specialty of Emergency Medicine ¿ the safety net of our health care system. This course is designed for students interested in medicine/emergency medicine and public health. This lecture based series will explore the depth and breadth of EM. You will hear from world-renowned faculty from the Department of Emergency Medicine on various concepts, and specialties within the field - such as Global Health, Pandemics and Bioterrorism, Pre-hospital Care, Sports Medicine, Wilderness Medicine, Pediatrics, Health Care Policy, Social Determinants of Health in Emergency Medicine, just to name a few. This course has been modified from previous years to a lecture-only course due to potential Covid exposures in the department. Students can add a second unit by writing a paper on a topic of their choice that falls within EM.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2
Instructors: ; Patil, A. (PI)

EMED 221: "I'm Not a Doctor but I Play One on TV": Exploring Clinical Reasoning Through Today's Medical Dramas

Have you ever watched an episode of a medical drama and wondered how the doctor came up with that diagnosis? Or, why they performed that procedure? Do these contemporary television medical dramas really reflect the practice of real life medicine? In this course, we will explore exciting emergency cases from today's medical dramas, discuss the clinical reasoning for arriving at a particular diagnosis, and the rationale for any life-saving therapies or medical procedures. This innovative approach to analyzing and simplifying the practice of emergency medicine represents the intersection of science and modern cinema and is meant for students from all disciplines. No prerequisites are required.
| Units: 4

EMED 222: BioSecurity and Pandemic Resilience (BIOE 122, EMED 122, PUBLPOL 122, PUBLPOL 222)

Overview of the most pressing biosecurity issues facing the world today, with a special focus on the COVID-19 pandemic. Critical examination of ways of enhancing biosecurity and pandemic resilience to the current and future pandemics. Examination of how the US and the world is able to withstand a pandemic or a bioterrorism attack, how the medical/healthcare field, government, and technology sectors are involved in biosecurity and pandemic or bioterrorism preparedness and response and how they interface; the rise of synthetic biology with its promises and threats; global bio-surveillance; effectiveness of various containment and mitigation measures; hospital surge capacity; medical challenges; development, production, and distribution of countermeasures such as vaccines and drugs; supply chain challenges; public health and policy aspects of pandemic preparedness and response; administrative and engineering controls to enhance pandemic resilience; testing approaches and challenges; promising technologies for pandemic response and resilience, and other relevant topics. Guest lecturers have included former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, former Special Assistant on BioSecurity to Presidents Clinton and Bush Jr. Dr. Ken Bernard, Chief Medical Officer of the Homeland Security Department Dr. Alex Garza, eminent scientists, public health leaders, innovators and physicians in the field, and leaders of relevant technology companies. Open to medical, graduate, and undergraduate students. No prior background in biology necessary.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5
Instructors: ; Trounce, M. (PI)

EMED 223: Zombie Apocalypse Survival: Advanced Wilderness Medicine

What will you do when the world falls apart and zombies attack? Threats of earthquakes, fires, and tsunamis loom over us daily in the Bay. Will you be the one to make it to the Disco at the End of The World? Come learn the skills to survive in all environments. Topics will include patient assessment, trauma, fractures and dislocations, combat and tactical medicine, go-bags/medical kits, search and rescue, shelter building, animal attacks, dangerous plants, and much more with a focus on hands-on, practical skills.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

EMED 225: The ED as a Safety Net

As the sole source of medical care and social services available 24/7 to all patients regardless of insurance status, ability to pay or even complaint, Emergency Departments (ED) are safety nets for local communities. EDs serve as a window into society and offer opportunities for intervention. The field of Social Emergency Medicine uses this unique position to investigate societal patterns of health inequity and develop solutions to decrease health disparities for vulnerable populations. This dinner seminar will explore psychosocial, economic, and medical factore that contribute to human health from the perspective of ED providers. Each session will cover a different topic of societal emergency medicine such as opioid use, human trafficking, firearms, and homelessness. Possible interventions will also be discussed including buprenorphine, screening, and identification tools, medical-legal partnerships, and legislative advocacy.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)
Instructors: ; Wang, N. (PI)

EMED 227: Health Care Leadership (EMED 127, PUBLPOL 127, PUBLPOL 227)

Healthcare Leadership class brings eminent healthcare leaders from a variety of sectors within healthcare to share their personal reflections and insights on effective leadership. Speakers discuss their personal core values, share lessons learned and their recipe for effective leadership in the healthcare field, including reflection on career and life choices. Speakers include CEOs of healthcare technology, pharmaceutical and other companies, leaders in public health, eminent leaders of hospitals, academia, biotechnology companies and other health care organizations. The class will also familiarize the students with the healthcare industry, as well as introduce concepts and skills relevant to healthcare leadership. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit. Students taking the course Mondays and Wednesdays should enroll for 4 units (exceptions for a 3 unit registration can be made with the consent of instructor to be still eligible for Ways credit). Students taking the course on Wednesdays only should register for 2 units.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit

EMED 228: Virtual Reality Storytelling (EMED 129)

Do you have a story to tell? Would you like to make an impact on medicine through the most immersive medium available? Virtual reality filmmaking is a cutting edge means of shaping the public's perception of and relationship to healthcare, with enormous potential to act as a vehicle for change. This course will describe and practice the entire virtual reality filmmaking process from preproduction and production through to postproduction completion. Step by step you will learn to tell stories that matter in this immersive medium using both 360 video and computer generated simulations. You will be part of the design team for an exhibited interactive experience with a meaningful story. No prior virtual reality or filmmaking experience required.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 9 units total)

EMED 229: Pediatric Point of Care Ultrasound

Point of Care Ultrasound AND Pediatric specific Point of Care Ultrasound Course emphasizes a hands on approach to teaching the key points in using beside ultrasound taught by faculty and fellows of the Stanford department of emergency medicine ultrasound section. Each class will start with a short lecture reviewing a particular ultrasound exam, followed by a large amount of hands on scanning time focusing on acquiring high quality images. This course is an excellent adjunct to not only to anatomy , physiology , pathophysiology , but also enhancing physical exam skills while constructing a differential diagnosis. In addition to the general point of care ultrasound, we will introduce and review unique and specific applications related to the Pediatric population who are at higher risk of exposure to ionizing radiation. Course will cover the pediatric abdomen for diagnosis of pyloric stenosis, intussusception, appendicitis, lungs ,for diagnosis of pneumonia or pleural effusion and the pediatric hip exam for diagnosis of septic arthritis . By the end of the course, you will be familiar with the ultrasound skills needed to start using it at bedside in upcoming clinical rotations. The course is open to all Stanford medical students, PA students, and undergraduates.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | Units: 3

EMED 231: Peer Mentoring for Medical and MSPA Students

This course meets for 5 total sessions, and covers topics including compassionate listening, problem solving, understanding imposter syndromes, role of emotions in decision making, implicit bias training, professionalism, and ethics and boundaries. Students will engage in dedicated interactive sessions to prepare them for common scenarios and potential approaches for resolution. Faculty mentors from the Office of Medical Student Wellness, Counseling and Psychological Services staff at the Vaden Health Center, and Ear4Peer (E4P) upperclass student team leaders will collaborate each week to lead the sessions. Students will also receive training on campus resources and appropriate channels for referring peers to professional services. This course is a pre-requisite for students interested in becoming an E4P. Prerequisites: Must be a currently enrolled medical or PA student
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

EMED 234: The Impact of Climate Change on Human Health (EMED 134)

Climate change is one of the most pressing issues facing all subsequent generations of patients and physicians. This nweekly lunch seminar aims to introduce medical trainees to a variety of climate change topics and advanced clinical nskills specific to climate change. Course content will cover climate and disease, sustainable medicine, and advocacy. The course will feature speakers who are leaders in this emerging domain and patient perspectives of climate change. Each class session is designed to be interactive, with a mix of didactic lecture and small group discussion. Optional study materials will supplement each weekly topic for further study. Lunch provided for enrolled students.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)
Instructors: ; Harter, P. (PI)

EMED 235: Wilderness Leadership and Mentorship Skills for Medical and PA Students

For MD/Master of Medicine wilderness pre-orientation trip (SWEAT) leaders and MSPA pre-orientation camping trip leaders. Training to engage with and prepare incoming first-year medical students and MSPA students for the rigors of their respective programs. Topics include: fundamentals of wilderness survival, wilderness equipment use, camping, outdoor leadership, mentorship, team building, problem-solving, risk management, cultural competency, professionalism as a physician, reflection and resiliency, first-year curricula, stress management and coping. Guest lectures from Stanford faculty and advisors, emergency medicine physicians, outdoor education specialists, and mental health personnel.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit

EMED 237: Caring for Individuals with Disabilities

Over 57 million individuals in the US (20%) have a disability and face significant healthcare disparities, stigmas, and difficulty accessing care. This interactive seminar course has been designed to better prepare students to care for individuals with disabilities throughout their careers. Through the course, individuals with disabilities, caregivers and physicians will discuss a variety of topics including: disability framework, medical model vs. social model of disability, healthcare disparities, language and disability, communication, ethics, government and non-governmental services, laws and policies, and coordinating complex care. Students will be matched with a patient partner with whom they meet outside of class at a mutually convenient time to learn about the patient and caregiver journey, and to further explore the impact of topics discussed in the course at the individual level. Upon finishing this course, students will have a fundamental knowledge of common disabilities, understand patient-centered care for people with disabilities, and foster skills necessary to improve the lives of their patients. Course open to MD students only.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

EMED 244: On the Path to Medical School

Student lead: This is a course for all prospective pre-medical students, including undergraduate and graduate students, who seek knowledge and guidance on their path to medical school, with an opt-in component to work alongside (remotely during Covid-19) doctors in the Emergency Room at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center. Discussions, presentations, and lectures will help students discover how to integrate service with pursuing medicine, whether the pre-medical path is right for them, and if so, how best to navigate the pre-med requirements. In addition, in collaboration with physician advisors and medical students, we have designed a series of presentations on topics including strategically approaching pre-medical classes and extracurriculars, studying for the MCAT, optimizing the medical school application, preparing for medical school interviews, and evidence-based pros and cons of careers in medicine and differences between specialties. This course is a one-stop-shop for getting all the information needed to become an efficient, successful pre-medical student while also gaining clinical experience as students consider whether medicine is right for them and navigate the path to medical school. Currently, to our knowledge, there are no classes directly targeted towards guiding students at every stage of the premed path in this way while also providing an active volunteer learning experience, and yet pre-meds are among the largest group of pre-professional students at Stanford. Due to COVID, our active volunteer component is on hold for the summer. Must be a member of SCOPE, please apply at https://scope.beagooddoctor.org/apply/
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Weiss, E. (PI)

EMED 255: Design for Health: Navigating Futures in Virtual Reality (DESINST 255)

For many people, participating in the American healthcare system is confusing, frustrating and often disempowering. It is also an experience fueled with emotional intensity and feelings of vulnerability. Virtual Reality (VR) is an emerging technology that is finally starting to feel like it will play a more significant role in many human experiences. While initial applications have been primarily in entertainment and gaming, we are interested in how VR might be used to improve healthcare experiences and outcomes. In this class, students will gain an introduction to VR technology and insight into the experiences of different healthcare stakeholders that are likely to benefit from VR technologies. Students will collaborate to explore multiple use cases and design opportunities for VR in these healthcare scenarios. Expect an immersive experience!nAdmission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

EMED 299: Directed Reading in Emergency Medicine

Consists of Emergency Medicine focused studies and projects (including Research Projects) in progress. Possible topics include management of trauma patients, common medical and surgical emergencies in pediatric and adult populations, topics in disaster medicine, biosecurity and bioterrorism response, wilderness medicine, international medicine, and others. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit

EMED 301A: Emergency Medicine Core Clerkship

VISITING: Closed to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Required. DESCRIPTION: The Emergency Department (ED) provides a unique learning environment as patients often present with undifferentiated chief complaints and experience dynamic changes in their clinical state. Through this clinical exposure, medical students will develop an understanding of the initial approach, management, and treatment of the undifferentiated acutely ill or injured patient and patients with worsening of their chronic disease. Students will perform complaint-directed history and physical exams, develop an appropriately prioritized differential diagnosis, initiate management, and determine the disposition of patients. Additionally, students will be exposed to the impact of social factors that influence a patient¿s seeking care in the ED along with the structural shortcomings of our current healthcare systems. Students will work a mix of days, evenings, overnights, weekends and holidays as part of their 4 week rotations. In addition to the shift work (approximately 14-16 shifts) they will participate in didactics, web-based learning, simulation exercises, and case presentations. Students will have shifts in both the Adult and Pediatric ED and be assigned to work with a senior Emergency Medicine resident under the supervision of an Emergency Medicine attending. Students will be required to take the NBME Shelf Examination in Emergency Medicine. PREREQUISITES: None. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-12, full time for 4 weeks, 10 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Moises Gallegos, M.D., moisesg@stanford.edu. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Maria Alfonso, 650-497-6702, malfonso@stanford.edu and Kristen Kayser, 650-497-3058, kkayser@stanford.edu. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: The students are notified prior to the first day of the clerkship; Time: TBA. CALL CODE: 2-Other, see comment for explanation. OTHER FACULTY: W. Dixon. LOCATION: SUMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 5

EMED 308A: Bedside Ultrasound Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: Point of care ultrasound (POCUS) has become increasingly utilized and useful in multiple medical specialties, with emergency medicine in the forefront of its use. This rotation is designed to introduce bedside ultrasound to the clinical medical student and provide more in-depth and hands-on familiarity with bedside US for a variety of modalities. These skills will better equip students to use these techniques right at the bedside of any patient in the emergency room or on the floors with greater facility and confidence. It will enhance patient diagnosis and management, procedural guidance, and patient satisfaction. It may even save a life! Primary emphasis will be on developing competent technical skills to enhance image acquisition and interpretation. The applications as defined by the American College of Emergency Medicine will be the main focus. A goal for a minimum number of ultrasound scans will be 25 per application including, eFAST, thoracic, renal, RUQ, aorta, limited ECHO and IVC, first trimester pelvic, DVT, orbital, MSK. Other advanced ultrasound applications will also be introduced (Testicular, airway, bladder, nerve blocks). Students will obtain US images in the Stanford emergency department and will have imaging formally reviewed by an US fellowship trained emergency medicine faculty. Images will be obtained during scan shifts during which students will scan appropriate patients and review images with the faculty member onsite. Students will attend Bedside US didactics offered by an US EM faculty member every Thursday morning, followed by quality assessment (QA) review of Ultrasound scans performed in the ED. Students will have access and be expected to participate in online and computer based learning that will be provided for them as well. A multiple choice test will be given at the end of the rotation. This clerkship requires prior approval by Clerkship Director. PREREQUISITES: None. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 4-16, full time for 3 weeks, 2 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Dr. Nick Ashenburg, ashenburg@stanford.edu. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Kendra Lee Stahl, 650-723-6576. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: TBA; Time: 8:00 am. CALL CODE: 2. OTHER FACULTY: K. Anderson, Y. Duanmu, V. Lobo, M. Askgar. LOCATION: SUMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

EMED 312A: Pediatric Emergency Medicine

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: The Emergency Department frontline providers are tasked with the rapid assessment and stabilization of patients who present uniquely undifferentiated to the ED 24/7/365. Exposure to Pediatric Emergency Medicine (PEM) in medical school provides an invaluable opportunity for students to learn about the unique challenges and complexities of children with acute, undifferentiated complaints. This 3-week elective at the SHC Pediatric Emergency Department provides students with educational opportunities that include one-on-one teaching with both Pediatric and EM senior residents as well as Pediatric Emergency Medicine trained fellows and attendings. There is protected time to attend the EMED weekly grand rounds and resident conferences as well as didactic sessions provided by PEM faculty. This elective will expose the student to a wealth of clinical scenarios, supplemented with didactics and ultrasound teaching, that will address the most common chief complaints. Traditionally PEM physicians manage pathology from every pediatric subspeciality, and the experience of the student will range from management of the patient with acute illness to day to day chief complaints that bring the patient to the ED provider. Clerkship students will see patients on their own, with senior resident, PEM fellow, and attending guidance. PREREQUISITES: None. PERIODS AVAILABLE: P1-16, full-time for 3 weeks. 1 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Jason Lowe DO; jtlowe@stanford.edu; 650-723-9215. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Maria Alfonso; malfonso@stanford.edu; 650-497-6702. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Stanford Hospital; Time: TBA. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: SUMC.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5

EMED 313A: Emergency Medicine Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 1. DESCRIPTION: Overall Description: During this 3-week, dual-site selective, medical students will develop critical skills in the rapid evaluation and management of undifferentiated and acutely ill patients at the new, state of the art Stanford University Medical Center (SUMC). Students will also be paired with a faculty coach in order to maximize educational opportunities and feedback over the three weeks. With this high level of mentorship and guidance, learners will gain confidence assessing and resuscitating the incredible spectrum of patients presenting at each of these clinical sites. Clinical Duties: Students will work 10-11, 8-hour clinical shifts during the rotation. Rotators will have the opportunity to play an integral role on the care team, learning to take full responsibility in ensuring their patients receive high quality emergency care. Students will lead the initial assessment of each patient, performing complaint-directed history and physical exam, developing a focused differential diagnosis, and then designing and implementing a targeted care plan with input and support from the attending physician. Students will also learn essential communication skills, acting as the primary contact between the care team, patients, patient's families, consultants and hospital staff. Educational Curriculum: Throughout the rotation, students will have access to a number of supporting educational events outside of the emergency department. Students will attend weekly core curriculum conference with the Stanford Emergency Medicine residents, as well as a monthly journal club. Rotators will also have dedicated, student oriented educational sessions focused on bedside ultrasound, laceration repair, orthopedic injury management, and ECG interpretation, as well as a series of interactive, faculty-led, case discussions. A student-only simulation experience held at Stanford's innovative Center for Immersive and Simulation Based Learning early in the rotation will help faculty and students develop specific learning plans. The rotation culminates in a final written exam. Visiting students ONLY accepted periods 1-8, 16, pre-approval is required only for visiting students (PLEASE NOTE: **Due to policies around COVID-19, we will not be taking visiting students in the 2020-2021 academic year.**Pre-approval dates: Periods 1-4 (March 19-23), Period 4-8 (June 19-23), and Period 16 (December 1-5). Please contact clerkship coordinator Maria Alfonso (malfonso@stanford.edu) to inquire about pre approval process and materials needed for submission. PREREQUISITES: Completed all core clerkships in medicine, surgery, OB/GYN, and pediatrics. Stanford medical students must complete MED 313A. Exceptions only at the discretion of the clerkship director on a case by case basis. PERIODS AVAILABLE: Periods 1-8 and 15-16 only for 2020-21, Periods 1-8 and 16 only. Closed Periods 9-15 for 2021-22. Full-time for 3 weeks, 10 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: William Dixon, MD at wdixon@stanford.edu. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Maria Alfonso (malfonso@stanford.edu). REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: 900 Welch Road Suite 350; Time: TBA. Coordinator will email details one week prior to the first day of the rotation block. CALL CODE: 2 (No call, but a mixture of at least 3 overnights and/or weekend shifts during the EMED block.) OTHER FACULTY: Emergency Dept. Faculty. LOCATION: SUMC, KPMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

EMED 313D: Emergency Medicine Clerkship

VISITING: Closed to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 1. DESCRIPTION: This rotation focuses on the clinical practice of Emergency Medicine. The 3 week rotation consists of 10 clinical shifts in the emergency department. There are no required supplemental didactic sessions. Orientation will occur on the first day of the rotation in the Kaiser GME office (Dept. 384 MOB, Susan Krause). Faculty will orient medical students to the Emergency Department after your meeting in the GME office. Clinical shifts will consist of approximately 10 8-10 hour shifts, which will be a mix of daytime, evening, overnight, and weekend shifts. Students will usually work 1:1 with an EM attending to maximize learning. Each patient seen by the student is presented to an EM attending staff physician. Students should present each patient upon completing history and physical examination in a timely fashion. EM residents will give daily informal lectures at 4pm, which students are encouraged to attend when on shift. PREREQUISITES: Surgery 300A, Medicine 300A, Obstetrics & Gynecology 300A and Pediatric 300A, passing score USMLE I (and II if taken) on first attempt. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full time for 3 weeks, 2 students per period. No students may be added less than 3 weeks prior to the start of each rotation. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Alice Chao, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Susan Krause, 408-851-3836. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: GME office, Homestead Medical Office Building at 710 Lawrence Expressway, Dept 384; Time: TBA. CALL CODE: 2. OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: KPMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

EMED 370: Medical Scholars Research

Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4-18 | Repeatable for credit

EMED 398A: CLINICAL ELECTIVE IN EMERGENCY MEDICINE

VISITING: Closed to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: Provides an opportunity for a student in the clinical years to have an individualized clinical experience in one of the fields of Emergency Medicine. The quality and duration of the elective will be decided by both the student and a faculty preceptor in the Department of Emergency Medicine. Please note: Students cannot add 398A clerkships directly to their fishbowl schedules through the regular shuffles. Please contact Caroline Cheang in the Office of Medical Student Affairs at cheang@stanford.edu or 650-498-7619 with the faculty preceptor's name and email address to add this clerkship. PREREQUISITES: Core clerkships in Emergency Medicine, Internal Medicine, Surgery, and Pediatrics. Passing score on USMLE I. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full time for 3 weeks, 6 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: N. Nounou Taleghani MD, PhD. at Nounou@stanford.edu. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Maria Alfonso, 650-497-6702, malfonso@stanford.edu. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: TBA; Time: TBA. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: Emergency Department Faculty. LOCATION: SUMC
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: ; Lowe, J. (PI)

EMED 398W: Clinical Elective in Emergency Medicine

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 18 units total)

EMED 399: Graduated Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 72 units total)
Instructors: ; Quinn, J. (PI); Yang, S. (PI)

ENGLISH 118A: Illness in Literature

This class provides an overview of illness narratives in fiction from the 19th century to the present. We will examine how authors use language, plot, and structure to portray illness and even recreate its sensations within the reader. We will also study how domestic arrangements, art, medicine and technology mediate the experience of disease. Our discussion of fiction will be buttressed by theoretical texts about the function (and breakdown) of language when deployed to describe physical and mental suffering. Finally, we will consider the ethics of writing about illness. What does it mean to find beauty in descriptions of pain? What role can literature play in building empathy for experiences we have not (yet) experienced ourselves?
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: ; Houghteling, S. (PI)

ENGR 155C: Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers (CME 106)

Probability: random variables, independence, and conditional probability; discrete and continuous distributions, moments, distributions of several random variables. Numerical simulation using Monte Carlo techniques. Topics in mathematical statistics: random sampling, point estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, non-parametric tests, regression and correlation analyses. Numerous applications in engineering, manufacturing, reliability and quality assurance, medicine, biology, and other fields. Prerequisite: CME100/ENGR154 or Math 51 or 52.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR

EPI 206: Meta-research: Appraising Research Findings, Bias, and Meta-analysis (CHPR 206, MED 206, STATS 211)

Open to graduate, medical, and undergraduate students. Appraisal of the quality and credibility of research findings; evaluation of sources of bias. Meta-analysis as a quantitative (statistical) method for combining results of independent studies. Examples from medicine, epidemiology, genomics, ecology, social/behavioral sciences, education. Collaborative analyses. Project involving generation of a meta-research project or reworking and evaluation of an existing published meta-analysis. Prerequisite: knowledge of basic statistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Ioannidis, J. (PI)

EPI 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HUMBIO 26, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAids (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 82 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
| Units: 3-4

EPI 238: Genes and Environment in Disease Causation: Implications for Medicine and Public Health (HUMBIO 159)

(Formerly HRP 238) The historical, contemporary, and future research and practice among genetics, epidemiology, clinical medicine, and public health as a source of insight for medicine and public health. Genetic and environmental contributions to multifactorial diseases; multidisciplinary approach to enhancing detection and diagnosis. The impact of the Human Genome Project on analysis of cardiovascular and neurological diseases, and cancer. Ethical and social issues in the use of genetic information. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit. In academic year 2020-21, a letter grade or a `CR¿ grade will satisfy the Ways requirement. Prerequisites: Human Biology core or Biology Foundations or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3

EPI 245: Intensive Course in Clinical Research

The Intensive Course in Clinical Research (ICCR) is a one-week immersion course designed for new or aspiring clinical investigators, medical students, residents, graduate students, fellows and junior faculty interested in pursuing careers in clinical and transnational research. Students spend five days and four evenings immersed in all aspects of research study design and performance. The format combined didactic with intense group/team activities focused on practical issues in clinical research design - from selection of a researchable study question through actual writing of a research proposal. Lectures and panel discussions are presented by an accomplished faculty of Stanford clinical researchers and key leaders from the Stanford community. Every presentation includes a discussion of relevant issues. The course is supported by over 40 faculty and fellows from across the School of Medicine.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: ; Goodman, S. (PI)

EPI 250: Understanding Evidence-Based Medicine: Hands-on experience (CHPR 205, MED 250)

How can one practice evidence-based medicine and make evidence-based decisions for clinical practice and policy making? Using pivotal papers published in the recent scientific literature addressing important clinical questions on diverse medical topics, we will probe a wide range of types of studies, types of targeted therapeutic or preventive interventions, and types of studied outcomes (effectiveness and/or safety), including RCTs, observational studies, epidemiologic surveillance studies, systematic reviews-umbrella reviews-meta-analyses-meta-analyses of individual patient data, studies on the evaluation of diagnostic tests and prognostic models, economic analyses studies, and guidelines. Students enrolled for 4 units will complete an additional project or other engagement approved by the instructor. MD studies enroll for +/-. GR students enroll for Letter grade.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4

EPI 265: Advanced Methods for Meta-Analysis

(Formerly HRP 265) Meta-analysis is a method to quantitatively combine information from multiple studies; this combination is also called "research synthesis." Historically, it has been used to combine studies with a similar design, such as randomized controlled trials or observational studies examining similar interventions or exposures. However, evidence about a given relationship is often provided by many studies with different designs, or studies that can be "fit together" to create an evidence base. This can only be done with advanced meta-analytic methods. The course will cover advanced methods for research synthesis, including multivariate meta-analysis for multiple outcomes, generalized evidence synthesis of multiple study designs, and network meta-analysis for multiple interventions. These techniques are being increasingly used in evidence-based medicine, health technology assessments and policy making. Recommended preparation: EPI 206, and at least 2 quarters of biostatistics and one of epidemiology, including clinical research design. Familiarity with logistic and linear regression modeling required.
| Units: 2

EPI 299: Directed Reading in Epidemiology

Epidemiology, preventive medicine, medical genetics, public health, occupational or environmental medicine, international health, or related fields. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit

ETHICSOC 131X: Ethics in Bioengineering (BIOE 131)

Bioengineering focuses on the development and application of new technologies in the biology and medicine. These technologies often have powerful effects on living systems at the microscopic and macroscopic level. They can provide great benefit to society, but they also can be used in dangerous or damaging ways. These effects may be positive or negative, and so it is critical that bioengineers understand the basic principles of ethics when thinking about how the technologies they develop can and should be applied. On a personal level, every bioengineer should understand the basic principles of ethical behavior in the professional setting. This course will involve substantial writing, and will use case-study methodology to introduce both societal and personal ethical principles, with a focus on practical applications.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER

ETHICSOC 133: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (CSRE 178, PHIL 175A, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D, URBANST 122)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ER

ETHICSOC 301: Conflicts, Ethics, and the Academy

(Same as LAW 684) This course looks at conflicts of interest and ethical issues as they arise within academic work. The participants will be drawn from schools and departments across the University so that the discussion will prompt different examples of, and perspectives on, the issues we discuss. Topics will include the conflicts that arise from sponsored research, including choices of topics, shaping of conclusions, and nondisclosure agreements; issues of informed consent with respect to human subjects research, and the special issues raised by research conducted outside the United States; peer review, co-authorship, and other policies connected to scholarly publication; and the ethics of the classroom and conflicts of interest implicating professor-student relationships. Representative readings will include Marcia Angell's work, Drug Companies and Doctors: A Story of Corruption, N.Y. Rev. Books, Jan. 15, 2009, and Is Academic Medicine for Sale? 342 N. Engl. J. Med. 1516 (2000) (and responses); William R. Freudenburg, Seeding Science, Courting Conclusions: Reexamining the Intersection of Science, Corporate Cash, and the Law, 20 Sociological Forum 3 (2005); Max Weber, Science as a Vocation; legal cases; and conflict-of-interest policies adopted by various universities and professional organizations. The course will include an informal dinner at the end of each session. The goal of the course is to have students across disciplines think about the ethical issues they will confront in an academic or research career. Non-law students should enroll in ETHICSOC 301.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | Units: 1-3

FAMMED 199: Undergraduate Directed Reading and Research in Family and Community Medicine

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit

FAMMED 200: United States of Healthcare: A Geographic Survey of American Healthcare Disparities

Student lead: This dinner seminar will describe the various ways in which healthcare is experienced and practiced across the country. Each class will focus on one region of the nation and examine the socioeconomic, geographic, historical and cultural factors that contribute to one present-day disparity localized to the region. By examining several topics in depth, this course aims to illustrate how community and state-level discrepancies affect individual experiences and the role healthcare providers can play in making healthcare more equitable and accessible to all. This year topics covered will include: Refugee/Immigrant health, Native Health, Mental Health, Women's Health + Reproductive Rights, Homeless Health, Medicare/Health Insurance Gap.
| Units: 1

FAMMED 210: The Healer's Art

Please join us for this year's Stanford Healer's Art on Zoom, now in its 20th year. This unique five-session course provides a foundation for designing and living one's life with meaning and wellbeing as a physician and healer. The Healer's Art focuses on essential foundations of our humanity not explored elsewhere in the curriculum. It is relevant to all combinations of specialties and careers in medicine whether clinical, academic, research, community health, business, administration, or policy. Medical school students and select faculty participate in a discovery process that explores essential dimensions of meaning, service, healing, deep listening, presence, loss, grief, awe and mystery, commitment, prophylaxis against burnout, self-care and other topics. No papers/exams. May be repeated for credit. Here are to links that provide an overview of The Healer's Art (http://www.rishiprograms.org/healers-art/) and a course description (http://www.rishiprograms.org/healers-art/the-healers-art-course-description/)
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Feldstein, B. (PI)

FAMMED 213: Medical Tai Chi

Tai chi is a recognized form of integrative and complementary medicine. This class promotes health and well-being by teaching how to decrease stress, depression, and anxiety through the practice of moving meditation. The course also includes the study of the peer-reviewed research studies on the health benefits of tai chi and qigong.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Kane, B. (PI)

FAMMED 214: Core Fitness Exercise Class: A 30 Minute Blast...Then Back to Class!

Being a medical student is busy! Being a physician is busy! How better to squeeze in healthy exercise habits than over the lunch break? This class is appropriate for all levels of fitness: it will challenge even the most fit physiques but can be modified for beginners. The exercises focus on the core muscles (abs, back, shoulders, hips/glutes) and use resistance training ¿ you will work hard but won¿t be so sweaty that you can¿t go back to your afternoon classes. No need to bring anything, just show up and be ready to have fun to motivating music in this group fitness session.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)
Instructors: ; Rydel, T. (PI)

FAMMED 215: Primary Care Defined: Perspectives and Procedures

Designed to give pre-clerkship MD / PA students a broad overview of the diverse specialties and career trajectories available within the rewarding field of primary care. Students experience hands-on immersion in common office-based procedures, including abscess incision & drainage, joint injections, IUD insertion, and skin biopsy. Sessions led by primary care leaders, faculty, and residents address important questions, opportunities and popular misconceptions about primary care (pediatrics, family medicine and internal medicine), regarding salary, lifestyle, prestige, rigor of clinical practice, and career opportunities. Course enrollment limited to MD and PA students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable 20 times (up to 20 units total)

FAMMED 219: Mind-Body Medicine

A small group (8-10) of medical students experientially exploring the interconnections among human capacities such as thought, emotion, belief, attitudes, and physical health. Learn, review and practice of specific skills (including various forms of meditation-focused, mindfulness, active, imagery, genograms, body awareness, autogenics, and biofeedback etc) to enhance self-awareness, self-expression, and stress management. Readings relevant to mind-body medicine made available. Anticipated benefits to class participants include discovering and mobilizing their capacity to participate in valuable and proven methods of self knowledge and stress reduction, while dealing with the challenges that many students experience in medical school and beyond, as well as picking up important skills to pass on to patients.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 1

FAMMED 241: Assistantship in Family and Community Medicine

An in-depth experience in primary care following the first year of the pre-clerkship curriculum. The student applies during the first year to participate in the summer following completion. Application is through Family Medicine (pcpheducation@stanford.edu). Placements with primary care practices throughout California.
Last offered: Autumn 2012 | Units: 6-12

FAMMED 245: Women and Health Care

Lecture series. Topics of interest to those concerned about women as health care consumers and providers. The historical role of women in health care; current and future changes discussed.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

FAMMED 252: Medicine & Horsemanship: An Outdoor, Equine Assisted Learning Course for Doctor-Patient Relationship

Medicine and Horsemanship is a unique outdoor experience working with horses to develop interpersonal skills, leadership qualities, and self-care techniques. A challenge throughout a clinical career is to conduct relationships with patients and colleagues in a manner that is professional, perceptive, confident, and authentic. Horses mirror and magnify our intentions and behaviors. Working with horses requires sensitivity to nonverbal cues, discrimination in the quality and amount of physical contact, and an awareness of one's emotional state, all important skills for relating to patients. Horses give non-judgmental feedback about our personal communication styles and our ability to operate from a place of empathy and kindness. The course also teaches how to recognize subjectivity in judgment and how to overcome fear and immobility in the face of uncertainty. No riding is required and no previous horse experience is assumed. Limit 12 students.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

FAMMED 280: Student Community Outreach and Physician Support (S-CORPS)

Student Community OutReach and Physician Support (S-CORPS) was created in the midst of the SARS-CoV2 pandemic to empower motivated medical students, who were otherwise limited by PPE shortage and safety limitations, to provide remote support to high risk patients and improved access to their PCP's. This course will emphasize outreach to vulnerable patient populations who have been disproportionately affected by COVID-19, along with opportunities to help to bridge the health disparity gap widened by the rapid shift to telemedicine. Under the guidance of a paired physician mentor, students will build longitudinal relationships with vulnerable and isolated patients via team-based virtual video and telephone calls. Students participate in weekly didactic and debrief small group sessions to learn highly applicable clinical skills and reflect on their early patient experiences. S-CORPS fulfills the ECE credit graduation requirement. Please email Marcello Chang (TA) with questions: marcelkc@stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

FAMMED 299: Directed Reading in Family and Community Medicine

Students organize an individualized study program in family and community medicine. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit

FAMMED 301A: Family Medicine Core Clerkship

VISITING: Closed to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Required. DESCRIPTION: Teaches the management of diseases commonly encountered in the primary care setting. Emphasis is placed on patient-centered, efficient, equitable, cost-effective medical care of men, women and children of all ages in a variety of settings. Prevention, managed care, and cultural humility are emphasized. Didactic workshops are conducted at the School of Medicine, and clinic sessions are held at numerous community ambulatory sites on the Peninsula, in the South Bay, in the East Bay, in San Francisco, and electively in Humboldt County. PREREQUISITES: None. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-12, full time for 4 weeks, 10 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Tracy A. Rydel, M.D. & Rika Bajra, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Luis Hernandez, lhernan@stanford.edu. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: To be sent by email. Contact coordinator 2 weeks prior; Time: 8:00AM. CALL CODE: 2 (Occasional weekend and/or evening activities). OTHER FACULTY: R. Brinckhaus, M. Chelvakumar, M. Deshpande, R. Gibbs, D. Griffith, A. Hui, O. Jee, C. Ladika, B. Laniakea, D. Rai, T. Rydel, K. Vu, G. Yu, and other faculty and community preceptors in Family and Community Medicine.nLOCATION: (Stanford Family Medicine Hoover, Stanford Portola Valley, Stanford Los Altos, O'Connor Family Medicine Residency, Kaiser Santa Clara, Milpitas SCVMC, Almaden Family Practice/Stanford UHA, various community sites, and rural sites).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

FAMMED 310A: Continuity of Care Clerkship

VISITING: Closed to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 1. DESCRIPTION: In the Continuity of Care Clerkship, students work with a preceptor in any field of medicine, including Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, and other sub-specialties. They are released from other clerkships for one afternoon a week for a total of four afternoons per period. Three afternoons students to report to clinic. One afternoon every odd period is reserved for the Continuity of Care group session consisting of student and MD presentations. Students participating in this clerkship work with one faculty preceptor and his/her patients for 9 periods. This continuity experience allows students to establish a mentoring relationship with their preceptor, to see a cohort of patients repeatedly, gain insight into patient care and chronic disease management over time, develop and carry out a QI or similar project, and develop a deeper understanding of their specialty of choice. PREREQUISITES: MED 300A, OBGYN 300A or PEDS 300A. Limited to 3rd and 4th year medical students. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-12, open to 5 students for period 1. Open to 9 students for period 2 and 3. Open to 10 students for periods 4-12. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Kim Chiang, M.D., kichiang@stanford.edu. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Luis Hernandez, 650-723-9621, lhernan@stanford.edu. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Please contact the clerkship director or coordinator at least 8 weeks prior to the first week of the clerkship to seek out an appropriate preceptor; Time: TBA. CALL CODE: 0, varies according to preceptor. OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: Various.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6

FAMMED 338E: Elective Clerkship in Family Medicine

VISITING: Closed to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: The objective of this 3 week clerkship is to provide clinical experience in the following areas: management of normal adult and pediatric patients; evaluation and treatment of common acute medical conditions in the ambulatory setting; diagnostic criteria and management of chronic medical conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, and obesity; and the administration of routine health maintenance examinations in the clinical environment. Students will work with both Internal and Family Medicine physicians in the primary care department at the Kaiser Permanente Vallejo Medical Center. Students may also spend time in patient education classes as well as residency didactics. All students will complete an evidence based medicine project by the end of their rotation. Rotations are scheduled up to one year in advance on a first come, first serve basis. PREREQUISITES: 3rd and 4th year medical students only. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-12, full time for 4 weeks, 1 student per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Patrick Lowerre, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Gilbert Garces, Email: Gilbert.garces@kp.org or via fax (707) 651-5624. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Contact Gilbert Garces, Residency Assistant; Time: TBA. CALL CODE: 2 (night call optional). OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: Kaiser Permanente Napa-Solano.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

FAMMED 344E: Family Medicine Elective Clerkship (O'Connor Hospital)

VISITING: Closed to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: Offers the student a flexible learning experience as part of a team of family physicians working closely with Stanford's Family Medicine Residency Program at OConnor Hospital. With faculty guidance, the student develops an individually tailored mix of inpatient and ambulatory patient care responsibilities, supplemented by conferences and tutorials in family medicine topics. Special faculty interests include sports medicine, school health, HIV, and geriatrics. Emphasis is given to providing comprehensive, continuity family orientated care to patients of all ages from multiple ethnic groups in an inner city community hospital setting and physician offices. Students must register for this clerkship before May 1st of each year. After this date, students wishing to do this clerkship must first contact the clerkship coordinator to set it up before registering. Students wishing to do this elective clerkship are required to do a drug test. PREREQUISITES: FAMMED 301A. Fourth year medical students only. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full time for 3 weeks, 1 student per period (one additional slot scheduled by Diep Nguyen at O'Connor Hospital). Rotations are scheduled up to one year in advance on a first come, first serve basis. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Grace Yu, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Diep Nguyen, 408-283-7767. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: 455 O'Connor Drive, Ste 250, San Jose, CA 95128; Time: 8:30 am. CALL CODE: 2 (Night call optional). OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: O'Connor Hospital.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

FAMMED 345E: Family Practice Office Clerkship

VISITING: Closed to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 1. DESCRIPTION: THIS CLERKSHIP IS NOT BEING OFFERED DURING 2020-21 AND 2021-22. Family medicine preceptorship with physicians in family practice, in a model family practice unit (other than O'Connor Hospital), located in urban, suburban, or rural areas. The preceptor may be in private practice or in a health care center. Special opportunities are available in Indian Health Service settings, especially in South Dakota and New Mexico. The experience includes health supervision and primary medical care. It may include minor surgery and obstetrics under the supervision of the preceptor. The focus is family-oriented ambulatory care with minimal hospital experience. Team functioning and home visits are desirable. Visits with other health professionals and to community resources are important parts of the clerkship. This clerkship requires prior approval by Clerkship Director. PREREQUISITES: MED 300A or PED300A and consent of coordinator 6 weeks before clerkship. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-12, full time for 2 weeks or 4 weeks, 10 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Erika Schillinger, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Luis Henandez, lhernan@stanford.edu. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: TBA. Call Coordinator up to 3 months ahead of time; Time: TBA. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: Stanford Family Practice Group. LOCATION: Various.
Last offered: Summer 2020 | Units: 5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

FAMMED 364E: Subinternship in Family Medicine

VISITING: Closed to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 2. DESCRIPTION: Offers the student ready for an advanced experience similar to an internship a learning experience with an assigned patient load as part of a team of family physicians working closely with Stanford's Family Medicine Residency Program at O'Connor Hospital. With faculty guidance, the student develops an individually tailored mix of inpatient and ambulatory patient care responsibilities including supervised procedures and overnight call, supplemented by conferences and tutorials in family medicine topics. Special faculty interests include sports medicine, school health, HIV, and geriatrics. Emphasis is given to providing comprehensive, continuity family oriented care to patients of all ages from multiple ethnic groups in an inner city community hospital setting and physician offices. Students must register for this clerkship before May 1st of each year. After this date, students wishing to do this Sub-I must first contact the clerkship coordinator to set it up (to ensure there is room for the student in a given clerkship period) before registering. Students wishing to do this Sub-I are required to do a drug test. PREREQUISITES: FAMMED 301A. Fourth year students only. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for three weeks. 1 student per period (one additional slot scheduled by Diep Nguyen at O'Connor Hospital). CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Grace Yu, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Diep Nguyen, 408-283-7767. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Program Office, 455 O'Connor Drive, Ste 250, San Jose, CA 95128; Time: 8:30 am. CALL CODE: 2 (night call optional). OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: O'Connor Hospital.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

FAMMED 370: Medical Scholars Research

Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4-18 | Repeatable for credit

FAMMED 398A: Clinical Elective in Family Medicine

VISITING: Closed to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: Provides an opportunity for a student in the clinical years to have a clinical experience in one of the fields of Family Medicine, of a quality and duration to be decided upon by the student and a faculty preceptor in Family Medicine. Please note: Students cannot add 398A clerkships directly to their fishbowl schedules through the regular shuffles. Please contact Caroline Cheang in the Office of Medical Student Affairs at cheang@stanford.edu or 650-498-7619 with the faculty preceptor's name and email address to add this clerkship. PREREQUISITES: None. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-12, full time for 4 weeks, 1 student per period, 2 students for period 3 ONLY. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Kim Chiang, M.D., Erika Schillinger, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Anthony Duong (650-723-7357). REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: TBA, designated by faculty perceptor; Time: TBA. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: SUMC, PAVAMC, SCVMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 15 units total)

FAMMED 399: Graduate Research

Students interested in conducting research in a specific area of family and community medicine undertake investigations sponsored by the faculty instructor. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit

FEMGEN 44Q: Gendered Innovations in Science, Medicine, Engineering, and Environment (HISTORY 44Q)

Explores ¿Gendered Innovations¿ or how sex, gender, and intersectional analysis in research sparks discovery and innovation. Section 1 focuses on the history of women in science. Section 2 looks at transforming research institutions. Section 3 explores ¿Gendered Innovations.¿ Topics include historical background, basic concepts, social robots, sustainability, medicine & public health, facial recognition, inclusive crash test dummies, and more. Stanford University is engaged in a multi-year collaboration with the European Commission and the U.S. National Science Foundation project on Gendered Innovations in Science, Health & Medicine, Engineering, and Environment, and this class will contribute that project. This course fulfills the second level Writing and Rhetoric Requirement (WRITE 2) and emphasizes oral, multimedia presentation, and writing skills. Each student will develop a case study illustrating how sex, gender, and intersectional analysis can lead to innovation and enhance social equalities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI, Writing 2
Instructors: ; Schiebinger, L. (PI)

FEMGEN 124: Challenging Sex and Gender Dichotomies in Medicine (FEMGEN 224)

Explores and challenges the traditional physiological bases for distinguishing human males from females, as well as the psychosocial factors that play a role in experiencing and expressing gender and sexuality. Topics include the influence of sociocultural (gender) norms and behaviors on human biology, the interactions of sex and gender on medical outcomes, the importance of understanding the spectrum of sex, gender, and sexuality in clinical practice.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | Units: 1

FEMGEN 144: Sex, Gender, and Intersectional Analysis in Science, Medicine, Engineering, and Environment (HISTORY 144)

(HISTORY 44 is offered for 3 units; HISTORY 144 is offered for 5 units.) Explores "Gendered Innovations" or how sex, gender, and intersectional analysis in research sparks discovery and innovation. Section 1 focuses on the history of women in science. Section 2 looks at transforming research institutions. Section 3 explores Gendered Innovations. Topics include historical background, basic concepts, social robots, sustainability, medicine & public health, facial recognition, inclusive crash test dummies, and more. Stanford University is engaged in a multi-year collaboration with the European Commission and the U.S. National Science Foundation project on Gendered Innovations in Science, Health & Medicine, Engineering, and Environment, and this class will contribute that project. The operative questions is: how can sex, gender, and intersectional analysis lead to discovery and enhance social equalities?
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

FEMGEN 156H: Women and Medicine in US History: Women as Patients, Healers and Doctors (AMSTUD 156H)

This course explores ideas about women's bodies in sickness and health, as well as women's encounters with lay and professional healers in the United States from the eighteenth century to the present. We begin with healthy women and explore ideas about women's life cycle in the past, including women's sexuality, the history of birth control, abortion, childbirth, and aging. We then turn to the history of women healers including midwives, lay physicians, professional physicians and nurses. Finally, we examine women's illnesses and their treatment as well as the lives of women with disabilities in the past. We will examine differences in women's experience with medicine on the basis of race, ethnicity, sexuality and class. We will relate this history to issues in contemporary medicine, and consider the efforts of women to gain control of their bodies and health care throughout US history.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

FEMGEN 224: Challenging Sex and Gender Dichotomies in Medicine (FEMGEN 124)

Explores and challenges the traditional physiological bases for distinguishing human males from females, as well as the psychosocial factors that play a role in experiencing and expressing gender and sexuality. Topics include the influence of sociocultural (gender) norms and behaviors on human biology, the interactions of sex and gender on medical outcomes, the importance of understanding the spectrum of sex, gender, and sexuality in clinical practice.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | Units: 1

FEMGEN 230: Sexual Function and Diversity in Medical Disciplines (CHPR 230, SOMGEN 230)

This course is a coordinated seminar series that presents evidence-based health promotion and disease prevention guidelines by clinical and translational research and population health science faculty of clinical departments other than Medicine (the focus of CHPR 260) of the Stanford School of Medicine, including; Anesthesiology & Perioperative, & Pain Medicine, Cardiothoracic gy, Emergency Medicine, Neurology & Neurological Sciences, Neurosurgery, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Ophthalmology, Orthopaedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Radiation Oncology, Radiology, Surgery and Urology. CHPR master's program students must enroll in CHPR 230 for a letter grade and priority for enrollment will be given to current CHPR students. For third unit, graduate students attend INDE 215 Queer Health & Medicine and complete assignments for that section. For third unit and WAYs, undergrads enroll in SOMGEN 130. Prerequisites: CHPR 201 or HUMBIO 126/CHPR 226 or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3
Instructors: ; Stefanick, M. (PI)

FEMGEN 444: Graduate Research Seminar: Gender in Science, Medicine, and Engineering (HISTORY 444)

Theory and practice of gender in STEM. 1. "Fix the Numbers of Women" focuses on increasing women's participation; 2. "Fix the Institutions" promotes gender equality in careers through structural change in research organizations; 3. "Fix the Knowledge" or "gendered innovations" stimulates excellence in science and technology by integrating gender analysis into research. Seminar explores harnessing the creative power of gender analysis to enhance knowledge and spark innovation.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | Units: 5

FRENCH 75N: Narrative Medicine and Near-Death Experiences (ITALIAN 75N)

Even if many of us don't fully believe in an afterlife, we remain fascinated by visions of it. This course focuses on Near-Death Experiences and the stories around them, investigating them from the many perspectives pertinent to the growing field of narrative medicine: medical, neurological, cognitive, psychological, sociological, literary, and filmic. The goal is not to understand whether the stories are veridical but what they do for us, as individuals, and as a culture, and in particular how they seek to reshape the patient-doctor relationship. Materials will span the 20th century and come into the present. Taught in English.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

FRENCH 219: The Renaissance Body in French Literature and Medicine (FRENCH 319)

If the Renaissance is famous for discovering unknown continents and ancient texts the body too was a new territory of conquest. How did literature respond to the rise of an anatomical gaze in the arts and in medicine and how did it stage the aesthetic religious philosophical and moral issues related to such a promotion or deconstruction of the body? Does literature aim at representing the body or does it use it instead as a ubiquitous signifier for intellectual emotional and political ideas? The locus of desire, pleasure and disease, the body also functioned as a reminder of human mortality and was caught in the web of gender issues, religious controversies and new norms of behavior. Texts from prose fiction (Rabelais) poetry (Scève Ronsard Labé D'Aubigné) essays (Montaigne) and emblem literature. Extra documents include music scores tapestries paintings philosophical and anatomical plates from medical treatises. Taught in French.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

FRENCH 319: The Renaissance Body in French Literature and Medicine (FRENCH 219)

If the Renaissance is famous for discovering unknown continents and ancient texts the body too was a new territory of conquest. How did literature respond to the rise of an anatomical gaze in the arts and in medicine and how did it stage the aesthetic religious philosophical and moral issues related to such a promotion or deconstruction of the body? Does literature aim at representing the body or does it use it instead as a ubiquitous signifier for intellectual emotional and political ideas? The locus of desire, pleasure and disease, the body also functioned as a reminder of human mortality and was caught in the web of gender issues, religious controversies and new norms of behavior. Texts from prose fiction (Rabelais) poetry (Scève Ronsard Labé D'Aubigné) essays (Montaigne) and emblem literature. Extra documents include music scores tapestries paintings philosophical and anatomical plates from medical treatises. Taught in French.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 3-5

FRENCH 343: In Defense of Poetry

Beginning with the account of the quarrel between philosophy and poetry in Plato's Republic, we will read definitions and defenses of poetry by authors such as Cicero, Horace, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Sidney, Shelley, and Pound, among others. While we will try to historicize these authors' defenses as much as possible, we will also read them from the perspective of contemporary efforts to defend literature and the humanities. Topics of central concern will be the connection between poetry and ethics, the conflict between poetry and the professions of business, law, and medicine, poetry's place in the university, the political role of the poet, questions of poetic language and form, and the relevance of defenses of poetry to literary theory.
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | Units: 3-5

GENE 202: Human Genetics

Utilizes lectures and small group activities to develop a working knowlege of human genetics as applicable to clinical medicine. Basic principles of inheritance, risk assessment, and population genetics are illustrated using examples drawn from diverse areas of medical genetics practice including prenatal, pediatric, adult and cancer genetics. Practical aspects of molecular and cytogenetic diagnostic methods are emphasized. Existing and emerging treatment strategies for single gene disorders are also covered. Prerequisites: basic genetics. Only available to MD and MOM students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

GENE 210: Genomics and Personalized Medicine (DBIO 220)

Principles of genetics underlying associations between genetic variants and disease susceptibility and drug response. Topics include: genetic and environmental risk factors for complex genetic disorders; design and interpretation of genome-wide association studies; pharmacogenetics; full genome sequencing for disease gene discovery; population structure and genetic ancestry; use of personal genetic information in clinical medicine; ethical, legal, and social issues with personal genetic testing. Hands-on workshop making use of personal or publicly available genetic data. Prerequisite: GENE 202, Gene 205 or BIOS 200.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | Units: 3

GENE 217: Translational Bioinformatics (BIOE 217, BIOMEDIN 217, CS 275)

Computational methods for the translation of biomedical data into diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications in medicine. Topics: multi-scale omics data generation and analysis, utility and limitations of public biomedical resources, machine learning and data mining, issues and opportunities in drug discovery, and mobile/digital health solutions. Case studies and course project. Prerequisites: programming ability at the level of CS 106A and familiarity with biology and statistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4

GS 182: Field Trip to Cascade Volcanoes of California

Three-day field trip (involving light hiking and camping) to study active and dormant volcanoes of northern California, including Mt. Shasta, Mt. Lassen, and Medicine Lake, and their relationship to regional extensional faulting. Features visited include stratovolcanoes, cinder cones, lava caves, obsidian flows, hot springs and hydrothermal alteration, volcanic blast deposits and mudflows, debris avalanches, fault scarps. Recommended: 1 or equivalent. Limited enrollment; preference to frosh, sophs, and undergraduates and graduates majoring in SE3.
Last offered: Autumn 2016 | Units: 1

GSBGEN 368: Managing Difficult Conversations

This elective 3- unit course is offered to JD law students and other selected graduate students, and to MBA students who aspire to improve their ability to deal effectively with difficult interpersonal situations. The course will be taught by William F. Meehan III, the Lafayette Partners Lecturer in Strategic Management, Stanford Graduate School of Business and Charles G. Prober, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics, Microbiology & Immunology and Senior Associate Vice Provost for Health Education, Stanford School of Medicine. The course, which will be case-based, will involve frequent student-to-student and student-to-instructor role-playing in authentic medical interactions and difficult interpersonal situations. Topic-specific experts often will be present to participate as class guests. Relevant principles of professionalism, leadership, and psychology underlie the course pedagogy. Students will be expected to attend all classes unless excused in advance. Class preparation will include reading of assigned cases; analysis of the cases and recommendations as to how to confront specific difficult conversations (consistent with assigned study questions); and reading of assigned background material. It is important that all students participate actively in classroom discussions. For GSB students, 50% of the final grade will depend on classroom performance; the remainder will be based on a final written assignment of 3-5 pages. GSB students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis. The course will be ungraded for medical students, residents and fellows. All students will be expected to complete the written assignment. Class size will be limited to 40 students per the following: (1) a maximum of 20 MBA students and (2) a maximum of 20 non-GHB graduate students.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3

GSBGEN 551: Innovation and Management in Health Care

The health care system accounts for 18% of US GDP and is one of the fastest growing segments of the economy. This two unit class focuses on the interplay and tension between the main players in the health care field - providers of health care services (individual doctors, group practices, integrated health care systems), payors (insurances companies, employers, consumers, and government), patients, and innovator companies (biopharma, medical device, diagnostics, and health care IT). The course is designed for students with a broad diversity of backgrounds and interests who want to better understand the health care business and system. No prior experience in the health care or medical field is assumed or needed. The focus of the class will be primarily on the US health care system, but there will be limited discussion of non-US systems as well. The course is divided into four modules: An overview of the US Health Care System and the interplay between payers, providers, innovators, and patients, Provider delivery models, health care information technology, and incentive structures - The relationship between quality, cost, and access - Integrated systems, value-based, and fee for service models - New IT technologies, including electronic data records - The role of information and incentives - Innovator business models and issues - Financing and managing new product development - Clinical trial management and gaining regulatory approval - Marketing, reimbursement, and sales strategies - Business models to drive innovation - Health care system reform The class will be taught primarily from the perspective of a business person operating a company rather than that of a policy maker, academic, or investor. While there will be a few lectures to provide background and frameworks for course topics, most classes will involve a case discussion and prominent guest speakers from the health care industry. Speakers will include CEOs and senior executives from Genomic Health, Blue Shield of California, Tenet Health, Venrock, Burd Health, Verily (Google Health), Myovant, and Stanford Medicine.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: ; Chess, R. (PI); Davis, S. (GP)

GSBGEN 568: Managing Difficult Conversations

This elective 2-unit course is offered to all medical students, residents, and fellows, and to GSB students who aspire to improve their ability to deal effectively with difficult interpersonal situations. The course will be taught by William F. Meehan III, the Lafayette Partners Lecturer in Strategic Management, Stanford Graduate School of Business and Charles G. Prober, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics, Microbiology & Immunology and Senior Associate Vice Provost for Health Education, Stanford School of Medicine. The course, which will be case-based, will involve frequent student-to-student and student-to-instructor role-playing in authentic medical interactions and difficult interpersonal situations. Topic-specific experts often will be present to participate as class guests. Relevant principles of professionalism, leadership, and psychology underlie the course pedagogy. There will be seven classes held on Wednesdays beginning April 10th and concluding on May 22nd. Students will be expected to attend all classes unless excused in advance. Class preparation will include reading of assigned cases; analysis of the cases and recommendations as to how to confront specific difficult conversations (consistent with assigned study questions); and reading of assigned background material. It is important that all students participate actively in classroom discussions. For GSB students, 50% of the final grade will depend on classroom performance; the remainder will be based on a final written assignment of 3-5 pages. GSB students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis. The course will be ungraded for medical students, residents and fellows. All students will be expected to complete the written assignment. Class size will be limited to 40 students per the following: (1) a maximum of 20 GSB students and (2) a maximum of 20 medical students, residents, and fellows.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | Units: 2

HISTORY 12: Medicine and Disease in the Ancient World

(Same as HISTORY 112. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 112.) This course explores medicine and disease through case studies from civilizations of the ancient world such as Egypt, Greece, and Peru. We will discuss how these cultures conceptualized disease, and in turn, how they contended with illnesses. Lectures will address different forms of illness through medical texts, art, and human remains. Weekly discussion will incorporate evidence from these sources to explore both their potential and their limitations.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | Units: 3

HISTORY 23S: Sex and Socialism

Among the major promises made by socialism and communism was the liberation of women from an imperialist, capitalist, and patriarchal world. How did these promises hold up in the face of the realities of revolution and state formation? This course explores the relationship between gender, sex, and sexuality within the state socialist polities of the 20th century. Topics include diversity in barricades and workplaces, motherhood and reproductive rights, medicine and sexology, incarceration and state violence, and homosexuality and gender non-conformity.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: ; Signer, M. (PI)

HISTORY 40: World History of Science

(History 40 is 3 units; History 140 is 5 units.) The earliest developments in science, the prehistoric roots of technology, the scientific revolution, and global voyaging. Theories of human origins and the oldest known tools and symbols. Achievements of the Mayans, Aztecs, and native N. Americans. Science and medicine in ancient Greece, Egypt, China, Africa, and India. Science in medieval and Renaissance Europe and the Islamic world including changing cosmologies and natural histories. Theories of scientific growth and decay; how science engages other factors such as material culture and religions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

HISTORY 44: Sex, Gender, and Intersectional Analysis in Science, Medicine, Engineering, and Environment

(HISTORY 44 is offered for 3 units; HISTORY 144 is offered for 5 units.) Explores ¿Gendered Innovations¿ or how sex, gender, and intersectional analysis in research sparks discovery and innovation. Section 1 focuses on the history of women in science. Section 2 looks at transforming research institutions. Section 3 explores Gendered Innovations. Topics include historical background, basic concepts, social robots, sustainability, medicine & public health, facial recognition, inclusive crash test dummies, and more. Stanford University is engaged in a multi-year collaboration with the European Commission and the U.S. National Science Foundation project on Gendered Innovations in Science, Health & Medicine, Engineering, and Environment, and this class will contribute that project. The operative questions is: how can sex, gender, and intersectional analysis lead to discovery and enhance social equalities?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 44Q: Gendered Innovations in Science, Medicine, Engineering, and Environment (FEMGEN 44Q)

Explores ¿Gendered Innovations¿ or how sex, gender, and intersectional analysis in research sparks discovery and innovation. Section 1 focuses on the history of women in science. Section 2 looks at transforming research institutions. Section 3 explores ¿Gendered Innovations.¿ Topics include historical background, basic concepts, social robots, sustainability, medicine & public health, facial recognition, inclusive crash test dummies, and more. Stanford University is engaged in a multi-year collaboration with the European Commission and the U.S. National Science Foundation project on Gendered Innovations in Science, Health & Medicine, Engineering, and Environment, and this class will contribute that project. This course fulfills the second level Writing and Rhetoric Requirement (WRITE 2) and emphasizes oral, multimedia presentation, and writing skills. Each student will develop a case study illustrating how sex, gender, and intersectional analysis can lead to innovation and enhance social equalities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI, Writing 2
Instructors: ; Schiebinger, L. (PI)

HISTORY 112: Medicine and Disease in the Ancient World

(Same as HISTORY 12. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for HISTORY 112.) This course explores medicine and disease through case studies from civilizations of the ancient world such as Egypt, Greece, and Peru. We will discuss how these cultures conceptualized disease, and in turn, how they contended with illnesses. Lectures will address different forms of illness through medical texts, art, and human remains. Weekly discussion will incorporate evidence from these sources to explore both their potential and their limitations.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | Units: 5

HISTORY 140: World History of Science

(History 40 is 3 units; History 140 is 5 units.) The earliest developments in science, the prehistoric roots of technology, the scientific revolution, and global voyaging. Theories of human origins and the oldest known tools and symbols. Achievements of the Mayans, Aztecs, and native N. Americans. Science and medicine in ancient Greece, Egypt, China, Africa, and India. Science in medieval and Renaissance Europe and the Islamic world including changing cosmologies and natural histories. Theories of scientific growth and decay; how science engages other factors such as material culture and religions.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

HISTORY 144: Sex, Gender, and Intersectional Analysis in Science, Medicine, Engineering, and Environment (FEMGEN 144)

(HISTORY 44 is offered for 3 units; HISTORY 144 is offered for 5 units.) Explores "Gendered Innovations" or how sex, gender, and intersectional analysis in research sparks discovery and innovation. Section 1 focuses on the history of women in science. Section 2 looks at transforming research institutions. Section 3 explores Gendered Innovations. Topics include historical background, basic concepts, social robots, sustainability, medicine & public health, facial recognition, inclusive crash test dummies, and more. Stanford University is engaged in a multi-year collaboration with the European Commission and the U.S. National Science Foundation project on Gendered Innovations in Science, Health & Medicine, Engineering, and Environment, and this class will contribute that project. The operative questions is: how can sex, gender, and intersectional analysis lead to discovery and enhance social equalities?
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 234P: The Age of Plague: Medicine and Society, 1300-1750 (STS 200U)

(Undergraduates, enroll in 234P. Graduates, enroll in 334P) The arrival of plague in Eurasia in 1347-51 affected many late medieval and early modern societies. It transformed their understanding of disease, raised questions about the efficacy of medical knowledge, and inspired new notions of public health. This class explores the history of medicine in the medieval Islamic and European worlds. Changing ideas about the body, the roles of different healers and religion in healing, the growth of hospitals and universities, and the evolution of medical theory and practice will be discussed. How did medicine and society change in the age of plague?
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: ; Findlen, P. (PI)

HISTORY 243C: People, Plants, and Medicine: Colonial Science and Medicine (HISTORY 343C)

Explores the global exchange of knowledge, technologies, plants, peoples, disease, and medicines. Considers primarily Africans, Amerindians, and Europeans in the eighteenth-century West but also takes examples from other knowledge traditions. Readings treat science and medicine in relation to voyaging, colonialism, slavery, racism, plants, and environmental exchange. Colonial sciences and medicines were important militarily and strategically for positioning emerging nation states in global struggles for land and resources.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: ; Schiebinger, L. (PI)

HISTORY 244C: The History of the Body in Science, Medicine, and Culture (HISTORY 444C)

The human body as a natural and cultural object, historicized. The crosscultural history of the body from the 18th century to the present. Topics include: sciences of sex and race; medical discovery of particular body parts; human experimentation, foot binding, veiling, and other bodily coverings; thinness and obesity; notions of the body politic.
Last offered: Spring 2007 | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender

HISTORY 248D: Histories of Race in Science and Medicine at Home and Abroad (AFRICAAM 122F, AFRICAST 122F, CSRE 122F)

This course has as its primary objective, the historical study of the intersection of race, science and medicine in the US and abroad with an emphasis on Africa and its Diasporas in the US. By drawing on literature from history, science and technology studies, sociology and other related disciplines, the course will consider the sociological and cultural concept of race and its usefulness as an analytical category. The course will explore how the study of race became its own ¿science¿ in the late-Enlightenment era, the history of eugenics--a science of race aimed at the ostensible betterment of the overall population through the systematic killing or "letting die" of humanity¿s "undesirable" parts, discuss how the ideology of pseudo-scientific racism underpinned the health policies of the French and British Empires in Africa, explore the fraught relationship between race and medicine in the US, discuss how biological notions of race have quietly slipped back into scientific projects in the 21st century and explore how various social justice advocates and scholars have resisted the scientific racisms of the present and future and/or proposed new paths towards a more equitable and accessible science.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | Units: 4

HISTORY 298E: Chinese Pop Culture: A History

This discussion course examines the evolution of popular culture in the Chinese-speaking world and diaspora from the late imperial era to the present. Analyzing myth, literature, medicine, music, art, film, fashion, and internet culture will help students understand the revolutionary social and political changes that have transformed modern East Asia.
Terms: Sum | Units: 5
Instructors: ; Elmore, A. (PI)

HISTORY 334P: The Age of Plague: Medicine and Society, 1300-1750

(Graduates, enroll in 334P. Undergraduates, enroll in 234P.) The arrival of plague in Eurasia in 1347-51 affected many late medieval and early modern societies. It transformed their understanding of disease, raised questions about the efficacy of medical knowledge, and inspired new notions of public health. This class explores the history of medicine in the medieval Islamic and European worlds. Changing ideas about the body, the roles of different healers and religion in healing, the growth of hospitals and universities, and the evolution of medical theory and practice will be discussed. How did medicine and society change in the age of plague?
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5
Instructors: ; Findlen, P. (PI)

HISTORY 343C: People, Plants, and Medicine: Colonial Science and Medicine (HISTORY 243C)

Explores the global exchange of knowledge, technologies, plants, peoples, disease, and medicines. Considers primarily Africans, Amerindians, and Europeans in the eighteenth-century West but also takes examples from other knowledge traditions. Readings treat science and medicine in relation to voyaging, colonialism, slavery, racism, plants, and environmental exchange. Colonial sciences and medicines were important militarily and strategically for positioning emerging nation states in global struggles for land and resources.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5
Instructors: ; Schiebinger, L. (PI)

HISTORY 349: Bodies, Technologies, and Natures in Africa (AFRICAST 249, ANTHRO 348B)

This interdisciplinary course explores how modern African histories, bodies, and natures have been entangled with technological activities. Viewing Africans as experts and innovators, we consider how technologies have mediated, represented, or performed power in African societies. Topics include infrastructure, extraction, medicine, weapons, communications, sanitation, and more. Themes woven through the course include citizenship, mobility, labor, bricolage, in/formal economies, and technopolitical geographies, among others. Readings draw from history, anthropology, geography, and social/cultural theory.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | Units: 4-5

HISTORY 398E: Chinese Pop Culture: A History

This discussion course examines the evolution of popular culture in the Chinese-speaking world and diaspora from the late imperial era to the present. Analyzing myth, literature, medicine, music, art, film, fashion, and internet culture will help students understand the revolutionary social and political changes that have transformed modern East Asia.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4-5
Instructors: ; Elmore, A. (PI)

HISTORY 444: Graduate Research Seminar: Gender in Science, Medicine, and Engineering (FEMGEN 444)

Theory and practice of gender in STEM. 1. "Fix the Numbers of Women" focuses on increasing women's participation; 2. "Fix the Institutions" promotes gender equality in careers through structural change in research organizations; 3. "Fix the Knowledge" or "gendered innovations" stimulates excellence in science and technology by integrating gender analysis into research. Seminar explores harnessing the creative power of gender analysis to enhance knowledge and spark innovation.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | Units: 5

HISTORY 444C: The History of the Body in Science, Medicine, and Culture (HISTORY 244C)

The human body as a natural and cultural object, historicized. The crosscultural history of the body from the 18th century to the present. Topics include: sciences of sex and race; medical discovery of particular body parts; human experimentation, foot binding, veiling, and other bodily coverings; thinness and obesity; notions of the body politic.
Last offered: Spring 2007 | Units: 4-5

HRP 89Q: Introduction to Cross Cultural Issues in Medicine

Preference to sophomores. Introduction to social factors that impact health care delivery, such as ethnicity, immigration, language barriers, and patient service expectations. Focus is on developing a framework to understand culturally unique and non-English speaking populations in the health care system.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul

HRP 243: Health Policy Seminar: Population Health

This seminar course is intended to introduce students to the role of policy in public health in the United States. In addition to speakers from the law school, SIEPR, HRP, and School of Medicine, we will be bringing in speakers from outside organizations in the Bay Area with expertise in a variety of issues in public health. n There are no assignments and lunch will be provided.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)

HRP 263: Advanced Decision Science Methods and Modeling in Health (MED 263)

Advanced methods currently used in published model-based cost-effectiveness analyses in medicine and public health, both theory and technical applications. Topics include: Markov and microsimulation models, model calibration and evaluation, and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Prerequisites: a course in probability, a course in statistics or biostatistics, a course on cost-effectiveness such as HRP 392, a course in economics, and familiarity with decision modeling software such as TreeAge.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

HRP 281: Spanish for Medical Students (SPANLANG 122M)

Second quarter of three-quarter series.Goal is a practical and culturally appropriate command of spoken Spanish. Emphasis is on performing a physical examination. Topics include anatomy, general hospital procedures, reproductive health, emergency medicine, and essential doctor-patient phrases when dealing with Spanish-speaking patients. Series can be taken independently, depending on the level of prior knowledge. Undergraduates are welcome to enroll.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 2 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 3 units total)

HRP 299: Directed Reading in Health Research and Policy

Epidemiology, health services research, preventive medicine, medical genetics, public health, economics of medical care, occupational or environmental medicine, international health, or related fields. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit

HUMBIO 26: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, EPI 235, MED 235)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAids (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 82 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 3-4

HUMBIO 27: Traditional Chinese Medicine

The philosophy and history behind traditional Chinese medicine. Concepts such as Qi, Yin/Yang, meridians, Chinese organs, and the 5 elements. How these concepts are applied through techniques such as acupuncture, herbal medicine, Qi gong, and massage. How traditional Chinese medicine is understood from a scientific standpoint. Political and socioeconomic implications. Observation of an acupuncturist. Readings on the integration of Eastern and Western medicine and on traditional Chinese medicine.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Golianu, B. (PI)

HUMBIO 44: Diagnostic Odysseys In Medicine (MED 244)

Medicine is rapidly evolving, with increasing emphasis on genetic testing, immunophenotyping and integration of technology to guide diagnosis. In this course, experts from Stanford and Silicon Valley will highlight exciting developments. Topics include the latest developments in genetics and genomics (including genome testing in clinical practice, direct to consumer testing, and frontiers in neurogenetics), immunophenotyping, utilization of databases to research diseases and the emerging field of machine learning and clinical decision support in optimizing diagnostic strategies. Students who wish to engage in a mentored multi-disciplinary team-based research project related to advanced diagnostic techniques can additionally enroll in MED 239.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

HUMBIO 51: Big Data for Biologists - Decoding Genomic Function

Biology and medicine are becoming increasingly data-intensive fields. This course is designed to introduce students interested in human biology and related fields to methods for working with large biological datasets. There will be in-class activities analyzing real data that have revealed insights about the role of the genome and epigenome in health and disease. For example, we will explore data from large-scale gene expression and chromatin state studies. The course will provide an introduction to the relevant topics in biology and to fundamental computational skills such as editing text files, formatting and storing data, visualizing data and writing data analysis scripts. Students will become familiar with both UNIX and Python. This course is designed at the introductory level. Previous university-level courses in biology and programming experience are not required.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR

HUMBIO 65: Biosocial Medicine: The Social, Psychological, and Biological Determinants of Behavior and Wellbeing (EDUC 205, SOMGEN 215)

Explores how social forces, psychological influences, and biological systems combine to affect human behavior in early childhood, in the educational experience, and throughout the life course. Examines how behaviors are linked to well-being. Uses a flipped classroom model, in which a series of lectures are available for students to view on-line before class. In-class time then focuses on case studies from published research. Students must enroll in HUMBIO 65 for a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: ; Barr, D. (PI)

HUMBIO 71A: Race in Science (AFRICAAM 51A, CEE 151A, COMM 51A, CSRE 51A, STS 51A)

What are the roles of race and racism in science, technology, and medicine? 3-course sequence; each quarter can be taken independently. Fall quarter focuses on science. What is the science of race and racism? How does race affect scientific work? Weekly guest speakers will address such issues as the psychology and anthropology of race and racism; how race, language, and culture affect education; race in environmental science and environmental justice; the science of reducing police violence; and the role of race in genomic research. Talks will take a variety of forms, from panel discussions to interviews and lectures. Weekly assignments: read a related article and participate in an online discussion.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

HUMBIO 71B: Race in Technology (AFRICAAM 51B, BIOE 91B, CEE 151B, COMM 51B, CSRE 51B, STS 51B)

What are the roles of race and racism in science, technology, and medicine? 3-course sequence; each quarter can be taken independently. Winter quarter focuses on technology. How do race and racism affect the design and social impact of technology, broadly defined? Can new or different technology help to reduce racial bias? Invited speakers will address the role of race in such issues as energy infrastructure, nuclear arms control, algorithmic accountability, machine learning, artificial intelligence, and synthetic biology. Talks will take a variety of forms, ranging from panel discussions to interviews and lectures. Weekly assignments: read a related article and participate in an online discussion.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

HUMBIO 71C: Race in Medicine (AFRICAAM 51C, BIOE 91C, CEE 151C, CSRE 51C, STS 51C)

What are the roles of race and racism in science, technology, and medicine? 3-course sequence; each quarter can be taken independently. Spring quarter focuses on medicine. How do race and racism affect medical research and medical care? What accounts for health disparities among racial groups? What are the history, ethics, legal, and social issues surrounding racialized medical experiments and treatments? Invited speakers will address these and other issues. Talks will take a variety of forms: conversations, interviews, panels, and others. Weekly assignments: read a related article and participate in an online discussion.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Edwards, P. (PI)

HUMBIO 88: Introduction to Statistics for the Health Sciences

Students will learn the statistical tools used to describe and analyze data in the fields of medicine and epidemiology. This very applied course will rely on current research questions and publicly available data. Students will gain proficiency with Stata to do basic analyses of health-related data, including linear and logistic regression, and will become sophisticated consumers of health-related statistical results.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR
Instructors: ; Kurina, L. (PI); Shah, J. (TA)

HUMBIO 121E: Ethnicity and Medicine (EMED 121E)

Weekly lecture series. Examines the linguistic, social class, and cultural factors that impact patient care. Presentations promote culturally sensitive health care services and review contemporary research issues involving minority and underserved populations. Topics include health care inequities and medical practices of African Americans, Asians, Latinos, Native Americans, immigrants, and refugees in both urban and rural settings. 1 unit requires weekly lecture attendance, completion of required readings, completion of response questions; 2 units requires weekly lecture attendance and discussion session, completion of required readings and weekly response questions; 3 units (HUMBIO only) requires completion of a significant term paper. Students must in enroll in HUMBIO 121E for 3 units to receive a letter grade. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units to be eligible for Ways credit. Enrollment limited to students with sophomore academic standing or above.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

HUMBIO 129S: Global Public Health

The class is an introduction to the fields of international public health and global medicine. It focuses on resource poor areas of the world and explores major global health problems and their relation to policy, economic development, culture and human rights. We discuss technical solutions as well as the importance of the social determinants of health, and emphasize multi-sectoral approaches to care. The course is intended to challenge all students to think globally, and is geared for students interested in exploring how their major interests cold be directed to solve global health issues. We provide opportunities for in-depth discussion and interaction with experts in the field. This course must be taken for a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HUMBIO 133: Human Physiology (BIO 112)

Human physiology will be examined by organ systems: cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal and endocrine. Molecular and cell biology and signaling principles that underlie organ development, pathophysiology and opportunities for regenerative medicine are discussed, as well as integrative control mechanisms and fetal development. Prerequisite: Human Biology core or Biology Foundations or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

HUMBIO 139S: Sport and Exercise Medicine

This is an upper division course with a common theme of injury as well as injury prevention in sport and physical activity. The topics include the treatment and evaluation of common sports injuries and illnesses for both musculoskeletal and non-musculoskeletal/medical conditions. Students will also develop critical reading and thinking skills. Classes will incorporate didactic lectures, critical analysis of sports medicine literature, as well as hand-on labs incorporating current sports medicine injury evaluation tools. Enrollment limited to students with sophomore academic standing or above. Prerequisite: Human Biology Core or Biology Foundations or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

HUMBIO 159: Genes and Environment in Disease Causation: Implications for Medicine and Public Health (EPI 238)

(Formerly HRP 238) The historical, contemporary, and future research and practice among genetics, epidemiology, clinical medicine, and public health as a source of insight for medicine and public health. Genetic and environmental contributions to multifactorial diseases; multidisciplinary approach to enhancing detection and diagnosis. The impact of the Human Genome Project on analysis of cardiovascular and neurological diseases, and cancer. Ethical and social issues in the use of genetic information. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit. In academic year 2020-21, a letter grade or a `CR¿ grade will satisfy the Ways requirement. Prerequisites: Human Biology core or Biology Foundations or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

HUMBIO 162L: The Literature of Psychosis (ANTHRO 82P, PSYC 82, PSYC 282)

One of the great gifts of literature is its ability to give us insight into the internal worlds of others. This is particularly true of that state clinicians call "psychosis." But psychosis is a complex concept. It can be terrifying and devastating for patients and families, and yet shares characteristics with other, less pathological states, such as mysticism and creativity. How then can we begin to make sense of it? In this course, we will examine the first-hand experience of psychosis. We will approach it from multiple perspectives, including clinical descriptions, works of art, and texts by writers ranging from Shakespeare, to the science fiction writer Philip K. Dick, to patients attempting to describe their experience. This class is not only for students thinking of careers in medicine, psychology or anthropology, but also readers and writers interested exploring extraordinary texts. There are no prerequisites necessary; all that is needed is a love of language and a curiosity about the secrets of other minds.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: ; Mason, D. (PI)

HUMBIO 163: The Opioid Epidemic: Using Neuroscience to Inform Policy and Law

The opioid epidemic has become a national problem, killing 115 people per day in the United States, and contributing to the first decrease in life expectancy in this country for decades.This is an upper division undergraduate class that aims to help students understand the science of opiates, how opioid prescribing and availability led us to be in this place, and how that information might be used to create effective policy to reverse it. Students will engage didactic work and interactive discussions to stimulate critical thinking at the interface between psychology, psychiatry, addiction medicine, neuroscience, communication, law, and society. They will develop the knowledge-base and framework to critically evaluate the science behind opioid addiction and how to apply this knowledge to address the addiction epidemic. This highly interactive seminar aims to engage the students in critical thinking didactics, activities and discussions that shape their understanding of the complexity inherent to the issues surrounding addiction and increase the student's ability to more critically assimilate and interrogate information. Preference will be given to upperclassmen, especially in the HumBio program. Attendance at first class is mandatory. Enrollment limited to 20 by application only. Applications will be accepted on Sunday, February 28th at midnight, consistent with the Spring Quarter enrollment. Applications will be due on Friday, March 5th at 5:00PM. Applications will be considered in the order received. Apply here: https://app.smartsheet.com/b/form/615264add6dc475da6da583f9a41a4b0. Prerequisites: Human Biology Core or PSYC 83 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HUMBIO 174: Foundations of Bioethics

Classic articles, legal cases, and foundational concepts. Theoretical approaches derived from philosophy. The ethics of medicine and research on human subjects, assisted reproductive technologies, genetics, cloning, and stem cell research. Ethical issues at the end of life. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER
Instructors: ; Magnus, D. (PI)

HUMBIO 176A: Medical Anthropology (ANTHRO 82, ANTHRO 282)

Emphasis is on how health, illness, and healing are understood, experienced, and constructed in social, cultural, and historical contexts. Topics: biopower and body politics, gender and reproductive technologies, illness experiences, medical diversity and social suffering, and the interface between medicine and science.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HUMBIO 177: Disability Literature

This course explores literary and filmic narratives about disability in the Global South. Authors including Edwidge Danticat, Bapsi Sidhwa, and Ricardo Padilla highlight the unique aesthetic potential of what Michael Davidson calls the defamiliar body and Ato Quayson describes as aesthetic nervousness. While engaging universal issues of disability stigma, they also emphasize the specific geopolitics of disability and how people in the Global South face greater rates of impairment based on unequal exposure to embodied risk. The course particularly welcomes students with interests in fields of medicine, policy, or public health.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

HUMBIO 180: Human Skeletal Anatomy (ANTHRO 175, ANTHRO 275, BIO 174, BIO 274)

Study of the human skeleton (a. k. a. human osteology), as it bears on other disciplines, including medicine, forensics, archaeology, and paleoanthropology (human evolution). Basic bone biology, anatomy, and development, emphasizing hands-on examination and identification of human skeletal parts, their implications for determining an individual's age, sex, geographic origin, and health status, and for the evolutionary history of our species. Three hours of lecture and at least three hours of supervised and independent study in the lab each week.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

INDE 201: Practice of Medicine I

Six quarter series extending throughout the first two years of the MD program, interweaving core skills training in medical interviewing and the physical examination with other major threads addressing the context of medical practice: information literacy, nutrition principles, clinical epidemiology and biostatistics, evidence-based practice, psychiatry, biomedical ethics, health policy, population health. Core clinical skills are acquired through hands-on practice, and evaluated through an extensive program of simulated medical encounters, in which students interview, examine, and manage patients in a mock clinic. The information literacy thread introduces students to informatics and knowledge management, biomedical informatics, and evidence-based medicine searching. Nutrition principles are acquired through interactive, web-based instruction, and reinforced through problem-based learning cases, which run in parallel to the basic science components over the first year. In epdemiology students learn the taxonomy of epidemiological studies, how to critically read a journal article, and how to recognize and understand the concepts behind different clinical study designs. Topics include bias, confounding, diagnostic testing and screening, and "how statistics can lie." Psychiatry introduces students to the unique role of medical students in talking with patients, the difference between process and content in patient communication, how to respond to breaks in the patient-physician relationship, and the relationship between the quality of the patient-physician interaction and health outcomes. Health care policy covers such topics as health insurance, physician payment, health care costs, access, measurement and improvement of quality, regulation and health care reform. Biomedical ethics includes important ethical issues in medical practice, such as confidentiality, privacy, and ethical issues relating to medical students. The population health curriculum exposes students to concepts of public health, community action, and advocacy, and includes a year-long, community-based project. At the end of this quarter students participate in a performance-based assessment of the medical interview skills.nCourse offered to MD and MSPA students only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 8

INDE 202: Practice of Medicine II

Medical interview and physical examination skills, information literacy, nutrition principles, evidence-based practice, health policy, and population health are covered. At the end of this quarter, students participate in a performance-based assessment of their medical interview and physical examination skills. See INDE 201 for a complete description of the Practice of Medicine course series. Course open to MD and MSPA students only.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: ; Hosamani, P. (PI)

INDE 203: Practice of Medicine III

Medical interview and physical examination skills, biomedical literature retrieval and appraisal, nutrition principles, evidence-based practice, biomedical ethics, and population health are covered. Students begin clinical problem-solving sessions to learn the approach to common and important clinical problems. Cases integrate other course themes of population health, evidence-based practice, clinical ethics, nutrition, health policy, and behavioral medicine. Students begin transition from comprehensive to problem-focused patient encounters. Students also gain exposure to geriatrics, pediatrics, and interprofessional healthcare teams, and practice mental health interview skills. At the end of this quarter, students participate in a performance-based assessment of their medical interview and physical examination skills. See INDE 201 for a complete description of the Practice of Medicine course series. Course open to MD and MSPA students only.
Terms: Spr | Units: 6
Instructors: ; Hosamani, P. (PI)

INDE 204A: Practice of Medicine IV-A

The second year of the Practice of Medicine series (INDE 204 and 205) emphasizes clinical reasoning, clinical practicum, and clinical procedures. Students continue clinical problem-solving sessions to learn the approach to common and important clinical problems. Cases integrate other course themes of population health, evidence-based practice, clinical ethics, nutrition, health policy, and behavioral medicine. Students spend one-half day per week in a clinical setting, practicing medical interview, physical examination skills, oral presentations, and clinical note-writing under the mentorship of a clinical tutor. In the practicum, students also gain experience with other practical aspects of patient care. The Clinical Procedures segment introduces common and important procedures in clinical practice, including phlebotomy, intravenous line insertion, and electrocardiography.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: ; Hom, J. (PI); Parra, L. (GP)

INDE 204B: Practice of Medicine IV-B

The second year of the Practice of Medicine series (INDE 204 and 205) emphasizes clinical reasoning, clinical practicum, and clinical procedures. Students continue clinical problem-solving sessions to learn the approach to common and important clinical problems. Cases integrate other course themes of population health, evidence-based practice, clinical ethics, nutrition, health policy, and behavioral medicine. Students spend one-half day per week in a clinical setting, practicing medical interview, physical examination skills, oral presentations, and clinical note-writing under the mentorship of a clinical tutor. In the practicum, students also gain experience with other practical aspects of patient care. The Clinical Procedures segment introduces common and important procedures in clinical practice, including phlebotomy, intravenous line insertion, and electrocardiography.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: ; Hom, J. (PI); Parra, L. (GP)

INDE 205A: Practice of Medicine V

Continued emphasis on clinical reasoning, clinical practicum, and clinical procedures. Students continue clinical problem-solving sessions to learn the approach to common and important clinical problems Cases integrate other course themes of population health, evidence-based practice, clinical ethics, nutrition, health policy, and behavioral medicine. Students spend one-half day per week in a clinical setting, practicing medical interview, physical examination skills, oral presentations, and clinical note-writing under the mentorship of a clinical tutor. In the practicum, students also gain experience with other practical aspects of patient care. For the Clinical Procedures segment, students will have an opportunity in the Emergency Department to practice performing procedures learned in the previous quarter. At the end of this quarter, students participate in a comprehensive four-station objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) performance-based assessment of their medical interview, physical examination, and clinical problem-solving skills.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Hom, J. (PI)

INDE 205B: Practice of Medicine V

Continued emphasis on clinical reasoning, clinical practicum, and clinical procedures. Students continue clinical problem-solving sessions to learn the approach to common and important clinical problems Cases integrate other course themes of population health, evidence-based practice, clinical ethics, nutrition, health policy, and behavioral medicine. Students spend one-half day per week in a clinical setting, practicing medical interview, physical examination skills, oral presentations, and clinical note-writing under the mentorship of a clinical tutor. In the practicum, students also gain experience with other practical aspects of patient care. For the Clinical Procedures segment, students will have an opportunity in the Emergency Department to practice performing procedures learned in the previous quarter. At the end of this quarter, students participate in a comprehensive four-station objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) performance-based assessment of their medical interview, physical examination, and clinical problem-solving skills.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Johnstone, N. (PI)

INDE 206: Practice of Medicine VI

This last segment of the Practice of Medicine series is an intensive, four-week learning experience to consolidate clinical skills from prior quarters, and a final preparation for transition to clerkships. An extensive series of workshops covers topics such as dermatology, ophthalmology, advanced clinical reasoning, advanced presentations, bedside skills, ethics, palliative medicine, advanced sexual history, electronic medical record, ekg interpretation, intravenous fluid and electrolyte management. Students practice clinical procedures with task trainers and on a cadaver. This quarter also includes a professionalism series to prepare students for entry into clinical practice. Special clinical practice sessions are held as a capstone to clinical skills preparation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: ; Hom, J. (PI); Parra, L. (GP)

INDE 207A: Medical Mandarin I: Beginning

Develops conversational communication skills and essential medical vocabularies. Teaches in pinyin pronunciation system, which provides an accessible method of learning basic phrases. The foundations of taking a comprehensive patient history in Mandarin and doing medical interviews at individual hospital divisions, including making introductions, soliciting symptoms, explaining health concepts (e.g. diseases and prescriptions) as well as daily survival conversations. Main goals are to improve rapport with Chinese patients through Mandarin fluency in the medical setting and to promote understanding of Chinese culture in the context of health care as well as daily life. Students registering for 3 units participate in clinic visits and field activities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3

INDE 207B: Medical Mandarin II: Intermediate

For students who already have a basic command of spoken Chinese. Conversational communication skills practiced in a more advanced setting, including more sophisticated assessment of patient history and different tasks such as giving medical instructions and doing labs and tests. Builds working vocabulary for organ system, disease assessment to conduct a full physical exam, and to describe treatment modalities for Chinese-speaking patients (diagnostic and therapeutic). Students registering for 3 units participate in clinic visits and field activities. Prerequisite: one year of college-level Chinese or instructor assessment of fluency.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3

INDE 207C: Medical Mandarin III: Advanced

Access advanced professional medical vocabulary, conduct medical research, and engage in discussions in Chinese. Aims at a proficiency level of medical interpreting or doing other independent work in Chinese. Students are also assisted in doing a project or projects related to a specific field of medicine. Students registering for 3 units participate in clinic visits, field activities or projects. Prerequisite: completion of Medical Mandarin II, or advanced Chinese proficiency.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3

INDE 207D: Professional Mandarin I

Designed for students who seek professional development via Mandarin. Coursework includes lectures, online classes, language partnerships, selected topics, projects and field activities. Goal is to enhance students' language abilities as professionals and facilitate a career. Students choose to enroll for 2 units or 3 units depending upon an agreed- upon workload approved by the instructor.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)

INDE 208A: Medical Mandarin I: Beginning

Continuation of 207A. See description for 207A. Students participating in classroom and online instruction only register for 2 units. Students registering for 3 units participate in clinic visits and field activities as well.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3

INDE 208B: Medical Mandarin II: Intermediate

Continuation of 207B. See description for 207B. Students participating in classroom and online instruction only register for 2 units. Students registering for 3 units participate in clinic visits and field activities as well.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3

INDE 208C: Medical Mandarin III: Advanced

Access advanced professional medical vocabulary, conduct medical research, and engage in discussions in Chinese. Aims at a proficiency level of medical interpreting or doing other independent work in Chinese. Students are also assisted in doing a project or projects related to a specific field of medicine. 3 units Includes clinic visits and field activities. Prerequisite: completion of 207C, or advanced Chinese proficiency.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3

INDE 208D: Professional Mandarin II

Continuation of INDE 207D. Designed for students who seek professional development via Mandarin. Coursework includes lectures, online classes, language partnerships, selected topics, projects and field activities. Goal is to enhance students' language abilities as professionals and facilitate a career. Students choose to enroll for 2 units or 3 units depending upon an agreed- upon workload approved by the instructor. Prerequisite: INDE 207D.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3

INDE 209: Analysis of Public Companies in the Life Sciences

Student lead: Life Science companies are often valued with a different methodology than traditional valuation metrics. This course will serve to teach students how to analyze a publicly traded life science company or sector using publicly available materials online such as 10-K, 13-F, conference calls, and financial & technical analysis. In addition, students will learn how to access various Stanford resources (analyst reports, Bloomberg, etc). Students will work in teams throughout class and publish an investment analysis at the end of the course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Repeatable 5 times (up to 10 units total)

INDE 209A: Medical Mandarin III: Beginning

Continuation of 207A/208A. See description for 207A. Students participating only in classroom and online instruction register for 2 units. Students registering for 3 units participate in clinic visits and field activities as well.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3

INDE 209B: Medical Mandarin III: Intermediate

Continuation of 207B/208B. See description for 207B. Students participating only in classroom and online instruction register for 2 units. Students registering for 3 units participate in clinic visits and field activities as well.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3

INDE 209C: Medical Mandarin III: Advanced

Access advanced professional medical vocabulary, conduct medical research, and engage in discussions in Chinese. Aims at a proficiency level of medical interpreting or doing other independent work in Chinese. Students are also assisted in doing a project or projects related to a specific field of medicine. 3 units Includes clinic visits and field activities. Prerequisite: completion of 208C or advanced Chinese proficiency.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3

INDE 209D: Professional Mandarin III

Continuation of INDE 208D. Designed for students who seek professional development via Mandarin. Coursework includes lectures, online classes, language partnerships, selected topics, projects and field activities. Goal is to enhance students' language abilities as professionals and facilitate a career. Students choose to enroll for 2 units or 3 units depending upon an agreed- upon workload approved by the instructor. Prerequisite: INDE 208D.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3

INDE 211: Creative Writing

For medical students - all levels of writing skill. Examines uses of creative writing, including understanding the experience of medical training. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Braitman, L. (PI)

INDE 212: Medical Humanities and the Arts

The interdisciplinary field of medical humanities: the use of the arts and humanities to examine medicine in personal, social, and cultural contexts. Topics include the doctor/patient relationship, the patient perspective, the meaning of doctoring, and the meaning of illness. Sources include visual and performing arts, film, and literary genres such as poetry, fiction, and scholarly writing. Designed for medical students in the Biomedical Ethics and Medical Humanities Scholarly Concentration, but all students are welcome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: ; Shafer, A. (PI)

INDE 214: Stanford Medical Student Journal

Provides an opportunity for editors of all levels to cultivate their skills and assist in preparing pieces submitted by colleagues for publication in the Stanford Medical Student Journal. Students enrolled in the course work closely with student authors as well as other editors. Editors examine multiple categories of writing, including opinion pieces, poetry, memoirs, book reviews, case reports and investigative reports. The Journal is published two to three times per year and highlights the diverse talents of Stanford medical students in both scientific writing and the humanities.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Shafer, A. (PI)

INDE 215: Queer Health & Medicine

Explores specific, pertinent, and timely issues impacting the health of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community; examines the role of the primary care physician in addressing the health care needs of this community. Guest lecturers provide a gender-sensitive approach to the medical care of the LGBT patient, breaking down homophobic barriers and reaffirming patient diversity. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)
Instructors: ; Stefanick, M. (PI)

INDE 217: Physician Scientist Hour

Enrollment is limited to MD, PhD, or MD-PhD students interested in careers as physician scientists. Focus is on aspects of developing careers in biomedical research through a mix of research lectures, clinical case presentations, and physician-scientist guest speakers.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 15 units total)

INDE 218: Histology

This course focuses on the microscopic structure of the major organ systems, including the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, renal, and reproductive systems. Sessions examine the unique features of the cells and tissues that comprise the major organs, describe how they contribute to the organs' functions, and explore how the form the foundation for many pathologic processes. Course open to MD and MSPA students only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

INDE 221: Science of Medicine I

First course in three-sequence Science of Medicine block. Focus is on structure, function, disease, and therapeutics of the respiratory system and the cardiovascular system. The Science of Medicine block presents organ system-based histology, pathology, physiology, pharmacology, and infectious disease in a sequence of interdisciplinary courses. Each organ-specific integrated course includes a review of the anatomy and related histology, normal function of that organ system, how the organ system is affected by and responds to disease including infection, and how diseases of that organ system are treated (therapeutics).
Terms: Spr | Units: 12

INDE 222A: Science of Medicine II-A

Focus is on structure, function, disease, and therapeutics of the renal, gastrointestinal, and hepatic systems. Science of Medicine presents organ system-based histology, pathology, physiology, pharmacology, and infectious disease in a sequence of interdisciplinary courses. Each integrated course includes a review of the anatomy, related histology, and normal function of one or more organ systems, how the organ systems are affected by and respond to disease including infection, and how diseases of those organ systems are treated (therapeutics).
Terms: Aut | Units: 7

INDE 222B: Science of Medicine II-B

Focus is on structure, function, disease, and therapeutics of the endocrine and musculoskeletal systems and on Women's Health. Science of Medicine presents organ system-based histology, pathology, physiology, pharmacology, and infectious disease in a sequence of interdisciplinary courses. Each integrated course includes a review of the anatomy, related histology, and normal function of one or more organ systems, how the organ systems are affected by and respond to disease including infection, and how diseases of those organ systems are treated (therapeutics).nPrerequisites if applicable: INDE-221, completed or concurrent INDE-222-A
Terms: Aut | Units: 7

INDE 223A: Science of Medicine III-A

Focus is on structure, function, disease, and therapeutics of the nervous system and skin. Science of Medicine presents organ system-based histology, pathology, physiology, pharmacology, and infectious disease in a sequence of interdisciplinary courses. Each integrated course includes a review of the anatomy, related histology, and normal function of one or more organ systems, how the organ systems are affected by and respond to disease including infection, and how diseases of those organ systems are treated (therapeutics).nnPrerequisites if applicable: INDE-221, INDE-222-A
Terms: Win | Units: 5

INDE 223B: Science of Medicine III-B

Focus is on structure, function, disease, and therapeutics in the areas of Hematology and Autoimmune Disease. Science of Medicine presents organ system-based histology, pathology, physiology, pharmacology, and infectious disease in a sequence of interdisciplinary courses. Each integrated course includes a review of the anatomy, related histology, and normal function of one or more organ systems, how the organ systems are affected by and respond to disease including infection, and how diseases of those organ systems are treated (therapeutics).
Terms: Win | Units: 5

INDE 224: Pathophysiology Capstone

The Pathophysiology Capstone (PC) is a newly developed Science of Medicine (SOM) Year 2 capstone experience in Quarter 6 that will be integrated with the Practice of Medicine (PON) course called "Transition to Clerkships." This four-week long intensive spring quarter course, including 25-32 hours of instruction, focuses on the re-introduction of core pathophysiology concepts as well as delving into advanced topics, treatment, and breakthroughs based on essentials taught in the SOM series in quarters 3-5.nPrerequisites: Successful completion of Science of Medicine (SOM) I,II,III
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

INDE 225: Popular and Clinical Nutrition: Food Facts, Fads, and Pharmacology

Designed for medical students and other health care professionals. Lunchtime lectures review the epidemiological and clinical research related to eating patterns and misconceptions of the public, the mechanisms of pharmacological effects of food, and related topics common to patient nutritional concerns. Topics include fad diets, the impact of dietary addiction, longevity associated with caloric restriction, toxins in foods and the action of phytonutirents. Epidemiological, clinical, and biochemical studies are reviewed in the discussion of these and other topics.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Units: 1

INDE 226: History of Medicine Online

Via Internet. Topics include: ancient medicine, Egypt and Babylonia, ancient Greece and Rome, Europe in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, 18th-century schools of thought, and technological medicine. Sources include Kleinman's core clinical functions, and text, pictures, hypertext links, and sound clips. For assistance accessing the course, email: cwpsupport@lists.stanford.edu. Enroll in Axess, then ask cwpsupport to be added to the course site as a student
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Units: 1

INDE 227: Careers in Medicine: Pathways in the Medical Sciences

Open to medical students, graduate and undergraduate students. Interactive, seminar-style sessions expose students to diverse career opportunities and the challenges of developing work-life balance in medicine. Recognized experts in clinical medicine and biomedical research who have been innovators in their careers discuss their work, decision-points in their career pathways, and lifestyle aspects of their choices.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

INDE 228: Career Transition Planning: Taking Action Today for a Successful Tomorrow

Open to School of Medicine MD and graduate students; post-docs and clinical fellows may audit by consent of instructor. How to prioritize career goals and develop an effective job search campaign. Topics: translating scientific and clinical training into a variety of workplace environmennts, professional network development, professional interest assessment, recruiters' perspectives, credentials development, and creating a marketing plan. Guest speakers from myriad career fields. May be repeated for credit.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

INDE 230A: Topics in Scientific Management

Broadly discusses foundational topics in pursuing academic careers, including the academic and faculty career landscape, establishing a writing practice, establishing an independent research agenda, issues of diversity, equity and inclusion, presentation skills, self-advocacy, creativity in research, establishing collaborations, and grantsmanship. Topics may vary annually.
| Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

INDE 230B: Topics in Scientific Management

Reviews management skills necessary for successfully assuming leadership roles in scientific research. Addresses some of the most difficult aspects of developing, directing, and managing people and projects and running a research group, especially issues that new faculty have traditionally learned by trial and error over a number of years. Topics include: the faculty job search process and strategies, key elements in starting a lab, basic principles regarding legal dimensions of scientific activity (intellectual property, royalties, links with industry), team science, research ethics, communication and negotiation skills, writing and securing grants. Topics may vary annually.
| Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

INDE 230C: Topics in Scientific Management

Deep dive into topics in mentorship, which may include mentoring in a research environment, navigating all directions of mentoring relationships within academia, conflict management and resolution, communication styles, setting expectations, giving feedback, cultivating ethical behavior, promoting research self-efficacy, and navigating intercultural dynamics. Topics may vary annually.
| Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

INDE 231A: Career Transitions: Academia

Preference to PhD students in their fourth year or beyond and postdocs/fellows in their intended final year. Restricted to students in Biosciences and the School of Medicine. Focus is on practical, hands-on preparation of application materials (including interview and job talk) for academic positions. Provides practical, hands-on preparation for Bioscience PhD students, postdoctoral fellows and research/clinical trainees ready to apply to academic positions. It not only previews the academic hiring process, including tips from experienced faculty from different types of institutions, but also guides participants in the preparation and polishing of their application materials for success on the job market.
Last offered: Summer 2016 | Units: 1

INDE 231B: Career Prep and Practice: Academia

Open to all Biosciences PhD students, postdocs/fellows and medical students/residents/fellows planning to pursue academic careers. Focus is on gaining a deeper understanding of faculty roles and responsibilities. Topics include how to balance teaching, research, service, lab set-up, grantwriting and publishing at different types of institutions. Features panels of experienced faculty members from different academic environments. More information available on course website: web.stanford.edu/class/inde231b.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Units: 1

INDE 232: Introduction to Academic Medicine for Physician-Scientists

Open only to accepted MSTP students. Presentations by Stanford faculty on professional development topics, including: choosing a dissertation advisor, giving oral presentations, writing a grant proposal, attending scientific meetings, developing a research career. Substantial writing component.
Last offered: Summer 2010 | Units: 3

INDE 233: Medical Education Seminar Series

For pre-clinical and clinical medical students. A series of sessions rotating among the following formats: Medical Education journal club; education works-in-progress; topics in medical education design, implementation, and evaluation; teaching M&M; hot topics and controversies in medical education. May be repeated for credit.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

INDE 234: Introduction to Writing Research Proposals

Practical instruction in research proposal writing. Suitable for advanced graduate students. Substantial writing component. Enrollment by instructor approval only.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

INDE 238: Managing Difficult Conversations

(Crosslisted with GSBGEN 368) This elective 3-unit course is offered to all medical students, residents, and fellows, and to GSB students who aspire to improve their ability to deal effectively with difficult interpersonal situations. The course will be taught by William F. Meehan III, the Raccoon Partners Lecturer in Strategic Management, Stanford Graduate School of Business and Charles G. Prober, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics, Microbiology & Immunology and Senior Associate Vice Provost for Health Education, Stanford School of Medicine. The course, which will be case-based, will involve frequent student-to-student and student-to-instructor role-playing in authentic difficult professional and interpersonal situations. Topic-specific experts often will be present to participate as class guests. Relevant principles of professionalism, leadership, and psychology underlie the course pedagogy. Students will be expected to attend all classes unless excused in advance. Class preparation will include reading of assigned cases; analysis of the cases and recommendations as to how to confront specific difficult conversations (consistent with assigned study questions); and reading of assigned background material. It is important that all students participate actively in classroom discussions. Class size will be limited to 40 students per the following: (1) a maximum of 20 MBA students and (2) a maximum of 20 non-GSB graduate students. MD student enrollment only in INDE 238, GSB students enroll under GSBGEN 368.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3

INDE 240: Humanistic Medicine: Engaging Difference by Design

In the changing healthcare landscape, maintaining a human connection with patients is more essential than ever. Humanistic medicine is defined by its focus on building a patient-provider relationship grounded in compassion and empathy. It¿s medicine practiced with sensitivity to diverse cultural backgrounds, values, and preferences. How do our own unique identities as healthcare practitioners intersect with those of our patients? Our colleagues? This course incorporates experiential activities with active discussion to explore the complex ways that identities intersect in medicine, starting with our own.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 1

INDE 255A: Health Policy, Finance and Economics I

Open to medical students and resident physicians. Introduction to basic concepts and current issues in health policy, health finance, and health economics. Goals are to promote understanding of the forces that shape healthcare; to integrate medical students with graduate medical education (residents); to motivate participants to pursue further scholarly activity in these subjects through coursework, graduate programs or research . Team taught by world-renowned experts in their respective fields. Prerequisite: instructor consent.
Last offered: Summer 2010 | Units: 1

INDE 257: Global Health Storytelling

Global health storytelling is a hands-on workshop that teaches global health students the art of performing compelling stories. Participants will focus on seeking, structuring, and sharing stories culminating in a live performance in front of their peers. Through the workshop, students will learn the narrative structure of a story, practice active listening, examine the importance of body language and dramatic techniques, and understand the power of narrativizing medical research and clinical experiences.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | Units: 1

INDE 258: PSTP Career Development Symposium

Enrollment is limited to senior MD program students. Preference given to MSTP and Berg Scholars Program participants. Focus is on providing guidance to students who are pursuing physician-scientist careers. Topics include introduction to physician investigator careers, identifying a research area and mentor, how to maintain a research focus in a clinical environment, clinical research: challenges and rewards, staffing and funding a research group. Guest speakers include Stanford faculty physician-scientists and physician-scientist assistant professors for a panel discussion.Prerequisites: Must be a senior MD program student. Priority will be given to MSTP and Berg Scholars Program participants.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 1

INDE 260A: Pharmacological Treatment of Disease

This course will provide an overview of how drugs and therapeutics are used in the treatment and prevention of diseases and disorders. It aims to review the general principles of drug action, including drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of the major drug classes. For each major drug class, we will review selected prototype drugs and discuss their molecular mechanisms of action, therapeutic indication, adverse effects, contra-indications and drug-drug interactions.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

INDE 260B: Pharmacological Treatment of Disease

This course will provide an overview of how drugs and therapeutics are used in the treatment and prevention of diseases and disorders. It aims to review the general principles of drug action, including drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of the major drug classes. For each major drug class, we will review selected prototype drugs and discuss their molecular mechanisms of action, therapeutic indication, adverse effects, contra-indications and drug-drug interactions.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

INDE 263: Microbiology and Infectious Diseases I

First course in a two-course series exploring microbiology, pathogenesis, and clinical issues associated with infectious diseases. Patient cases springboard discussion on viral, bacterial, fungal, protozoal and helminthic pathogens. Online videos and self-assessments followed by interactive sessions and problem sets.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

INDE 265: Microbiology and Infectious Diseases III

Second course in a two-course series exploring microbiology, pathogenesis, and clinical issues associated with infectious diseases. Patient cases springboard discussion on microbiomes, diarrhea, hepatitis, STIs, helminths, zoonoses. and systemic diseases. Online videos and self-assessments followed by interactive sessions and problem sets.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

INDE 267: Planning and Writing a Research Proposal

Students will gain fundamental skills in developing research questions and writing research proposals through a series of engaging workshops. Topics include developing a research idea; writing an executive summary, i.e. NIH-style 1-page specific aims; outlining the research plan to include rigor; and designing career development training plans. Students will develop early drafts of key proposal documents, such as the 1-page Specific Aims, and receive feedback from an instructor or Grant Coach. Students in the Medical Scholars Research Program or Biosciences Program may enroll in the course.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 4 units total)

INDE 268: Early Clinical Engagement (ECE)

Early Clinical Engagement (ECE) is an innovative course for first year medical students to participate in clinical experiences that inform their vision as future physicians. Course goals include integration into the clinical setting with preceptors, development of concrete skills, and introduction to different career paths. ECE includes three components: (1) clinical experiences, (2) interactive large group seminars, and (3) small group sessions for reflection of clinical sessions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

INDE 273: Medical Improvisation

Medicine, like theater, is both a skill set and an art form. The practice of medicine demands exceptional communicative, cognitive, and interpersonal skills in order to respond to unpredictable situations while interacting with a wide variety of individuals. Improvisational theater skills have a surprising and substantial overlap with those required of clinicians. Improv is a genre of performance art grounded in principles of spontaneity, adaptability, collaboration, and skilled listening. In this course, the principles and training techniques of improvisational theater are used to highlight and improve awareness, communication, and teamwork in the field of medicine. Limited enrollment. Class meets on five consecutive Mondays 9/30, 10/7, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28 from 5:30-7:30 pm.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

INDE 274: Medical Spanish

Medical Spanish is a new elective course for MD and MSPA students to engage in 40-hours of medical Spanish curriculum through an online platform then solidify their knowledge through workshops for practical dialogue with faculty members at Stanford Medicine in multiple subspecialties who have native Spanish fluency. Students take part in online curriculum that is differentiated into 3 proficiency levels, therefore all levels of learners from beginners to native speakers are encouraged to participate. The online content covers over 36 medical specialties to provide a broad base of clinically relevant knowledge. The platform has validated pedagogy to meet the needs of individual learners with clinical scenarios that are relevant to medical engagements across all disciplines and inclusive of a culturally relevant approach to clinical care. Subspecialty faculty will lead the language workshops: Dr. Reena Thomas, Clinical Associate Professor of Neurology; Dr. Matias Bruzoni, Associate Professor of Surgery; Dr. Katherine Bianco, Clinical Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Dr. Felipe Perez, Clinical Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology; Dr. Moises Gallegos, Clinical Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Repeatable 5 times (up to 10 units total)

INDE 281: Ethics, Science, and Society (IMMUNOL 258)

This discussion focused Ethics, Science, and Society interactive mini-course will engage Immunology graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty in learning and conversations on topics in responsible research (including animal subjects, authorship, collaboration, conflicts of interest, data management, human subjects, mentor-mentee relationships, peer review, publication, research misconduct, and social responsibility) and diversity in science, informed by readings, case studies, individual reflections, and more. Some of the driving themes in this course include: what it means to do research well and how to and not to achieve this, why doing research well and with integrity is important, and who are researchers currently and who should they be. Prerequisite: MED 255
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 1 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 4 units total)

INDE 290A: Walk With Me: A Patient and Family Centered Exploration of Health & The Health Care System

This innovative course for first year students places patients, families, and caregivers front and center in the journey to explore health from a person-centered perspective and better understand the challenges of managing optimal health in a complex health care system. The curriculum is organized around a monthly workshop series, which explores a different health systems science topic each month through lectures from experts from Stanford and the community and from the perspectives of an individual patient or caregiver, or panel, with time to engage in discussion and explore patient-centered solutions to real-world problems. Students are also paired with a patient partner for the year with whom they meet (online) monthly, outside of class, to explore the patient and caregiver journey by developing an individual relationship. Participation in this course can fulfill the ECE requirement. Enrollment by Instructor Approval Only. Please submit an application by September 11 at 11:59PM: https://stanfordmedicine.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bvzt6ZZqAg5Vvkp. Those selected will be informed by September 14 at 11:59PM so that they may enroll in the course. For questions, please email Marcello Chang (TA): marcelkc@stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

INDE 290B: Walk With Me: A Patient & Family Centered Exploration of Health & The Health Care System

Continuation of monthly workshop series begun in INDE 290A, with new monthly topics. Students will continue the partnership with their patient and gain further understanding of the challenges of managing optimal health in a complex health care system. Enrollment by Instructor Approval Only.nnThis course can be fulfills the ECE requirement for pre-clinical students.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

INDE 290C: Walk With Me: A Patient & Family Centered Exploration of Health & The Health Care System

Continuation of monthly workshop series begun in INDE 290A and INDE 290B, with new monthly topics. Students will continue the partnership with their patient and gain further understanding of the challenges of managing optimal health in a complex health care system. Enrollment by Instructor Approval Only.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

INDE 292: Exploration of The Health Care System : Clinical Partnership Development

For second year medical students who wish to continue their existing longitudinal clinical partnerships begun in year 2. 1/2 day clinical immersion, by arrangement woth preceptor. 2-unit option includes clinical quality improvement or other approved project. Director approval required.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 6 units total)

INDE 295: Bioethics and Anthropology Interdisciplinary Directed Individual Study

Supervised individualized study in bioethics and anthropology for a qualifying paper, research proposal, or project with an individual faculty member. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5
Instructors: ; Lee, S. (PI); Magnus, D. (SI)

INDE 297: Reflection and Contextual Medicine

Required for all MD students enrolled in clerkships at Stanford affiliated sites. Two-year curriculum designed to provide structured time for students to step back from clerkships, in order to promote reflection on and reinforcement for their learning in the clinical environment. The goals of this course are: to offer a regular opportunity for students to discuss challenging issues faced in their clinical training; to ground students in strategies for managing challenging situations they are likely to experience in their personal and professional lives while on clerkships; and to provide opportunities for students to develop and expand their reflective and communication skills. Components of this curriculum include the "Doctoring with CARE" small groups, the "MeD-ReST" Medical Student Resiliency Skills Training¿ sessions, and the "Contextual Medicine: Communication, Connection and Creativity in Practice" lunch and lecture series. All students in clinical clerkships must participate in all aspects of RCM Days. Students enrolled in Selective II Clerkships (Sub-internships) may choose to participate in clinical duties but are expected to communicate their absence to course faculty/staff in advance. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in clinical clerkships. Please note, students will enroll in this course their final quarter of enrollment prior to graduation to receive retroactive credit for all session. Only enroll the last quarter of enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4

INDE 298: Women's Health Independent Project

Women's Health Scholarly Concentration. Students pursue individual projects under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1

ITALIAN 75N: Narrative Medicine and Near-Death Experiences (FRENCH 75N)

Even if many of us don't fully believe in an afterlife, we remain fascinated by visions of it. This course focuses on Near-Death Experiences and the stories around them, investigating them from the many perspectives pertinent to the growing field of narrative medicine: medical, neurological, cognitive, psychological, sociological, literary, and filmic. The goal is not to understand whether the stories are veridical but what they do for us, as individuals, and as a culture, and in particular how they seek to reshape the patient-doctor relationship. Materials will span the 20th century and come into the present. Taught in English.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ITALIAN 142: The Good Life: Renaissance Perspectives on Perennial Questions

What constitutes a good life? What conditions and relationships enable one to live well, and what attitudes and activities, systems and structures bring them about or make them possible? Renaissance men and women asked such questions, turning to study of the classical past and to close observation of their contemporary world in search of satisfying answers. This course will explore their reflections and investigations, experimentations and creations, examining seminal conceptions and ideals of the Renaissance through their expression in text and image. Topics will include beauty and love; virtue and honor; excellence and exceptionalism; freedom and justice; power and authority; leadership and governance; wealth and prosperity; work and service; education and religion; health and medicine; family, friendship and community. Focusing on Italian contexts with reference to broader European and global trends, discussion and analysis will center on discrepancies between the real and the ideal in Renaissance society and culture. Taught in English. NOTE: New Italian Studies Assistant Professor Sarah Prodan will teach this course.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | Units: 3-5

LAW 807L: Policy Practicum: The Opioid Epidemic: Developing New Law and Policy Tools

Same as PSYC 107. Client: Broken No More, http://broken-no-more.org/about-us/. More Americans die every year of overdose than died in the entire course of the 1955-75 Vietnam conflict. Overdose has helped reduce aggregate US life expectancy for three years in a row¿something that has not happened in 100 years, including at the height of the AIDS epidemic in the '80s and '90s. Measured by loss-of-life, opiate-related overdose is the most acute national health crisis of our lifetimes. Student researchers will work closely with the client, Broken No More, a national organization of parents and families who have lost family members to opioid use. The organization supports grieving members and also pushes forward evidence-based, public health interventions to the opioid epidemic. This practicum explores legal approaches to a more comprehensive and thoughtful understanding to the Opioid Epidemic. The research team will evaluate whether various stakeholders have fulfilled their legal and regulatory obligations to respond to the epidemic, including whether hospitals and insurers fulfill their implied "duty of care." The questions addressed in this practicum could have life-saving impact on people currently suffering from opioid use disorder. The course seeks to build a diverse research team with students from law, public policy, medicine, public health, and sociology. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 2

LAW 3002: Health Law: Quality and Safety of Care

(Formerly Law 727) Concerns about the quality of health care, along with concerns about its cost and accessibility, are the focal points of American health policy. This course will consider how legislators, courts, and professional groups attempt to safeguard the quality and safety of the health care patients receive. The course approaches "regulation" in a broad sense. We will cover regimes for determining who may deliver health care services (e.g. licensing and accreditation agencies), legal and ethical obligations providers owe to patients (e.g. confidentiality, informed consent), individual and institutional liability for substandard care, and various proposals for reforming the medical malpractice system. We will also discuss the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (aka, "Obamacare"), which has led to many new initiatives aimed at improving health care quality. Special Instructions: Any student may write a paper in lieu of the final exam with consent of instructor. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Exam or Final Paper. Cross-listed with School of Medicine (MED 209).
Last offered: Spring 2019 | Units: 3

LAW 3009: Health Law: Improving Public Health

This course examines how the law can be used to improve the public's health. The broad questions explored are: what authority does the government have to regulate in the interest of public health? How are individual rights balanced against this authority? What are the benefits and pitfalls of using laws and litigation to achieve public health goals? The course investigates these questions as they operate in a range of specific contexts, including preventing and controlling infectious diseases; preventing obesity; reducing tobacco use; ensuring access to medical care; reducing firearm injuries; addressing the opioid epidemic; and responding to public health emergencies. In examining these contexts, we will ask and answer questions such as, what do the Constitution and key statutes permit? What makes a good public health law? Where do we see success stories--and failures--in public health law? What ethical and economic arguments justify government intervention to shape individuals' and companies' health-related behaviors? Instruction is through interactive lectures with a significant amount of class discussion and some group exercises. Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Exam. Cross-listed with Medicine (MED 237).
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 3

LAW 5029: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives

(Formerly Law 675) This course offers an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, including trafficking for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ harvesting. In each of these areas, we will focus on human rights violations and remedies. The course aims to: 1. Provide the historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. 2. Analyze current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluate their practical implementation. 3. Examine the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. 4. Stimulate ideas for new interventions. Instruction will combine lectures and small group discussion, and uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should also enroll in History 6W/7W (FemGen 6W/7W), a two-quarter service learning workshop. Elements used in grading: Attendance; participation; written assignments; and final exam. This class is cross-listed with Feminist, Gender and Sexuality Studies (FEMGEN 5C, FEMGEN 105C), History (HISTORY 5C, 105C), Human Biology (HUMBIO 178T), International Relations (INTNLREL 105C) & School of Medicine General (SOMGEN 205).
Last offered: Winter 2017 | Units: 3

MATSCI 10: Materials Matter

All facets of engineering rely on materials to develop modern devices and solve the greatest technological challenges in society today. In this introductory 1-unit course, students will learn about the field of Materials Science and Engineering and its broad applications in research and industry. Students who are interested in careers in energy and sustainability, biomaterials and regenerative medicine, or engineering matter at the atomic scale for electronics and nanotechnology will be able to have an early window into the work done in these areas through this course. Each week, students will listen to talks from invited guest speakers and discover the wide variety of career opportunities and areas of focus offered through Materials Science and Engineering. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to develop networks with Stanford alumni and current students in our department. This course is open to all undergraduates and does not have any pre-requisites.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Kumar, R. (PI); Patta, Y. (PI)

MATSCI 31: Chemical Principles: From Molecules to Solids (CHEM 31M)

A one-quarter course for students who have taken chemistry previously. This course will introduce the basic chemical principles that dictate how and why reactions occur and the structure and properties of important molecules and extended solids that make up our world. As the Central Science, a knowledge of chemistry provides a deep understanding of concepts in fields ranging from materials, environmental science, and engineering to pharmacology and metabolism. Discussions of molecular structure will describe bonding models including Lewis structures, resonance, crystal-field theory, and molecular-orbital theory. We will reveal the chemistry of materials of different dimensionality, with emphasis on symmetry, bonding, and electronic structure of molecules and solids. We will also discuss the kinetics and thermodynamics that govern reactivity and dictate solubility and acid-base equilibria. A two-hour weekly laboratory section accompanies the course to introduce laboratory techniques and reiterate lecture concepts through hands-on activities. Specific discussions will include the structure, properties, and applications of molecules used in medicine, perovskites used in solar cells, and the dramatically different properties of materials with the same composition (for example: diamond, graphite, graphene). There will be three lectures, one two-hour laboratory session, and an optional 80-minute problem solving session each week. The course will assume familiarity with stoichiometry, unit conversions, and gas laws. All students who are interested in taking general chemistry at Stanford must take the Autumn 2020 General Chemistry Placement Test before Autumn quarter begins, regardless of chemistry background. Generally students earning an AP chemistry score of 4 or higher place into 31M. Students earning an AP score of 5 are also welcome to take the Autumn 2020 Chemistry 33 Placement Test to see if Chem33 is a more appropriate placement. Same as: MATSCI 31
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

MATSCI 81N: Bioengineering Materials to Heal the Body

Preference to freshmen. Real-world examples of materials developed for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine therapies. How scientists and engineers design new materials for surgeons to use in replacing body parts such as damaged heart or spinal cord tissue. How cells interact with implanted materials. Students identify a clinically important disease or injury that requires a better material, proposed research approaches to the problem, and debate possible engineering solutions.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA

MATSCI 83N: Great Inventions That Matter

This introductory seminar starts by illuminating on the general aspects of creativity, invention, and patenting in engineering and medicine, and how Stanford University is one of the world's foremost engines of innovation. We then take a deep dive into some great technological inventions which are still playing an essential role in our everyday lives, such as fiber amplifier, digital compass, computer memory, HIV detector, personal genome machine, cancer cell sorting, brain imaging, and mind reading. The stories and underlying materials and technologies behind each invention, including a few examples by Stanford faculty and student inventors, are highlighted and discussed. A special lecture focuses on the public policy on intellectual properties (IP) and the resources at Stanford Office of Technology Licensing (OTL). Each student will have an opportunity to present on a great invention from Stanford (or elsewhere), or to write a (mock) patent disclosure of his/her own ideas.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: ; Wang, S. (PI)

MATSCI 381: Biomaterials in Regenerative Medicine (BIOE 361)

Materials design and engineering for regenerative medicine. How materials interact with cells through their micro- and nanostructure, mechanical properties, degradation characteristics, surface chemistry, and biochemistry. Examples include novel materials for drug and gene delivery, materials for stem cell proliferation and differentiation, and tissue engineering scaffolds. Prerequisites: undergraduate chemistry, and cell/molecular biology or biochemistry.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Heilshorn, S. (PI)

ME 571: Surgical Robotics Seminar (CS 571)

Surgical robots developed and implemented clinically on varying scales. Seminar goal is to expose students from engineering, medicine, and business to guest lecturers from academia and industry. Engineering and clinical aspects connected to design and use of surgical robots, varying in degree of complexity and procedural role. May be repeated for credit.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

MED 1A: Leadership in Multicultural Health

Designed for undergraduates serving as staff for the Stanford Medical Youth Science Summer Residential Program (SRP). Structured opportunitie to learn, observe, participate in, and evaluate leadership development, multicultural health theories and practices, and social advocacy. Utilizes service learning as a pedagogical approach to developing an understanding of the intersections between identity, power and privilege and disparities (health, education, environment), fostering knowledge and skills to become social advocates to address forms of inequities. Students explore approaches for identifying and tackling issues of equity (health and education) as well as learn fundamental skills necessary to implement activities for the Summer Residential Program.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 2

MED 1B: Identity, Power and Privilege in Multicultural Health

An independent study service learning course designed to develop students' understanding of the intersection between identity, power, privilege, and disparities (health, education, environment). Students submit a written reflective term paper based on their experience as staff for the Summer Residential Program as well as their understanding of how constructs of identity, power and privilege impact low-income and underrepresented students in their pursuit of higher education. Prerequisite MED 1A.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | Units: 1

MED 50N: Translational Research: Turning Science into Medicine

Investigates how scientific research informs how physicians take care of patients and how clinical research informs how scientific experiments are conducted. Topics include how these two processes have improved health and have resulted in innovation and scientic progress; specific human disease areas in allergy and immunology that affect all ages of patients globally, including food allergy; scientific concepts of research that helped in discovery of novel diagnostics and treatment of disease; ethical roles of physicians and scientists in conducting translational research in human disease.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

MED 50Q: Respiration

Preference to sophomores. Topics include: the biological basis for use of oxygen for aerobic metabolism in animals, human lung physiology and pathophysiology, comparative physiology of respiration in fish, birds and mammals, new insights into mammalian lung development, current challenges in human respiratory health including air pollution and lung cancer. Student presentations on specific topics based on literature research developed in consultation with the instructor. Application required.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | Units: 3

MED 51B: Compassionate Presence at the Bedside: The Healer's Art

Students in this class must have already completed MED51Q. This quarter is a skill-based practicum. The skills component of this course is focused on communication and presence at the patient's bedside. Students will learn the theoretical aspects of respectful communication and cultural competence. They will then participate in a variety of immersive simulation activities including role-play, video enacting, class presentations, reflective exercises to understand the nuances of empathetic communication. The focus of the second quarter is to practice the art of communication honestly and compassionately with patients, learning empathy and cultivating the skill of being present at the bedside of a patient. Students will be assigned a panel of seriously ill patients and they do mentored house calls and provide support to patients and families as a volunteer. The idea here is that the knowledge and skills acquired in the first quarter will be utilized in real-life settings to practice compassionate and respectful communication strategies, learn how to be a cam, compassionate and healing presence at the bedside of seriously ill patients. We believe that medical school curricula do not have a strong focus on essential doctoring skills related to communication and a compassionate presence at the bedside. By offering this course to pre-med students, we believe that the doctors of the future will become skilled and compassionate healers.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable 10 times (up to 30 units total)

MED 51Q: Aging, Dying, and End-of-Life Care

This is a Community-Engaged Virtual Healthcare Course for undergraduate students. This course is designed to prepare students to critically examine values, attitudes, and contexts that govern perspectives toward and engagement of patients within the context of aging and end of life. The course prepares students to responsibly and reflectively interact with aging and seriously ill patients in a mentored setting as follows: (a) Students will learn about the history, evolution, principles and practice of geriatrics and palliative care in class through didactics and lectures by guest lecturers (b) Through mentored fieldwork, students will learn the basic competencies of communicating with older adults from diverse backgrounds in a respectful and compassionate manner. Students will be exposed to the challenges faced by patients from diverse backgrounds and their caregivers. Each student will be assigned a small panel of patients. Due to COVID, all patient and family interaction will be virtual. Students will work with an inter-disciplinary team, conduct virtual calls on patients in their panel, and write progress notes, which will become a part of the patients' electronic medical records. (c) Weekly assignments will help students reflect on their interactions with the patients and lessons they learned. (d) All students will complete a mentored capstone project (either individually or in small groups as they choose) and present this project at the end of the quarter. Our goal is to train future leaders in healthcare and especially in the space of aging and end-of-life care. PLEASE NOTE: This Introductory Seminar is a Cardinal Course. Students who enroll in MED 51Q will be working virtually with patients. As a prerequisite for patient-care, all students (a) must complete HIPAA training, patient safety training, and a background check. All tests required will be provided free of cost and have to be completed with specific agencies affiliated with Stanford. Failure to complete paperwork will result in student being dropped from the class. Dr. Periyakoil will send more specific directions after students are enrolled in MED 51Q.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Periyakoil, V. (PI)

MED 52Q: What is a Human? Scientific and Mythological Approaches to Meaning

Reconciling our mythology and current scientific consensus is a worthwhile pursuit to establish a balanced, congruent personal philosophy toward life. nIn this sophomore seminar, we will first explore scientific perspectives on the origin and evolution of humans utilizing archaeology, genetics, and evolutionary psychology. With this framework secured, we will sample major religious texts such as Genesis, The New Testament, and Eastern texts. Throughout the course, each student will have opportunities to reflect deeply on his or her own personal worldview (past, present, and future) to tailor a personalized philosophy for life. This course will provide you with an overview of a fascinating subject that can impact progress on your life journey and career.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | Units: 3

MED 53Q: Storytelling in Medicine

Stories are at the core of medical practice, but the skills developed are applicable across disciplines, including technology and business. Storytelling in Medicine is a new sophomore seminar designed to teach skills in multiple modalities of storytelling including narrative, oral, social media, academic presentations and visual storytelling for different audiences. This seminar combines small groups, interactive workshops, and guest speakers who are experts in their fields of medicine. This will also include editing and support to complete your own story by the end of the seminar.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: ; Edwards, L. (PI); Lin, B. (PI)

MED 54Q: Decolonizing Global Health

In this seminar, we will look at how global health discourse has changed over the years and discuss possible future directions for global health exchanges. This course will introduce students to the various definitions of global health from colonial times, through international health, tropical medicine, and now global health. We will consider what moral imperative leads to global health work, and how conventional thought about the relationships between providers, patients and systems in the global North and South is shifting. Global health has transitioned through various stages. In the 1800s, missionary doctors provided medical care while also spreading religion and colonial interests. During the twentieth century, great strides were made in sanitation and infectious disease treatment as part of systems and government based ¿international health¿ and ¿tropical medicine.¿ Paradoxically, in the last two decades, as the world becomes more intertwined, ¿global health¿ has generally involved shorter term encounters, usually with specialists at the vanguard. With the epidemiological transition and increasing communicable disease prevalence in developing countries, systems strengthening, and capacity building are the main priorities. It is argued that the current global health infrastructure does not focus on building long term partnerships or assign equitable worth to participants from the global North and South. We will investigate how effective our current efforts are and think critically about the meaning of ¿decolonizing global health¿ as regards population outcomes and the flow of resources. We will review each of these stages in global health development and use examples of long-term partnerships that have yielded considerable success, such as Partners in Health (PIH) and Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH). We will also briefly discuss overlapping concepts in global health equity and health and social justice in the US. Guest speakers from primary care fields and with global health backgrounds will stimulate further dialogue and speak from their experiences on the front lines.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Shumba, T. (PI)

MED 71N: Hormones in a Performance-Enhanced Society

(Formerly 117Q) Preference to first-year students. Explores how the availability of hormone therapy has affected various aspects of daily lives. Topics include the controversies concerning menopause and its treatment; use of hormones in athletics; cosmetic use of hormones to enhance growth, strength, and libido; use of hormones as anti-aging drugs; and how the hormone system has influenced our notions of gender. Includes the biochemistry and physiology of the human endocrine system; how hormones influence behavior, and how to read a scientific paper.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: ; Hoffman, A. (PI)

MED 73N: Scientific Method and Bias

Offers an introduction to the scientific method and common biases in science. Examines theoretical considerations and practical examples where biases have led to erroneous conclusions, as well as scientific practices that can help identify, correct or prevent such biases. Additionally focuses on appropriate methods to interweave inductive and deductive approaches. Topics covered include: Popper¿s falsification and Kuhn¿s paradigm shift, revolution vs. evolution; determinism and uncertainty; probability, hypothesis testing, and Bayesian approaches; agnostic testing and big data; team science; peer review; replication; correlation and causation; bias in design, analysis, reporting and sponsorship of research; bias in the public perception of science, mass media and research; and bias in human history and everyday life. Provides students an understanding of how scientific knowledge has been and will be generated; the causes of bias in experimental design and in analytical approaches; and the interactions between deductive and inductive approaches in the generation of knowledge.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: ; Ioannidis, J. (PI)

MED 110: Patient Health Advocate

The "Patient Health Advocate" course is designed to introduce students to population health concepts in primary care, providing a clinical experience and an opportunity to contribute towards patient care. With guidance from faculty members, students will learn important preventive health care topics, gain skills in patient health coaching, and design and implement a quality improvement project to address a population health measure of their choice. Students will also be exposed to clinical care through clinic shadowing and pre-visit planning with resident physician mentors.nnPrerequisites: MED 143A/243A or equivalent
Last offered: Spring 2019 | Units: 2 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 4 units total)

MED 114: Frontier Technology: Understanding and Preparing for Technology in the Next Economy (CEE 114, CEE 214, MED 214, PSYC 114)

The next wave of technological innovation and globalization will affect our countries, our societies, and ourselves. This interdisciplinary course provides an introduction to frontier technology, the intersection where radical forward thinking and real-world implementation meet. Topics covered include artificial intelligence, additive manufacturing and advanced robotics, smart cities and urban mobility, telecommunications with 5G, and other key emerging technologies in society. These technologies have vast potential to address the largest global challenges of the 21st century, ushering in a new era of progress and change. Limited enrollment, contact instructors for application.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2

MED 121: Translational Research and Applied Medicine (MED 221)

(Same as MED 121; undergraduate students enroll in MED 121) Open to graduate students and medical students, this course enables students to learn basic principles in the design, performance and analysis of translational medical research studies. The course includes both didactic seminars from experts in translational medicine as well as the opportunity to design and present a translational research project. Students enrolling for 3 units are paired with a TRAM translational research project and work as a team with TRAM trainees and faculty on a weekly basis, as arranged by the instructor, and present a final project update at the end of the quarter.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 9 units total)

MED 124: Global Child Health (HUMBIO 124C, PEDS 124)

(HUMBIO students must enroll in HUMBIO 124C. Med/Graduate students must enroll in MED 124 or PEDS 124.) This course introduces students to key challenges to the health and well being of children worldwide. We explicitly focus on child and public health problems in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) to reflect the global burden of disease among children. We will review the scope and magnitude of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality, as well as examine regional variations. We will then identify both medical and non-medical causes, effects of, as well as interventions to address, some of the biggest child health problems. The course will also prevent an overview of the role of culture, gender, and non-state actors (NGOs, foundations, etc.) on health and health policy. Optional: The course will be taught in conjunction with an optional two-unit community engaged learning component. Please view the course syllabus for more information. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen. Prerequisites: Human Biology Core or equivalent or Biology Foundations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

MED 129: Health Care Systems Around the World (HUMBIO 129W)

This course will explore the role of health care systems in societies around the world, identifying the common challenges facing health care systems and how different institutional structures in different countries perform in response to these challenges. We will structure the course around general conceptual frameworks related to key health system institutions (including financing, insurance, provider payment, patient cost-sharing, and the regulation of medical technology). From this foundation, we will draw on the experience of individual countries (high and low income, with heavy chronic disease and infectious disease burdens) to illustrate the function of these institutions under real-world circumstances observed around the globe. Prerequisite: Human Biology Core or Biology Foundations or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | Units: 4

MED 130: Yesplus: Meditation practices for wellbeing

Meditation Practices for Wellbeing" is a 1-unit course that provides students with tools and strategies to develop a sustainable approach to their happiness and wellbeing. Students will learn breathwork and meditation based techniques to decrease stress and increase peace and focus in day to day life. Students will also study happiness-based research and participate in community building discussions, yoga, and mindfulness processes to learn how wellness can be sustained as a personal practice. Class meets 5 evenings throughout the quarter, along with a mandatory mini retreat during the third week (Thursday 7 - 10 pm, Friday 7 - 10 pm, Saturday 12 - 3 pm). Open to all students, including freshmen and those new to meditation. Enrollment limited to 25. Admission by application, details at first class. See yesplus.stanford.edu for more information.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | Units: 1

MED 131: Exploring Israel's Ecosystem in Human and Planetary Health

Israel¿s innovation ecosystem is one of the most admired in the world. Israel is a leader in health, environmental, and ecological innovation, and despite its small size, Israel is home to a disproportionate number of successful start-ups. Israel combines history, culture, politics, and religion in unparalleled ways that influence not only the human and planetary health innovation ecosystem, but all aspects of life. Students in this course will (1) develop an understanding of how socio-cultural conditions, including political, regulatory, military, and academic institutions; geographical, historical, environmental, and technological conditions; and human cultures and activities have shaped the innovation ecosystem in human and planetary health in Israel into one of the world¿s most productive centers; (2) gain an appreciation of the advantages and disadvantages faced by entrepreneurs in Israel, how they have evolved, and how they compare to the experience of entrepreneurs in the US and elsewhere; and (3) develop a strategy for delving more deeply into these themes in Israel. Note, this course will meet a total of four times during spring term. ¿ REGISTRATION is limited to undergraduate students participating in the Bing Overseas Study Program in Israel, Summer 2020. Prerequisites: This course is limited in enrollment to undergraduate students who will be participating in the Summer 2020 Bing Overseas Study Program (BOSP) Seminar in Israel ¿ Exploring Israel¿s Innovation Ecosystem in Human and Planetary Health: Can A startup Culture and Technology Change the World?
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2

MED 142: Modem Ethical Challenges in Neuroscience and Organ Transplantation

Today we face unprecedented innovations in neuroscience and medicine. While these advances offer new hope, they also challenge medical, legal, and ethical paradigms. We will explore the ethical constructs surrounding topics including brain death, brain-computer interfaces and other adaptive technologies, and organ transplantation. The course material will include clinical and legal cases, scientific literature, film and popular culture, and experiential learning at Stanford Hospital. We will also focus on cultural comparisons between the US and Japan, where brain death is not widely accepted and deceased donor organ donation is rare. Course evaluation will be based on participation, written work, and team projects.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER

MED 145: Alternative Spring Break: Confronting HIV/AIDS in San Francisco

Preparation for the Alternative Spring Break trip. Current issues regarding HIV/AIDS worldwide and in the United States, with a specific focus on San Francisco. Topics include biology, transmission, prevention, pharmaceutical development, discrimination, stigma, access to health care, and perspectives of affected communities. Students enrolling for 3 units attend both Monday and Wednesday sections; medical students who can only attend Wednesday session have option to enroll for 2 units. See asb.stanford.edu for more information.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | Units: 1

MED 147: Methods in Community Assessment, Evaluation, and Research (CHPR 247, MED 247)

Development of pragmatic skills for design, implementation, and analysis of structured interviews, focus groups, survey questionnaires, and field observations. Topics include: principles of community-based participatory research, including importance of dissemination; strengths and limitations of different study designs; validity and reliability; construction of interview and focus group questions; techniques for moderating focus groups; content analysis of qualitative data; survey questionnaire design; and interpretation of commonly-used statistical analyses.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Kiernan, M. (PI)

MED 157: Foundations for Community Health Engagement

Open to undergraduate, graduate, and MD students. Examination and exploration of community health principles and their application at the local level. Designed to prepare students to make substantive contributions in a variety of community health settings (e.g. clinics, government agencies, non-profit organization, advocacy groups). Topics include community health assessment; health disparities; health promotion and disease prevention; strategies for working with diverse, low-income, and underserved populations; and principles of ethical and effective community engagement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

MED 159: Oaxacan Health on Both Sides of the Border

Required for students participating in the Community Health in Oaxaca summer program. Introduction to the health literacy and health-seeking behaviors of Oaxacan and other Mexican migrants; the health challenges these groups face. Through discussion and reflection, students prepare for clinical work and community engagement in Oaxaca, while also gaining knowledge and insight to make connections between their experiences in Mexico and their health-related work with Mexican immigrants in the Bay Area. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). Prerequisite: application and acceptance into the Community Health in Oaxaca Summer Program (http://och.stanford.edu/oaxaca.html).
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit

MED 160: Physician Shadowing: Stanford Immersion in Medicine Series (SIMS)

Undergraduates are paired with a physician mentor at Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, or the Veteran's Administration Hospital. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Application and acceptance to the SIMS program.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

MED 164: Covid-19 Case Investigation and Contact Tracing (CHPR 235, MED 264)

In this service-learning course students will be learn how to identify people who have COVID-19 and those who have been exposed to people with COVID-19. Students will learn basics about the biology and health effects of SARS-CoV-2 and the epidemiology of COVID-19. Students will be taught important skills in healthcare communication including motivational interviewing, health education, and health coaching. Students will work as volunteers together with Santa Clara County staff to interrupt the chains of transmission of COVID-19 as they apply skills they have learned to help people with the illness and those who have been exposed understand the importance of isolation, quarantine, and other critical aspects of public health needed to control and manage this disease. Students will need to be willing to commit 20 hours per week to this course for 10 weeks over 2 quarters. Requires application and instructor approval. Please contact Course Director, Lars Osterberg MD, MPH for an application form and approval for enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 3-6 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Repeatable 3 times (up to 18 units total)

MED 181: Preparation for Early Clinical Experience at the Cardinal Free Clinics

Training course for new undergraduate volunteers at the Cardinal Free Clinics (CFCs). Topics include introduction to methods for providing culturally appropriate, high quality transitional medical care for underserved patient populations, clinic structure and roles, free clinics in the larger context of American healthcare, foundations in community health, cultural humility and implicit bias in healthcare, motivational interviewing and patient advocacy skills, and role-specific preparation. Application only; must be an accepted CFC volunteer. Visit https://cfc.stanford.edu for more information. 1-2 units.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2

MED 182: Early Clinical Experience at the Cardinal Free Clinics (MED 282)

The Cardinal Free Clinics, consisting of Arbor and Pacific Free Clinic, provide culturally appropriate, high quality transitional medical care for underserved patient populations in the Bay Area. Students volunteer in various clinic roles to offer services including health education, interpretation, referrals, and labs. In clinic students are guided in the practice of medical interviews, history-taking and physical examinations as appropriate, and work with attending physicians to arrive at a diagnosis and management plan. Visit http://cfc.stanford.edu for more information. For questions related to the course or volunteering, please email arborclinic@stanford.edu and/or pacific@med.stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

MED 184: Team Leadership in the Cardinal Free Clinics I (MED 284)

Introduction to skills for effective leadership, including topics such as conflict resolution, team dynamic. Applied learning through shifts at the Cardinal Free Clinics and related project work. Enrollment limited to Cardinal Free Clinic Managers.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

MED 199: Undergraduate Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Advani, R. (PI); Ahmed, A. (PI); Ahuja, N. (PI); Akatsu, H. (PI); Al-Ahmad, A. (PI); Alizadeh, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Anand, S. (PI); Andrews, J. (PI); Annes, J. (PI); Arai, S. (PI); Artandi, M. (PI); Artandi, S. (PI); Asch, S. (PI); Ashley, E. (PI); Assimes, T. (PI); Ayoub, W. (PI); Baiocchi, M. (PI); Banerjee, S. (PI); Barry, M. (PI); Basaviah, P. (PI); Basina, M. (PI); Basu, S. (PI); Behal, R. (PI); Bendavid, E. (PI); Benjamin, J. (PI); Berube, C. (PI); Bhalla, V. (PI); Bhatt, A. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blackburn, B. (PI); Blaschke, T. (PI); Blayney, D. (PI); Blish, C. (PI); Bloom, G. (PI); Bollyky, P. (PI); Bouvier, D. (PI); Boxer, L. (PI); Braddock, C. (PI); Brinton, T. (PI); Brown, W. (PI); Bulow, K. (PI); Carlson, R. (PI); Cartwright, C. (PI); Chan, D. (PI); Chan, G. (PI); Chang, C. (PI); Chang, S. (PI); Chaudhuri, O. (PI); Chen, A. (PI); Chertow, G. (PI); Cheung, R. (PI); Chi, J. (PI); Cho-Phan, C. (PI); Chu, G. (PI); Chua, K. (PI); Chung, L. (PI); Clarke, M. (PI); Clusin, W. (PI); Colevas, A. (PI); Colloff, E. (PI); Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI); Cooke, J. (PI); Cooper, A. (PI); Coutre, S. (PI); Crapo, L. (PI); Crump, C. (PI); Cullen, M. (PI); Das, A. (PI); Dash, R. (PI); Daugherty, T. (PI); David, S. (PI); Dawson, L. (PI); Deresinski, S. (PI); Desai, M. (PI); Desai, T. (PI); Dhillon, G. (PI); Dorman, J. (PI); Dosiou, C. (PI); Downing, N. (PI); DuBose, A. (PI); Edwards, L. (PI); Einav, S. (PI); Fantl, W. (PI); Farquhar, J. (PI); Fathman, C. (PI); Fearon, W. (PI); Feldman, D. (PI); Felsher, D. (PI); Fisher, G. (PI); Fitzgerald, P. (PI); Ford, J. (PI); Ford, P. (PI); Fowler, M. (PI); Frayne, S. (PI); Friedland, S. (PI); Fries, J. (PI); Froelicher, V. (PI); Gabiola, J. (PI); Ganjoo, K. (PI); Garcia, G. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gardner, P. (PI); Gavi, B. (PI); Geng, L. (PI); Genovese, M. (PI); Gerson, L. (PI); Gesundheit, N. (PI); Glaseroff, A. (PI); Glenn, J. (PI); Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. (PI); Goldstein, M. (PI); Goodman, S. (PI); Goronzy, J. (PI); Gotlib, J. (PI); Gray, G. (PI); Greenberg, H. (PI); Greenberg, P. (PI); Gregory, P. (PI); Habtezion, A. (PI); Hallenbeck, J. (PI); Harman, S. (PI); Harrington, R. (PI); Harshman, L. (PI); Haskell, W. (PI); Heaney, C. (PI); Heidenreich, P. (PI); Henri, H. (PI); Ho, D. (PI); Hoffman, A. (PI); Holman, H. (PI); Holodniy, M. (PI); Hopkins, J. (PI); Horning, S. (PI); Hsia, H. (PI); Hunt, S. (PI); Ioannidis, J. (PI); Isom, R. (PI); Jernick, J. (PI); Ji, H. (PI); Johnston, L. (PI); Jones, E. (PI); Kahn, J. (PI); Kao, P. (PI); Kappagoda, S. (PI); Kastelein, M. (PI); Katz, R. (PI); Katzenstein, D. (PI); Kenny, K. (PI); Khatri, P. (PI); Khazeni, N. (PI); Khush, K. (PI); Killen, J. (PI); Kim, S. (PI); King, A. (PI); Kohrt, H. (PI); Kraemer, F. (PI); Krishnan, E. (PI); Kummar, S. (PI); Kunz, P. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Kurian, A. (PI); Kuschner, W. (PI); Ladabaum, U. (PI); Lafayette, R. (PI); Laport, G. (PI); Laws, A. (PI); Lee, D. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Lee, P. (PI); Leung, L. (PI); Levin, E. (PI); Levitt, L. (PI); Levy, R. (PI); Levy, S. (PI); Liang, D. (PI); Liedtke, M. (PI); Lin, B. (PI); Lindsay, A. (PI); Lorenz, K. (PI); Lorig, K. (PI); Lotfi, J. (PI); Lowe, A. (PI); Lowsky, R. (PI); Luby, S. (PI); Lutchman, G. (PI); Majeti, R. (PI); McConnell, M. (PI); McLaughlin, T. (PI); Medeiros, B. (PI); Meyer, T. (PI); Miklos, D. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Milstein, A. (PI); Mitchell, B. (PI); Mohabir, P. (PI); Morioka-Douglas, N. (PI); Musen, M. (PI); Narayan, S. (PI); Neal, J. (PI); Negrin, R. (PI); Nevins, A. (PI); Nguyen, L. (PI); Nguyen, M. (PI); Nguyen, P. (PI); Nicolls, M. (PI); O' Callahan, P. (PI); Okafor, P. (PI); Osterberg, L. (PI); Owens, D. (PI); Palaniappan, L. (PI); Pao, A. (PI); Parnes, J. (PI); Parsonnet, J. (PI); Pasricha, P. (PI); Pegram, M. (PI); Periyakoil, V. (PI); Petersen, J. (PI); Phadke, A. (PI); Pinto, H. (PI); Pompei, P. (PI); Popp, R. (PI); Posley, K. (PI); Price, E. (PI); Prochaska, J. (PI); Puri, R. (PI); Quertermous, T. (PI); Raffin, T. (PI); Rehkopf, D. (PI); Relman, D. (PI); Rizk, N. (PI); Robinson, B. (PI); Rockson, S. (PI); Rohatgi, R. (PI); Rosas, L. (PI); Rosen, G. (PI); Rosenberg, S. (PI); Rudd, P. (PI); Ruoss, S. (PI); Rydel, T. (PI); Scandling, J. (PI); Schnittger, I. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Schroeder, J. (PI); Shafer, R. (PI); Shah, J. (PI); Shah, N. (PI); Shah, S. (PI); Sharp, C. (PI); Shen, K. (PI); Shieh, L. (PI); Shizuru, J. (PI); Shoor, S. (PI); Sikic, B. (PI); Singer, S. (PI); Singh, B. (PI); Singh, U. (PI); Skeff, K. (PI); Spiekerkoetter, E. (PI); Srinivas, S. (PI); Stafford, R. (PI); Stefanick, M. (PI); Stertzer, S. (PI); Stevens, D. (PI); Stockdale, F. (PI); Strober, S. (PI); Studdert, D. (PI); Tai, J. (PI); Tamura, M. (PI); Tan, J. (PI); Telli, M. (PI); Tepper, R. (PI); Tompkins, L. (PI); Tremmel, J. (PI); Triadafilopoulos, G. (PI); Tsao, P. (PI); Upadhyay, D. (PI); Utz, P. (PI); Vagelos, R. (PI); Valantine, H. (PI); Verghese, A. (PI); Wakelee, H. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warvariv, V. (PI); Weill, D. (PI); Weinacker, A. (PI); Weng, K. (PI); Weng, W. (PI); Weyand, C. (PI); Wheeler, M. (PI); Wiedmann, T. (PI); Winkelmayer, W. (PI); Winkleby, M. (PI); Winograd, C. (PI); Winslow, D. (PI); Winter, T. (PI); Witteles, R. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Yabu, J. (PI); Yang, P. (PI); Yeung, A. (PI); Yock, P. (PI); Zamanian, R. (PI); Zehnder, J. (PI); Zei, P. (PI); Zolopa, A. (PI); Zulman, D. (PI); de Jesus Perez, V. (PI); Gardner, C. (SI)

MED 200: Primary Care Presentations

This course is a lecture series offered during the winter quarter. The aim of this seminar is to allow medical students to experience the mindset of primary care physicians in real time. Classes feature presentations of patient cases submitted by Stanford faculty. Faculty presenters are provided with the diagnostic information for the cases in a sequential manner during and not in advance of each class, allowing students to learn from the thought process of physicians in real time as they put together the differential diagnosis, interpret diagnostic information, deliberate treatment and management options, and discuss other thoughts about the cases.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

MED 201: Internal Medicine: Body as Text

Body as Text refers to the idea that every patient's body tells a story. The narrative includes the past and present of a person's social and medical condition; it is a demonstration of the phenotype. The art of reading the body as text was at its peak in the first half of the 20th century, but as technology has become ascendant, bedside skills and the ability to read the text have faded. Beyond scientific knowledge and medical facts, it is this often forgotten craft which is at the heart of the excitement of being an internist. This course introduces students to the art of the clinical exam, to developing a clinical eye, and learning to see the body in a completely different way. Enrollment will be based on a lottery system, for which details will be sent to first year students at the end of mini quarter.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

MED 202: Alternative Spring Break: Rosebud Resilience: Community, Health and Learning in Lakota Nation

Open to MD, graduate, and undergraduate students. Classroom preparation followed by a one week spring break service learning experience on a reservation in South Dakota. Introduces students to the challenges and promise of Native American and rural health care, and the role of communities as leaders and problem solvers. Includes lectures, discussion and readings pertaining to Native American culture, current research in Native American health, and the methods and practice of community based participatory research.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | Units: 1

MED 206: Meta-research: Appraising Research Findings, Bias, and Meta-analysis (CHPR 206, EPI 206, STATS 211)

Open to graduate, medical, and undergraduate students. Appraisal of the quality and credibility of research findings; evaluation of sources of bias. Meta-analysis as a quantitative (statistical) method for combining results of independent studies. Examples from medicine, epidemiology, genomics, ecology, social/behavioral sciences, education. Collaborative analyses. Project involving generation of a meta-research project or reworking and evaluation of an existing published meta-analysis. Prerequisite: knowledge of basic statistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Ioannidis, J. (PI)

MED 207: History of Medicine

Begins with studying Shamanistic medicine, practiced by humans throughout the globe, for millennia. Covers magico-religious medicine developed in ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia and Greece; the 4th Century BC with Hippocrates beginning to separate medicine from religion and magic; the slow progress in ancient Rome, the medieval period, and during the Renaissance; and the acceleration in the pace of discoveries In the last few centuries, as medicine became more scientific, complex, and specialized as Pasteur developed the germ theory of disease, Darwin and Mendel publications begin the development of Evolution and of Genetics, Watson and Crick solved the mystery of DNA structure, organ transplants began, and imaging procedures such as CT and MRI came into being. Lectures are profusely illustrated, and, for the sake of comparison, two equally ancient systems of medicine, the traditional Chinese and the Vedic, are briefly reviewed.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | Units: 1

MED 210: Principles and Practice of Healthcare Quality Improvement

This course will introduce students to foundational concepts in healthcare quality improvement, and provide tools for translating these principles into practice. Topics include: current state, A3, SMART goals, root-cause analysis, metrics and measures, PDCA cycles, process controls, systems, and sustainability. Students have the option of completing the course curriculum in conjunction with a quality improvement/patient safety project offered by the SMS Quality Improvement Interest Group. This course will meet for four in-class sessions throughout the quarter, with students reviewing the online materials before each session. May be repeated for credit up to three quarters with continued work on a quality improvement project, and all units count towards the Quality Improvement Scholarly Concentration. Open to all.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

MED 212: Methods for Health Care Delivery Innovation, Implementation and Evaluation (CHPR 212, HRP 218)

Preference given to postgraduate fellows and graduate students.Focus is on implementation science and evaluation of health care delivery innovations. Topics include implementation science theory, frameworks, and measurement principles; qualitative and quantitative approaches to designing and evaluating new health care models; hybrid design trials that simultaneously evaluate implementation and effectiveness; distinction between quality improvement and research, and implications for regulatory requirements and publication; and grant-writing strategies for implementation science and evaluation. Students will develop a mock (or actual) grant proposal to conduct a needs assessment or evaluate a Stanford/VA/community intervention, incorporating concepts, frameworks, and methods discussed in class. Priority for enrollment for CHPR 212 will be given to CHPR master's students.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: ; Asch, S. (PI); Zulman, D. (PI)

MED 214: Frontier Technology: Understanding and Preparing for Technology in the Next Economy (CEE 114, CEE 214, MED 114, PSYC 114)

The next wave of technological innovation and globalization will affect our countries, our societies, and ourselves. This interdisciplinary course provides an introduction to frontier technology, the intersection where radical forward thinking and real-world implementation meet. Topics covered include artificial intelligence, additive manufacturing and advanced robotics, smart cities and urban mobility, telecommunications with 5G, and other key emerging technologies in society. These technologies have vast potential to address the largest global challenges of the 21st century, ushering in a new era of progress and change. Limited enrollment, contact instructors for application.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: ; Fischer, M. (PI); Fu, E. (PI)

MED 215A: Health Policy Graduate Student Tutorial I (HRP 201A)

Seminar series is the core tutorial for first-year Health Policy PhD students and all MS Health Policy students. Major themes in fields of study including health insurance, healthcare financing and delivery, health systems and reform and disparities in the US and globally, health and economic development, health law and policy, resource allocation, efficiency and equity, healthcare quality, measurement and the efficacy and effectiveness of interventions. Blocks of session led by Stanford expert faculty in particular fields of study. 2 unit registration requires written responses to assigned reading questions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2
Instructors: ; Polyakova, M. (PI)

MED 215B: Health Policy Graduate Student Tutorial II (HRP 201B)

Second in a three-quarter seminar series, the core tutorial is for first-year Health Policy PhD students and all MS Health Policy students. Major themes in fields of study including health insurance, healthcare financing and delivery, health systems and reform and disparities in the US and globally, health and economic development, health law and policy, resource allocation, efficiency and equity, healthcare quality, measurement and the efficacy and effectiveness of interventions. Blocks of session led by Stanford expert faculty in particular fields of study.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2
Instructors: ; Mello, M. (PI)

MED 215C: Health Policy Graduate Student Tutorial III (HRP 201C)

Third in a three-quarter seminar series, the core tutorial is for first-year Health Policy PhD students and all MS Health Policy students. Major themes in fields of study including health insurance, healthcare financing and delivery, health systems and reform and disparities in the US and globally, health and economic development, health law and policy, resource allocation, efficiency and equity, healthcare quality, measurement and the efficacy and effectiveness of interventions. Blocks of session led by Stanford expert faculty in particular fields of study.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2
Instructors: ; Haberland, C. (PI)

MED 216: Clinical Integration

The practice of clinical medicine requires the integration of several fields of knowledge including Embryology, Anatomy, Physiology, Pathology, Pharmacology, and Microbiology. In this exciting course, we will systematically review subjects such as Cardiology, Gastroenterology, Nephrology, Pulmonology, Endocrinology, Neurology, and Hematology/Oncology. I will provide power points and an outline as a reference point for the content. The majority of the classroom time will be spend with guided review of an excellent question bank. This will serve as an excellent review of the subjects after they have been formally taught during the M2 year. I have almost a decade of experience guiding students through the USMLE Step 1 exam with significant success. Utilizing my experience, I hope to help ¿connect the dots¿ in the above fields and prepare the student to think about ¿pathophysiology¿ as a guide to clinical reasoning.
Last offered: Summer 2019 | Units: 1 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 4 units total)

MED 217: Inpatient Medicine Shadowing Rotation

The objective of this rotation is to provide second year medical students the opportunity to experience the application of their medical education to clinical scenarios in the hospital. Students will have a one-day weekend shadowing opportunity (either on Saturday or Sunday morning) with a dedicated internal medicine team and witness the evaluation and management of patients to better understand the roles of the different team members, the flow of rounds, and the functions of history taking and physical examinations to perform a patient assessment. Following the experience, the students will debrief with the course directions. Students will also attend virtual weekly lectures/discussions on Friday afternoon from 1:30-2:20pm to learn about the ins and outs of inpatient rotation logistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 4 units total)

MED 219: What Keeps Us Up at Night

This lunchtime seminar series will bring Patients and Families, Clinicians and Hospital Administrative Leadership together in the classroom to discuss real world healthcare issues that directly affect all of us. In-class discussion will focus around current events and the impact on patient care and the learning health system. Participants will engage in conversation and gain insight into where innovation and is occurring within Stanford Health Care, and what opportunities exist to get involved and effect change.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

MED 221: Translational Research and Applied Medicine (MED 121)

(Same as MED 121; undergraduate students enroll in MED 121) Open to graduate students and medical students, this course enables students to learn basic principles in the design, performance and analysis of translational medical research studies. The course includes both didactic seminars from experts in translational medicine as well as the opportunity to design and present a translational research project. Students enrolling for 3 units are paired with a TRAM translational research project and work as a team with TRAM trainees and faculty on a weekly basis, as arranged by the instructor, and present a final project update at the end of the quarter.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 9 units total)

MED 223: Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Sciences Seminar

Weekly seminar series featuring cardiovascular research by faculty. This course is intended for medical students, graduate students, and advanced undergraduate students. On Tuesdays, students attend Frontiers in Cardiovascualr Science. On Thursdays, a faculty member will present to students their research, followed by Q&A session with the students.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit

MED 224: Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation Lab (SE Lab) - Human & Planetary Health (HRP 224, PUBLPOL 224)

Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation Lab (SE Lab) - Global & Planetary Health is a Collaboratory workshop for students/fellows to design and develop innovative social ventures addressing key challenges in health and the environment, especially in support of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs 2030). Your mandate in identifying problems and designing solutions is broad and flexible! SE Lab is open to students and fellows across Stanford and combines design thinking exercises, short lectures & case studies, workshops, small group teamwork, presentations, guest speakers, and faculty, practitioner and peer feedback to support you and your team in generating and developing ideas and projects that will change the world! Join SE Lab with an idea or simply the desire to join a team. Enrollment limited to 30.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 12 units total)
Instructors: ; Bloom, G. (PI)

MED 225: Drug Development: From a Concept to the Clinic

This course is designed for medical students, trainees, basic scientists, clinicians and clinician-scientists at Stanford to provide an educational and practical perspective on the essential issues in drug development. Using a blend of seminars and dynamic workshops, the curriculum is focused on educating the audience on all stages of drug development and related research and business processes ¿ from discovery and translational science and how to launch new projects to analyzing data, communication and interpretation of results of clinical trials, regulatory issues and commercial considerations in product development. The emphasis will be on cardiovascular applications. Proposed seminar topics are attached and include How Drugs Are Discovered and Developed, Case Studies of the various challenges in Drug Development, Cardiac Safety, Moving a Compound through the Drug Development Process, and the FDA Advisory Committee Process.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)

MED 226: Practical Approaches to Global Health Research (EPI 237, INTLPOL 290)

(Formerly IPS 290 and HRP 237) How do you come up with an idea for a useful research project in a low resource setting? How do you develop a research question, prepare a concept note, and get your project funded? How do you manage personnel in the field, complex cultural situations, and unexpected problems? How do you create a sampling strategy, select a study design, and ensure ethical conduct with human subjects? This course takes students through the process of health research in under-resourced countries from the development of the initial research question and literature review to securing support and detailed planning for field work. Students progressively develop and receive weekly feedback on a concept note to support a funding proposal addressing a research question of their choosing. Aimed at graduate students interested in global health research, though students of all disciplines interested in practical methods for research are welcome. Undergraduates who have completed 85 units or more may enroll with instructor consent. Sign up for 1 unit credit to participate in class sessions or 3 units to both participate in classes and develop a concept note.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3
Instructors: ; Luby, S. (PI)

MED 228: Physicians and Social Responsibility

Social and political context of the roles of physicians and health professionals in social change; policy, advocacy, and shaping public attitudes. How physicians have influenced governmental policy on nuclear arms proliferation; environmental health concerns; physicians in government; activism through research; the effects of poverty on health; homelessness; and gun violence. Guest speakers from national and international NGOs.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Laws, A. (PI)

MED 232: Global Health: Scaling Health Technology Innovations in Low Resource Settings

Recent advances in health technologies - incorporating innovations like robotics, cloud computing, artificial intelligence, and smart sensors - have raised expectations of a dramatic impact on health outcomes across the world. However, bringing innovative technologies to low resource settings has proven challenging, limiting their impact. Ironically, the current COVID-19 pandemic has become Exhibit 1 in the challenges the global health community faces in scaling innovative interventions. This course explores critical questions regarding the implementation and impact of technological innovations in low-resource settings. The course will feature thought leaders from the health technology community, who will explore examples of technologies that have been successful in low resource communities, as well as those that have failed. A subset of these examples will be drawn from the current pandemic. Students will think critically to consider conditions under which technologies reach scale and have positive impact in the global health field. Students will also have an opportunity to work on real-world projects, each of which will focus on the potential opportunity for a health technology in a low-resource setting and consider approaches to ensure its impact at scale. This course will be taught by Dr. Anurag Mairal, Adjunct Professor of Medicine and the Director, Global Outreach Programs at Stanford Byers Center for Biodesign, and Dr. Michele Barry, Senior Associate Dean for Global Health. This course is open to undergraduate students, graduate students, and medical students. Undergraduates can take this course for a letter grade and 3 units. Graduate students and MD students can enroll for 2 units. Students enrolling in the course for a third unit will also work on group projects described above. Students enrolled in the class for three units will also have additional assignments, including weekly discussion posts. Students must submit an application and be selected to receive an enrollment code. The application form can be found at the following link: : https://tinyurl.com/ghmed232. Contact Olivia Paige with any questions: olivia.paige@stanford.edu.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit

MED 233: Global Health: Beyond Diseases and International Organizations

Provides multidisciplinary trainees insight into over-arching themes of global health. Topics include systemic issues affecting healthcare progress globally, ethical and thoughtful approaches to solving these issues, as well as economics, water sanitation, public health, organizations in global health, human rights, involvement in NGOs, ethics of overseas work, and other non-medical aspects of this subject. This course will cover some of the essentials of patient care while working in the field as well including child health care, malaria, TB, and HIV. Course only open to graduate and MD/MSPA students. Undergraduates are not eligible to enroll.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

MED 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, EPI 235, HUMBIO 26)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAids (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 82 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 3-4

MED 237: Health Law: Improving Public Health

(Same as Law 3009) Examines how the law can be used to improve the public's health. Major themes explored include: what authority does the government have to regulate in the interest of public health? How are individual rights balanced against this authority? What are the benefits and pitfalls of using laws and litigation to achieve public health goals? Investigates these issues in several contexts, including the control and prevention of infectious disease, laws aimed at preventing obesity and associated noncommunicable diseases, tobacco regulation, ensuring access to medical care, reproductive health, lawsuits against tobacco, food and gun companies, and public health emergencies.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 3

MED 238: Leading and Managing Health Care Organizations: Innovation and Collaboration in High Stakes Settings

Same as OB 348. Leading and managing in complex, high stakes settings, like health care, where lives and livelihoods are on the line, presents distinctive challenges and constraints. This course challenges you to apply seminal and contemporary theories in organizational behavior to evaluate managerial decisions and develop evidence-based strategies for leading and managing health care teams and organizations. Topics include leading systems that promote learning; implementing change; and interdisciplinary problem-solving, decision-making, and collaboration. Group work and exercises will simulate high pressure and risk-taking under uncertainty. While the focus of this course will be on health care situations, lessons are relevant to other settings including consulting, banking, and high tech, and prior experience in the health sector is not required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

MED 239: Workshop For Ending Diagnostic Odysseys

Have you ever wondered how Dr. House solves difficult cases? Intrigued by Sherlock Holmes? Want to be a disease detective? In this project-based course, teams of students will work together to study cases of un-diagnosed rare and novel diseases. Like Dr. House, students will attempt to solve these medical mysteries. Course directors and team facilitators from Stanford's Center for Undiagnosed Diseases will introduce methods and approaches successful in solving past cases. Teams are expected to report on their findings at the completion of the quarter. Interested medical students may pursue follow-up research in subsequent quarters through Med Scholars. Co-Enrollment in the lecture-based course MED 244 is encouraged but not required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 9 units total)

MED 240: Sex and Gender in Human Physiology and Disease (FEMGEN 241, HUMBIO 140)

(HUMBIO students must enroll in HUMBIO 140. PhD minor in FGSS must enroll in FEMGEN 241. Med students must enroll in MED 240.) Chromosomal, hormonal and environmental influences that lead to male and female and intersex reproductive anatomy and physiology and neuroendocrine regulation. Masculinizing and feminizing effects of endogenous and exogenous sex hormones and sociocultural factors, in particular gender identity, (social) gender norms and relationships, on the musculoskeletal, neurological, cardiovascular, immunological and other systems and tissues, e.g. adipose, skin, etc. over the lifecourse, from conception to puberty, through reproductive phases (including changes during the menstrual cycle and pregnancy up to and beyond menopause in women, and with aging in both sexes). Transgender health issues. Guest lecturers. Enrollment limited to students with sophomore academic standing or above. Prerequisites: Human Biology Core or Biology Foundations or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3
Instructors: ; Stefanick, M. (PI)

MED 241: Clinical Skills for Patient Care in Free Clinics

Enrollment in this course is by application only for advanced volunteers at the Cardinal Free Clinics. Focus is on preparing students to gain early clinical experience by teaching basic skills such as taking patient histories, working with interpreters, providing motivational interviewing, and presenting cases to medical students or physicians. Students learn through classroom lectures and practice sessions. Upon successful completion of a competency assessment, students are able to serve in a clinic role in the Cardinal Free Clinics. Prerequisite: Advanced standing as a volunteer at the Cardinal Free Clinics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)

MED 242: Physicians and Human Rights

Weekly lectures on how human rights violations affect health. Topics include: regional conflict and health, the health status of refugees and internally displaced persons; child labor; trafficking in women and children; HIV/AIDS; torture; poverty, the environment and health; access to clean water; domestic violence and sexual assault; and international availability of drugs. Guest speakers from national and international NGOs including Doctors Without Borders; McMaster University Institute for Peace Studies; UC Berkeley Human Rights Center; Kiva.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Laws, A. (PI)

MED 243: Citizen Science Theory to Practice: Advancing Community-Driven Solutions for Health (CHPR 236)

Harnessing and activating the insights of community members and patients is essential to achieving health equity ¿from the bottom up.¿ Students will 1) learn and apply a novel datadriven, technology-enabled approach to improving community health through systematic documentation of lived experience and application of collective data to inform local change; 2) examine global project case studies targeting physical activity, food access, transportation, affordable housing, gender-based violence, and age-friendly environments; and 3) complete assessments of their local built environments using a Stanford-developed app and web platform, then use their data to develop and explore feasible strategies to improve community health.n(Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3

MED 244: Diagnostic Odysseys In Medicine (HUMBIO 44)

Medicine is rapidly evolving, with increasing emphasis on genetic testing, immunophenotyping and integration of technology to guide diagnosis. In this course, experts from Stanford and Silicon Valley will highlight exciting developments. Topics include the latest developments in genetics and genomics (including genome testing in clinical practice, direct to consumer testing, and frontiers in neurogenetics), immunophenotyping, utilization of databases to research diseases and the emerging field of machine learning and clinical decision support in optimizing diagnostic strategies. Students who wish to engage in a mentored multi-disciplinary team-based research project related to advanced diagnostic techniques can additionally enroll in MED 239.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

MED 245: Leadership in Medicine: Developing your Moral Identity

Students will view videos of well-known leaders being interviewed or watch a live interview of the chief communications officer of Stanford School of Medicine each week. All this will be conducted through zoom conferencing for students to connect from home. With these interviews we will be highlighting the ethical challenges that these leaders faced and how they rose to these challenges, or fell short. These famous leaders will come from a variety of fields including academia, government, law, public service, public health, the military or journalism. We will then hold small group discussions after the interviews to debate the decisions made by these leaders. Through discourse and deep reflection we aim to prepare students for their own leadership challenges of the future. Students can apply for an additional unit with self-directed reading and a written paper describing important principles of leadership (1-2 units).
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2
Instructors: ; Osterberg, L. (PI)

MED 246: The Medical Interview for Spanish Speakers

Student led forum for practicing and learning medical Spanish related specifically to the medical interview. Prepares clinical students to interact more effectively with Spanish speaking patients in clinics. Classes are topical; each class includes a demonstration, medical vocabulary practice, and conversational practice on the topic of the day.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Units: 1 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 4 units total)

MED 247: Methods in Community Assessment, Evaluation, and Research (CHPR 247, MED 147)

Development of pragmatic skills for design, implementation, and analysis of structured interviews, focus groups, survey questionnaires, and field observations. Topics include: principles of community-based participatory research, including importance of dissemination; strengths and limitations of different study designs; validity and reliability; construction of interview and focus group questions; techniques for moderating focus groups; content analysis of qualitative data; survey questionnaire design; and interpretation of commonly-used statistical analyses.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Kiernan, M. (PI)

MED 248: Student Rounds

Teams of preclinical students meet weekly with a clinical student to hear the history and physical of a recent case the clinical student encountered on the wards. Following the presentation, the preclinical students work together under the guidance of the clinical student to develop a problem list and plan, which are then compared with the problem list, plan, and orders made by the actual admitting team. In the course of presenting the cases, the clinical student describes personal experiences and practical components of ward work and daily clinical routine.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Kenny, K. (PI)

MED 249: Topics in Health Economics I (ECON 249, HRP 249)

Course will cover various topics in health economics, from theoretical and empirical perspectives. Topics will include public financing and public policy in health care and health insurance; demand and supply of health insurance and healthcare; physicians' incentives; patient decision-making; competition policy in healthcare markets, intellectual property in the context of pharmaceutical drugs and medical technology; other aspects of interaction between public and private sectors in healthcare and health insurance markets. Key emphasis on recent work and empirical methods and modelling. Prerequisites: Micro and Econometrics first year sequences (or equivalent). Curricular prerequisites (if applicable): First year graduate Microeconomics and Econometrics sequences (or equivalent)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5

MED 250: Understanding Evidence-Based Medicine: Hands-on experience (CHPR 205, EPI 250)

How can one practice evidence-based medicine and make evidence-based decisions for clinical practice and policy making? Using pivotal papers published in the recent scientific literature addressing important clinical questions on diverse medical topics, we will probe a wide range of types of studies, types of targeted therapeutic or preventive interventions, and types of studied outcomes (effectiveness and/or safety), including RCTs, observational studies, epidemiologic surveillance studies, systematic reviews-umbrella reviews-meta-analyses-meta-analyses of individual patient data, studies on the evaluation of diagnostic tests and prognostic models, economic analyses studies, and guidelines. Students enrolled for 4 units will complete an additional project or other engagement approved by the instructor. MD studies enroll for +/-. GR students enroll for Letter grade.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4

MED 251: Measurement for Health Policy (HRP 232)

Conceptual, technical and empirical basis for measurement essential to health policy. Principles and good practice for designing measures fit for purpose. Practical application of measurement concepts and methods. Main emphasis on measuring levels of health in individuals and populations, combining mortality/longevity and quality of life/functioning. Additional topics include measurement of inequalities and health care quality. Examples and applications include high income and low/middle-income settings.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | Units: 3

MED 252: Outcomes Analysis (BIOMEDIN 251, HRP 252)

Methods of conducting empirical studies which use large existing medical, survey, and other databases to ask both clinical and policy questions. Econometric and statistical models used to conduct medical outcomes research. How research is conducted on medical and health economics questions when a randomized trial is impossible. Problem sets emphasize hands-on data analysis and application of methods, including re-analyses of well-known studies. Prerequisites: one or more courses in probability, and statistics or biostatistics.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 4

MED 253: Building for Digital Health (CS 342)

This project-based course will provide a comprehensive overview of key requirements in the design and full-stack implementation of a digital health research application. Several pre-vetted and approved projects from the Stanford School of Medicine will be available for students to select from and build. Student teams learn about all necessary approval processes to deploy a digital health solution (data privacy clearance/I RB approval, etc.) and be guided in the development of front-end and back-end infrastructure using best practices. The final project will be the presentation and deployment of a fully approved digital health research application. CS106A, CS106B, Recommended: CS193P/A, CS142, CS47, CS110. Limited enrollment for this course.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Aalami, O. (PI); Xu, S. (GP)

MED 255: The Responsible Conduct of Research

Forum. How to identify and approach ethical dilemmas that commonly arise in biomedical research. Issues in the practice of research such as in publication and interpretation of data, and issues raised by academic/industry ties. Contemporary debates at the interface of biomedical science and society regarding research on stem cells, bioweapons, genetic testing, human subjects, and vertebrate animals. Completion fulfills NIH/ADAMHA requirement for instruction in the ethical conduct of research. Prerequisite: research experience recommended. Intensive format, 1-day course, register for only one section. One pre-class assignment required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1

MED 255C: The Responsible Conduct of Research for Clinical and Community Researchers

Engages clinical researchers in discussions about ethical issues commonly encountered during their clinical research careers and addresses contemporary debates at the interface of biomedical science and society. Graduate students required to take RCR who are or will be conducting clinical research are encouraged to enroll in this version of the course. Prequisite: research experience recommended.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | Units: 1

MED 256: Gene Expression Profiling in Cancer

This course will cover techniques used to query the expression of genes in tissue and how the information derived from those techniques can be used to answer questions in cancer biology. The focus will be on the transcriptome analysis (e.g. RT-qPCR, microarrays, RNA-seq, etc.) in the context of cancer biology experiments. Throughout the quarter, we will develop a pipeline to analyze high-throughput RNA-seq data. Finally we will go over differential gene expression analysis techniques and tools used to interpret lists of genes derived from such analysis.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | Units: 2-3

MED 258: Stanford Technology Access Resource Team: A Primary Care Effort to Bridge the Telehealth Divide

Video visits have been invaluable during the COVID pandemic for patients and providers and will continue to serve as a vital connection between patients and their care team beyond COVID-19. However, many patients cannot access this resource due to challenges with technology. This course will give students an opportunity to explore concepts in design thinking, communication, community-building, and team-based patient care while providing a service that will connect vulnerable patients and their caregivers to health care providers through video visits. The course consists of didactic sessions and opportunities for undergraduates and graduate students to interact with patients and health care teams by phone and video. Please note that regular use of the phone and internet are required and may not be the best option for those who are residing out of the country. MD Students should enroll in FAMMED 280.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 10 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: ; Cuan, N. (PI)

MED 261: Leadership in Health Equity and Community Engagement: Creating New Educational Opportunities

Creating Capacity in Community Engagement Medical Education is a new course for first/second-year medical students with an interest in both community health and medical education. In a small group, faculty-facilitated setting, students will design and develop the foundational structure for a new scholarly application in the area of health equity and community engagement leadership. Additionally, students will work collaboratively with community engagement, public health, and diversity, equity, inclusion faculty members to create a new health equity and community engagement leadership course to be launched in Spring 2021. Activities will include reviewing other similar courses at peer medical schools, assessing medical education needs around these topic areas from peers, creating a syllabus and identifying key content areas, designing interactive small-group activities, and inviting health equity and community engagement practitioner guest speakers. Instructor/s permission is required. Prerequisite: INDE 201: Practice of Medicine I.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)
Instructors: ; Chang, D. (PI)

MED 262: Economics of Health Improvement in Developing Countries (ECON 127)

Application of economic paradigms and empirical methods to health improvement in developing countries. Emphasis is on unifying analytic frameworks and evaluation of empirical evidence. How economic views differ from public health, medicine, and epidemiology; analytic paradigms for health and population change; the demand for health; the role of health in international development. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and ECON 102B.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | Units: 5

MED 263: Advanced Decision Science Methods and Modeling in Health (HRP 263)

Advanced methods currently used in published model-based cost-effectiveness analyses in medicine and public health, both theory and technical applications. Topics include: Markov and microsimulation models, model calibration and evaluation, and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Prerequisites: a course in probability, a course in statistics or biostatistics, a course on cost-effectiveness such as HRP 392, a course in economics, and familiarity with decision modeling software such as TreeAge.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

MED 264: Covid-19 Case Investigation and Contact Tracing (CHPR 235, MED 164)

In this service-learning course students will be learn how to identify people who have COVID-19 and those who have been exposed to people with COVID-19. Students will learn basics about the biology and health effects of SARS-CoV-2 and the epidemiology of COVID-19. Students will be taught important skills in healthcare communication including motivational interviewing, health education, and health coaching. Students will work as volunteers together with Santa Clara County staff to interrupt the chains of transmission of COVID-19 as they apply skills they have learned to help people with the illness and those who have been exposed understand the importance of isolation, quarantine, and other critical aspects of public health needed to control and manage this disease. Students will need to be willing to commit 20 hours per week to this course for 10 weeks over 2 quarters. Requires application and instructor approval. Please contact Course Director, Lars Osterberg MD, MPH for an application form and approval for enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 3-6 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 18 units total)

MED 265: Advanced Topics in the Economics of Health and Medical Care (HRP 257)

Emphasis is on research studies in health economics. Seminar style course focuses on health economics. Complimentary with HRP 256. Students will be expected to read and present papers to the group and discuss concepts with faculty. Restricted to second year or beyond PhD students in economics & economics-related disciplines.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | Units: 2 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 4 units total)

MED 266: Literacy: A Fundamental Human Right Toward Health and Advocacy

This is a Community Engaged learning seminar style course that meets once a week for an hour and a half. We will have seminar discussions and readings related to local health literacy issues, and the systemic factors affecting health literacy through collaborative problem-solving processes through course readings and community engagement experiences. Emphasis will be on active learning, with assignments calling for data gathering through interaction with community members to explore and address these issues for more positive health outcomes. The course is open to pre-clinical medical, undergraduate and graduate students. No prerequisites.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Gabali, C. (PI)

MED 267: Ideo, Presence & The Human Experience in Medicine

Presence. The Art and Science of Human Connection in Medicine is a new center, founded and lead by Dr. Abraham Verghese (http://med.stanford.edu/presence.html). This course partners with IDEO (https://www.ideo.com/) to bring design thinking to address the challenges of diagnostic error in medicine. Dr. Verghese and colleagues will outline the consequences of the lack of presence in the clinical encounter. IDEO's design thinking will be taught by Dr. Jayant Menon, Dr. Farzad Azimpour and Grace Hwang. Class participants will be divided into small groups and designated coaches. Each group will work with the course leadership to define a specific challenge and utilize the design thinking process to create deployable solutions. In class lectures and workshops will be held on campus on Tuesdays from 3.30-5 p.m., and IDEO (Forest Av, Palo Alto) based small group meetings will be held on Thursdays from 5.30-6.20pm. Admission is selective and requires all applicants submit an application before March 1, 2017. Applications can be found at https://goo.gl/forms/7mCI7vf8PbcdVG0m1 nQuestions should emailed to sonoot@stanford.edu
Last offered: Spring 2018 | Units: 3

MED 268: Tackling Cross-Cultural Health Challenges: Emphasis on the Asian/Pacific Islander Community

Why do certain diseases like hepatitis B affect Asian/Pacific Islanders (APIs) disproportionately? How can public policy advance health equity among ethnic groups? Weekly lectures examine health challenges endemic to the API community, recognizing underreported health issues in a prevalent ethnic demographic. Students will emerge with an understanding of topics including stigmas attached to traditional medicine, prevalent diseases in APIs, API health politics, and cultural/linguistic barriers that health professionals encounter. Guest speakers include professionals from the Ravenswood Family Health Center, the Santa Clara County Public Health Department, Hep B Free, the Stanford School of Medicine, etc. (Light supper served).
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

MED 270: Learning & Teaching of Science (EDUC 280, ENGR 295, PHYSICS 295, VPTL 280)

This course will provide students with a basic knowledge of the relevant research in cognitive psychology and science education and the ability to apply that knowledge to enhance their ability to learn and teach science, particularly at the undergraduate level. Course will involve readings, discussion, and application of the ideas through creation of learning activities. It is suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students with some science background.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Wieman, C. (PI)

MED 271: Global Biodesign: Medical Technology in an International Context (BIOE 371)

This course ( BIOE371, MED271) exposes students to the challenges and opportunities of developing and implementing innovative health technologies to help patients around the world. Non-communicable diseases, such as metabolic and chronic respiratory disease, now account for 7 in 10 deaths worldwide, creating the need for innovative health technologies that work across diverse global markets. At the beginning of the quarter, the course will provide an overview of the dynamic global health technology industry. Next, faculty members, guest experts, and students will discuss key differences and similarities when commercializing new products in the for-profit health technology sector across six important regions: the US and Europe, China and Japan, and India and Brazil. Finally, the course will explore critical ¿global health¿ issues that transcend international borders and how technology can be leveraged to address them. This section will culminate with an interactive debate focused on whether for-profit, nonprofit, or hybrid models are best for implementing sustainable global health solutions. The last class will be devoted to synthesis, reflection, and a discussion of career opportunities in the global health technology field.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | Units: 1

MED 272A: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation (BIOE 374A, ME 368A)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are required to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of 50 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

MED 272B: Biodesign Innovation: Concept Development and Implementation (BIOE 374B, ME 368B)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are required to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of 50 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

MED 273: Biodesign for Digital Health (BIOE 273)

Health care is facing significant cross-industry challenges and opportunities created by a number of factors including: the increasing need for improved access to affordable, high-quality care; growing demand from consumers for greater control of their health and health data; the shift in focus from sick care to prevention and health optimization; aging demographics and the increased burden of chronic conditions; and new emphasis on real-world, measurable health outcomes for individuals and populations. Moreover, the delivery of health information and services is no longer tied to traditional brick and mortar hospitals and clinics: it has increasingly become "mobile," enabled by apps, sensors, wearables; simultaneously, it has been augmented and often revolutionized by emerging digital and information technologies, as well as by the data that these technologies generate. This multifactorial transformation presents opportunities for innovation across the entire cycle of care, from wellness, to acute and chronic diseases, to care at the end of life. But how does one approach innovation in digital health to address these health care challenges while ensuring the greatest chance of success? At Stanford Biodesign, we believe that innovation is a process that can be learned, practiced, and perfected; and, it starts with a need. In Biodesign for Digital Health, students will learn about digital health and the Biodesign needs-driven innovation process from over 50 industry experts. Over the course of ten weeks, these speakers join the teaching team in a dynamic classroom environment that includes lectures, panel discussions, and breakout sessions. These experts represent startups, corporations, venture capital firms, accelerators, research labs, health organizations, and more. Student teams will take actual digital and mobile health challenges and learn how to apply Biodesign innovation principles to research and evaluate needs, ideate solutions, and objectively assess them against key criteria for satisfying the needs. Teams take a hands-on approach with the support of need coaches and mentors. On the final day of class, teams present to a panel of digital health experts and compete for project extension funding. Friday section will be used for team projects and for scheduled workshops. Limited enrollment for this course. Students need to submit their application online via: https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_28ZWIF8RJsyMvCR
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

MED 275B: Biodesign Fundamentals

MED 275B is an introduction to the Biodesign process for health technology innovation. This team-based course emphasizes interdisciplinary collaboration and hands-on learning at the intersection of medicine and technology. Students will work on projects in the space of medical devices, digital health, and healthcare technologies with the assistance of clinical and industry mentors. Applicants from all majors and stages in their education welcome. Students will work in teams to develop solutions to current unmet medical needs, starting with a deep dive into understanding and characterizing important unmet medical needs through disease research, competitive analysis, market research, and stakeholder analysis. Other topics that will be discussed include FDA regulation of medical technology, intellectual property, value proposition, and business model development. Consent required for enrollment, to apply visit: http://bit.ly/MED275B2020
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: ; Fan, R. (PI); Wall, J. (PI)

MED 277: AI-Assisted Care (CS 337)

AI has been advancing quickly, with its impact everywhere. In healthcare, innovation in AI could help transforming of our healthcare system. This course offers a diverse set of research projects focusing on cutting edge computer vision and machine learning technologies to solve some of healthcare's most important problems. The teaching team and teaching assistants will work closely with students on research projects in this area. Research projects include Care for Senior at Senior Home, Surgical Quality Analysis, AI Assisted Parenting, Burn Analysis & Assessment and more. AI areas include Video Understanding, Image Classification, Object Detection, Segmentation, Action Recognition, Deep Learning, Reinforcement Learning, HCI and more. The course is open to students in both school of medicine and school of engineering.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 1

MED 278: Stanford Health Consulting Group- Leadership

This course is application-based and will be composed of students who have taken ¿Stanford Health Consulting Group - Core¿ and who wish to take on leadership roles in organizing and managing the high-impact health care projects for the class, which address major strategic and operational challenges in health care delivery and innovation. Participants will select projects, define objectives and deliverables, manage teams of 4-8 students from the core class, and ultimately serve as a bridge between students, faculty sponsors, and other health care stakeholders. Enrollment requires permission from the Instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit (up to 99 units total)

MED 279: Stanford Heath Consulting Group - Core

This course provides the opportunity to analyze and solve major strategic and operational challenges in health care delivery and innovation through interdisciplinary team projects. Teams will receive direct mentorship from Stanford Medicine faculty, health care leaders, and experienced student leads, with projects carefully defined to optimize high-impact experiential learning and leadership development. Projects will culminate with student-led presentations to faculty sponsors and other health care stakeholders, as well as opportunities for further dissemination of solutions.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit (up to 99 units total)

MED 281: How to Change the World (for the Better)

This unique course will enable students to learn from invited guests about how to "Change the World". As a group, Humankind has had a lasting impact on this planet but, on an individual basis, our impact can seem limited. Many innovators from the sciences, humanities, engineering and business are making this world a better place on a large scale. How do they do this? Through a series of fireside interviews with "World Changing" guest speakers from non-profits, business and government, we will explore how individuals can have a huge, positive influence on the state of the world. Students will be asked to formulate a short 5 slide presentation about their thoughts on the interviews or their plan to change the world. Previous speakers included: co-founder of Patreon, business editor of the New York Times, executive from Nike, and head of Bangladesh USAID program. Students can take ideas developed in the course to apply for the $40,000 Westly Prize in Social Innovation (under age 28). Dinner will be provided for enrolled students.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 1

MED 282: Early Clinical Experience at the Cardinal Free Clinics (MED 182)

The Cardinal Free Clinics, consisting of Arbor and Pacific Free Clinic, provide culturally appropriate, high quality transitional medical care for underserved patient populations in the Bay Area. Students volunteer in various clinic roles to offer services including health education, interpretation, referrals, and labs. In clinic students are guided in the practice of medical interviews, history-taking and physical examinations as appropriate, and work with attending physicians to arrive at a diagnosis and management plan. Visit http://cfc.stanford.edu for more information. For questions related to the course or volunteering, please email arborclinic@stanford.edu and/or pacific@med.stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

MED 283: Interpersonal Communication in Health Care (PSYC 283)

Communication is an unavoidable element of our everyday life that often goes unexamined. In this course, we will first examine the communication experiences in daily life with friends, family, significant others, peers, and coworkers. You will then engage with a variety of materials designed to enhance both your analytic and experiential knowledge about our everyday communication and how this relates to communication in health care. Analytic knowledge stems from your understanding of theoretical and written materials and others¿ experiences. Experiential knowledge will require you to apply what you have learned to your own communication experiences. In addition to mastering course concepts through readings, class discussions, and lectures, time in class will be devoted to applying these concepts through various activities.
| Units: 2-3

MED 284: Team Leadership in the Cardinal Free Clinics I (MED 184)

Introduction to skills for effective leadership, including topics such as conflict resolution, team dynamic. Applied learning through shifts at the Cardinal Free Clinics and related project work. Enrollment limited to Cardinal Free Clinic Managers.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

MED 285: Global Leaders and Innovators in Human and Planetary Health (HRP 285)

Are you interested in innovative ideas and strategies for addressing urgent challenges in human and planetary health? This 7 session lecture series features a selection of noteworthy leaders, innovators and experts across diverse sectors in health and the environment such as: healthcare/medical innovation, environmental sustainability, foundations/venture capital, biotechnology/pharmaceuticals, social innovation/entrepreneurship, tech/media and artificial intelligence (AI), human rights, global poverty/development, sustainable agriculture/hunger/nutrition, public policy/systems change. Co-convened by faculty, fellows and students collaborating across several Stanford centers/departments/schools, the course invites the discussion of global problems, interdisciplinary perspectives and solutions in the fields of health and the environment. nSpecial themes for AY 2020-2021 include: 1) US and Global Responses in Combatting the Coronavirus Pandemic; 2) Climate Crisis, Wildfires, Extreme Weather and Environmental Sustainability; 3) Systemic Racism, Gender Inequality, Health Inequity and Community Well Being; 4) Democracy Under Siege, Political Landscape of Electoral, Judicial, Legislative Turmoil; 5) Partnership/Collaboration, Models of Leadership, Innovation, Sustainable Social Change; and Other Topics TBD by students/fellows. Students from all backgrounds are encouraged to enroll - registration open to all Stanford students and fellows. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 8 units total)

MED 286: Health Information Technology and Strategy

Health Information technology was intended to help reduce and cost and improve the quality of health care services. TO date, this is little evidence that this goal has been achieved. This course is designed to explore economic frameworks that can help us to understand how health IT can achieve it's intended goals. These frameworks build from general business and economic models used successfully in other industries. The course will be utilize both business cases and lecture to prepare students to propose potential novel applications of health information technology solutions. Each student will have a team-based final project.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

MED 287: Survey of Asian Health Issues (ASNAMST 287)

In this lecture series, students will explore Asian health topics. Specifically, the chronic disease risk and burden of Asians in the U.S. as a group is considered. Additionally, the necessity of the practice of disaggregation in the study and treatment of Asian Americans is emphasized. Topics will include cardiovascular disease, cancer, population health, precision health, pharmacogenomics and longevity in Asian-Americans. Class format is 30 minute lecture followed by 20 minutes for questions. No required readings. Opportunity to connect with guest speakers for research opportunities. Assignments will include short written reflections on lecture topics. This course is relevant for students interested in basic biology research, epidemiology, and public health policy, or clinical careers in medicine, psychology, or social work. Grading is satisfactory/no credit. All students are welcome, limit 25.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | Units: 1

MED 288: Perspectives on Cancer

Cancer consumes the lives of those associated with it: patients and their loved ones, their medical staff, and often the larger community. This course will address the broad impact of cancer from multiple fronts (medical, social, mental, etc.) by providing perspectives beyond the cut-and-dry scientific issue that the disease is often made out to be, enabling students to explore the "human-side" to the disease. In alternating weeks, students will participate in a Socratic seminar based on light reading about relevant topics and personally interact with guest speakers, who may include medical professional, cancer survivors and their loved ones, and activists. This course will meet weeks 2-9.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

MED 289: Introduction to Bioengineering Research (BIOE 390)

Preference to medical and bioengineering graduate students with first preference given to Bioengineering Scholarly Concentration medical students. Bioengineering is an interdisciplinary field that leverages the disciplines of biology, medicine, and engineering to understand living systems, and engineer biological systems and improve engineering designs and human and environmental health. Students and faculty make presentations during the course. Students expected to make presentations, complete a short paper, read selected articles, and take quizzes on the material.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 5 times (up to 10 units total)

MED 290: Independent Study with Presence and the Program in Bedside Medicine

Students work with their faculty mentor on projects and studies that are broadly centered around the vision and mission of Presence: The Art and Science of Human Connection and the Program in Bedside Medicine. Please see our websites for updated projects and initiatives - Presence + Program in Bedside Medicine. Currently, we focus on: How do we teach and emphasize to students, residents, physicians (and beyond) in the medical field the need to master bedside skills? How does bedside medicine affect patient care? How has patient care changed with the omnipresence of technology in our lives? How is bedside medicine going to change in the next few decades, centuries? In investigating these questions, students utilize scientific articles and data, engage patients, and collaborate with our faculty and staff. Independent study projects culminate in a presentation to our team, with the potential for posters or manuscripts. Students paired with faculty based on their area of interest and faculty/project needs.We emphasize the human connection with patients, and students are encouraged to engage patients within our program for teaching sessions, research studies, among other projects. Enrollment varies with and is limited to faculty need. Repeatable for credit; more than one-quarter of commitment expected.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 16 times (up to 80 units total)

MED 291: Diagnostic Medicine on Television: Truths vs. Theatrics

School of Medicine faculty in charge of Stanford's Consultative Medicine Clinic, a real-life medical mystery clinic, will review cases from the popular TV show House and critique the show's depiction of complex disease diagnosis and treatment. We tread down the road of diagnostic dilemmas and the line between fact vs fiction.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

MED 292: Pathways in Global Health

The goal of this class is to introduce students to the diverse pathways that contribute to Global Health. From epidemiology, to climate change, everyone is impacted, and the ways we address global health problems is multifaceted. Each week, there will be different speakers from various departments such as in biology, anthropology, medicine who will talk about their careers and perspectives in global health. The class experience with be an interactive speaker series, where students will learn and develop ways they can contribute to global health.
| Units: 1

MED 295: Advanced Cardiac Life Support

(For clinical MD students only) Prepares students to manage the victim of a cardiac arrest. Knowledge and skills necessary for resuscitation of critically ill patients. Clinical scenarios and small group discussions address cardiovascular pharmacology, arrhythmia recognition and therapy, acute coronary syndrome including myocardial infarction, ventricular dysrhythmias and defibrillation, and acute ischemic stroke. Students should get the approval of their Clerkship Coordinator before registering for the course. nRecommended prerequisites: Medicine 300A, Pediatrics 300A, or Surgery 300A. nPrerequisite: EMED 201A
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2

MED 296: Being Mortal: Medicine, Mortality and Caring for Older Adults

Mortality is the inevitable, final outcome of human health. Though medical education focuses on treating illness and prolonging life, healthcare professionals in practice must face the fact that patients¿ lives cannot always be saved. This course will explore the difficult issues such as end-of-life planning, decision-making, and cost of care, that figure in hospitals, hospice, and assisted living centers. Guest speakers will include elderly care workers, medical writers and filmmakers, and physicians in geriatrics, oncology and palliative care, who will lead student discussions following their lectures. Upon finishing the course, students will learn how to better handle aging and death in their medical practice, in order to improve the quality of their patients¿ lives¿and that of their families¿ as well.
| Units: 1

MED 297: Diabetes 101 for Healthcare Providers

Diabetes is an extremely high-prevalence disease, that you will likely encounter on a consistent basis regardless of your medical specialty, so learning about the practical aspects of treatment is extremely useful. This course is designed to teach these practical skills about diabetes care, treatment and the latest research in the field. Diabetes 101 for healthcare providers is a lunch seminar style course with lectures on subjects like: A meal in the life of a diabetic; Pumps/ CGMs/ Artificial Pancreases; Beyond Types 1 and 2; The Psychology of diabetes and chronic disease; and Rare complications and future treatments.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Basina, M. (PI)

MED 298: Being Mortal II: Approaching Serious Illness

This elective offers an opportunity for MD and PA students to improve their ability to engage in effective and compassionate conversations with patients facing serious illnesses. The course will feature palliative care physicians, oncologists, spiritual care providers, and hospice staff, and provide students with early exposure to concepts in palliative medicine, hospice care, and end-of-life care, which are otherwise given little emphasis in the core curriculum. Students will learn practical skills in serious illness conversations with patients, through case-based sessions involving peer-to-peer, peer-to-instructor, and peer-to-patient role play. Relevant topics in leadership, psychology, sociology, and professionalism will also be covered. In addition, students taking the course for 2 credits will have the opportunity to participate in on-site visits to hospices, nursing facilities, assisted-living facilities, and adult day health care facilities. For more information please contact Henry Bair (hbair@stanford.edu) or Paul Horak (pwhorak@stanford.edu).
| Units: 1-2

MED 299: Directed Reading in Medicine

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Advani, R. (PI); Ahmed, A. (PI); Ahuja, N. (PI); Akatsu, H. (PI); Al-Ahmad, A. (PI); Alizadeh, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Andrews, J. (PI); Annes, J. (PI); Arai, S. (PI); Ariel, D. (PI); Artandi, M. (PI); Artandi, S. (PI); Asch, S. (PI); Ashley, E. (PI); Assimes, T. (PI); Ayoub, W. (PI); Banerjee, S. (PI); Barry, M. (PI); Basaviah, P. (PI); Basina, M. (PI); Basu, S. (PI); Behal, R. (PI); Bendavid, E. (PI); Benjamin, J. (PI); Berube, C. (PI); Bhalla, V. (PI); Bhatt, A. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blackburn, B. (PI); Blaschke, T. (PI); Blayney, D. (PI); Blish, C. (PI); Bloom, G. (PI); Bollyky, P. (PI); Bouvier, D. (PI); Boxer, L. (PI); Braddock, C. (PI); Brinton, T. (PI); Brown, W. (PI); Bulow, K. (PI); Carlson, R. (PI); Cartwright, C. (PI); Chakravarty, E. (PI); Chan, D. (PI); Chan, G. (PI); Chang, C. (PI); Chang, S. (PI); Chen, A. (PI); Chen, M. (PI); Cheng, X. (PI); Chertow, G. (PI); Cheung, R. (PI); Chi, J. (PI); Cho-Phan, C. (PI); Chu, G. (PI); Chua, K. (PI); Chung, L. (PI); Clarke, M. (PI); Clusin, W. (PI); Colevas, A. (PI); Colloff, E. (PI); Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI); Cooke, J. (PI); Cooper, A. (PI); Coutre, S. (PI); Crapo, L. (PI); Crump, C. (PI); Cullen, M. (PI); Das, A. (PI); Dash, R. (PI); Daugherty, T. (PI); David, S. (PI); Dawson, L. (PI); Deresinski, S. (PI); Desai, M. (PI); Desai, T. (PI); Dhillon, G. (PI); Dorman, J. (PI); Dosiou, C. (PI); DuBose, A. (PI); Edwards, L. (PI); Einav, S. (PI); Farquhar, J. (PI); Fathman, C. (PI); Fearon, W. (PI); Feldman, D. (PI); Felsher, D. (PI); Fernandez-Becker, N. (PI); Fisher, G. (PI); Fitzgerald, P. (PI); Ford, J. (PI); Ford, P. (PI); Fowler, M. (PI); Frayne, S. (PI); Friedland, S. (PI); Fries, J. (PI); Froelicher, V. (PI); Gabiola, J. (PI); Ganjoo, K. (PI); Garcia, G. (PI); Garcia, R. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gardner, P. (PI); Gavi, B. (PI); Genovese, M. (PI); Gerson, L. (PI); Gesundheit, N. (PI); Glaseroff, A. (PI); Glenn, J. (PI); Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. (PI); Goldstein, M. (PI); Goodman, S. (PI); Goronzy, J. (PI); Gotlib, J. (PI); Gray, G. (PI); Green, E. (PI); Greenberg, H. (PI); Greenberg, P. (PI); Gregory, P. (PI); Habtezion, A. (PI); Hallenbeck, J. (PI); Harman, S. (PI); Harrington, R. (PI); Harshman, L. (PI); Haskell, W. (PI); Heaney, C. (PI); Heidenreich, P. (PI); Henri, H. (PI); Ho, D. (PI); Hoffman, A. (PI); Holman, H. (PI); Holodniy, M. (PI); Hopkins, J. (PI); Horning, S. (PI); Hsia, H. (PI); Hunt, S. (PI); Ioannidis, J. (PI); Isom, R. (PI); Jagannathan, P. (PI); Jernick, J. (PI); Ji, H. (PI); Johnston, L. (PI); Jones, E. (PI); Kahn, J. (PI); Kao, P. (PI); Kastelein, M. (PI); Katz, R. (PI); Katzenstein, D. (PI); Kenny, K. (PI); Khatri, P. (PI); Khazeni, N. (PI); Khemani, S. (PI); Khush, K. (PI); Killen, J. (PI); Kim, S. (PI); Knowles, J. (PI); Kohrt, H. (PI); Kraemer, F. (PI); Krishnan, E. (PI); Kumar, S. (PI); Kummar, S. (PI); Kunz, P. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Kurian, A. (PI); Kuschner, W. (PI); Ladabaum, U. (PI); Lafayette, R. (PI); Laport, G. (PI); Lee, D. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Lee, P. (PI); Leung, L. (PI); Levin, E. (PI); Levitt, J. (PI); Levitt, L. (PI); Levy, R. (PI); Levy, S. (PI); Liang, D. (PI); Liedtke, M. (PI); Lin, S. (PI); Lindsay, A. (PI); Lorig, K. (PI); Lowe, A. (PI); Lowsky, R. (PI); Luby, S. (PI); Lutchman, G. (PI); Majeti, R. (PI); McConnell, M. (PI); McLaughlin, T. (PI); Medeiros, B. (PI); Meyer, T. (PI); Miklos, D. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Milstein, A. (PI); Mitchell, B. (PI); Mohabir, P. (PI); Morioka-Douglas, N. (PI); Musen, M. (PI); Nadeau, K. (PI); Narayan, S. (PI); Neal, J. (PI); Negrin, R. (PI); Nevins, A. (PI); Nguyen, L. (PI); Nguyen, M. (PI); Nguyen, P. (PI); Nicolls, M. (PI); O' Callahan, P. (PI); Osterberg, L. (PI); Owens, D. (PI); Pao, A. (PI); Parikh, R. (PI); Parnes, J. (PI); Parsonnet, J. (PI); Pasricha, P. (PI); Pegram, M. (PI); Periyakoil, V. (PI); Petersen, J. (PI); Pinto, H. (PI); Pompei, P. (PI); Popp, R. (PI); Posley, K. (PI); Price, E. (PI); Prochaska, J. (PI); Puri, R. (PI); Quertermous, T. (PI); Raffin, T. (PI); Reejhsinghani, R. (PI); Rehkopf, D. (PI); Relman, D. (PI); Rizk, N. (PI); Robinson, B. (PI); Rockson, S. (PI); Rodriguez, F. (PI); Rohatgi, R. (PI); Rosas, L. (PI); Rosen, G. (PI); Rosenberg, S. (PI); Rudd, P. (PI); Ruoss, S. (PI); Rydel, T. (PI); Scandling, J. (PI); Schillinger, E. (PI); Schnittger, I. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Schroeder, J. (PI); Shafer, R. (PI); Shah, N. (PI); Shah, S. (PI); Sharp, C. (PI); Shen, K. (PI); Shieh, L. (PI); Shizuru, J. (PI); Shoor, S. (PI); Sikic, B. (PI); Sindher, S. (PI); Singer, S. (PI); Singh, B. (PI); Singh, U. (PI); Skeff, K. (PI); Sledge, G. (PI); Smith-Coggins, R. (PI); Spiekerkoetter, E. (PI); Srinivas, S. (PI); Stafford, R. (PI); Stefanick, M. (PI); Stertzer, S. (PI); Stevens, D. (PI); Stockdale, F. (PI); Strober, S. (PI); Studdert, D. (PI); Tai, J. (PI); Tamura, M. (PI); Tan, J. (PI); Telli, M. (PI); Tepper, R. (PI); Tompkins, L. (PI); Tremmel, J. (PI); Triadafilopoulos, G. (PI); Tsao, P. (PI); Upadhyay, D. (PI); Utz, P. (PI); Vagelos, R. (PI); Valantine, H. (PI); Verghese, A. (PI); Wakelee, H. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warvariv, V. (PI); Weill, D. (PI); Weinacker, A. (PI); Weng, K. (PI); Weng, W. (PI); Weyand, C. (PI); Wheeler, M. (PI); Wiedmann, T. (PI); Winkelmayer, W. (PI); Winkleby, M. (PI); Winslow, D. (PI); Winter, T. (PI); Witteles, R. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Yabu, J. (PI); Yang, P. (PI); Yeung, A. (PI); Yock, P. (PI); Zamanian, R. (PI); Zehnder, J. (PI); Zei, P. (PI); Zolopa, A. (PI); Zulman, D. (PI); de Jesus Perez, V. (PI); Mendoza, F. (SI); Jezmir, J. (TA); Xu, S. (GP)

MED 300A: Internal Medicine Core Clerkship

VISITING: Closed to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Required. DESCRIPTION: Teaches the natural history, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of medical illness. Emphasis is placed on acquiring the understanding, skills, and attitudes desirable in a scientific and compassionate physician. Students record histories, physical examinations, and laboratory data for patients for whom they are responsible and present their findings, together with their diagnoses and treatment plans, at rounds and conferences. Developing sound clinical reasoning skills is continuously emphasized. An essential aspect of the clerkship is the students¿ gradual assumption of direct responsibility for, and full-time involvement in, patient care with the house staff and faculty team. To take advantage of the differences in patient populations and teaching staffs of the four hospitals, students spend three weeks at either SUMC or PAVAMC, and three weeks at either SCVMC in San Jose or KPMC in Santa Clara. The resulting six week experience is an integrated curriculum designed to cover the essentials of internal medicine. The Department of Medicine supervises a random draw-based assignment to two of the four locations shortly before the beginning of each odd-numbered clerkship period. A passing grade will require both a satisfactory performance at both clinical sites and passing the NBME Subject Exam at the end of 6 weeks. PREREQUISITES: None. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full time for six weeks, 18 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: John Kugler, M.D. (jkugler@stanford.edu). CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Nancy D'Amico (650-721-1640). REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Varies, students will be notified prior to the first day; Time: TBA. CALL CODE: 4. OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: SUMC, PAVAMC, SCVMC, KPMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 10 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 20 units total)

MED 302A: Infectious Diseases Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: The infectious diseases clerkship features an active inpatient service at Stanford Hospital, which averages two to four new consults per day. As a consulting specialty service within the Department of Medicine, participants are able to see a wide variety of community-acquired and nosocomial infections. Particular emphasis is placed on clinical and diagnostic reasoning, as well as in developing a good working knowledge of antimicrobial agents and a rational approach for their use. The training and teaching opportunities are rich because of the case mix (medical, surgical, ICU) and broad patient populations that are seen at Stanford Hospital. The service is supervised on a daily basis by the infectious diseases fellow, who will work closely with students rotating on the clinical service. Students attend daily patient rounds, weekly infectious diseases conferences, and may attend other research or patient-care conferences at Stanford. The infectious diseases fellows' team room, L-134, is located in the Division of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine home office on the first floor of the Lane building. PREREQUISITES: MED 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full time for 3 weeks, 2 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Andrew Nevins, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Brenda Norrie (650-725-8338). REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: On the first day of the rotation, page the Stanford general infectious diseases fellow through the Stanford page operator at (650) 723-6661; Time: 8:00 AM. CALL CODE: 1. OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: SUMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

MED 302B: Infectious Diseases Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: The infectious diseases clerkship features an active inpatient service at the Palo Alto VA, which averages one to three new consults per day. As a consulting specialty service within the Department of Medicine, participants are able to see a wide variety of community-acquired and nosocomial infections. Particular emphasis is placed on clinical and diagnostic reasoning, as well as in developing a good working knowledge of antimicrobial agents and a rational approach for their use. The training and teaching opportunities are rich because of the case mix (medical, surgical, ICU) and patient populations that are seen at the Palo Alto VA. The service is supervised on a daily basis by the infectious diseases fellow, who will work closely with students rotating on the clinical service. Students attend daily patient rounds, weekly infectious diseases conferences, and may attend other research or patient-care conferences at the VA and/or Stanford. Course objectives and resources are provided at the beginning of the rotation. PREREQUISITES: MED 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for 3 weeks, 2 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: David Relman, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Marian Askew (650-493-5000 x64209, marian.askew@va.gov). REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: On the first day of the rotation, page the Palo Alto VA infectious diseases fellow through the Stanford page operator at (650) 723-6661; Time: 8:30 AM. CALL CODE: 1. OTHER FACULTY: A. Chary, M. Holodniy, J. Parsonnet, C. Renault, U. Singh, D. Winslow. LOCATION: PAVAMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

MED 302C: Infectious Diseases Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: Teaches the skills of diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases, including acute illnesses seen in the economically disadvantaged, and subspecialty patient referrals. The format of the clerkship at SCVMC is the same as at SUMC and PAVAMC, but the patient population at SCVMC differs from that of the other two hospitals. Two infectious diseases teaching conferences are held weekly for all three hospital services, and there are two additional conferences per month at SCVMC. Consultations are provided to all general (medical, ob-gyn, surgical) and specialized (burn, rehabilitation, dialysis) units. Tuberculosis clinic and HIV clinic experiences are also available during the rotation. The diagnostic microbiology laboratory staff will instruct students on diagnostic microbiology lab use and interpretation of results as required. The Infection Prevention nurses provide an orientation to hospital epidemiology. Students will be supervised by an attending, fellow and one to two residents. Students wishing to do this clerkship must get approval from Dr. Supriya Narasimhan first before registering. PREREQUISITES: MED 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-12, full-time for 4 weeks, 2 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Supriya Narasimhan, M.D., 408-885-5304. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Melanie Bozarth, 408-885-5395, melanie.bozarth@hhs.sccgov.org. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Room 6C095, 6th floor, Old Main Hospital, SCVMC; Time: 8:30 am. CALL CODE: 1. OTHER FACULTY: J. Gupta, J. Kim, S. Narasimhan, A. Polesky, M. Ray, H. Sahni, J. Cooper. LOCATION: SCVMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

MED 303A: Cardiology Clerkship-Inpatient/Outpatient Consult

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 1. DESCRIPTION: Emphasizes the acquisition of diagnostic skills related to cardiovascular evaluation. This experience is derived through active participation in the inpatient consultative cardiology program, which is directed by Dr. Stanley Rockson. In addition, at least three half days per week are spent in the outpatient setting, which encompasses aspects of preventive cardiology as well. Direct patient experiences are supplemented with one-on-one didactic sessions and directed reading. The elective also emphasizes the acquisition of ECG reading skills via electrocardiographic reading sessions. PREREQUISITES: Medicine 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for three weeks. 2 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Stanley Rockson, M.D., 650-725-7571, rockson@stanford.edu. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Stanley Rockson, M.D., 650-725-7571, rockson@stanford.edu. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Dr. Rockson, CVRC CV-267; Time: 8:30 am. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: SUMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

MED 303B: Cardiology Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 1. DESCRIPTION: Exposes the students to all areas of clinical cardiology. Students participate in four half-day ambulatory care cardiology clinics, perform at least 3-5 new consultations per week, with each consultation being presented to an attending physician and having a consultation note written. Additionally, each students 'rounds' five days a week on patients on the consultation service. Students read electrocardiograms almost daily. Their physical examinations are reviewed by the attending physician and/or cardiology fellow. They are exposed to all areas of clinical cardiologic testing: exercise treadmill/stress testing, radionuclide testing (thallium scans and radionuclide ejection fractions), cardiac ultrasound studies, cardiac catheterization and percutaneous transluminal coronary intervention (PTCI). Students follow each of their patients through these tests. When surgery is required, they observe the procedure in the operating room. Students participate in daily didactic sessions covering all areas of basic cardiology and are present at daily coronary care unit/medical intensive care unit rounds. Each student also has the opportunity to participate in any other ongoing medical or surgical teaching conferences as time permits. PREREQUISITES: None. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full time for 3 weeks, 5 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Karen Friday, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Donna Harris (650-858-3932). REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: PAVAMC, Second Floor, Rm E2-426; Time: 7:30AM. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: V. Froelicher, P. Heidenreich, P. Milner, M. Hlatky, W. Fearon, K. Friday. LOCATION: PAVAMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)

MED 303C: Cardiology Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 1. DESCRIPTION: Students are part of a cardiology team that consults on hospitalized patients, sees outpatients in seven half day sessions weekly, and attends didactic conferences including noon conferences, weekly Medicine grand-round as well as Cardiology Cath conferences. Opportunities are available to be involved in the various procedures performed by the department: stress test, echocardiogram, cardiac catheterization and implantable devices. We also encourage their participation with our Cardiovascular Surgeons for a complete cardiology experience. PREREQUISITES: MED 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-12, full time for 4 weeks, 2 students per period, available by arrangement only. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Susan Zhao, MD, FACC, Associate Chief, Division of Cardiology, SCVMC. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Sherry Hamamjy (408-885-4389, sherry.hamamjy@hhs.sccgov.org). REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Valley Specialty Center, 3rd Floor, Suite 340; Time: 9:00 a.m. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: M. Aggarwal, H. Brewster, A. Deluna, H. Shiran, C. Smith, A. Swaminathan, E. Yu, S. Zhao. LOCATION: SCVMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

MED 304A: Cardiovascular Medicine Clerkship - Inpatients

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 2. DESCRIPTION: General cardiology rotation remains part of the bread and butter core of internal medicine inpatient rotations. Advances in diagnostic imaging, rapid bedside testing and evidence based clinical trials have allowed us to deliver coordinated complex care to our patients with ample opportunities for teaching and learning. The development of the skills and knowledge required for the practice of cardiac vascular medicine is an essential part of the educational process of internal medicine training. Cardiovascular diseases affect millions of Americans and now we have tools and drugs to treat and/or prevent this problem. It is an essential large component of a daily internal medicine practice. Involves four weeks of intensive experience with clinical cardiology inpatients. ECG reading will be included. Students are required to attend daily teaching rounds with the attending cardiologist and house staff, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine conferences, and formal teaching sessions, including electrocardiography. Cardiac patients who do not require CCU care, e.g. AF, NSTEMI, chest pain, SBE are admitted primarily via the ER 7 days a week. Students will work directly with R1 and a supervisory R2 Medicine Resident and Cardiology faculty member. Work day usually is from 7 am - 7 pm with one day off/week. No night call as patients are covered by R2 and R3 night float residents. Please note: COVID-19 pandemic has currently closed to visiting students. Please check in furute (after September 2021). Visiting students must obtain approval prior to applying for this clerkship. International students should email a CV to Rita Balian balian@stanford.edu, and domestic students should email a CV to Cassandra Hawthorne at casshaw@stanford.edu. PREREQUISITES: MED 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-12, full time for 4 weeks, 1 student per period (a second student can be added with approval from clerkship coordinator). CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: John Schroeder, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Cassandra Hawthorne, casshaw@stanford.edu, 650-723-5562. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: 500 Pasteur Drive, J7 Team Room 707; Time: 7:30 am. CALL CODE: 1. OTHER FACULTY: R. Dash, W. Fearon, C. Haeffele, R. Harrington, K. Josan, A. Khandelwal, J. Knowles, D. Lee, N. Leeper, D. Liang, K. Mahaffey, D. Maron, V. Parikh, R. Reejhsinghani, S. Rockson, F. Rodriguez, J. Spin, J. Wu, S. Wu, P. Yang. LOCATION: SHC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

MED 305A: Hematology Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: Exposes students to the conceptual basis of hematology, the factual information that is available, and the responses required for consultation and patient care in rapidly evolving and frequently complex clinical circumstances. Under the supervision of the resident, fellow, and faculty attending physician, students admit and follow patients on the very well balanced inpatient Hematology Service (Med VIII) and do consultations. Students also round with the Med VIII team in the morning and attend outpatient clinics in the afternoon. In addition, students participate in the bone marrow reading sessions two mornings a week. Students also learn the requirements for prospective clinical protocol research. There is a weekly research conference, a journal club and a patient-oriented post-clinic conference. PREREQUISITES: MED 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for 3 weeks, 2 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Michaela Liedtke, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Silvia Solorzano (650-723-7078, ssolorza@stanford.edu). REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: meet heme fellow and heme attending, F Ground, in basement of main hospital; Time: 7:45 am. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: C. Berube, R. Brar, S. Coutre, J. Gotlib, D. Iberri, L. Leung, M. Liedtke, G, Mannis, B. Martin, B. Medeiros, J. Zehnder, T. Zhang. LOCATION: SUMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

MED 306A: Endocrinology and Metabolism Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 1. DESCRIPTION: Provides students with a comprehensive experience in clinical endocrinology by combining inpatient and outpatient experiences at SCVMC, Stanford (SHC), and PAVA. Students will attend 6-7 clinics per week at the three institutions. Each clinic has approximately 15 to 30 patients who are seen by students, residents, and fellows with faculty members in endocrinology. In addition, students will participate in inpatient endocrine consultation services at Stanford (SHC). Clinical conferences, teaching rounds, grand rounds each week will cover a broad array of endocrine and metabolic problems in both clinical and research spheres. Working at the three hospitals during the clerkship will require travel. PREREQUISITES: MED 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for 3 weeks, 2 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Kaniksha Desai, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Jessica Wong, 650-736-8274, S025. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Valley Specialty Center, Rm. 2Q261; Time: 8:15 am on Monday. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: SHC, PAVAMC, SCVMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

MED 308A: Immunology/Rheumatology Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: A comprehensive clinical experience in rheumatology. Students attend five weekly clinics, gaining familiarity with the evaluation of new patients and the longitudinal follow-up of complex autoimmune rheumatic diseases, such as SLE, myositis, scleroderma and vasculitis, and common rheumatological problems such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout and spondyloarthropathies. Inpatient consultations provide experience with diagnosis and management of more complex, acute patients with rheumatic diseases. A Journal club, division Grand Rounds and a core curricular conference provide didactic teaching. Critical thinking, cost effectiveness and social and psychological elements associated with evaluation and treatment are emphasized. Stanford Students wishing to do this clerkship must receive prior approval from Clerkship Director before registering. PLEASE NOTE: Visiting students must obtain approval from Russelle McDermott prior to applying for this clerkship. Please email requests to russelle.mcdermott@stanford.edu. Interested students from other Medical Schools must send their CV and 2 letters of recommendation, one from the clerkship director, and the other letter from an attending attesting to the students clinical abilities (i.e. proficient H&P's and exam skills). These must be sent to Russelle at least 4 to 6 weeks prior to the start of the period that the student would like to enroll in. PREREQUISITES: Completion of a full Medicine clerkship. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-12, full-time for 4 weeks, 1 student per period. Additional students only allowed if reviewed and approved by clerkship director. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Stanford Shoor, M.D., sshoor@stanford.edu, 650-725-5070. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Ruselle McDermott, russelle.mcdermott@stanford.edu, 650-498-5630. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: 1000 Welch Rd. Suite #203, see Russelle McDermott (call one week prior to confirm); Time: 8:30 am OR contact Dr. Shoor at sshoor@stanford.edu. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: M. Baker, Y. Chaichian, L. Chung, R. Fairchild, A. Horomanski, J. Hong, J. Lin, W. Robinson, N. Shah, K. Sheth. LOCATION: SUMC Blake Wilbur Clinic 2nd Floor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 12 units total)

MED 308C: Immunology/Rheumatology Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: Introduces students to patients with different forms of arthritis and related rheumatic diseases. Emphasis is on the specific examination of muscles, bones, and joints and important systemic signs and symptoms pertinent to the diagnosis of rheumatic diseases. Laboratory tests, X-rays, and biopsies are reviewed. Students see both new and returning patients and participate in both inpatient and outpatient consultations. Formal and informal participation in conferences is encouraged. PREREQUISITES: MED 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for 3 weeks, 1 student per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Veronika Sharp, M.D., 408-885-6777. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Veronika Sharp, M.D., or secretary, Lupe Ibanez, 408-885-6777. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Check in with SCVMC Housestaff Office, Room 7C081, 751 S. Bascom Avenue, San Jose; Time: Between 8:00 and 8:30 am the first day of clerkship. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: B. Amlani, J. Burkham, U. Marvi. LOCATION: SCVMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)

MED 311D: Advanced Medicine Clerkship

VISITING: Closed to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 2. DESCRIPTION: The Kaiser Permanente Santa Clara Medical Center offers a dynamic academic clinical clerkship in advanced medicine. Students serve as the primary provider for their patients: documenting H&P's, progress notes and discharge summaries, arranging and completing procedures, participating in daily follow-up care, and communicating with patients. Supervision is provided by the senior level resident and the teaching Hospitalist. There are weekly teaching didactics specifically for sub-interns and daily conferences. It is highly recommended that students register for this clerkship near the beginning or middle of their final year of clinicals. If you want to be sure to have a slot for a particular period, you should register to it as soon as possible as the slots are limited and fill quickly. No adds or drops less than one week before start of each period. PREREQUISITES: MED 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 2-12, full-time for 4 weeks, 2 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Sudhir S. Rajan, MD, FACP, FCCP. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Susan Krause (408-851-3836), KPMC, Santa Clara. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: KPMC, Graduate Medical Education Office, Call 408-236-4921 for site location; Time: 7:00 am. CALL CODE: 5 (Not overnight). OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: KPMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

MED 312C: Advanced Medicine Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 2. DESCRIPTION: Involves an advanced level of inpatient care responsibility. Under the close supervision of faculty and residents the student is expected to function as an intern, caring for the same number of patients and working the same hours. Beepers are provided; meals are free. Please note: Visiting students must obtain approval from Dr. Stephanie Chan prior to applying for this clerkship. Please email requests to Stephanie.Chan@hhs.sccgov.org. Interested students must send their transcript and evaluations from 2 core clerkships. These must be sent to Dr. Chan at least 4 to 6 weeks prior to the start of the period that the student would like to enroll in. PREREQUISITES: MED 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for 3 weeks, 6 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Stephanie Chan, M.D. (408-885-7744). CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Amy Luu (408-885-6300), amy.luu@sccgov.org. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: SCVMC, Room 4C004, 4th Floor Conference Room in the Department of Medicine [Visitors call (408-885-5110) and bring proof of PPD and malpractice insurance to 7th Floor Room 54]; Time: 8:30 am. CALL CODE: 4. OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: SCVMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

MED 313A: Ambulatory Medicine Core Clerkship

VISITING: Closed to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Required. DESCRIPTION: In the ambulatory medicine clerkship, students will attend ambulatory clinics and didactics over the course of the four weeks. All students will attend Monday morning ambulatory didactics, which addresses common outpatient medical topics, such as chronic disease management. Students take their final exam on the last Friday of the rotation. Students will attend general medicine and subspecialty clinics, generally Tuesday-Friday. Sites include SUMC, PAVA, SCVMC, Kaiser Santa Clara, Kaiser Fremont, and community clinics. No student may miss more than two clerkship days. PREREQUISITES: None. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-12, full-time for 4 weeks, 10 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Jacqueline Tai-Edmonds, M.D. and Nancy Cuan, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Maria Alfonso, 650-497-6702, malfonso@stanford.edu. and Kristen Kayser, 650-497-3058, kkayser@stanford.edu. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Varies depending on site assignment. The students are notified prior to the first day of the clerkship; Time: TBA. CALL CODE: 2 (No call, but schedule may occasionally include an evening or weekend clinic). OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: SUMC, PAVA, SCVMC, Kaiser Santa Clara, Kaiser Fremont, Community Clinics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

MED 314A: Advanced Medicine Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 2. DESCRIPTION: Intended for students in their second clinical year who are able to proceed to an advanced experience similar to an internship. Students see patients with a wide variety of internal medical diseases in both the inpatient and outpatient settings, and gain experience in the practical aspects of internal medicine. The variety of patients and the contact with many private practitioners provide a valuable complement to other clerkship experiences. The clerkship experience is enhanced by exposure to a broad variety of patients as well as clinical teaching from community attendings and Stanford faculty. Please note: Visiting students must obtain pre-approval from Nancy D'Amico prior to applying for this clerkship. Please email requests (pre-approval form) to ndamico@stanford.edu. PREREQUISITES: MED 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for 3 weeks, 5 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: John Kugler, M.D. (jkugler@stanford.edu). CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Nancy D'Amico (650-721-1640), 1215 Welch Road, Mod B, Space #37, MC 5418. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Students will be notified a week prior to the first day; Time: TBA. CALL CODE: 4. OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: SUMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

MED 317C: Medical ICU Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: An in-depth, three week rotation in the general medical ICU of the SCVMC. Students work as an integral part of a large ICU team aiding housestaff in managing a wide range of critically ill patients. Direct student participation in ICU activities is the essential element of this clerkship. With guidance, students gain experience with a variety of procedures, actively apply their knowledge of physiology, and hone their patient management skills. PREREQUISITES: ANES 306A or MED 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for 3 weeks (longer by arrangement), 2 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Vibha Mohindra, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Eva Apolinar (408-885-2051), Building Q, Suite 5Q153, Valley Specialty Center. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: SCVMC, Valley Specialty Center, 5th Floor, Pulmonary Division Office; Time: 8:00 AM. CALL CODE: 4. OTHER FACULTY: C. Kirsch, J. Wehner, V. Mohindra, E. Hsiao, F. Kagawa, A, Friedenberg, W.Chen, A. Gohil. LOCATION: SCVMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

MED 318A: Palliative Medicine

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: The clerkship provides medical students in-depth exposure to palliative care across the continuum of care including several ambulatory clinics, an inpatient consult service, and home and inpatient hospice care. Students will learn core communications strategies in disclosing bad news, eliciting and clarifying goals of care, and aiding in transitions in care. They will also learn physiology and pharmacology relevant for symptom management (e.g. pain, nausea, depression), as well as interact with patients confronting their own mortality. Students complete 3 weeks for elective credit. All patient visits will be conducted via the EPIC multi-provider video visit platform. PREREQUISITES: Prior approval by the Clerkship Director is required for all students. Please fill out the Qualtrics survey at: https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0Il1gXXVKBV5uvz. We will begin reviewing pre-approval surveys for the 20-21 academic year starting in July. Surveys received prior to 7/1/2020 will not be processed. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for 3 weeks. 6 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Kavitha Ramchandran, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Laura J Lundi, 650-724-9705, llundi@stanford.edu. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Please look for an email from the Clerkship Coordinator the Friday prior to your rotation; Time: TBA. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: SUMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

MED 321A: Inpatient Medical Oncology Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 2. DESCRIPTION: Offers an intensive, inpatient, subspecialty care experience, equivalent to a subinternship. Students are responsible for 2 to 5 patients who are seriously ill with a broad range of medical problems in the setting of underlying malignant disease. Students work with the inpatient team composed of an attending, a medical oncology fellow, 2 medical residents and 2 medical interns. PREREQUISITES: MED 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for 3 weeks. 1 student per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Sukhmani Kaur Padda, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Laura Lundi (650-724-9705, llundi@stanford.edu). REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Stanford Hospital, F Ground (Oncology Fellow); Time: 8:00 AM. CALL CODE: 2 (patients are admitted daily and the sub-intern will admit patients on a rotation basis with the team without overnight call, but may stay late some evenings). OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: SUMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

MED 322A: Outpatient Medical Oncology Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 1. DESCRIPTION: Familiarizes students with the subspecialty of medical oncology through subspecialty patient care in clinics and tumor boards and attending the weekly conferences of the Division of Oncology. The experience draws heavily on and will expand skills in internal medicine, emphasizing differential diagnosis, physical examination, utilization of laboratory, X-ray, and imaging studies, as well as approaches to psycho-social problems for patients with suspected or established malignant disease. PREREQUISITES: MED 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for 3 weeks. 2 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Sukhmani Kaur Padda, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Laura Lundi (650) 724-9705; llundi@stanford.edu). REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Cancer Center, Visitor Information Desk; Time: 9:00 am. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: SUMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6

MED 323A: Trans-Disciplinary Breast Oncology Clerkship

VISITING: Closed to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 1. DESCRIPTION: This three week trans-disciplinary breast oncology clerkship cuts across the relevant treatment modalities and emphasizes interdisciplinary, patient-centered care. Breast cancer is a highly prevalent disease often treated in early stages with medical, radiation and surgical therapies. The student will be in each clinic of these treatment clinics for one day every week, independently work up and discuss patients with assigned faculty, present new cases to the breast tumor board, and subsequently synthesize the visit notes and outpatient letters. At least one day per week, students will choose from additional care activities that shape the patient's experience, including observation of breast surgeries, wound care visits, radiation dosimetry planning or simulation, chemotherapy teaching or infusion, and medical oncology inpatient rounds. Furthermore, students are encouraged to identify patients with multiple visits that month and follow them across clinics for concentrated continuity. The clerkship offers a unique vantage point to learn about the shared decision-making and coordination of complex cancer care, in addition to the management of general health problems for breast cancer patients. Students further appreciate the longitudinal evolution of the patient's relationship with their cancer. There will be weekly debrief check-ins and short didactics to optimize the student's experience. PREREQUISITES: Any core clerkship. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for 3 weeks. 1 student per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Melina Telli, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Vanessa Murillo, vmurill0@stanford.edu, 650-725-8738. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Stanford Cancer Center CC-2241; Time: 8:30 am. CALL CODE: 5. OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: SUMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

MED 325A: Gastroenterology Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: Involves participation in inpatient consultations and outpatient clinics. Students are responsible for evaluating patients with major diseases of the liver and gastrointestinal tract. They assume primary responsibility in both inpatient and outpatient settings and present cases regularly to the faculty attending physician. Daily inpatient rounds are made with the attending physician, fellow, and resident. Clinics are held on Mondays. Clinical conferences and journal clubs are held once weekly. PREREQUISITES: MED 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for 3 weeks, 1 student per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Subhas Banerjee, M.D., 650-736-0431. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Abbey Hamilton, 650-723-4519, abbeyh@stanford.edu. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Endoscopy Unit, 300 Pasteur Dr, Basement Room H0262. (Please ask for GI attending fellow); Time: 8:30 am. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: A. Aijaz, S. Banerjee, L. Becker, A. Cheung, J. Clarke, T. Daugherty, R. Dhanasekaran, D. Dronamraju, N. Fernandez-Becker, S. Friedland, G. Garcia, P. Garcia, J. Glenn, A. Goel, A. Gottfried, D. Grewal, H. Halawi, E. Ho, J. Hwang, A. Kalra, K. Keyashian, R. Kim, R. Kumari, P. Kwo, U. Ladabaum, B. Limketkai, A. Lowe, D. Limsui, L. Neshatian, L. Nguyen, M. Nguyen, P. Okafor, W. Park, A. Shah, S. Sinha, I. Sonu, S. Streett. LOCATION: SUMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

MED 325B: Gastroenterology Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: Gives students responsibility for both inpatient consultations and the evaluation and treatment of referred patients in the Gastroenterology clinic. Rounds with the faculty consultant, fellow and resident, as well as GI endoscopic procedures are conducted daily. Conferences on clinical gastroenterology, hepatology, gastrointestinal radiology, and gastrointestinal and liver histopathology are held weekly. A combined medical-surgical conference is held every other week. PREREQUISITES: MED 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for 3 weeks, 1 student per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Ramsey Cheung, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Matthew Alcera, Matthew.Alcera@va.gov. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: PAVAMC, Bldg. 100, Endoscopy Suite; Time: 8:30 am. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: R. Cheung, R. Soetikno, S. Matsui, B. Omary, S. Friedland. LOCATION: PAVAMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

MED 325C: Gastroenterology Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: This clerkship provides experience in outpatient and inpatient gastroenterology (GI). In the mornings, students will evaluate outpatients referred to GI clinic and will also have an opportunity to observe outpatient endoscopic procedures, including upper endoscopy, colonoscopy, paracentesis, ERCP and endoscopic ultrasound. In the afternoons, students will evaluate inpatients who require GI consultation, observe inpatient procedures and participate in inpatient rounds with the GI team. Students will assume primary responsibility for the inpatients they provide consultation on. In addition to direct patient care, students will attend multiple didactic lectures and conferences, including a bi-weekly GI/Surgery conference, bi-weekly GI Radiology conference, bi-weekly GI Journal Club, monthly Liver Tumor Board, monthly GI Pathology conference and weekly Stanford multi-disciplinary (GI/Surgery/Radiology/Pathology) Digestive Diseases Clinical Conference. This clerkship is closed to registration unless given prior approval by Clerkship Coordinator. PREREQUISITES: MED 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for 3 weeks, 1 student per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Elizabeth Hwang, M.D. (408-793-2598). CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Louise Leprohon (408-885-7947), Louise.Leprohon@hhs.sccgov.org. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: SCVMC, Valley Specialty Center, 5th Floor, GI Clinic; Time: 8:00 am. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: A. Chen, A. Davila, A. Ho, E. Hwang, A. Kamal, R. Lerrigo, D. Lin, N. Shah, J. Williams. LOCATION: SCVMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 12 units total)

MED 326A: Hepatology Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: Involves participation in inpatient consultations and outpatient clinics for 4 weeks. The goals are to familiarize students with evaluation and management of patients with major liver diseases. Students are responsible for evaluating patients with major diseases of the liver diseases. They assume primary responsibility in both inpatient and outpatient settings and present cases regularly to the faculty attending physician. Daily inpatient rounds are made with the attending physician, fellow, and resident. Clinics are held on Mondays to Friday. Journal clubs are held once weekly. Pathology conferences are held on Thursday and radiology conferences on Friday. Patient care conferences are held on Tuesday and Friday. PREREQUISITES: None. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-12, full-time for 4 weeks, 2 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Mindie Nguyen, M.D., MAS, 650-722-4478. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Jeff Mathews, 650-498-6084. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: 780 Welch Road, Room CJ280K; Time: 8:30 am. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: A. Ahmed, T. Daugherty, A. Goel, R. Kumari, P. Kwo. LOCATION: SUMC, PAVAMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

MED 328A: Addiction Medicine Clerkship

VISITING: Closed to visitors unless already approved for clerkship within SHC. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: This clerkship will teach students the fundamentals of addiction medicine from the perspective of primary care and interdisciplinary coordination of care. Clinic exposure will include opportunities to interact with patients with substance use disorders in a variety of settings that may include: Community Clinics through Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, Stanford Family Medicine Clinic, Los Altos Primary Care and Buprenorphine and Alcohol Use Disorder Support Groups, and Residential and Inpatient settings. There may be opportunities to rotate in a smoking cessation group. Students will learn about outpatient detoxification from opioids and alcohol, relapse prevention medications for opioid and alcohol use disorders and the culture of substance use recovery. Please contact Coordinator listed below for pre-approval before signing up. PREREQUISITES: A minimum of 2 clerkship experiences that may include: Family or Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, Surgery, OBGYN, Emergency, or Ambulatory (Urgent Care) Medicine. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 9-16 for 2020-21; 1-16 for 2021-22, full time for 3 weeks. 1 student per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Chwen-Yuen Angie Chen, MD, FACP, FASAM, ChChen@stanfordhealthcare.org. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Chwen-Yuen Angie Chen, MD, FACP, FASAM, ChChen@stanfordhealthcare.org. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: TBA; Time: 8:00 am. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: SHC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6

MED 330A: Pulmonary Medicine Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: Helps students develop the attitudes and skills necessary for the evaluation and management of patients with pulmonary disease. Students are expected to understand pulmonary disease in the context of internal medicine, using general as well as specific approaches to diagnosis. The clerkship affords direct patient involvement under supervision in the outpatient clinic and on inpatient consultation services. Critically ill patients with pulmonary disease in the ICU will be evaluated. Pulmonary function tests are evaluated daily, and student involvement in specialized studies is emphasized. Divisional clinical conferences are held weekly, and a joint medical-surgical conference bi-weekly. Each student has the option of spending one-half of the clerkship at the PAVAMC and one-half at the Stanford University Hospital on a rotational basis. These options are discussed and determined on the first day of the clerkship. PREREQUISITES: MED 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-12, full-time for 4 weeks (half-time at SUH; half-time at PAVAMC,) 2 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Peter N. Kao, M.D, Ph.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Kerry Keating, 650-723-1150, keatingk@stanford.edu. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: H3147; Time: 8:45 am. CALL CODE: 1. OTHER FACULTY: A. Andruska, H. Bedi, L. Chhatwani, S. Chinthrajah, K. de Boer, T. Desai, G. Dhillon, K. Duong, L. Eggert, J. Hsu, J. Holty, A. Jonas, N. Juul, P. Kao, K. Kudelko, W. Kuschner, Y. Lai, J. Levitt, M. McCarra, M. Marmor, P. Mohabir, S. Majumdar, J. Mooney, M. Nicolls, H. Paintal, S. Pasupneti, R. Raj, M. Ramsey, A. Rogers, S. Ruoss, B. Shaller, H. Sharifi, G. Singh, E. Spiekerkoetter, A. Sung, Y. Sung, A. Sweatt, R. Van Wert, A. Weinacker, R. Zamanian, C. Zone, V. de Jesus Perez. LOCATION: SUMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

MED 330C: Pulmonary Medicine Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: Affords students an opportunity to deal with a broad range of clinical pulmonary problems. Working as part of a busy consulting service, students develop a practical approach to evaluating and managing patients with respiratory disease. The spectrum of patients ranges from ambulatory outpatients, to patients with tuberculosis, to ICU patients with acute respiratory failure. The application of the basic principles of physiology to clinical problems is emphasized. Under supervision, students participate in interpreting pulmonary function tests and other diagnostic procedures. PREREQUISITES: MED 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-12, full-time for 4 weeks, 1 student per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Eric Hsiao, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Angelica Segovia (408-885-2051), Building Q, Suite 5Q153, Valley Specialty Center. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Valley Specialty Center, 5th Floor, Room 5Q153; Time: 8:00 am. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: U. Barvalia, V. Chen, H. Duong, A. Gohil, E. Hsiao, V. Mohindra, H. Tsai, J. Wehner. LOCATION: SCVMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

MED 331A: Advanced Work in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: The content of this clerkship is flexible. Students can do additional clinical work in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine or research work in the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine. Specific arrangements for content should be made with the faculty in advance. PREREQUISITES: MED 330A and consent of instructor. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-12, full-time for 4 weeks only, 1 student per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Peter Kao, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Kerry Keating, 650-723-1150, keatingk@stanford.edu. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: H3147; Time: 9:00 am. CALL CODE: 1. OTHER FACULTY: A. Andruska, H. Bedi, L. Chhatwani, S. Chinthrajah, K. de Boer, T. Desai, G. Dhillon, K. Duong, L. Eggert, J. Hsu, J. Holty, A. Jonas, N. Juul, P. Kao, K. Kudelko, W. Kuschner, Y. Lai, J. Levitt, M. McCarra, M. Marmor, P. Mohabir, S. Majumdar, J. Mooney, M. Nicolls, H. Paintal, S. Pasupneti, R. Raj, M. Ramsey, A. Rogers, S. Ruoss, B. Shaller, H. Sharifi, G. Singh, E. Spiekerkoetter, A. Sung, Y. Sung, A. Sweatt, R. Van Wert, A. Weinacker, R. Zamanian, C. Zone, V. de Jesus Perez. LOCATION: SUMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

MED 334A: Nephrology Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: Provides students with an introduction to clinical nephrology, including diseases of the kidney and disorders of fluid, electrolyte, and acid-base balance. The clerkship is available at SUMC. Students evaluate inpatients as members of the nephrology consulting team. After completing this rotation, we expect that students will be able to independently work up and manage a wide variety of acute and chronic disturbances of renal function, as well as glomerular disease, vasculitis, hypertension, fluid and electrolyte disorders, and acid-base disturbances. They also participate in the management of patients with end-stage renal disease. There is a weekly schedule of grand rounds, journal club, and a monthly renal biopsy conference. PREREQUISITES: Medicine 300A, Surgery 300A or Pediatrics 300A are preferred but not required. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for 3 weeks, 2 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Shuchi Anand, M.D., M.S. (650-723-6961). CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Cayla Whitney, caylacw@stanford.edu, 650-721-6680, 777 Welch Road Suite DE Palo Alto, CA 94304. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: 777 Welch Road Suite DE Palo Alto, CA 94304; Time: 8:30 am. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: T. Meyer, R, Lafayette, J. Scandling, J. Tan, Y. Lit, G. Chertow, V. Bhalla, A. Pao, M. Tamura, J. Yabu, N. Arora, R. Isom, T. Chang, S. Anand, T. Sirich, K. Erickson, P. Fatehi. LOCATION: SUMC, PAVAMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

MED 334C: Nephrology Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: Students see patients in the outpatient renal clinic, and on an active inpatient service. The diverse patient population at SCVMC enables student to encounter patients with a wide variety of acute and chronic renal diseases, hypertension, and fluid and electrolyte disturbances. The clerkship is also designed to acquaint students with a systematic approach to patients with fluid, electrolyte, and acid-base abnormalities. A series of seminars covering a broad range of topics in nephrology and designed specifically for medical students is given by the faculty. An optional self-study program on fluid and electrolytes consisting of 8 taped lectures with slides is also available. Weekly divisional nephrology conferences are held at SCVMC, and address various topics in nephrology. Additionally, there is a monthly nephrology resident conference, in addition to a monthly renal pathology conference. Videotaped lecture series on the entire field of nephrology are also available. PREREQUISITES: MED 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for 3 weeks. 2 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Anjali Bhatt Saxena, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Mary Jane Monroe (408-885-7019). REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: SCVMC, Renal Dialysis Unit, 3rd Floor [Visitors call (408-885-5110) and bring proof of PPD and malpractice insurance as directed]; Time: 8:30 am. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: A. Saxena, J. Lugovoy, A. Jobalia, B. Young, N. Pham, F. Luo, staff. LOCATION: SCVMC
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

MED 338A: Outpatient Infectious Diseases Elective

VISITING: Closed to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: This clerkship provides medical students with an elective course of 3 weeks of outpatient ID experience. Clinical experiences will focus on antibiotic selection, utilization and stewardship, as well as the management of commonly encountered ID syndromes, including sexually transmitted infections, HIV, Tuberculosis, and viral hepatitis. Students will attend outpatient clinics at the Palo Alto Veterans Administration Medical Center, the Stanford affiliated Positive Care Clinic, and the San Mateo County Health System. Due to COVID-19, some or all of these clinics may be televisits. There is potential flexibility for students interested in a focus area at a specific clinic or with a specific physician, to arrange more concentrated clinical work at one of the clinics with permission of the attending. Each student will be asked to prepare a small research project (e.g. a case or literature review) to be presented at the end of the rotation. Students planning on doing the outpatient ID rotation should contact Dr. Levy at vlevy@stanford.edu as soon as possible but at least 8 weeks prior to rotation beginning to verify there is period availability for the desired period of rotation and that all needed electronic medical record and infection control requirements have been obtained. This clerkship requires prior approval by Clerkship Director. PREREQUISITES: MED 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: Due to COVID-19, this clerkship is closed until May 24, 2021. 1-12, full-time for 2 weeks or 4 weeks, 1 student per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Vivian Levy, M.D., vlevy@stanford.edu, 650-573-3987. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Vivian Levy, M.D., vlevy@stanford.edu, 650-573-3987. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Dr. Levy will send the student a schedule, curriculum and orientation materials prior to starting the rotation of clinics and physicians; Time: TBA. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: SUMC, PAVAMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

MED 339B: Advanced Medicine Clerkship

VISITING: Closed to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 2. DESCRIPTION: Intended for clinically experienced students who seek an advanced experience similar to an internship. PREREQUISITES: MED 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for 3 weeks, 4 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Arlina Ahluwalia, M.D., 650-493-5000 x66759. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Matthew Alcera, 650-493-5000 x63157, Matthew.Alcera@va.gov, Bldg. 5, 3rd Fl Rm C-367. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: First Monday of rotation, Bldg 101; Time: 08:30 a.m. CALL CODE: 4. OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: PAVAMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

MED 340B: Medical-Surgical Intensive Care Unit Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: This clerkship provides experience managing adult patients in a critical care unit. Students learn how to optimize care for the acutely ill patient and the multidisciplinary approach to complex patients. Teaching emphasizes the review of basic organ physiology, the ability to determine the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in critical illness, and the formulation of a physiologic based treatment plan. Students gain experience with the implementation of monitoring and therapeutic devices used in the intensive care units and begin to become adept at the evaluation, stabilization and management of the most critically ill patients expected to be encountered in today's acute care hospitals. Ward rounds, bedside evaluation and treatment, and individual interactions with attending, fellows and residents are part of the educational process. Students must attend mandatory simulator courses in order to receive passing grade for this clerkship. Students wishing to do this clerkship must get approval from Bernadette Carvalho first before registering. Students must register for Anes 340B for this clerkship. PREREQUISITES: Anesthesia 306A or Medicine and Surgery core clerkships. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for 3 weeks, 1 student per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Juliana Barr, M.D., 650-493-5000 x64452, Building 1, Room F315, PAVAMC 112A. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Bernadette F. Carvalho, berniec@stanford.edu. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: PAVAMC, MSICU, 3rd Floor; Time: 8:00 am. CALL CODE: 4. OTHER FACULTY: E. Bertaccini, R. Chitkara, G. Lighthall, W. Kuschner, G. Krishna, J. Olsson. LOCATION: PAVAMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 5

MED 342A: Geriatric Medicine Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 1. DESCRIPTION: This clinical experience introduces students to the principles of effective geriatric care in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Geriatric faculty and fellows work with students in various clinical settings including: 1) outpatient clinics at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System 2) outpatient clinic at Stanford University 3) a community skilled nursing facility in Palo Alto. The rotation emphasizes the evaluation and management of patients with multiple chronic conditions, such as diabetes, congestive heart failure, hypertension, urinary incontinence, mental status changes, functional impairments and gait problems. This clerkship requires written approval by Clerkship Director before you can enroll. Please contact Dr. Philip Choe at Philip.Choe@va.gov to check for availability of spots in the clerkship. PREREQUISITES: None. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for 3 weeks, 1 student per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Philip Choe, D.O. (650-493-5000 x64740). CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Philip Choe, D.O. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Arrange with clerkship coordinator; Time: Arrange with clerkship coordinator. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: SUMC, PAVAMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

MED 343B: Palliative Care Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 1. DESCRIPTION: Teaches the natural history, prognostication, and management of serious illnesses. Emphasis is placed on acquiring the knowledge, skills, and attitudes desirable in a compassionate clinician-scholar physician. Students record history (with special assessment to symptoms, functional assessment, mood and cognitive assessment), physical examination, and pertinent laboratory data for patients for whom they are responsible and present their findings, together with their diagnoses and management care plans, at rounds, and daily team meetings. Provision of patient-centered, family-oriented care is continuously emphasized. An essential aspect of the clerkship is the students' gradual assumption of direct responsibility for, and full-time involvement in, care of patients with serious illness with the house staff, fellows and a large inter-disciplinary team and this is why we have structured this as a three week rotation. A passing grade will require both a satisfactory performance and a successful 30 minute formal presentation on palliative care topic of interest (student will discuss ideas with Course Director to identify potential topics of interest to them). Course highlights include (a) mentoring from the course director and a cadre of mentors including Palliative Care Attendings and Fellows (b)focus on skill building and practice with special focus on communication skills (c) opportunity to work closely with a multi-disciplinary team(d) learning to care for the patient and their family as the unit of care. PREREQUISITES: This clerkship requires written approval by Clerkship Director before you can enroll. Please contact Dr. VJ Periyakoil at periyakoil@stanford.edu to check for availability of spots in the clerkship. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for 3 weeks. 1 student per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: VJ Periyakoil, M.D. (periyakoil@stanford.edu). CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: VJ Periyakoil, M.D. (650-497-0332, periyakoil@stanford.edu). REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: This will depend on the start day of the rotation as training activities vary by the day; Time: 8:00 am. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: SUMC, PAVAMC, SCVMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

MED 344A: Elective in Quality Improvement, Patient Safety, and Organizational Change

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: Mentored practice and growth in knowledge, skills, and attitudes in quality improvement, patient safety, and organizational change. Students engage in directed readings, attend sessions with experienced QI Champions, learn about quality improvement projects and processes at Stanford University, participate in ongoing quality and patient safety activities within the Department of Medicine and Stanford Hospital and Clinics, and design and begin a quality improvement/patient safety/organizational change project. Designed to allow the student to develop a mentoring relationship with a QI Champion who will serve as a role model, mentor, and educator. Contact Dr. Lisa Shieh at lshieh@stanford.edu if interested. PREREQUISITES: None. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full-time for three weeks. 3 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Lisa Shieh, M.D., Ph.D, FHM, 650-724-2917, lshieh@stanford.edu. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Lisa Shieh, M.D., Ph.D, FHM, 650-724-2917, lshieh@stanford.edu. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: 700 Welch Road, Suite 310B, Palo Alto, CA 94304; Time: TBA. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: K. Hooper, L. Shieh. LOCATION: SUMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5
Instructors: ; Shieh, L. (PI)

MED 347A: Stanford Perioperative Internal Medicine Rotation

VISITING: Closed to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: The Stanford Perioperative Internal Medicine elective is a three-week inpatient rotation that will provide the students a clinical immersive experience in medical management of Orthopedics, Neurosurgery and ENT patients with bedside and didactic teaching. The students will be directly supervised by hospital medicine attendings. They will be expected to perform thorough histories and physical examinations of patients admitted to the hospital and then formulate and implement treatment plans. This rotation will expose the students to learn effective ways to evaluate medical co-morbidities, learn evidence based clinical practices to prevent and treat post-operative complications and learn about research and quality improvement projects pertaining to perioperative medicine. The students will also be expected to attend the resident morning report, noon conference and medical grand rounds during this time. PREREQUISITES: None. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full time for 3 weeks, 2 students per three week period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Sarita Khemani, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Sarita Khemani, M.D., 650-906-5070, skhemani@stanford.edu. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Stanford hospital 500 P, Floor L4, nursing station; Time: 9:00AM. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: Stanford Medicine faculty and residents from multiple disciplines. LOCATION: SUMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

MED 370: Medical Scholars Research

Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4-18 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Abu-Remaileh, M. (PI); Advani, R. (PI); Ahmed, A. (PI); Ahuja, N. (PI); Akatsu, H. (PI); Al-Ahmad, A. (PI); Alizadeh, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Alyono, J. (PI); Andrews, J. (PI); Annes, J. (PI); Arai, S. (PI); Artandi, M. (PI); Artandi, S. (PI); Asch, S. (PI); Ashley, E. (PI); Assimes, T. (PI); Ayoub, W. (PI); Banerjee, S. (PI); Barry, M. (PI); Basaviah, P. (PI); Basina, M. (PI); Basu, S. (PI); Behal, R. (PI); Bendavid, E. (PI); Benjamin, J. (PI); Berube, C. (PI); Bhalla, V. (PI); Bhatt, A. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blackburn, B. (PI); Blaschke, T. (PI); Blayney, D. (PI); Blish, C. (PI); Blumenfeld, Y. (PI); Bollyky, P. (PI); Bouvier, D. (PI); Boxer, L. (PI); Braddock, C. (PI); Braitman, L. (PI); Brinton, T. (PI); Brown, W. (PI); Bulow, K. (PI); Campen, C. (PI); Caretta-Weyer, H. (PI); Carlson, R. (PI); Cartwright, C. (PI); Chan, D. (PI); Chan, G. (PI); Chang, C. (PI); Chang, S. (PI); Chang, T. (PI); Chao, S. (PI); Chao, T. (PI); Chen, A. (PI); Chen, S. (PI); Chertow, G. (PI); Cheung, L. (PI); Cheung, R. (PI); Chi, J. (PI); Cho-Phan, C. (PI); Chu, C. (PI); Chu, G. (PI); Chua, K. (PI); Chung, L. (PI); Clarke, M. (PI); Clusin, W. (PI); Colevas, A. (PI); Colloff, E. (PI); Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI); Cooke, J. (PI); Cooper, A. (PI); Coutre, S. (PI); Crapo, L. (PI); Crump, C. (PI); Cullen, M. (PI); Czechowicz, A. (PI); Das, A. (PI); Dash, R. (PI); Daugherty, T. (PI); David, S. (PI); Davis, K. (PI); Dawson, L. (PI); Deresinski, S. (PI); Desai, M. (PI); Desai, T. (PI); Dhillon, G. (PI); Diver, E. (PI); Dorman, J. (PI); Dosiou, C. (PI); DuBose, A. (PI); Edwards, L. (PI); Einav, S. (PI); Farquhar, J. (PI); Fathman, C. (PI); Fearon, W. (PI); Feldman, D. (PI); Feldman, H. (PI); Felsher, D. (PI); Fisher, G. (PI); Fitzgerald, P. (PI); Flavin, K. (PI); Ford, J. (PI); Ford, P. (PI); Fowler, M. (PI); Frayne, S. (PI); Friedland, S. (PI); Fries, J. (PI); Froelicher, V. (PI); Gabiola, J. (PI); Ganjoo, K. (PI); Garcia, G. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gardner, P. (PI); Gavi, B. (PI); Genovese, M. (PI); Gerson, L. (PI); Gesundheit, N. (PI); Glaseroff, A. (PI); Glenn, J. (PI); Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. (PI); Goldstein, M. (PI); Gomez-Ospina, N. (PI); Goodman, S. (PI); Goronzy, J. (PI); Gotlib, J. (PI); Gray, G. (PI); Greenberg, H. (PI); Greenberg, P. (PI); Gregory, P. (PI); Habtezion, A. (PI); Hallenbeck, J. (PI); Harman, S. (PI); Harrington, R. (PI); Harshman, L. (PI); Haskell, W. (PI); Hawn, M. (PI); Heaney, C. (PI); Heidenreich, P. (PI); Henri, H. (PI); Ho, D. (PI); Hoffman, A. (PI); Holman, H. (PI); Holodniy, M. (PI); Hopkins, J. (PI); Horning, S. (PI); Hsia, H. (PI); Hunt, S. (PI); Ioannidis, J. (PI); Isom, R. (PI); Jagannathan, P. (PI); Jernick, J. (PI); Ji, H. (PI); Johnston, L. (PI); Jones, E. (PI); Judy, A. (PI); Kache, S. (PI); Kahn, J. (PI); Kamal, R. (PI); Kao, P. (PI); Kastelein, M. (PI); Katz, R. (PI); Katzenstein, D. (PI); Kenny, K. (PI); Khan, C. (PI); Khatri, P. (PI); Khazeni, N. (PI); Khush, K. (PI); Killen, J. (PI); Kim, S. (PI); King, A. (PI); Kohrt, H. (PI); Kraemer, F. (PI); Kraus, E. (PI); Krishnan, E. (PI); Kummar, S. (PI); Kunz, P. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Kurian, A. (PI); Kuschner, W. (PI); Kwong, B. (PI); Ladabaum, U. (PI); Lafayette, R. (PI); Laport, G. (PI); Lee, A. (PI); Lee, D. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Lee, P. (PI); Lee-Messer, C. (PI); Leung, L. (PI); Levitt, L. (PI); Levy, R. (PI); Levy, S. (PI); Liang, D. (PI); Liedtke, M. (PI); Lin, S. (PI); Lindsay, A. (PI); Lorenz, K. (PI); Lorig, K. (PI); Lowe, A. (PI); Lowsky, R. (PI); Luby, S. (PI); Luhrmann, T. (PI); Lunn, M. (PI); Luo, L. (PI); Lutchman, G. (PI); Mahajan, V. (PI); Mahoney, M. (PI); Majeti, R. (PI); Mariano, E. (PI); McConnell, M. (PI); McLaughlin, T. (PI); Medeiros, B. (PI); Meyer, T. (PI); Miklos, D. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Milstein, A. (PI); Mitchell, B. (PI); Mohabir, P. (PI); Moran-Miller, K. (PI); Morioka-Douglas, N. (PI); Musen, M. (PI); Myung, D. (PI); Narayan, S. (PI); Nazerali, R. (PI); Neal, J. (PI); Negrin, R. (PI); Nevins, A. (PI); Newberry, J. (PI); Nguyen, L. (PI); Nguyen, M. (PI); Nguyen, P. (PI); Nicolls, M. (PI); O' Callahan, P. (PI); Osterberg, L. (PI); Owens, D. (PI); Padda, S. (PI); Pao, A. (PI); Parikh, R. (PI); Parikh, V. (PI); Parnes, J. (PI); Parsonnet, J. (PI); Pasricha, P. (PI); Pegram, M. (PI); Pepper, J. (PI); Periyakoil, V. (PI); Petersen, J. (PI); Pinto, H. (PI); Pompei, P. (PI); Popp, R. (PI); Posley, K. (PI); Price, E. (PI); Prochaska, J. (PI); Qi, S. (PI); Quertermous, T. (PI); Raffin, T. (PI); Ramchandran, K. (PI); Rehkopf, D. (PI); Relman, D. (PI); Rizk, N. (PI); Robinson, B. (PI); Rockson, S. (PI); Rodriguez, F. (PI); Rohatgi, R. (PI); Rosas, L. (PI); Rosen, G. (PI); Rosenberg, S. (PI); Rudd, P. (PI); Ruoss, S. (PI); Rydel, T. (PI); Sarnquist, C. (PI); Scandling, J. (PI); Schnittger, I. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Schroeder, J. (PI); Shafer, R. (PI); Shah, J. (PI); Shah, N. (PI); Shah, S. (PI); Sharp, C. (PI); Shaw, K. (PI); Shen, K. (PI); Shieh, L. (PI); Shizuru, J. (PI); Shoor, S. (PI); Sikic, B. (PI); Singer, S. (PI); Singh, B. (PI); Singh, U. (PI); Skeff, K. (PI); Skylar-Scott, M. (PI); Spiekerkoetter, E. (PI); Srinivas, S. (PI); Stafford, R. (PI); Stefanick, M. (PI); Stertzer, S. (PI); Stevens, D. (PI); Stockdale, F. (PI); Strober, S. (PI); Studdert, D. (PI); Svec, D. (PI); Tabor, H. (PI); Tai, J. (PI); Tamura, M. (PI); Tan, J. (PI); Telli, M. (PI); Tepper, R. (PI); Tompkins, L. (PI); Tremmel, J. (PI); Triadafilopoulos, G. (PI); Tsao, P. (PI); Upadhyay, D. (PI); Utz, P. (PI); Vagelos, R. (PI); Valantine, H. (PI); Van Haren, K. (PI); Verghese, A. (PI); Wakelee, H. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Wang, T. (PI); Warvariv, V. (PI); Weill, D. (PI); Weinacker, A. (PI); Weng, K. (PI); Weng, W. (PI); Weyand, C. (PI); Wiedmann, T. (PI); Winkelmayer, W. (PI); Winkleby, M. (PI); Winter, T. (PI); Witteles, R. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Yabu, J. (PI); Yang, P. (PI); Yeung, A. (PI); Yock, P. (PI); Zamanian, R. (PI); Zehnder, J. (PI); Zei, P. (PI); Zolopa, A. (PI); Zulman, D. (PI); de Jesus Perez, V. (PI); Cullen, M. (SI); Xu, S. (GP)

MED 390: Curricular Practical Training

CPT Course required for international students completing degree requirements.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 72 units total)
Instructors: ; Taleghani, N. (PI)

MED 397A: MD Capstone Experience: Preparation for Residency

VISITING: Closed to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: This 1-week clerkship provides senior medical students an opportunity to review and practice a wide variety of knowledge and skills that are essential to preparing them to work effectively as interns. The capstone clerkship will include a significant emphasis on simulation-based learning as well as small group sessions, didactics, skills labs, and resident panels. Required skills and common experiences during internship will be specifically highlighted, such as cross cover calls, sign out, and advanced communication skills. All training is designed to help students master practical skills that will be essential during the first few months of any intern year. For those students who are not enrolled for the quarter in which the Capstone Clerkship is offered, please contact Mary Devega at mdevega@stanford.edu to register. PREREQUISITES: Completion of required core clerkships. PERIODS AVAILABLE: P14 (5/3/21-5/9/21) or P15 (5/17/21-5/23/21) for 2020-21; P14 (5/2/22-5/8/22) or P15 (5/16/22-5/22-22) for 2021-22, full-time for 1 week. 30 students maximum per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Jeff Chi, M.D. and John Kugler, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Mary Devega mdevega@stanford.edu. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Course coordinator will send out reporting instructions with syllabus before the start of the clerkship; Time: TBA. CALL CODE: 2 - you will be asked to do one evening session, but no overnight session. OTHER FACULTY: Stanford Medicine faculty and residents from multiple disciplines. LOCATION: SUMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Devega, M. (GP)

MED 398A: Clinical Elective in Medicine

VISITING: Closed to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Elective. DESCRIPTION: Provides an opportunity for a student in the clinical years to have a clinical experience in one of the fields of Medicine, of a quality and duration to be decided upon by the student and a faculty preceptor in the Department of Medicine. Please note: Students cannot add 398A clerkships directly to their fishbowl schedules through the regular shuffles. Please contact Caroline Cheang in the Office of Medical Student Affairs at cheang@stanford.edu or 650-498-7619 with the faculty preceptor's name and email address to add this clerkship. PREREQUISITES: None. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, 4 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: John Kugler, M.D., jkugler@stanford.edu. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Nancy D'Amico, 650-721-1640, 1215 Welch Road, Mod B, Space #37, MC 5418. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: TBA (designated faculty preceptor); Time: TBA. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: SUMC, PAVAMC, SCVMC, KPMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 15 units total)

MED 399: Graduate Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Advani, R. (PI); Ahmed, A. (PI); Ahuja, N. (PI); Akatsu, H. (PI); Al-Ahmad, A. (PI); Alizadeh, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Andrews, J. (PI); Annes, J. (PI); Arai, S. (PI); Artandi, M. (PI); Artandi, S. (PI); Asch, S. (PI); Ashley, E. (PI); Assimes, T. (PI); Ayoub, W. (PI); Banerjee, S. (PI); Barry, M. (PI); Basaviah, P. (PI); Basina, M. (PI); Basu, S. (PI); Behal, R. (PI); Bendavid, E. (PI); Benjamin, J. (PI); Berube, C. (PI); Bhalla, V. (PI); Bhatt, A. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blackburn, B. (PI); Blaschke, T. (PI); Blayney, D. (PI); Blish, C. (PI); Bloom, G. (PI); Bollyky, P. (PI); Bouvier, D. (PI); Boxer, L. (PI); Braddock, C. (PI); Brinton, T. (PI); Brown, W. (PI); Bulow, K. (PI); Carlson, R. (PI); Cartwright, C. (PI); Chan, D. (PI); Chan, G. (PI); Chang, C. (PI); Chang, S. (PI); Chen, A. (PI); Chertow, G. (PI); Cheung, R. (PI); Chi, J. (PI); Cho-Phan, C. (PI); Chu, G. (PI); Chua, K. (PI); Chung, L. (PI); Clarke, M. (PI); Clusin, W. (PI); Colevas, A. (PI); Colloff, E. (PI); Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI); Cooke, J. (PI); Cooper, A. (PI); Coutre, S. (PI); Crapo, L. (PI); Crump, C. (PI); Cullen, M. (PI); Das, A. (PI); Dash, R. (PI); Daugherty, T. (PI); David, S. (PI); Dawson, L. (PI); Deresinski, S. (PI); Desai, M. (PI); Desai, T. (PI); Dhillon, G. (PI); Dorman, J. (PI); Dosiou, C. (PI); DuBose, A. (PI); Einav, S. (PI); Farquhar, J. (PI); Fathman, C. (PI); Fearon, W. (PI); Feldman, D. (PI); Felsher, D. (PI); Fisher, G. (PI); Fitzgerald, P. (PI); Ford, J. (PI); Ford, P. (PI); Fowler, M. (PI); Frayne, S. (PI); Friedland, S. (PI); Fries, J. (PI); Froelicher, V. (PI); Gabiola, J. (PI); Ganjoo, K. (PI); Garcia, G. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gardner, P. (PI); Gavi, B. (PI); Genovese, M. (PI); Gerson, L. (PI); Gesundheit, N. (PI); Glaseroff, A. (PI); Glenn, J. (PI); Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. (PI); Goldstein, M. (PI); Goodman, S. (PI); Goronzy, J. (PI); Gotlib, J. (PI); Gray, G. (PI); Greenberg, H. (PI); Greenberg, P. (PI); Gregory, P. (PI); Habtezion, A. (PI); Hallenbeck, J. (PI); Hanson-Kahn, A. (PI); Harman, S. (PI); Harrington, R. (PI); Harshman, L. (PI); Haskell, W. (PI); Heaney, C. (PI); Heidenreich, P. (PI); Henri, H. (PI); Ho, D. (PI); Hoffman, A. (PI); Holman, H. (PI); Holodniy, M. (PI); Hopkins, J. (PI); Horning, S. (PI); Hsia, H. (PI); Hunt, S. (PI); Ioannidis, J. (PI); Isom, R. (PI); Jernick, J. (PI); Ji, H. (PI); Johnston, L. (PI); Jones, E. (PI); Kahn, J. (PI); Kao, P. (PI); Kastelein, M. (PI); Katz, R. (PI); Katzenstein, D. (PI); Kenny, K. (PI); Khatri, P. (PI); Khazeni, N. (PI); Khush, K. (PI); Killen, J. (PI); Kim, S. (PI); Kohrt, H. (PI); Kraemer, F. (PI); Krishnan, E. (PI); Kummar, S. (PI); Kunz, P. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Kurian, A. (PI); Kuschner, W. (PI); Ladabaum, U. (PI); Lafayette, R. (PI); Laport, G. (PI); Lee, D. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Lee, P. (PI); Leung, L. (PI); Levin, E. (PI); Levitt, J. (PI); Levitt, L. (PI); Levy, R. (PI); Levy, S. (PI); Liang, D. (PI); Liedtke, M. (PI); Lindsay, A. (PI); Lorig, K. (PI); Lowe, A. (PI); Lowsky, R. (PI); Luby, S. (PI); Lutchman, G. (PI); Majeti, R. (PI); McConnell, M. (PI); McLaughlin, T. (PI); Medeiros, B. (PI); Meyer, T. (PI); Miklos, D. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Milstein, A. (PI); Mitchell, B. (PI); Mohabir, P. (PI); Morioka-Douglas, N. (PI); Musen, M. (PI); Narayan, S. (PI); Neal, J. (PI); Negrin, R. (PI); Nevins, A. (PI); Nguyen, L. (PI); Nguyen, M. (PI); Nguyen, P. (PI); Nicolls, M. (PI); O' Callahan, P. (PI); Osterberg, L. (PI); Owens, D. (PI); Pao, A. (PI); Parnes, J. (PI); Parsonnet, J. (PI); Pasricha, P. (PI); Pegram, M. (PI); Periyakoil, V. (PI); Petersen, J. (PI); Phadke, A. (PI); Pinto, H. (PI); Pompei, P. (PI); Popp, R. (PI); Posley, K. (PI); Price, E. (PI); Prochaska, J. (PI); Puri, R. (PI); Quertermous, T. (PI); Raffin, T. (PI); Rehkopf, D. (PI); Relman, D. (PI); Rizk, N. (PI); Robinson, B. (PI); Rockson, S. (PI); Rodriguez, F. (PI); Rohatgi, R. (PI); Rosas, L. (PI); Rosen, G. (PI); Rosenberg, S. (PI); Rudd, P. (PI); Ruoss, S. (PI); Rydel, T. (PI); Scandling, J. (PI); Schnittger, I. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Schroeder, J. (PI); Shafer, R. (PI); Shah, N. (PI); Shah, S. (PI); Sharp, C. (PI); Shen, K. (PI); Shieh, L. (PI); Shizuru, J. (PI); Shoor, S. (PI); Sikic, B. (PI); Singh, B. (PI); Singh, U. (PI); Skeff, K. (PI); Spiekerkoetter, E. (PI); Srinivas, S. (PI); Stafford, R. (PI); Stefanick, M. (PI); Stertzer, S. (PI); Stevens, D. (PI); Stockdale, F. (PI); Strober, S. (PI); Studdert, D. (PI); Tai, J. (PI); Tamura, M. (PI); Tan, J. (PI); Telli, M. (PI); Tepper, R. (PI); Tompkins, L. (PI); Tremmel, J. (PI); Triadafilopoulos, G. (PI); Tsao, P. (PI); Upadhyay, D. (PI); Utz, P. (PI); Vagelos, R. (PI); Valantine, H. (PI); Verghese, A. (PI); Wakelee, H. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warvariv, V. (PI); Weill, D. (PI); Weinacker, A. (PI); Weng, K. (PI); Weng, W. (PI); Weyand, C. (PI); Winkelmayer, W. (PI); Winkleby, M. (PI); Winter, T. (PI); Witteles, R. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Yabu, J. (PI); Yang, P. (PI); Yeung, A. (PI); Yock, P. (PI); Zamanian, R. (PI); Zehnder, J. (PI); Zei, P. (PI); Zolopa, A. (PI); Zulman, D. (PI); de Jesus Perez, V. (PI); Xu, S. (GP)

MGTECON 331: Health Law: Finance and Insurance

This course provides the legal, institutional, and economic background necessary to understand the financing and production of health services in the US. Potential topics include: health reform, health insurance (Medicare and Medicaid, employer-sponsored insurance, the uninsured), medical malpractice and quality regulation, pharmaceuticals, the corporate practice of medicine, regulation of fraud and abuse, and international comparisons.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | Units: 3

MLA 358: The Intersection of Medicine, Science, Public Policy, and Ethics: Cancer as a Case Study

Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: ; Lipsick, J. (PI)

MS&E 148: Ethics of Finance

Explores the ethical reasoning needed to make banking, insurance and financial services safer, fairer and more positively impactful. Weighs tradeoffs in how money is created, privileging some, under-privileging others, using market mechanisms for transforming and trading financial risk, return, maturity and asset types. Technology is changing banks, financial markets, insurance and money. Like technology for medicine, finance is being rebuilt as machine learned code, algorithmic investment rules and regulatory monitoring. Risk models can be built to detect fraud and ethical lapses, or to open doors for them. Investment valuation models can optimize short term or long term returns, by optimizing or ignoring environmental and social impacts. Transparency or opacity can be the norm. Transforming finance through engineering requires finding, applying and evolving codes of professional conduct to make sure that engineers use their skills within legal and ethical norms. Daily, financial engineers focus on two horizons: on the floor, we stand on the bare minimum standards of conduct, and on the ceiling, we aim for higher ethical goals that generate discoveries celebrated though individual fulfillment and TED Talks. Stanford engineers, computer scientists, data scientists, mathematicians and other professionals are building systems for lending, investment and portfolio management decisions that determine future economic and social growth. This course uses the case method to preview intersecting codes of conduct, legal hurdles and ethical impact opportunities, and creates as a safe academic setting for seeing career-limiting ethical stop signs (red lights) and previewing ¿what¿s my life all about¿ events, as unexpected threats or surprising ah-ha moments. Guest speakers will highlight real life situations, lawsuits and other events where ethics of financial engineering was a predominant theme, stumbling block or humanitarian opportunity.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: ; Cahan, B. (PI); Ho, J. (TA)

MS&E 252: Decision Analysis I: Foundations of Decision Analysis

Coherent approach to decision making, using the metaphor of developing a structured conversation having desirable properties, and producing actional thought that leads to clarity of action. Socratic instruction; computational problem sessions. Emphasis is on creation of distinctions, representation of uncertainty by probability, development of alternatives, specification of preference, and the role of these elements in creating a normative approach to decisions. Information gathering opportunities in terms of a value measure. Relevance and decision diagrams to represent inference and decision. Principles are applied to decisions in business, technology, law, and medicine. Prerequisite: 220 or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4

MS&E 263: Healthcare Operations Management (PEDS 263)

US health care spending is approximately 18% of GDP, growing rapidly, and driven in large part by prices and waste rather than quality and access. New approaches for improving health care delivery are urgently needed. This class focuses on the use of analytical tools to support efficient health care delivery. Topics include case studies on capacity planning, resource allocation, and scheduling. Methods include queueing, optimization, and simulation. Prerequisites: basic knowledge of Excel, probability, and optimization. For students in the Schools of Medicine, Business, and Law the course includes a variant of the curriculum with less emphasis on the technical material.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

NBIO 206: The Nervous System

Structure and function of the nervous system, including neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and systems neurobiology. Topics include the properties of neurons and the mechanisms and organization underlying higher functions. Framework for general work in neurology, neuropathology, clinical medicine, and for more advanced work in neurobiology. Lecture and lab components must be taken together.
Terms: Win | Units: 6

NBIO 227: Understanding Techniques in Neuroscience

Students will learn to select and evaluate multidisciplinary techniques for approaching modern neuroscience questions. A combination of lectures and small group paper discussions will introduce techniques from molecular, genetic, behavioral, electrophysiological, imaging, and computational neuroscience. Students will be expected to complete homework assignments analyzing primary literature and attend optional laboratory demonstrations. Intended for graduate students, postdocs, and staff from any discipline; and for advanced undergraduates in the biosciences, engineering, or medicine.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

NENS 204: Stroke Seminar

Standing at the intersection of many fields of medicine, including neurology, internal medicine, cerebrovascualr surgery, diagnostic and interventional radiology, and emergency medicine, stroke is a critical topic for all practitioners of medicine and is the third leading cause of death and disability, This seminar draws upon Stanford's leaders in stroke research to present and discuss the causes, presentation, treatment, and imaging characteristics of the disease.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

NENS 222: Dance, Movement and Medicine: Immersion in Dance for PD (DANCE 100)

Combining actual dancing with medical research, this Cardinal Course investigates the dynamic complementary relationship between two practices, medicine and dance, through the lens of Parkinson's disease (PD), a progressive neurological disease that manifests a range of movement disorders. "Dance for PD" is an innovative approach to dancing --and to teaching dance --for those challenged by PD. Course format consists of: 1. Weekly Lecture/Seminar Presentation: Partial list of instructors include Ms. Frank, Dr. Bronte-Stewart and other Stanford medical experts & research scientists, David Leventhal (Director, "Dance for PD") and Bay Area "Dance for PD" certified master teachers, film-maker Dave Iverson, Damara Ganley, and acclaimed choreographers Joe Goode, Alex Ketley, Judith Smith (AXIS Dance). 2. Weekly Dance Class: Stanford students will fully participate as dancers, and creative partners, in the Stanford Neuroscience Health Center's ongoing "Dance for Parkinson's" community dance class for people with PD. This Community Engaged Learning component provides opportunity to engage meaningfully with people in the PD community. Dancing together weekly, students will experience firsthand the embodied signature values of "Dance for PD" classes: full inclusion, embodied presence, aesthetic and expressive opportunity for creative engagement, and community-building in action. A weekly debriefing session within Friday's class time will allow students to integrate seminar material with their movement experiences.nnnNO PRE-REQUISITES: No prior dance experience required. Beginners are welcome.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

NENS 250S: Windows Into the Brain: Unlocking Mysteries through Neurologic Disease

Dementia, epilepsy, Parkinson¿s disease, stroke, brain tumors, MS, traumatic brain injury, headaches, and many other neurologic diseases inflict a tremendous toll on the individual and society. In this course, using material adapted from what is taught second-year medical students at the Stanford School of Medicine, we will explore different neurologic ailments to provide a window into the mysteries of brain function (and dysfunction). All that is needed is a solid background in high school biology, and the burning desire to dive deep into the complex and fascinating world of clinical neuroscience. Students will be provided the background neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and neuropathology that is necessary to understand the underpinnings, presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of some of the most common diseases that affect the central nervous system. Lectures are taught by clinical faculty from the Department of Neurology & Neurological Sciences and will use real cases, neuroimaging, and videos in an interactive and stimulating setting. Students will learn about the cutting-edge technologies used in 2020 in Neurology and Neurosurgery to manage patients with these illnesses. Get ready for an exciting and dynamic sneak peek into medical school and the mysteries of the human brain!
| Units: 0

NENS 308A: Advanced Clinical Elective in Adult Neurology

VISITING: Open to visitors and SCORE applicants. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 2. DESCRIPTION: This clerkship provides an opportunity for students in the clinical years to have an advanced clinical experience in Adult Neurology. The student will be expected to perform at a "subinternship" level on the Stanford inpatient ward and/or inpatient consult service, where they will be evaluating often undifferentiated patients with neurologic symptoms and will have increased independence as a student member of the team. In rare circumstances, we may ask applicants to consider an outpatient clinical or inpatient specialty experience as space allows. In addition to this advanced clinical and professional role, the student will have an opportunity to be a near-peer mentor and educator for the neurology clerkship students if they chose. This elective is often selected by those students interested in pursuing future residency training and career in Neurology or Neurosciences. This is a 3 week rotation in which the schedule conforms to Stanford School of Medicine period dates. This clerkship requires completion of the Required Neurology Clerkship at Stanford (NENS301A) or an equivalent neurology clerkship from an outside institution. Visiting students wishing to apply for a position in this clerkship experience must receive prior approval from Clerkship Director before submitting an application by sending a curriculum vitae and statement of purpose for review. Students should also indicate which period(s) they are available to rotate and any flexibility they may have. Students must adhere to rotation on the predefined Stanford rotation period dates. PREREQUISITES: A prior Neurology clerkship and advance approval by the Clerkship Director. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16 as space allows, full-time for 3 weeks, 1 student per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Veronica Santini, M.D., M.A., 954-632-8899, santiniv@stanford.edu. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Christine Hopkins, 650-498-3056, chopkins@stanford.edu. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: TBA; Time: TBA. CALL CODE: 1 - No call, but rounds on weekends. OTHER FACULTY: Neurology, Neurosurgery and Neuro Pediatrics staff. LOCATION: SUMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5

OBGYN 282: Pregnancy, Birth, and Infancy (PEDS 282)

Comprehensive clinical experience where pre-clinical medical students follow pregnant women receiving care at Stanford hospitals to attend prenatal visits, delivery, and postnatal visits. Continuity clinic format, combined with didactic lessons and discussion seminars. Students are exposed to clinical activities in a meaningful context, bolstering classroom studies in anatomy, physiology, embryology and human development, and emphasizing social, economic, and personal issues related to medicine. This program spans one quarter, covering topics related to pregnancy, labor and delivery and newborn care. Students are expected to be engaged in the clinical experiences throughout the quarter and attend the weekly 2-hour seminar. Prerequisite: pre-clinical medical student or physician assistant student. Course directors: Janelle Aby, MD and Yasser El-Sayed, MD. TAs: Jill Anderson (janders5@stanford.edu) and Jenny Tiskus (tiskus@stanford.edu).
Last offered: Spring 2020 | Units: 3

OBGYN 307A: Maternal-Fetal Medicine Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors.TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 2. DESCRIPTION: Provides a focused experience in the care of ambulatory and hospitalized high-risk obstetric patients at Stanford University Medical Center. The student serves as a sub-intern with responsibility for ongoing care of assigned patients with problem pregnancies, under the supervision of the faculty of the Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine. Note: Visiting students must obtain approval through Gloria King, Residency Program Manager, prior to applying for this clerkship. Please e-mail requests to gking1@stanford.edu. Interested students must send their CV, USMLE score(s), current transcript and a letter of recommendation from the Ob/Gyn Clerkship Director or a faculty mentor attesting to clinical abilities (i.e. proficient H&Ps and exam skills). The letter of recommendation must be emailed to Gloria by the letter writer or their supporting administrative assistant. These must be sent at least 4-6 weeks prior to the start of the period in which the student would like to enroll. PREREQUISITES: OBGYN 300A. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-12, full-time for 2 weeks or 4 weeks, 1 student per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Yasser Yehia El-Sayed, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Jacquie Laskey (650-725-8623), HH333. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: F2 Conference Room, LPCH; (OB faculty member on rounds); Time: 8:00 am. CALL CODE: 2 (optional). OTHER FACULTY: Staff. LOCATION: SUMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)

OIT 344: Design for Service Innovation

Design for service innovation is an experiential course in which students work in multidisciplinary teams to design new services (including but not limited to web services) that will address the needs of an underserved population of users. Through a small number of lectures and guided exercises, but mostly in the context of specific team projects, students will learn to identify the key needs of the target population and to design services that address these needs. Our projects this year will focus on services for young adult survivors of severe childhood diseases. For the first time ever, children who have cystic fibrosis, rheumatoid arthritis, major cardiac repairs, organ transplants, genetic metabolic disorders, and several forms of cancer are surviving. The first wave of these survivors is reaching young adulthood (ages 18-25). Many aspects of the young adult world are not yet user-friendly for them: applying to and then entering college, adherence to required medication and diet, prospects for marriage and parenthood, participation in high school or college sports, driving, drinking, drugs, and more. Our aspiration is to develop services to improve these young adults? options for a fulfilling and satisfying life. The course is open to graduate students from all schools and departments: business (MBA1, MBA2, PhD, Sloan), Medicine (medical students, residents, fellows and postdocs), engineering (MS and PhD), humanities, sociology, psychology, education, and law. Students can find out more about this course at: http://DesignForService.stanford.edu; GSB Winter Elective BBL Jan 10th, 12 noon - 1 pm; D-School Course Exposition Feb 3rd, time TBA. Admission into the course by application only. Applications will be available at http://DesignForService.stanford.edu on Jan 13th. Applications must be submitted by Feb 4th midnight. Students will be notified about acceptance to the course by Feb 7th . Accepted students will need to reserve their slot in the course by completing an online privacy training course. Details about online training will be provide to accepted students. The training is related to the protection of our partners' privacy. Application Deadline: Noon, Feb 4th.
Last offered: Spring 2011 | Units: 4

OIT 384: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation

In this two-quarter course series (OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams from medicine, business, and engineering work together to identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their development and implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2021), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2021), teams screen their ideas, select a lead solution, and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology industry experts and investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of more than 50 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of students launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

OIT 385: Biodesign Innovation: Concept Development and Implementation

In this two-quarter course series (OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams from medicine, business, and engineering work together to identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their development and implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter 2021), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring 2021), teams screen their ideas, select a lead solution, and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology industry experts and investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of more than 50 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of students launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

ORTHO 97Q: Sport, Exercise, and Health: Exploring Sports Medicine

Preference to sophomores. Sports medicine is the practice of clinical medicine at the interface between health and performance, competition and well-being. While sports medicine had its origins in providing care to athletes, medical advances developed in care of athletes exerted a great effect on the nature and quality of care to the broader community. Topics include sports injuries, medical conditions associated with sport and exercise, ethics, coaching, women's issues, fitness and health, and sports science. Case studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: Writing 2
Instructors: ; Hwang, C. (PI)

ORTHO 110: Practical Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Exam (ORTHO 210)

Designed for students considering a career in sports medicine, orthopaedics, physical medicine and rehabilitation, emergency medicine, internal medicine, family practice, or physical therapy. Focus is on diagnosis and treatment of the most common injuries encountered in sports medicine, from head to toe and from acute trauma to chronic overuse. Students gain competence performing an efficient sports medicine exam, developing a differential diagnosis, and a treatment plan on how to safely return athletes back to their sport. Focused physical exam skills are taught for the neck, shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand, low back, hip, knee, leg, ankle and foot. Most sessions consist of anatomy review, case discussion, and hands-on exam practice in small groups. A few sessions cover specific hot topics in sports medicine such as concussion, athletic heart syndrome, and advanced performance techniques. Students enrolling for two units prepare an in-class presentation or short review paper.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-2
Instructors: ; Fredericson, M. (PI)

ORTHO 120: Introduction to Lifestyle Medicine (ORTHO 220)

Lifestyle medicine is an exciting new movement to empower practicing clinicians and aspiring physicians to facilitate behavioral change and promote a culture of health and wellness in patients. Focus is on both concrete, evidence-based findings and tangible, practical tools to readily translate into everyday clinical practice. A series of leading experts and guest lectures guide students through interactive, patient-focused activities in topics including, but not limited to: nutrition, exercise, sleep, motivational interviewing, meditation, and mindfulness techniques. Students enrolling for 2 units use a fitness and lifestyle monitoring wristband and prepare a Subject: ORTHO report on your results.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Fredericson, M. (PI)

ORTHO 210: Practical Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Exam (ORTHO 110)

Designed for students considering a career in sports medicine, orthopaedics, physical medicine and rehabilitation, emergency medicine, internal medicine, family practice, or physical therapy. Focus is on diagnosis and treatment of the most common injuries encountered in sports medicine, from head to toe and from acute trauma to chronic overuse. Students gain competence performing an efficient sports medicine exam, developing a differential diagnosis, and a treatment plan on how to safely return athletes back to their sport. Focused physical exam skills are taught for the neck, shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand, low back, hip, knee, leg, ankle and foot. Most sessions consist of anatomy review, case discussion, and hands-on exam practice in small groups. A few sessions cover specific hot topics in sports medicine such as concussion, athletic heart syndrome, and advanced performance techniques. Students enrolling for two units prepare an in-class presentation or short review paper.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-2
Instructors: ; Fredericson, M. (PI)

ORTHO 220: Introduction to Lifestyle Medicine (ORTHO 120)

Lifestyle medicine is an exciting new movement to empower practicing clinicians and aspiring physicians to facilitate behavioral change and promote a culture of health and wellness in patients. Focus is on both concrete, evidence-based findings and tangible, practical tools to readily translate into everyday clinical practice. A series of leading experts and guest lectures guide students through interactive, patient-focused activities in topics including, but not limited to: nutrition, exercise, sleep, motivational interviewing, meditation, and mindfulness techniques. Students enrolling for 2 units use a fitness and lifestyle monitoring wristband and prepare a Subject: ORTHO report on your results.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Fredericson, M. (PI)

ORTHO 250: Orthopedic Surgery Radiology Rounds

An interactive weekly seminar focused on increasing radiology fluency and early exposure to orthopedic medical decision making. The format will be largely case-based learning with didactic components interspersed as necessary for foundational material. Topics covered include radiology interpretation, orthopedic anatomy and physiology, and the basics of fracture management. While the focus of this class is to build fundamental knowledge in orthopedics, students will be exposed to a variety of subspecialties within the field including pediatrics, trauma, sports medicine, and musculoskeletal tumor.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

ORTHO 303C: Clinical Clerkship in Rehabilitation Medicine

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 1. DESCRIPTION: The Rehabilitation Center at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center (SCVMC) is a national leader in the advancement of rehabilitation and a core training site for the Stanford Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Residency (PM&R) program. The Rehabilitation Center at SCVMC is accredited by the Commission of the Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities, and we have treated individuals with brain injury, spinal cord injury, stroke, and other disabling neurological conditions since 1971. Our clerkship emphasizes an interdisciplinary approach to the patient severely disabled by acute spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, stroke, major trauma, and other neurologic disabilities. Concentration is on clinical evaluation, prevention of complications and participation in long-term planning for maximum independence and improving the quality of life for the patient.The student functions integrally as a member of the treatment team and participates in all aspects of patient care, including acute admissions of spinal cord-injured patients, multidisciplinary evaluations of new admissions, patient care rounds, teaching and team conferences, therapy sessions, formal case presentations, neuroscience grand rounds, journal club and didactic lectures. The team approach, using multiple medical and therapeutic modalities, is key to our patients' success. Students will observe and participate in routinely performed procedures that aide in optimizing function including peripheral joint injections, chemodenervation, peripheral nerve blocks and intrathecal baclofen pump management for spasticity. Additionally, they may participate in electrodiagnostic studies that aide in diagnosis of peripheral nervous system pathology. Students may also have the opportunity to study the lifestyles of outpatients when they return to the community, investigate community resources and assess the ongoing medical issues of individuals with disabilities in PM&R outpatient clinics. Clerkships are available in spinal cord injury, brain injury, inpatient consults, and outpatient PM&R clinics and must be scheduled in advance by calling the clerkship coordinator listed below before registering. PREREQUISITES: MED 300A. Will accept third and fourth year students. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-16, full time for three weeks, 1 student per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: James Crew, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Teresa Goodman, (408) 885-2030. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: SCVMC, Room 1A012 (Sobrato Pavilion) Visitors call (408) 885-2100. Proof of PPD, Rubella and malpractice insurance required; Time: 8:00 am. CALL CODE: 0. OTHER FACULTY: J. Crew, K. Shem, S. McKenna, M. Mian, E. Chaw, T. Duong, H. Huie, E. Huang, R. Wang, P. Varma. LOCATION: SCVMC.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

ORTHO 304A: Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clerkship

VISITING: Open to visitors. TYPE OF CLERKSHIP: Selective 1. DESCRIPTION: Typically students spend time at the Palo Alto VA doing both inpatient and outpatient PM&R, and often we can accommodate preferences for exposure to a given VA PM&R service. The polytrauma rehabilitation center is one of five national centers that treat active duty military patients. Students may also request time at the VA's dedicated spinal cord injury inpatient service, at outpatient musculoskeletal clinics, at the electromyography clinic and at prosthetics clinic. Often, we can facilitate time on the Stanford inpatient PM&R consultation service or at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center on inpatient and/or outpatient. Sometimes we can arrange for a half day of at the Stanford Redwood City clinics observing interventional spine or sports. For Stanford students, this rotation may fulfill your selective 1 or elective requirements; there may be weekend or overnight call. Please note: Visiting students must obtain approval before applying for this clerkship. To request approval, please contact Erin Hart at ejheart@stanford.edu. We are often able to accommodate visiting students whose medical school calendars do not align with the Stanford calendar, so please let Erin Hart know if you wish to rotate off-cycle. PREREQUISITES: None. PERIODS AVAILABLE: 1-12, full-time for 2 weeks or 4 weeks, 6 students per period. CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Theodore Scott, M.D. CLERKSHIP COORDINATOR: Erin Hart (650) 721-7627, Stanford Medicine Outpatient Center. REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS: Where: Unl