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MUSIC 1: Musical Genius: Exemplars in the History of Organized Sound

How does music work? A broad exploration of music as defined by three major components (i) Theories of Music (elements and parameters), (ii) Histories of Music (cultures and people), and (iii) Practitioners of Music (musicians and scholars). Lecture, discussion, guided critical listening and viewing of audio, video, and live performance, and creation of self-curated mini-projects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

MUSIC 1A: Music, Mind, and Human Behavior

An introductory exploration of the question of why music is a pervasive and fundamental aspect of human existence. The class will introduce aspects of music perception and cognition as well as anthropological and cultural considerations.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: ; Berger, J. (PI)

MUSIC 1SI: Introduction to Indian Classical Music

This is an introductory course in the classical music of India, with emphasis on learning to listen to and appreciate Indian classical music concerts. It will cover a broad overview of the two main genres of Indian classical music - Carnatic and Hindustani. We will have several in-class demonstrations of instruments unique to the Indian classical music tradition. Class meetings will include discussions of landmark performances and artists as well as fundamentals of this music style, such as Raaga (melody), Taala (rhythm), song structure, and improvisation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Schultz, A. (PI)

MUSIC 2A: The Symphony

Symphonic literature 1750 to the present, with emphasis on developing listening skills and preparation for attending a live performance. Ability to read music not required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: ; Hinton, S. (PI)

MUSIC 2C: An Introduction to Opera

The lasting appeal of opera as a lavishly hybrid genre from the 1600s to the present. How and why does opera set its stories to music? What is operatic singing? Who is the audience? How do words, music, voices, movement, and staging collaborate in different operatic eras and cultures? Principal works by Monteverdi, Handel, Mozart, Verdi, Wagner, Strauss, Britten, and Adams. Class studies and attends two works performed by the San Francisco Opera.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: ; Grey, T. (PI)

MUSIC 4SI: Interactive Introduction to North American Taiko

Taught by Stanford Taiko members. Techniques and history. No experience necessary. May be repeated for credit. This course was initiated by Mitchell Fukumoto and Stanford Taiko.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Sano, S. (PI)

MUSIC 5SI: Insiders Guide to Music Production: The Modern Applications of Digital Audio

Learn how to produce music on computer. Class focus on achieving fluence in a digital audio workstation and fostering creativity within the music-making process. Practical mixing techniques, fundamental audio editing practices, and ow to create sounds from scratch. Final project (song) that utilizes techniques taught in class. No prior music production experience is required.
Last offered: Winter 2016 | Units: 2

MUSIC 6F: Art is My Occupation: Professional Development in Music

Open to majors and non-majors. This course is designed for students who are considering careers in performance or the music industry to explore their personal and artistic identity. Weekly guest speakers provide real world insight on topics related to professional advancement.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Lee, J. (PI)

MUSIC 7B: Musical Cultures of the World

An overview of selected musical cultures from Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas. Course objectives: cultivate an appreciation for the diversity of human musical expression; discover how music is used to shape social interactions and systems of meaning; develop active listening skills that can be used when encountering any music; gain a preliminary understanding of ethnomusicological concepts and vocabulary. No musical experience is necessary. Class format: Lecture, discussion, listening, guest performances, musical participation, and a concert analysis.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: ; Schultz, A. (PI)

MUSIC 8A: Rock, Sex, and Rebellion

Development of critical listening skills and musical parameters through genres in the history of rock music. Focus is on competing aesthetic tendencies and subcultural forces that shaped the music. Rock's significance in American culture, and the minority communities that have enriched rock's legacy as an expressively diverse form. Lectures, readings, listening, and video screenings. Attendance at all lectures is required.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

MUSIC 9: Music + Mentorship

Music + Mentorship (M+M) is a coalition of Stanford University musicians who seek to empower kids in the surrounding community through music. Through M+M, volunteers commit to weekly music lessons in local schools and participate in class readings and discussions about the principles of music education. Guest lecturers include local music educators.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2
Instructors: ; Sano, S. (PI)

MUSIC 11A: Orchestral Repertoire and Technique for Violin

Open to major and non-majors who would like to learn orchestral pieces and performance technique, including the works from the Stanford Symphony Orchestra's concert program. Priority is given to students who sign up for SSO and SPO. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 6 times (up to 6 units total)

MUSIC 11AZ: Orchestral Repertoire and Technique for Violin

Open to major and non-majors who would like to learn orchestral pieces and performance technique, including the works from the Stanford Symphony Orchestra's concert program. Priority is given to students who sign up for SSO and SPO. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: ( http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | Units: 0

MUSIC 11N: A View from the Podium: The Art of Conducting

How a conductor interprets music, realizes a personal vision through the rehearsal process, and communicates with orchestra and audience. Conducting as based on human communication skills. How to apply these lessons to other fields of endeavor.
Last offered: Autumn 2013 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

MUSIC 12A: Introductory Piano Class

(A=level 1; B=level 2; C=level 3) There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fee and signup information. Class is closed by design. Please register on the waitlist and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Preference to department majors. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: ; Zerlang, T. (PI)

MUSIC 12AS: Introductory Piano Class, Level 1 (Group)

Piano: Introductory Level 1 (Group; 10 students to a section) (A=Level 1; B=Level 2; C=Level 3). Class is closed by design. Please register on the wait-list and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Complete registration form available for download at: http://tinyurl.com/q43c48g. May be repeated for credit 5 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://tinyurl.com/posmuhn) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 5 times (up to 5 units total)
Instructors: ; Zerlang, T. (PI)

MUSIC 12AZ: Introductory Piano Class

(A=level 1; B=level 2; C=level 3) There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fee and signup information. Class is closed by design. Please register on the waitlist and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Preference to department majors. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.May be repeat for credit for 0 unit and total completion allowed 99.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Zerlang, T. (PI)

MUSIC 12B: Introductory Piano Class

This class is closed by design. To enroll, please sign up on the Axess waitlist and show up on the first day to receive a permission number for re-enrollment. Your place on the waitlist will be considered a reservation. If the waitlist is closed, there are no more spaces in the class. (A=level 1; B=level 2; C=level 3) There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fee and signup information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: ; Zerlang, T. (PI)

MUSIC 12BS: Introductory Piano Class, Level 2 (Group)

Piano: Introductory Level 2 (Group; 10 students to a section) (A=Level 1; B=Level 2; C=Level 3). Class is closed by design. Please register on the wait-list and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Complete registration form available for download at: http://tinyurl.com/q43c48g. May be repeated for credit 5 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://tinyurl.com/posmuhn) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 5 times (up to 5 units total)
Instructors: ; Zerlang, T. (PI)

MUSIC 12BZ: Introductory Piano Class

This class is closed by design. To enroll, please sign up on the Axess waitlist and show up on the first day to receive a permission number for re-enrollment. Your place on the waitlist will be considered a reservation. If the waitlist is closed, there are no more spaces in the class. (A=level 1; B=level 2; C=level 3) There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fee and signup information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0
Instructors: ; Zerlang, T. (PI)

MUSIC 12C: Introductory Piano Class

This class is closed by design. To enroll, please sign up on the Axess waitlist and show up on the first day to receive a permission number for re-enrollment. Your place on the waitlist will be considered a reservation. If the waitlist is closed, there are no more spaces in the class. (A=level 1; B=level 2; C=level 3.) May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fee and signup information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: ; Zerlang, T. (PI)

MUSIC 12CS: Introductory Piano Class, Level 3 (Group)

Piano: Introductory Level 3 (Group; 10 students to a section) (A=Level 1; B=Level 2; C=Level 3). Class is closed by design. Please register on the wait-list and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Complete registration form available for download at: http://tinyurl.com/q43c48g. May be repeated for credit 5 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://tinyurl.com/posmuhn) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 5 times (up to 5 units total)
Instructors: ; Zerlang, T. (PI)

MUSIC 12CZ: Introductory Piano Class

This class is closed by design. To enroll, please sign up on the Axess waitlist and show up on the first day to receive a permission number for re-enrollment. Your place on the waitlist will be considered a reservation. If the waitlist is closed, there are no more spaces in the class. (A=level 1; B=level 2; C=level 3.). There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fee and signup information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Zerlang, T. (PI)

MUSIC 12SC: Musical Collisions and Radical Creativity

The margins of musical culture; nonconformist, maverick, and eccentric creative impulses that expand the definition of art. Laboratory atmosphere and daily rehearsals in which students create collaborative works with a final public concert involving collaborations with local musicians and presentations of student-composed works created during the course.
Last offered: Autumn 2008 | Units: 2

MUSIC 12SZ: Introductory Piano

Introductory Piano (zero-unit option). Complete registration form available for download at: http://tinyurl.com/q43c48g. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://tinyurl.com/posmuhn) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Sum | Units: 0
Instructors: ; Zerlang, T. (PI)

MUSIC 13N: Bollywood and Beyond: South Asian Popular and Folk Music

This seminar is an introduction to regional and popular music of South Asia¿India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, and Nepal. An immense variety of South Asian music¿everything from drumming to wedding songs to movie scores¿is woven into the social lives of both audiences and performers. Through their music, people across South Asia express social criticism, bring about political change, engage in worship, mark rites of passage, and cope with rapid and unsettling socio-economic changes. For example, Marathi kirtan, a form of devotional song/storytelling from Western India, has been used to teach spiritual lessons and oppose colonial occupation; musicians from South Indian oppressed castes enlist drums to protest their low social status; and the ever-popular Bollywood dance music creates a sense of home for Indians living abroad. In this seminar you will have the opportunity to acquire listening skills that will enhance your appreciation of the variety and depth of South Asian folk and popular music. We will draw on areas such as folklore and ethnomusicology to gain an understanding about what makes these musical practices thrive. And we will go on three field trips, which will give you an opportunity to engage first-hand with South Asian music and musicians in our local community. No musical experience is required.
Last offered: Winter 2016 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

MUSIC 13Q: Classical Music and Politics: Western Music in Modern China

Preference to sophomores. Social history, cultural studies, China studies, international relations, and music. From the Italian Jesuit, Matteo Ricci who presented a clavichord to the Chinese emperor to the emergence of a modern generation of Chinese musicians.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom

MUSIC 13SC: Performing America: The Broadway Musical

This seminar explores how the themes, characters, stories, and, above all, the songs of the Broadway musical have played a key role in forming ideas of American identity from the early 20th century to the present. Musical theater is a perennial site for negotiating social themes of race, class, gender roles, and sexual identity. The American musical has been in constant dialogue with vernacular song and dance idioms, from ragtime and early jazz to rock, pop, disco, hip-hop, and electronic dance music. Jazz musicians have regularly looked to musical theater for their ¿standards,¿ as have talent shows from the vaudeville era to American Idol. Disney musicals, the television series Glee and Smash, and the High School Musical franchise all illustrate how ¿musicals¿ serve as a medium for negotiating personal identity from childhood through early adulthood, staging the conflicts and attachments that define our everyday lives while connecting these with the culture we live in through the collective medium of song. nWe will look at a variety of influential historical musicals (Oklahoma, Guys and Dolls, Gypsy, The Music Man, West Side Story) and a few recent shows such as Wicked, Hairspray, Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson, American Idiot, and The Book of Mormon, asking what the relation is between individual numbers and the overall themes and structures of the shows. How do lyrics and music combine in a successful song, and how does a song contribute to shape of the show? How do the dynamics of live theater relate to the presentation of musicals in the mediums of film and television? In addition to working on selected songs and scenes with the help of Stanford voice and drama faculty, students will attend, discuss, and review Bay area productions (San Jose, San Francisco), including the Broadway by the Bay (Redwood City) production of Cabaret opening on September 13, 2013. Grading will be based on class discussion, production analysis and reviews, and a choice between a final creative project and a short research paper.
Last offered: Summer 2013 | Units: 2

MUSIC 14N: Women Making Music (FEMGEN 13N)

Preference to freshmen. Women's musical activities across times and cultures; how ideas about gender influence the creation, performance, and perception of music.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: ; Hadlock, H. (PI)

MUSIC 15AX: A 24 Hour Decade History of Popular Music with Taylor Mac

Performance collaboration with Stanford Live and the Curran Theater, San Francisco<br>Students selected for this Arts Intensive course will have the opportunity to participate with Taylor Mac in creating four 6-hr performances that encompass the whole of the 24-hr project. (Note: performances on Fri 9/22, Sun 9/24, Fri 9/29, and Sun 10/1, 2017)
| Units: 2

MUSIC 15N: The Aesthetics of Data

Focus on visual and auditory display of data, specifically, the importance of aesthetic principles in effective data display, and the creative potential of scientific, biological, environmental and other data as inspiration for artistic expression.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-CE

MUSIC 17N: The Operas of Mozart

Preference to freshmen. Four of Mozart's mature operas, the earliest works in the operatic repertoire never to go out of fashion. What accounts for this extraordinary staying power? Focus on the history of their composition, performance, and reception, and their changing significance from Mozart's time to the present.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: ; Berger, K. (PI)

MUSIC 18A: Jazz History: Ragtime to Bebop, 1900-1940 (AFRICAAM 18A)

From the beginning of jazz to the war years.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II
Instructors: ; Low, M. (PI)

MUSIC 18B: Jazz History: Bebop to Present, 1940-Present (AFRICAAM 18B)

Modern jazz styles from Bebop to the current scene. Emphasis is on the significant artists of each style.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II
Instructors: ; Low, M. (PI)

MUSIC 19A: Introduction to Music Theory

For non-music majors and Music majors or minors unable to pass the proficiency test for entry to MUSIC 21. The fundamentals of music theory and notation, basic sight reading, sight singing, ear training, keyboard harmony; melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic dictation. Skill oriented, using piano and voice as basic tools to develop listening and reading skills.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: ; Berger, T. (PI); Rose, F. (PI)

MUSIC 19B: Intermediate Music Theory

This course is an introduction to music theory geared toward students who have basic literacy skills (i.e. fundamental notation, identifying major and minor scales, keys, etc). Using musical materials from repertoire selected from campus and area concerts, and incorporating the opportunity to attend these concerts, the course will introduce elements of harmony, melody, form, orchestration and arrangement. The course is an appropriate successor to Music 19A. Students who successfully complete Music 19B can go on directly to Music 21.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: ; Berger, T. (PI)

MUSIC 20A: Jazz Theory (AFRICAAM 20A)

Introduces the language and sounds of jazz through listening, analysis, and compositional exercises. Students apply the fundamentals of music theory to the study of jazz. Prerequisite: 19 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: ; Nadel, J. (PI)

MUSIC 20B: Advanced Jazz Theory

Approaches to improvisation through listening and transcribing, and developing familiarity with important contributors to this music. Topics: scale theory, altered dominants, and substitute harmony. Prerequisite: 20A or consent of instructor.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

MUSIC 20C: Jazz Arranging and Composition

Jazz arranging and composition for small ensembles. Foundation for writing for big band. Prerequisite: 20A or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: ; Nadel, J. (PI)

MUSIC 21: Elements of Music I

Preference to majors. Introduction to tonal theory. Practice and analysis. Diatonic harmony focusing on melodic and harmonic organization, functional relationships, voice-leading, and tonal structures. Students must concurrently enroll in an Ear-training and musicianship lab (MUSIC 24a, 24b, or 24c as appropriate). Music majors must take 4 courses in ear training, and pass an ear training exit exam in their Junior year. Enrollment limited to 40. Prerequisites: (1) Piano Proficiency Exam (must be passed within the first two weeks of the term) or MUSIC 12A (may be taken concurrently); (2) Passing grade on a basic musical skills proficiency examination on the first day of class or MUSIC 19.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

MUSIC 22: Elements of Music II

Preference to majors. Introduction to chromatic harmony focusing on secondary functions, modulations, harmonic sequences, mode mixture, and the Neapolitan, and augmented sixth chords. Analysis of musical forms and harmonizations complemented by harmonic and melodic dictation, sight singing, and other practical skills. Students must concurrently enroll in an Ear-training and musicianship lab (MUSIC 24a, 24b, or 24c as appropriate). Music majors must take 4 courses in ear training, and pass an ear training exit exam in their Junior year. Prerequisites: (1) MUSIC 21; (2) Piano Proficiency Exam or MUSIC 12B (may be taken concurrently).
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

MUSIC 23: Elements of Music III

Preference to majors. Continuation of chromatic harmony and complex forms of late Romantic period. Students must concurrently enroll in an Ear-training and musicianship lab (MUSIC 24a, 24b, or 24c as appropriate). Music majors must take 4 courses in ear training, and pass an ear training exit exam in their Junior year. Prerequisites: (1) MUSIC 22; (2) Piano Proficiency Exam or MUSIC 12C (may be taken concurrently).
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: ; Berger, T. (PI)

MUSIC 24A: Ear Training I

Class is closed by design. Please contact instructor Erika Arul (mailto:earul@stanford.edu) for permission to enroll.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-2
Instructors: ; Arul, E. (PI)

MUSIC 24B: Ear Training II

Class is closed by design. Please contact instructor Erika Arul (mailto:earul@stanford.edu) for permission to enroll.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2

MUSIC 24C: Ear Training III

Class is closed by design. Please contact instructor Erika Arul (mailto:earul@stanford.edu) for permission to enroll.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2
Instructors: ; Arul, E. (PI)

MUSIC 24K: Keyboard Harmony

In this practical introduction to keyboard harmony, students learn to play, analyze and improvise chord progressions at the keyboard. The course covers reading figured bass, playing chord progressions in all major and minor keys, and score reading. Students also analyze and perform solo repertoire that progresses through the semester from simple pieces to the level of a Bach invention and chorale. Preference given to majors. Keyboard harmony supports material learned in MUSIC 24B and 24C and counts as an ear training course. Prerequisites: (1) Piano Proficiency Exam, (2) MUSIC 24A.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Units: 1 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 15 units total)

MUSIC 25: Decoding Anime

Anime as an artistic form often boasts highly imaginative graphics, striking music, vibrant characters, and fantastical stories. The course aims at decoding the expressive power of anime by applying a method of multimedia analysis that focuses on the interaction between its component elements: story, image, sound and music. Through close reading of works by five leading and innovative directors the students will develop tools to analyze anime and interpret it in a larger cultural context.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: ; Rose, F. (PI)

MUSIC 26N: Japanese Arts: a Creative Exploration

The striking originality of Japanese contemporary culture seems to defy unifying pressures of globalization. What are the sources of this originality? Can it be traced to the unique and sophisticated art forms like rock gardens, haiku, tea ceremony, martial arts, ikebana and Noh Theater or to the illusive aesthetic notions of wabi, sabi, yûgen, ma or jo-ha-kyû? Exploration of Japanese arts through comparative examination and direct engagement. Creative projects and workshops in traditional Japanese arts.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

MUSIC 27N: The British Invasion

Examination of three generations of British popular music in the `60s and `70s: the Beatles (and the Rolling Stones, the Kinks, the Who); progressive rock (art rock) as embodied in Pink Floyd, Yes, King Crimson, Genesis, and Emerson, Lake, and Palmer; the emergence of punk in its revolutionary (the Clash) and nihilistic (the Sex Pistols) forms. Among other issues, the manner in which marginal American culture (particularly African-American blues) is neglected by Americans and venerated by foreigners and the subsequent mainstream consumption of a transformed and repackaged American minority culture is discussed.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: ; Applebaum, M. (PI)

MUSIC 28N: Queer Lives in Music (FEMGEN 28N)

Queer Lives in Music examines music by queer musicians in genres including punk, opera, rock, symphony, musical theater, folk, and jazz. We will study lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer composers, performers, and listeners, to learn how queer people have expressed individual identity and built communities through music. We will learn how sexual stigma, taboo, oppression, and resistance have impacted musical creativity and music history. Class is designed for students interested in music, social history, cultural studies, and gender/sexuality studies.
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | Units: 3

MUSIC 30N: A Stranger in a Strange Land: Jewish Musics in Translation

What does it mean to be a stranger in a strange land? For centuries Jewish people have struggled to shape their identities in unfamiliar surroundings, using music to remember the past and generate new, hybrid identities. In this class we adopt the metaphor of translation to think about how minority Jewish communities bridge distinct languages, musical idioms, and cultural practices. Our theme will take us on a journey across time and space¿from Italy to India, New York, Syria, Russia, and Israel. We consider the case of Salamone Rossi, a 17th-century Italian Jewish composer who moved uneasily between dual careers in the synagogue and a secular/Christian court. We also explore a group of Indian Jews (Bene Israel) who combine idioms learned from Jewish and Christian missionaries with local Hindu musical traditions. In all our examples musicians translate languages, musical styles, and cultures to unite memories of a Jewish past with the realities of minority status in the present. The class format includes listening, discussion, some singing, student presentations, and guest lectures.
Last offered: Winter 2013 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

MUSIC 31N: Perspectives in North American Taiko (ASNAMST 31N)

Preference to Freshman. Taiko, or Japanese drum, is a newcomer to the American music scene. Emergence of the first N. American taiko groups coincided with increased Japanese American activism, and to some it is symbolic of Japanese American identity. N. American taiko is associated with Japanese American Buddhism. Musical, cultural, historical, and political perspectives of taiko. Hands-on drumming. Japanese music and Japanese American history, and relations among performance, cultural expression, community, and identity.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: ; Sano, S. (PI); Uyechi, L. (PI)

MUSIC 32N: Sculpting with Sounds, Images, and Words

Throughout history and from East to West, cultures abound in multimedia forms. Whether in Coldplay's Music Video or Fantasia, Pepsi TV adds or Wagner's opera, Miyazaki anime or traditional Noh Theater of Japan, the three modes of expression (sounds, images, and word) are interwoven in distinctive ways. What are their individual and combined powers? How can one harness them in an online context? Can Web be a stage for multimedia theater? What is unique about the poetry of intermodal metaphor? The course will be an opportunity to face these questions in creative web-based projects as well as through in-class viewing of multimedia works, analysis and debates, readings, and student presentations. The seminar will be taught at the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics where students will have access to new media technologies. Prior experience in music, literature, art practice or computer programming is welcome but not required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-CE
Instructors: ; Kapuscinski, J. (PI)

MUSIC 33N: Beethoven

This seminar is designed as an in-depth introduction to the music of Ludwig van Beethoven. In addition to exploring the composer's principal works in a variety of genres (symphonies, piano sonatas, string quartets, opera, etc.), we will consider broader questions of biography and reception history. How have images of the composer and the fortunes of his music changed over time? How did his compositions come to define the paradigm of Western classical music? What impact has he had on popular culture? The class is open to all levels of musical expertise; the ability to read music is not a requirement. Come prepared to discover -- or rediscover -- some great music!
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: ; Hinton, S. (PI)

MUSIC 34N: Performing America: The Broadway Musical

Musical theater as a site for the construction of American identity in the twentieth century to the present. Issues of class, race, gender, and sexuality; intersections with jazz, rock, and pop; roles of lyricist, composer, director, choreographer, producer, performers. Individual shows (Showboat, Oklahoma, South Pacific, Guys and Dolls, West Side Story, Wicked, Book of Mormon, Hamilton, Dear Evan Hansen), show tunes in jazz performance, film musicals, and television. Opportunities for performance and attendance at local productions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: ; Grey, T. (PI)

MUSIC 36H: Dangerous Ideas (ARTHIST 36, COMPLIT 36A, EALC 36, ENGLISH 71, FRENCH 36, HISTORY 3D, PHIL 36, POLISCI 70, RELIGST 21X, SLAVIC 36)

Ideas matter. Concepts such as race, progress, and evil have inspired social movements, shaped political systems, and dramatically influenced the lives of individuals. Others, like religious tolerance, voting rights, and wilderness preservation play an important role in contemporary debates in the United States. All of these ideas are contested, and they have a real power to change lives, for better and for worse. In this one-unit class we will examine these dangerous ideas. Each week, a faculty member from a different department in the humanities and arts will explore a concept that has shaped human experience across time and space. Some weeks will have short reading assignments, but you are not required to purchase any materials.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

MUSIC 36N: Humor in Music

Through theoretical readings the course will touch on psychological and neurological bases of humor, explore contingent, tactical, modal, and ontological difficulties in the apprehension of humor, and address ethical issues surrounding humor in music. In addition to in-class listening and screening sessions, analytic discussions will be led by students who will find and present examples of humor in music. Students will also be invited to compose original humorous song lyrics and to create collaborative works of musical humor.
Last offered: Autumn 2012 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

MUSIC 37N: Ki ho'alu: The New Renaissance of a Hawaiian Musical Tradition

Preference to freshman. Developed in the Hawaiian Islands during the 1830s, ki ho'alu, or Hawaiian slack key guitar, is an art form experiencing newfound popularity coinciding with the growth of political activism in Hawaiian culture. The musical, cultural, historical, and political perspectives of Hawaiian music and ki ho'alu, through hands-on experience, readings, discussion, and workshops. Hawaiian music and history and relationships among performance, cultural expression, community, and identity.
Last offered: Autumn 2016 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

MUSIC 38N: Singing Early Music

Preference to freshmen. 15th- and 16th-century musical repertories and their contexts; performance practice.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-CE

MUSIC 40: Music History to 1600

Pre- or corequisite: 21.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: ; Chang, V. (PI)

MUSIC 41: Music History 1600-1830

Pre- or corequisite: 22.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: ; Hadlock, H. (PI)

MUSIC 42: Music History Since 1830

Pre- or corequisite: 23.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: ; Kronengold, C. (PI)

MUSIC 50: Arts in Context: The Process of Cultural Production (ARTSINST 50, TAPS 50)

A combination of practical skill-building and discussions with practicing arts professionals, this course will provide students with the foundational skills necessary to produce programs on campus and/or work in the arts. The talks and workshops will cover topics including curatorial practice and programming (for both visual and performing arts); grant writing and other fundraising methodology; budgeting and financial management; contracts and other legal considerations; and public relations and marketing. Every session is open for drop-in attendance, or students may take the entire series for credit. May be repeat for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 4 units total)
Instructors: ; Oh, E. (PI)

MUSIC 62: CLUB - Band (ATHLETIC 62)

This course is offered to club members who participate on credit approved Club Sports teams. All members must complete 30 hours of participation during the quarter. To be eligible for credit, the club must practice 2x a week for a maximum total of 4 hours and participate in 1-3 events in the quarter. Prerequisite: Permission of club sport administrator. May repeat for credit. A maximum of 8 activity units may be applied towards graduation.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 12 times (up to 12 units total)

MUSIC 65A: Voice Class I

Group (7 students to a section) beginning voice (A = level 1; B = level 2). May be repeated for credit. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and signup information. This class is closed by design. Please register on the waitlist and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Giovannetti, C. (PI)

MUSIC 65AS: Voice Class 1: Beginning Voice, Level 1 (Group)

Group (6 students to a section) beginning voice (A = level 1; B = level 2). Complete registration form available for download at: http://tinyurl.com/q43c48g. May be repeated for credit 5 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://tinyurl.com/posmuhn) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 5 times (up to 5 units total)
Instructors: ; Linduska, M. (PI)

MUSIC 65AZ: Voice Class I

Group (7 students to a section) beginning voice (A = level 1; B = level 2). There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and signup information. This class is closed by design. Please register on the waitlist and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. May be repeated for credit for 0 unit and total completion allowed 99.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Giovannetti, C. (PI)

MUSIC 65B: Voice Class II

Group (7 students to a section) beginning voice for the non-major (A = level 1; B = level 2). May be repeated for credit. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and signup information. This class is closed by design. Please register on the waitlist and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Giovannetti, C. (PI)

MUSIC 65BS: Voice Class 2: Beginning Voice, Level 2 (Group)

Group (6 students to a section) beginning voice (A = level 1; B = level 2). Complete registration form available for download at: http://tinyurl.com/q43c48g. May be repeated for credit 5 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://tinyurl.com/posmuhn) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 5 times (up to 5 units total)
Instructors: ; Linduska, M. (PI)

MUSIC 65BZ: Voice Class II

Group (7 students to a section) beginning voice for the non-major (A = level 1; B = level 2). There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and signup information. This class is closed by design. Please register on the waitlist and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. May be repeat for credit for 0 units and total completion of 99
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Giovannetti, C. (PI)

MUSIC 65SZ: Beginning Voice

Beginning Voice (zero-unit option). Complete registration form available for download at: http://tinyurl.com/q43c48g. May be repeated 5 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://tinyurl.com/posmuhn) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Sum | Units: 0
Instructors: ; Linduska, M. (PI)

MUSIC 72A: Intermediate Piano Class

For intermediate students. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Prerequisites: 12C or equivalent, audition. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fee and signup information. This class is closed by design. Please register on the waitlist and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: ; Zerlang, T. (PI)

MUSIC 72AS: Intermediate Piano Class (Group)

Piano: Intermediate Level (Group; 10 students to a section) Class is closed by design. Please register on the wait-list and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Complete registration form available for download at: http://tinyurl.com/q43c48g. May be repeated for credit 5 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://tinyurl.com/posmuhn) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 5 times (up to 5 units total)
Instructors: ; Zerlang, T. (PI)

MUSIC 72AZ: Intermediate Piano Class

For intermediate students. Prerequisites: 12C or equivalent, audition. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fee and signup information. This class is closed by design. Please register on the waitlist and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Zerlang, T. (PI)

MUSIC 72C: Harpsichord Class

For beginning harpsichord students who have keyboard skills. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and signup information. Admission based on instructor consent. Contact instructor prior to enrolling to discuss availability. Class meets in Braun 201. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: ; Bar-David, E. (PI)

MUSIC 72CZ: Harpsichord Class

For beginning harpsichord students who have keyboard skills. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and signup information. Admission based on instructor consent. Contact instructor prior to enrolling to discuss availability. Class meets in Braun 201. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Bar-David, E. (PI)

MUSIC 72D: Jazz Piano Class

Priority to majors and jazz-ensemble participants. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and signup information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: ; Low, M. (PI)

MUSIC 72DZ: Jazz Piano Class

Priority to majors and jazz-ensemble participants. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and signup information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Low, M. (PI)

MUSIC 72G: Gu-Zheng Class

Introduction to Chinese music through learning how to play Gu-Zheng, a 21-stringed traditional Chinese instrument. The cultural, social, and historical significance of Gu-Zheng. 15 Gu-Zheng techniques, how to read Chinese music and Gu-Zheng notation, and two simple classic Gu-Zheng pieces. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fee information. All participants must enroll. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: ; You, H. (PI)

MUSIC 72GZ: Gu-Zheng Class

Introduction to Chinese music through learning how to play Gu-Zheng, a 21-stringed traditional Chinese instrument. The cultural, social, and historical significance of Gu-Zheng. 15 Gu-Zheng techniques, how to read Chinese music and Gu-Zheng notation, and two simple classic Gu-Zheng pieces. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fee information. All participants must enroll. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable 14 times (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; You, H. (PI)

MUSIC 72SZ: Intermediate Piano

Intermediate Piano (zero-unit option). Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://tinyurl.com/posmuhn) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Sum | Units: 0
Instructors: ; Zerlang, T. (PI)

MUSIC 73: Intermediate Voice Class

For intermediate students. Admission by audition. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and signup information. This class is closed by design. Please register on the Axess waitlist and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: ; Giovannetti, C. (PI)

MUSIC 73Z: Intermediate Voice Class

For intermediate students. Admission by audition. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and signup information. This class is closed by design. Please register on the Axess waitlist and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Giovannetti, C. (PI)

MUSIC 74AA: Introductory Violin Class Level 1: Beginner

Open to majors and non-majors. Focus is on beginning violin skills. Topics include brief history and physics of the instrument, and survey of repertoire. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu for class fees and signup information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: ; Lee, J. (PI)

MUSIC 74AB: Introductory Violin Class Level 2: Intermediate

Open to majors and non-majors. Focus is on beginning violin skills. Topics include brief history and physics of the instrument, and survey of repertoire. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu for class fees and signup information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: ; Lee, J. (PI)

MUSIC 74AC: Introductory Violin Class Level 3: Advanced Intermediate

Open to majors and non-majors. Focus is on beginning violin skills. Topics include brief history and physics of the instrument, and survey of repertoire. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu for class fees and signup information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: ; Lee, J. (PI)

MUSIC 74AZ: Introductory Violin Class

(74A.1=Level 1 beginners; 74A.2=Level 2 continuing) Open to majors and non-majors. Focus is on beginning violin skills. Topics include brief history and physics of the instrument, and survey of repertoire. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu for class fees and signup information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Lee, J. (PI)

MUSIC 74C: Classical Guitar Class

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. There is a fee for this class. Please visit https://music.stanford.edu/ensembles-lessons/applied-music-policies/applied-music-fees-and-policies for class fee information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: ; Ferguson, C. (PI)

MUSIC 74CZ: Classical Guitar Class

There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and signup information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Ferguson, C. (PI)

MUSIC 74D: Harp Class

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and signup information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: ; Chauvel, M. (PI)

MUSIC 74DZ: Harp Class

There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and signup information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Chauvel, M. (PI)

MUSIC 75B: Renaissance Wind Instruments Class

May be repeated for credit. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu for class fees and signup information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Myers, H. (PI)

MUSIC 75BZ: Renaissance Wind Instruments Class

May be repeated for credit. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu for class fees and signup information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Myers, H. (PI)

MUSIC 76: Brass Instruments Class

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu for class fees and signup information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: ; Kenley, M. (PI)

MUSIC 76A: Tuba Class

Basic brass techniques as they apply to the tuba including warmups, breathing, and developing a daily routine. For beginning through intermediate players. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. May be repeated for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: ; Clements, T. (PI)

MUSIC 76AZ: Tuba Class

Basic brass techniques as they apply to the tuba including warmups, breathing, and developing a daily routine. For beginning through intermediate players. This course includes a fee of $175 for Music majors and minors, and $200 for non Music majors. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.May be repeated for credit for 0 unit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Clements, T. (PI)

MUSIC 76Z: Brass Instruments Class

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu for class fees and signup information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Kenley, M. (PI)

MUSIC 77: Percussion Class

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu for class fees and signup information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: ; Mach, L. (PI)

MUSIC 77Z: Percussion Class

There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu for class fees and signup information. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Mach, L. (PI)

MUSIC 80T: Jewish Music in the Lands of Islam (JEWISHST 80T)

An Interdisciplinary study of Music, Society, and Culture in communities of the Jewish Diaspora in Islamic countries. The course examines the diverse and rich musical traditions of the Jews in North Africa and the Middle East. Based on the "Maqamat" system, the Arabic musical modes, Jewish music flourished under Islamic rule, encompassing the fields of sacred music, popular songs, and art music. Using musicological, historical, and anthropological tools, the course compares and contrasts these traditions from their original roots through their adaptation, appropriation, and re-synthesis in contemporary art music and popular songs.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

MUSIC 101: Introduction to Creating Electronic Sounds

Students to explore their creative voices by learning the practical nuts and bolts of making sounds with computers and professional audio equipment. Basic concepts include mixing and production techniques used in podcasts, documentaries, live performance, electronic music, and sound art. Students will create a midterm soundscape project as well as a final class project that is focused on their particular creative interests.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: ; Callery, E. (PI)

MUSIC 102: Picturing Performance, Re-Envisioning the Arts (MUSIC 202)

Critical and creative exploration of the performing body as captured on film. Viewing/listening includes musicals, dance and opera on film, music video, experimental film and video, and moments of heightened musicality in feature film. Focus on examples of moving media that possess a kinship with music through gesture, rhythm or affect and through visual parameters like décor, lighting, texture, camera movement and editing. Requirements include choosing and documenting a live performance, producing a short audiovisual work involving post-production, and weekly reading and viewing/listening assignments. No previous videomaking experience required. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable 2 times (up to 8 units total)
Instructors: ; Vernallis, C. (PI)

MUSIC 112: Creative Expression: Musical Theater

Students begin to create pieces that are fresh and innovative forms of musical theater that do not necessarily appeal to specifically popular audiences but perhaps to audiences more associated with high art, opera, or even contemporary independent music. Musical theater is an untapped resource of potential artistic innovation and has unfortunately become stuck in an ideal of universal accessibility. In present popular culture and the culture of contemporary art forms, musical theater almost exclusively refers to popular productions such as Phantom of the Opera, Rent, Wicked, Jesus Christ Superstar. Although excellent pieces of art in their own way, both dramaturgically and in their ability to evoke emotion through catchy melodies, for the most part each of them have their basis in popular and traditional musical idioms and theatrical forms, seldom exploring more advanced or avant-garde and experimental compositional and theatrical techniques.
Last offered: Winter 2014 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

MUSIC 113: Introduction to Instrumental Composition

Students compose weekly exercises to improve creative fluency and develop basic control of instruments. Audio examples of diverse compositional techniques are introduced, analyzed and emulated. Prerequisite: Music 19A or Instructor's permission.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: ; Rose, F. (PI)

MUSIC 114: Sound Tracks: Music, Memory, and Migration in the Twentieth Century (CSRE 114)

This course comprises a thematic exploration of forces, experiences, and after-effects of diasporas of communities in the Americas and Europe throughout the 20th century. Through close listening accompanied by historical and theoretical readings, students will gain deeper insights into the making of meaning in music and the role of music as a creative response to the challenges of migration and minority-status in the modern nation-state. Historical examples will draw from the Romani diaspora, Eastern-European Jewish liturgical sounds, the Mexican-US border, and from Jazz and the Blues. We explore issues of race, ethnicity, identity, nationalism, minoritization as they intersect in the sound tracks of diaspora.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

MUSIC 122A: Counterpoint

Analysis and composition of contrapuntal styles from the Renaissance and Baroque periods. Use of keyboard, ear training, and sight singing underlies all written work. Prerequisites: MUSIC 23 and MUSIC 24C; passing piano-proficiency examination; or, consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: ; Ulman, E. (PI)

MUSIC 122B: Analysis of Tonal Music

Complete movements, or entire shorter works of the 18th and 19th centuries, are analyzed in a variety of theoretical approaches. Prerequisites: MUSIC 23 and MUSIC 24C; passing piano-proficiency examination; or, consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: ; Ulman, E. (PI)

MUSIC 122C: Introduction to 20th-Century Composition

Contemporary works, with emphasis on music since 1945. Projects in free composition based on 20th-century models. Prerequisites: MUSIC 23 and MUSIC 24C; passing piano-proficiency examination; or, consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum
Instructors: ; Ulman, E. (PI)

MUSIC 123: Undergraduate Seminar in Composition

Current trends in composition. May be repeated for credit a total of 7 times. Prerequisites: Music major; 23 or consent of instructor.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable 8 times (up to 24 units total)

MUSIC 123A: Undergraduate Seminar in Composition: Rhythmic Design

Students compose weekly exercises to develop creative fluency and personal style. The course focuses on listening to examples, analysis and emulation of diverse compositional techniques involving rhythm.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: ; Rose, F. (PI)

MUSIC 123B: Undergraduate Seminar in Composition: Pitch Design

Students compose weekly exercises to develop creative fluency and personal style. The course focuses on listening to examples, analysis and emulation of diverse compositional techniques involving pitch.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: ; Rose, F. (PI)

MUSIC 124A: Songwriters Workshop

Laboratory for composers of any kind of vernacular music: singer-songwriters; folk singers; laptop dance music composers; rock and pop bands; rappers; writers of instrumentals or music with lyrics; solo artists and collaborators; etc. Compositional strategies for songwriting, overview of exemplars, discussion of aesthetic issues, and development of artistic personae. Weekly critique session for students and faculty to share work and offer feedback. Music theory and literacy not required. Aimed, however, at those with at least some experience as writers, whether casual or extensive. For bands at least half of members must be enrolled.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 30 units total)
Instructors: ; Applebaum, M. (PI)

MUSIC 124B: Songwriters Workshop

Laboratory for composers of any kind of vernacular music: singer-songwriters; folk singers; laptop dance music composers; rock and pop bands; rappers; writers of instrumentals or music with lyrics; solo artists and collaborators; etc. Compositional strategies for songwriting, overview of exemplars, discussion of aesthetic issues, and development of artistic personae. Weekly critique session for students and faculty to share work and offer feedback. Music theory and literacy not required. Aimed, however, at those with at least some experience as writers, whether casual or extensive. For bands at least half of members must be enrolled. Enrollment in 3-unit course is by permission of, and invites lessons with instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Applebaum, M. (PI)

MUSIC 125: Individual Undergraduate Projects in Composition

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Prerequisites: music major, and one quarter of 123.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)

MUSIC 126: Introduction to Thoroughbass

The development of continuo techniques and skills for figured-bass realization. Performance and analysis of selected repertoire, using thoroughbass principles and exercises based on historical theoretical treatises. Prerequisite: 21.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3
Instructors: ; Berger, T. (PI)

MUSIC 127: Instrumentation and Orchestration

Individual instruments, instrumental groups within the orchestra, and combinations of groups. Arrangements from piano to orchestral music. Score analysis with respect to orchestration. Practical exercises using chamber ensembles and school orchestra. Prerequisite: 23.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-CE
Instructors: ; Aquilanti, G. (PI)

MUSIC 128: Stanford Laptop Orchestra: Composition, Coding, and Performance (CS 170)

Classroom instantiation of the Stanford Laptop Orchestra (SLOrk) which includes public performances. An ensemble of more than 20 humans, laptops, controllers, and special speaker arrays designed to provide each computer-mediated instrument with its sonic identity and presence. Topics and activities include issues of composing for laptop orchestras, instrument design, sound synthesis, programming, and live performance. May be repeated four times for credit. Space is limited; see https://ccrma.stanford.edu/courses/128 for information about the application and enrollment process. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 4 times (up to 20 units total)
Instructors: ; Wang, G. (PI)

MUSIC 129: Advanced Ear-Training/Musicianship

A course in advanced aural analysis and musicianship skills for students who have completed the Music 24 series. Topics of study include analysis by ear of large scale forms, chromatic or extended-tertian harmony, modulations to distantly related keys, chromatic or atonal melodies, modal harmony and melody, as well as alternative forms of aural analysis.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 8 units total)
Instructors: ; Arul, E. (PI)

MUSIC 130A: Introduction to Conducting

Baton techniques and rehearsal procedures. The development of coordination of the members of the body involved in conducting; fluency in beat patterns and meters; dynamics, tempi, cueing, and use of the left hand in conducting. Prerequisites: 122B and diagnostic musicianship exam given first day of class.
Last offered: Autumn 2016 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

MUSIC 130B: Elementary Orchestral Conducting

Prerequisites: 127 or previous orchestral performance experience, 130A.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | Units: 3

MUSIC 130C: Elementary Choral Conducting

Techniques specific to the conducting of choral ensembles: warm-ups, breathing, balance, blend, choral tone, isolation principles, recitative conducting, preparation, and conducting of choral/orchestral works. Prerequisite: 130A.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

MUSIC 133: Food, Text, Music: A Multidisciplinary Lab on the Art of Feasting (FRENCH 166, FRENCH 366, MUSIC 333)

Students cook a collection of unfamiliar recipes each week while learning about the cultural milieus in which they originated. The course focuses on the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, a time of great banquets that brought together chefs, visual artists, poets, musicians, and dancers. Students read late-medieval cookbooks under the guidance of professional chefs, learn songs and poetry with the help of visiting performers, and delve into a burgeoning scholarly literature on food history and sensory experience. We will also study trade routes and food networks, the environmental impact of large-scale banquets, the science of food, and the politics of plenty. This course may count towards the Medieval component of the French major, and corresponds to DLCL 121, a course requirement for the Medieval Studies Minor. Students interested in applying for course need to email Professors Galvez and Rodin (mailto:mgalvez@stanford.edu and mailto:jrodin@stanford.edu) with a statement of intent and dietary restrictions/preferences.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

MUSIC 135: Harmonic Convergence: Music's Intersections with Science, Mathematics, History, and Literature

Topics include music and the brain; tuning and temperament; musical form; connections between music and mathematics; and readings in history and literature with strong musical elements. Readings include "The Power of Music" (Mannes), "Musicophilia" (Sacks), "From Music to Mathematics" (Roberts), "The Kreutzer Sonata" (Tolstoy), "A Clockwork Orange" and "Honey for the Bears" (Burgess). Compositions by Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Debussy, Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Shostakovich, and others will be studied. Goals: increased understanding of music's relationship to other fields; improved writing skills. While ability to read music is not required, students with musical ability will be encouraged to perform relevant works in class.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: ; Phillips, P. (PI)

MUSIC 141J: Studies in Music of the Renaissance (MUSIC 241J)

Prerequisites: MUSIC 21, MUSIC 40. (WIM at 4-unit level only.)
| Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit

MUSIC 142J: Studies in Music of the Baroque: Monteverdi's Theater Music (MUSIC 242J)

Prerequisites: MUSIC 22, MUSIC 41. (WIM at 4-unit level only.)
Last offered: Winter 2016 | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Repeatable for credit

MUSIC 142K: Studies in Music of the Baroque: Handel the Cosmopolitan (MUSIC 242K)

Music history seminar on the operatic, sacred, and instrumental works of G.F. Handel as examples of the diversity, cosmopolitanism, expression, formal and technical features, and social uses of music in the first half of eighteenth century. Traces Handel¿s career from his native Germany to an elite Roman circle of musical connoisseurs, and to the Italian opera company he founded in London and his transformation of Italian opera into a new genre of English oratorio. By analyzing Handel¿s works in context, we examine the aesthetic, harmonic, and dramatic principles of the major European Baroque art-music genres. Prerequisites: MUSIC 22, MUSIC 41. (WIM at 4-unit level only.)
Last offered: Winter 2017 | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

MUSIC 143K: Studies in Music of the Classical Period: Mozart's Operas (MUSIC 243K)

Aesthetic, musical, and dramatic principles of 18th-century comic opera explored through W.A. Mozart's Abduction from the Seraglio, Marriage of Figaro, Don Giovanni, Così fan tutte, and Magic Flute. Comic strategies of exaggeration, farce, stock characters, ethnic caricature, and topsy-turvy social inversion; national traditions of Italian opera buffa and German Singspiel; musical forms and elements including recitative, aria, and ensemble. How Mozart's operas reflect 18th-century ideas about music, social organization, political authority, gender, sexuality, and rhetoric. Prerequisites: MUSIC 22, MUSIC 41. (WIM at 4-unit level only.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4
Instructors: ; Hadlock, H. (PI)

MUSIC 144L: Studies in Music of the Romantic Period: Wagner: The Ring of the Nibelung (MUSIC 244L)

Richard Wagner's cycle of four operas, "Der Ring des Nibelungen" (1848-74), is one of the key documents of the mid nineteenth-century revolutionary fervor in Europe and a monument of radical artistic modernism of the period. The course will examine the artistic features of this unique work and place it in the complex ideological context of its time. Prerequisites: MUSIC 23, MUSIC 42 (WIM at 4-unit level only.)
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4
Instructors: ; Berger, K. (PI)

MUSIC 145J: Studies in Western Art Music Since 1900: The Music & Ideas of Charles Ives (MUSIC 245J)

Prerequisites: MUSIC 23, MUSIC 42. (WIM at 4-unit level only.)
Last offered: Spring 2015 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit

MUSIC 145K: Studies in Western Art Music Since 1900: Concepts of New Music (MUSIC 245K)

A survey of the history of Western classical music in the twentieth century, concentrating on shifts in the concept of New Music in the first half of the century. The aim is twofold: to study in depth a representative selection of works and to develop a historiographical framework for that study. Relevant concepts to be examined include Expressionism, Neo-Classicism, New Objectivity, Serialism, Aleatoricism, and Minimalism -- all of them key terms used by music historians and critics to describe and delineate the multifaceted phenomenon of "New Music." Composers to be studied include Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Berg, Weill, Shostakovich, Reich and Glass, and others. Prerequisites: MUSIC 23, MUSIC 42. (WIM course for Music majors.)
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: ; Hinton, S. (PI)

MUSIC 146J: Studies in Ethnomusicology: Listening to the Local: Music Ethnography of the Bay Area (ANTHRO 146J, CSRE 146J, MUSIC 246J)

An introduction to music ethnography through student research on musical life in the Bay Area. Focus is on the intersections of music, social life, and cultural practice by engaging with people as they perform music and culture in situ. Techniques taught include participant-observation, interviewing and oral history, writing field-notes, recording, transcription, analysis, and ethnographic writing. Pre-/co-requisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 units only.)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: ; Schultz, A. (PI)

MUSIC 146K: Studies in Ethnomusicology: Music of South Asia (MUSIC 246K)

Focuses on the history, theory, and practice of South Asian music with particular emphasis on the classical traditions of North and South India. Also addresses regional folk, popular, and devotional musical styles of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Topics include: raga, tala, vocal and instrumental genres, improvisation, aesthetics, music transmission, musical nationalism, social organization of musicians, music and ritual, music and gender, and technology. Lecture with discussion, some singing (no experience necessary), guest performances, reading, listening, and analysis. Pre-/corequisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 or 5 units only.)
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

MUSIC 146L: Studies in Ethnomusicology: Musics of Africa and the African Diaspora (AFRICAAM 146L, AFRICAST 246L, MUSIC 246L)

An introduction to musics of Africa and the African Diaspora. Topics include: music and nationalism, religion, embodiment, diaspora, migration, resistance, gender, globalization, and race. Musical regions and nations may include: Zimbabwe, South Africa, West Africa, Central Africa, Somalia, Ethiopia, the Caribbean, and the United States. This is a seminar-based course in which students will write short reflective papers and a final, research-based paper.Pre- or co-requisite for WIM credit: Music 22. WIM at 4 or 5 letter-graded units only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: ; Schultz, A. (PI)

MUSIC 147J: Studies in Music, Media, and Popular Culture: The Soul Tradition in African American Music (AFRICAAM 19, AMSTUD 147J, CSRE 147J, MUSIC 247J)

The African American tradition of soul music from its origins in blues, gospel, and jazz to its influence on today's r&b, hip hop, and dance music. Style such as rhythm and blues, Motown, Southern soul, funk, Philadelphia soul, disco, Chicago house, Detroit techno, trip hop, and neo-soul. Soul's cultural influence and global reach; its interaction with politics, gender, place, technology, and the economy. Pre-/corequisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 units only.)
Last offered: Winter 2015 | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

MUSIC 147K: Studies in Music, Media, and Popular Culture: Music and Urban Film (MUSIC 247K)

How music and sound work in urban cinema. What happens when music's capacity to transform everyday reality combines with the realism of urban films? Provides an introduction to traditional theories of film music and film sound; considers how new technologies and practices have changed the roles of music in film. Readings discuss film music, realistic cinema, urban musical practices and urban culture. Viewing includes action/adventure, Hindi film, documentary, film noir, hip hop film, the musical, and borderline cases by Jean-Luc Godard, Spike Lee, Wong Kar-Wai and Tsai Ming-Liang. Pre- or corequisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 unit level only.)
Last offered: Winter 2016 | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

MUSIC 147L: Studies in Music, Media, and Popular Culture: Latin American Music and Globalization (CHILATST 147L, CSRE 147L, MUSIC 247L)

Focuses on vernacular music of Latin America and the Caribbean, including Mexico, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Peru, Brazil, Colombia, and Argentina. Musical examples discussed in relation to: globalization, migration, colonialism, nationalism, diaspora, indigeneity, politics, religion, dance, ethnicity, and gender. How music reflects and shapes cultures, identities, and social structures. Genres addressed: bachata, bossa nova, cumbia, forro, ranchero, reggaeton, rock, salsa, tango, and others. Seminar, guest performances, reading, listening, and analysis. Pre-/corequisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 units only.)
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Repeatable 2 times (up to 8 units total)

MUSIC 148J: Studies in Perf Practice: Reactions to the Record: Early Recordings, Lost Styles, and Music's Future (MUSIC 248J)

This is a seminar on the transformation of musical style in the era of recordings in light of their roots in cultural trends, including shifting hierarchies between composer and performer, work and notation, text and act. Early recordings will be studied as documents of musical values and conceptions different from those around us today. Methodologies of performance analysis will be explored and used to contextualize sources, which include historic recordings from Stanford's Archive of Recorded Sound, performance documents, and field research with performers, composers, critics, and listeners. Repertoire includes works for orchestra, piano, strings, chamber ensemble and voice. Outstanding contributions from seminar members may be featured in the Music Department¿s May 2014 Reactions to the Record symposium. May be repeated for credit. Pre- or corequisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4-unit level only.)
Last offered: Spring 2016 | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit

MUSIC 150: Musical Acoustics

The physics of vibrating systems, waves, and wave motion. Time- and frequency-domain analysis of sound. Room acoustics, reverberation, and spatialization. The acoustics of musical instruments: voice, strings, and winds. Emphasis is on the practical aspects of acoustics in making music. Hands-on and computer-based lab. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/courses/150/.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci
Instructors: ; Rossing, T. (PI)

MUSIC 150D: The Paradigm Shift (POLISCI 133D)

Examination of the idea of 'paradigm shift' by considering paradigm shifts in different academic fields of inquiry. Serial accumulation of guest lectures by distinguished faculty representing the University's many and varied departments, each asking and answering the question 'What is the most important paradigm shift in the history of my field? Are paradigm shifts revolution or evolution? Do they move us closer to truth? How frequently do they occur? Can humans plan for, cause, or resist them?
| Units: 1

MUSIC 150P: The Changing World of Popular Music (ARTSINST 150)

This course will cover changes in the business, economics, and practices of the popular music industry. It will provide a brief historical overview of the industry and its business models. The majority of the course will focus on the industry as it works today and on forces that are causing it to change rapidly. The course will feature guest artists and executives with current experience in the field, as well as project-based assignments designed to give students hands-on experience.Topics will include: Economics and business models of commercial music business,Technology and music production, Technology and music distribution, Technology and marketing, Leadership in the music industry: case studies, Managing creative projects, Copyright and legal issues. Attendance at first class required. Enrollment will be determined on the first day through a simple application process.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: ; LeBoeuf, J. (PI)

MUSIC 150R: Robert Schumann and the Idea of Musical Romanticism

The creative personality and musical compositions of Robert Schumann (1810-1856) as exemplars of the idea of Romanticism in European culture of the early nineteenth century. Survey of major genres (solo piano, Lieder, symphonies, chamber music, choral music) in dialogue with Romantic literary and visual cultures. Students prepare at least one or two works by Schumann or contemporary figures (Mendelssohn, Chopin, Brahms, Clara Schumann) for presentation in lecture-recital format. Prerequisites: Music 22 or equivalent (intermediate music theory), intermediate or higher performance ability in piano, strings, or voice
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: ; Grey, T. (PI)

MUSIC 151G: Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Tells the Story: Identity and Representation in American Musical Theater

Throughout the twentieth century and into the present day, musicals have sought to tell stories about a broad range of American experiences and engage with complex social issues. Foremost among these themes are the topics of race and cultural appropriation, immigration and citizenship, and LGBT lives and queer identity. Even as they seek to represent diverse perspectives and facilitate progressive social change, musicals just as often can reinforce and replicate troubling conceptions surrounding gender, race, sexual identity. This course will examine works of musical theater from the 1920s to the present day in order to understand how each of these individual works, and the musical as a genre and institution, navigates this forward-and-backward tension surrounding these three topics. Our focus will be on commercially successful stage and screen musicals that cover the span of almost a hundred years, from The Jazz Singer (1927) to Hamilton (2015). In the course of lectures and discussions we will build a working vocabulary for analyzing the musical's salient components including music and lyrics, staging, libretto, choreography, and cinematography and engage with key scholarship from musicology, performance studies, film studies, and American studies. The final week of class will examine current and planned musical theater productions on campus using the tools and perspectives from the previous three parts.
| Units: 4

MUSIC 152A: Careers in Media Technology

Careers in Media Technology explores how leading audio, music, and video technology companies, such as Pandora, Adobe, Sonos, Dolby, Gracenote, iZotope, and Avid bring products from idea to market. We examine best practices, roles, day-to-day responsibilities, desired skillsets, and department/team function. This seminar is intended for all students considering full-time positions or internships in media technology industry. No prior engineering background required.nTopics include: product management, project management (agile), software development in large organizations, UX/UI design, marketing, hardware development, R&D, sales, operations (HR, IP/patents), and the hiring process.nOnline lectures available. Class time includes discussion and meetings with industry professionals.
Last offered: Autumn 2016 | Units: 2

MUSIC 153: Online Jamming and Concert Technology

Today's vast amount of streaming and video conferencing on the Internet lacks one aspect of musical fun and that's what this course is about: high-quality, near-synchronous musical collaboration. Under the right conditions, the Internet can be used for ultra-low-latency, uncompressed sound transmission. The course teaches open-source (free) techniques for setting up city-to-city studio-to-studio audio links. Distributed rehearsing, production and split ensemble concerts are the goal. Setting up such links and debugging them requires knowledge of network protocols, network audio issues and some ear training.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 16 units total)
Instructors: ; Chafe, C. (PI)

MUSIC 154: History of Electronic Music

What is electronic music? Acousmatic, computer music, algorithmic composition, tape music, glitch, electronic, musique concrète, noise, laptop music, DJ'ing, organized sound...what do these labels mean? This course will provide a brief historical survey of electroacoustic music and discuss some of the most salient questions associated with it, from both a compositional and musicological point of view. Topics to be covered include: definitions of musical sounds; Schaefferian theory and musique concrète; serialism and elektronische Musik; tape music and computer music in the USA; analysis of electroacoustic music; sampling and intellectual property; algorithmic and computer-assisted composition; live-electronics and improvisation. The course does not require previous experience in the field. Classes will be based on discussion of selected listening and reading materials, as well as hands-on digital experimentation with sounds.
| Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)

MUSIC 154A: Sound Art I (ARTSTUDI 131)

Acoustic, digital and analog approaches to sound art. Familiarization with techniques of listening, recording, digital processing and production. Required listening and readings in the history and contemporary practice of sound art. (lower level)
Last offered: Autumn 2016 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-CE

MUSIC 154B: Aesthetics of Experimental Electronic Music, 1980 to Today

In this course, students will listen to, analyze, and interpret experimental electronic music since 1980. We will explore how technologies influence music making, audiences¿ experiences, distribution outlets and performance contexts for electronic music. How do artists generate meaning and expressivity when using experimental tools and styles? Emphasis on developing vocabulary and frameworks for informed discourse surrounding electronic music, drawing from both academic and journalistic traditions. Topics include electronic dance music, dubstep, hip hop, internet music culture, drone, noise, microsound, electroacoustic, and sound art. Highly recommended for music majors taking the MST specialization. For upper-level undergraduates and graduate students.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | Units: 3-5

MUSIC 154D: Symposium on Manufacturing Techniques for Music and Art

A guided symposium on the many techniques for making music and art objects. The course will be tailored to student interest and needs as it covers computer controlled machining, traditional techniques, and innovative methods of creating physical objects for music and art.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 6 times (up to 18 units total)

MUSIC 154F: Electroacoustic Music Analysis

This course will explore the most important methodologies for analysis of electroacoustic music that have been proposed in the literature. Class meetings include lectures, student discussions of relevant literature and listening sessions. Assignments include weekly readings, homework, and a final project. Basic musical proficiency is required. Experience with programming, music analysis, or music perception/cognition is desirable.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: ; Cadiz, R. (PI)

MUSIC 155: Intermedia Workshop (ARTSTUDI 239, MUSIC 255)

Students develop and produce intermedia works. Musical and visual approaches to the conceptualisation and shaping of time-based art. Exploration of sound and image relationship. Study of a wide spectrum of audiovisual practices including experimental animation, video art, dance, performance, non-narrative forms, interactive art and installation art. Focus on works that use music/sound and image as equal partners. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: consent of instructors, and one of FILMPROD 114, ARTSTUDI 131, 138, 167, 177, 179, or MUSIC 123, or equivalent. May be repeated for credit
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable 2 times (up to 8 units total)

MUSIC 156: "sic": Improvisation Collective

Small ensemble devoted to learning trans-idiomatic improvisation techniques and composing indeterminate pieces in a workshop setting. One major concert. Prerequisite: access to an instrument. Improvisational experience and conventional instrumental virtuosity not required. May be repeated for credit for a total of 3 times.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 4 times (up to 4 units total)
Instructors: ; Applebaum, M. (PI)

MUSIC 156Z: "sic": Improvisation Collective

Small ensemble devoted to learning trans-idiomatic improvisation techniques and composing indeterminate pieces in a workshop setting. One major concert. Prerequisite: access to an instrument. Improvisational experience and conventional instrumental virtuosity not required. May be repeated for credit for a total of 3 times.
Terms: Win | Units: 0 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Applebaum, M. (PI)

MUSIC 158: Stanford Community Chorus

Chorus members explore many different types of music and singing in a fun and supportive environment, including folk, spirituals, popular songs, and traditional choral music. The course culminates in an informal performance. No audition is required to join; experienced music readers and non-readers alike are welcome. The ensemble is open to both Stanford students and community members. There is a $25 fee for music. Offered in collaboration with Stanford Continuing Studies. Enrollment limited to 15 students and 30 community members. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit (up to 99 units total)
Instructors: ; Savage, K. (PI)

MUSIC 159: Early Music Singers

Small choir specializing in Medieval, Renaissance, and early Baroque vocal music. One major concert per quarter. May be repeated for credit for a total of 15 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: ; Mahrt, W. (PI)

MUSIC 159J: Performance as Analysis: Late-Medieval Music in Action

This experimental course channels embodied musical knowledge into text-based analysis and reflection. Part I features an intensive period of seven workshops and rehearsals: working closely with members of Cut Circle (http://cutcircle.org) as well as specialists in computer science and art history, students prepare a concert to be held during Week 2 of the quarter. Part II (Weeks 3­-5) comprises a more typical twice-a-week schedule in which we reflect on, contextualize, and analyze the music and our experience performing it. A final paper is due in about Week 7; regular meetings conclude after Week 5. Prerequisites: good sight-singing skills; at least one quarter's experience in MUSIC 165 (Chamber Chorale) or an ensemble of a similar caliber. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University. Week 1: Mon 4 January: 4:30 - 7:00, MemChu; Wed 6 January: 4:30 - 7:00, MemChu; Fri 8 January: 4:30 - 7:00, DinkReh; Sat 9, and Sun 10 January: 2:30 - 6pm, BRH moving to MemChu; Week 2: Tues 12 January: 4:30 - 7:00, MemChu; Wed 13 January: 6pm call for 7:30p concert, MemChu;; Weeks 3-5: Tues/Thurs, 4:30 - 5:50 Braun 105; Weeks 6-10: No class meeting. Final paper due in week 7.
Last offered: Winter 2016 | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 12 units total)

MUSIC 159K: Stanford Facsimile Singers

Small vocal ensemble performing late-medieval and Renaissance music from original sources. Exposes students to unfamiliar notational systems through often lavish music manuscripts and prints; builds sight-singing skills. May be repeated for credit for a total of three times. Zero-unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. Prerequisites: basic sight-singing. Prior training in voice not required.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

MUSIC 159KZ: Stanford Facsimile Singers

Small vocal ensemble performing late-medieval and Renaissance music from original sources. Exposes students to unfamiliar notational systems through often lavish music manuscripts and prints; builds sight-singing skills. May be repeated for credit for a total of three times. Zero-unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. Prerequisites: basic sight-singing. Prior training in voice not required.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Units: 0

MUSIC 159Z: Early Music Singers

Small choir specializing in Medieval, Renaissance, and early Baroque vocal music. One major concert per quarter. May be repeated for credit for a total of 15 times for 0 unit. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Mahrt, W. (PI)

MUSIC 160: Stanford Symphony Orchestra

70- to 100-member ensemble performing major orchestral works; minimum one concert per quarter. Admission and enrollment based on audition. For audition and contact information, please refer to the SSO/SPO/SNE website at (http://sso.stanford.edu). All participants must enroll. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: ; Phillips, P. (PI)

MUSIC 160A: Stanford Philharmonia

Prerequisite: audition, one year of 160, or consent of instructor. Admission and enrollment based on audition. For audition and contact information, please refer to the SSO/SPO/SNE website at (http://sso.stanford.edu). All participants must register. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: ; Phillips, P. (PI)

MUSIC 160AZ: Stanford Philharmonia

Prerequisite: audition, one year of 160, or consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit. Admission and enrollment based on audition. For audition and contact information, please refer to the SSO/SPO/SNE website at (http://www.stanford.edu/group/sso/cgi-bin/wordpress/member-login/). All participants must register. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: ; Phillips, P. (PI)

MUSIC 160B: Stanford New Ensemble

Performing compositions of the 20th century, recent works of this century, and new works by Stanford faculty and student composers. Musicians collaborate with composers and artists visiting and performing at Stanford. One concert per quarter. Admission and enrollment based on audition. For audition and contact information, please refer to the SSO/SPO/SNE website at (http://www.stanford.edu/group/sso/cgi-bin/wordpress/member-login/). All participants must register. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: ; Lee, J. (PI)

MUSIC 160BZ: Stanford New Ensemble

Performing compositions of the 20th century, recent works of this century, and new works by Stanford faculty and student composers. Musicians collaborate with composers and artists visiting and performing at Stanford. One concert per quarter. Admission and enrollment based on audition. For audition and contact information, please refer to the SSO/SPO/SNE website at (http://www.stanford.edu/group/sso/cgi-bin/wordpress/member-login/). All participants must register. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Lee, J. (PI)

MUSIC 160C: Stanford Baroque Soloists

Elite string group focusing on concerti by Corelli, Vivaldi and other Italians, Bach, Handel and other Germans, as well as theater music by Purcell and Lully. Each member expected to solo as well as play backup. Performances each quarter, played standing, student-led without conductor. Coaching will emphasize leadership and ensemble techniques, intonation and blend, particulars of eighteenth century notation and performance practice. Modern instruments, modern pitch, baroque bows as available. Limited to six violins, three violas, three cellos, bass, admission by audition. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. Contact instructor for audition and enrollment information: apmartin@stanford.edu. May be repeated for credit for total completion of 15 and total 15 units. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: ; Martin, A. (PI)

MUSIC 160CZ: Stanford Baroque Soloists

Elite string group focusing on concerti by Corelli, Vivaldi and other Italians, Bach, Handel and other Germans, as well as theater music by Purcell and Lully. Each member expected to solo as well as play backup. Performances each quarter, played standing, student-led without conductor. Coaching will emphasize leadership and ensemble techniques, intonation and blend, particulars of eighteenth century notation and performance practice. Modern instruments, modern pitch, baroque bows as available. Limited to six violins, three violas, three cellos, bass, admission by audition. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. Contact instructor for audition and enrollment information: apmartin@stanford.edu. May be repeated for credit for 0 units. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Martin, A. (PI)

MUSIC 160S: Summer Orchestra

See website for details: https://music.stanford.edu/academic-programs/summer-studies-stanford-music/summer-session-ensembles-chorus-and-symphony. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Phillips, P. (PI)

MUSIC 160SZ: Summer Orchestra

See website for details: https://music.stanford.edu/academic-programs/summer-studies-stanford-music/summer-session-ensembles-chorus-and-symphony. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Phillips, P. (PI)

MUSIC 160Z: Stanford Symphony Orchestra

70- to 100-member ensemble performing major orchestral works; minimum one concert per quarter. Admission and enrollment based on audition. For audition and contact information, please refer to the SSO/SPO/SNE website at (http://www.stanford.edu/group/sso/cgi-bin/wordpress/member-login/). All participants must enroll. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Phillips, P. (PI)

MUSIC 161A: Stanford Wind Symphony

40- to 50-member ensemble performing transcriptions of symphonic music, brass band music, and repertoire composed specifically for symphonic band. One concert per quarter. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: ; Aquilanti, G. (PI)

MUSIC 161AZ: Stanford Wind Symphony

40- to 50-member ensemble performing transcriptions of symphonic music, brass band music, and repertoire composed specifically for symphonic band. One concert per quarter. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Aquilanti, G. (PI)

MUSIC 161B: Jazz Orchestra

Jazz Orchestra is an undergraduate large ensemble performance class. Admission is by audition and/or permission of instructor. The class meets three times per week and presents a minimum of one formal concert per quarter with a major jazz artist. The class endeavors to provide students with the opportunity to perform, at the highest level, jazz compositions and arrangements of a serious nature, and provide opportunities for challenging and creative improvisational situations. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the structural, psychological, and emotional components of the materials studied and performed. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. May be repeated for total of 15 times. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: ; Galisatus, M. (PI)

MUSIC 161BZ: Jazz Orchestra

Jazz Orchestra is an undergraduate large ensemble performance class. Admission is by audition and/or permission of instructor. The class meets three times per week and presents a minimum of one formal concert per quarter with a major jazz artist. The class endeavors to provide students with the opportunity to perform, at the highest level, jazz compositions and arrangements of a serious nature, and provide opportunities for challenging and creative improvisational situations. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the structural, psychological, and emotional components of the materials studied and performed. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. May be repeated for total completion of 15 and 0 (zero) unit. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Galisatus, M. (PI)

MUSIC 161D: Stanford Brass Ensemble

Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. Performance of works for full brass choir and for smaller ensembles of brass instruments. Once weekly rehearsals. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: audition and consent of instructor. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 15 units total)

MUSIC 161DZ: Stanford Brass Ensemble

Performance of works for full brass choir and for smaller ensembles of brass instruments. Once weekly rehearsals. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: audition and consent of instructor. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 0 units total)

MUSIC 161E: Stanford Afro-Latin Jazz Orchestra

Ensemble dedicated to the performance, interpretation and study of Afro-Latin music and its fusion with North American jazz. Repertoire includes the music of Brazil, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Peru and Argentina, as well as the United States. Idioms studied include Latin Jazz, Danzon, Son Montuno, Samba, Bossa, Traditional and Modern Salsa, Timba, Lando, and Candombe. African roots of the music are also presented including songs and rhythms from the Lucumi and Arara traditions. Focus is placed on learning rhythms, associated syncopations and also clave phrasing.nOne weekly rehearsal and a concert are required per quarter. Other playing opportunities available at the discretion of the group. Regular openings for brass/wind players, drummers, percussionists, pianists, bassists, and vocalists. Guest openings on violin, guitar and vibraphone. Inclusion of other instruments at the discretion of the director.nMembers should have basic reading ability and some related ensemble experience (e.g, jazz band). Ability to read and play complex syncopations are mandatory. Percussionists with experience in bongo, congas, timbales and pandeiro desired. Vocalists with fluency or exposure to Spanish and/or Portuguese also preferred. May be repeat for credit. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Low, M. (PI)

MUSIC 161EZ: Stanford Afro-Latin Jazz Orchestra

Ensemble dedicated to the performance, interpretation and study of Afro-Latin music and its fusion with North American jazz. Repertoire includes the music of Brazil, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Peru and Argentina, as well as the United States. Idioms studied include Latin Jazz, Danzon, Son Montuno, Samba, Bossa, Traditional and Modern Salsa, Timba, Lando, and Candombe. African roots of the music are also presented including songs and rhythms from the Lucumi and Arara traditions. Focus is placed on learning rhythms, associated syncopations and also clave phrasing.nOne weekly rehearsal and a concert are required per quarter. Other playing opportunities available at the discretion of the group. Regular openings for brass/wind players, drummers, percussionists, pianists, bassists, and vocalists. Guest openings on violin, guitar and vibraphone. Inclusion of other instruments at the discretion of the director.nMembers should have basic reading ability and some related ensemble experience (e.g, jazz band). Ability to read and play complex syncopations are mandatory. Percussionists with experience in bongo, congas, timbales and pandeiro desired. Vocalists with fluency or exposure to Spanish and/or Portuguese also preferred. May be repeat for credit for total of 0 (zero) unit.. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Low, M. (PI)

MUSIC 162: Symphonic Chorus

180- to 200-voice choral ensemble, performing major choral masterworks with orchestra. One concert per quarter. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: ; Sano, S. (PI)

MUSIC 162Z: Symphonic Chorus

180- to 200-voice choral ensemble, performing major choral masterworks with orchestra. One concert per quarter. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Sano, S. (PI)

MUSIC 163: Memorial Church Choir

Official choir of Memorial Church, furnishing music for Sunday services and special occasions in the church calendar. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: ; Morgan, R. (PI)

MUSIC 163Z: Memorial Church Choir

Official choir of Memorial Church, furnishing music for Sunday services and special occasions in the church calendar. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Morgan, R. (PI)

MUSIC 165: Chamber Chorale

Select 24-voice choral ensemble, specializing in virtuoso choral repertoire from all periods of Western art music. Annual touring commitment required. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: ; Sano, S. (PI)

MUSIC 165Z: Chamber Chorale

Select 24-voice choral ensemble, specializing in virtuoso choral repertoire from all periods of Western art music. Annual touring commitment required. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Sano, S. (PI)

MUSIC 167: University Singers

Select, 50-voice choral ensemble, performing choral repertoire from all periods of Western art music. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: ; Morgan, R. (PI)

MUSIC 167S: Summer Chorus

80- to 100-voice non-auditioned ensemble, performing major choral masterworks and choral repertoire from all periods of Western art music. For details see: https://music.stanford.edu/academic-programs/summer-studies-stanford-music/summer-session-ensembles. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. May be repeated for credit for a total of 0 (zero) unit. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Ornes, R. (PI)

MUSIC 167SZ: Summer Chorus

80- to 100-voice non-auditioned ensemble, performing major choral masterworks and choral repertoire from all periods of Western art music. For details see: https://music.stanford.edu/academic-programs/summer-studies-stanford-music/summer-session-ensembles. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. May be repeated for credit for a total of 0 (zero) unit. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Ornes, R. (PI)

MUSIC 167Z: University Singers

Select, 50-voice choral ensemble, performing choral repertoire from all periods of Western art music. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Morgan, R. (PI)

MUSIC 169: Stanford Taiko

Select 15- to 18-member North American taiko ensemble, performing all-original repertoire for Japanese drums. Multiple performances in Winter and Spring quarters, also touring; instrument construction and maintenance. Admission by audition in Autumn Quarter only. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: ; Sano, S. (PI); Uyechi, L. (PI)

MUSIC 169Z: Stanford Taiko

Select 15- to 18-member North American taiko ensemble, performing all-original repertoire for Japanese drums. Multiple performances in Winter and Spring quarters, also touring; instrument construction and maintenance. Admission by audition in Autumn Quarter only. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Sano, S. (PI); Uyechi, L. (PI)

MUSIC 170: Collaborative Piano

Performance class in a workshop setting. Techniques of collaboration with vocalists and instrumentalists in repertoire ranging from songs and arias to sonatas and concertos. Prerequisite: private-lesson proficiency level in piano, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: ; Dahl, L. (PI)

MUSIC 171: Chamber Music

Admission based on audition. Weekly one-hour coachings from Music department faculty. Search for instructor section in Axess. Classical string quartets and piano/string groups are supervised by the St. Lawrence String Quartet. Two masterclasses and one performance per quarter are required. May be repeated for credit. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website for policy, procedure, and audition sign up: http://music.stanford.edu/ By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit

MUSIC 171Z: Chamber Music

Admission based on audition. Weekly one-hour coachings from Music department faculty. Search for instructor section in Axess. Classical string quartets and piano/string groups are supervised by the St. Lawrence String Quartet. Two masterclasses and one performance per quarter are required. May be repeated for credit. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website for policy, procedure, and audition sign up: http://music.stanford.edu/ By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit (up to 0 units total)

MUSIC 172A: Piano

Private lessons and group master class weekly. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)

MUSIC 172B: Organ

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Morgan, R. (PI)

MUSIC 172C: Harpsichord

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Bar-David, E. (PI)

MUSIC 172D: Jazz Piano

By invitation only; priority to majors and jazz-ensemble participants. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Low, M. (PI)

MUSIC 172E: Fortepiano

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. edit Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Barth, G. (PI)

MUSIC 172F: Carillon

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Zerlang, T. (PI)

MUSIC 172G: Gu-Zheng

Private lessons weekly. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; You, H. (PI)

MUSIC 173: Voice

Private lessons and group master classes weekly. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)

MUSIC 174A: Violin

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)

MUSIC 174B: Viola

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)

MUSIC 174C: Violoncello

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)

MUSIC 174D: Contrabass

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Moyer, B. (PI)

MUSIC 174E: Viola Da Gamba

Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Dornenburg, J. (PI)

MUSIC 174F: Classical Guitar

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Ferguson, C. (PI)

MUSIC 174G: Harp

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Chauvel, M. (PI)

MUSIC 174H: Baroque Violin

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Martin, A. (PI)

MUSIC 174I: Jazz Bass

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Thurston-Milgrom, J. (PI)

MUSIC 174J: Jazz Guitar

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Vandivier, R. (PI)

MUSIC 175A: Flute

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)

MUSIC 175B: Oboe

May be repeated for credit a total of 15 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; May, C. (PI)

MUSIC 175C: Clarinet

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Brandenburg, M. (PI)

MUSIC 175D: Bassoon

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Olivier, R. (PI)

MUSIC 175E: Recorder/Early Winds

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Myers, H. (PI)

MUSIC 175F: Saxophone

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Henderson, D. (PI)

MUSIC 175G: Baroque Flute

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Ellison, G. (PI)

MUSIC 175H: Jazz Saxophone

May be repeated for credit a total of 15 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; McCarthy, C. (PI)

MUSIC 176A: French Horn

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Ragent, L. (PI)

MUSIC 176B: Trumpet

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Luftman, A. (PI)

MUSIC 176C: Trombone

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Kenley, M. (PI)

MUSIC 176D: Tuba

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Clements, T. (PI)

MUSIC 176E: Jazz Trumpet

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Worley, J. (PI)

MUSIC 177: Percussion

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Mach, L. (PI)

MUSIC 177A: Drum Set Lessons

These lessons will be geared toward the individual student's desires and needs. All levels are welcome, but students should contact instructor to set up initial meeting, prior to enrolling in the course. Students will explore drumset technique, coordination, reading and a study various styles including, Jazz, Rock, R&B, Blues, Latin and Brazilian music. Students will use different texts as needed. These texts may include: Syncopation by Ted Reed, Modern Reading Text in 4/4 by Louis Bellson, A Funky Primer by Charles Dowd, Advanced Techniques for the Modern Drummer by Jim Chapin, and others. Students will also use material created by David for his classes "Around the World on a Drumset" and "Chart Reading Demystified." These lessons are designed to be both fun and challenging. Students will play along with recordings and are encouraged to bring in recordings of music that they enjoy. May be repeated for credit a total of 15 times. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 14 times (up to 42 units total)
Instructors: ; Rokeach, D. (PI)

MUSIC 179Z: Applied Music Private Lessons

Students enroll in appropriate instructor section for private instrumental/vocal lessons using this zero unit enrollment option. Available only with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit (up to 0 units total)

MUSIC 182: Diction for Singers

The international phonetic alphabet and its application to German, French, and Italian vocal literature. Open also to pianists interested in vocal coaching and choral conducting.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Dahl, L. (PI)

MUSIC 183A: German Art Song Interpretation

By audition only. For advanced singers and pianists as partners. Performance class in a workshop setting. Composers include Beethoven, Schubert, Wolf and Strauss. May be repeated for credit a total of 2 times. Enrollment limit: 20 (ten singers maximum). Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Recommended prerequisite: 170 (pianists) or 182 (singers).
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)
Instructors: ; Dahl, L. (PI)

MUSIC 183B: French Art Song Interpretation

By audition only. For advanced singers and pianists as partners. Performance class in a workshop setting. Composers include Fauré, Debussy, Ravel and Poulenc. May be repeated for credit a total of 2 times. Enrollment limit: 20 (ten singers maximum). Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Recommended prerequisite: 170 (pianists) or 182 (singers).
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)

MUSIC 183C: Interpretation of Musical Theater Repertoire (TAPS 183C)

By audition only: Contact instructor prior to enrolling (bnies1@gmail.com). Ability to read music expected, but students with experience singing in musical theater can be accepted. For singers and pianists as partners. Performance class in a workshop setting along with lecture/discussion of important eras of musical theater history. Composers include Kern, Porter, Gershwin, Rodgers, Sondheim, Lloyd Weber, Jason Robert Brown and others. May be repeated for credit a total of 2 times. Enrollment limit: 20 (ten singers maximum). Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Recommended prerequisite: 170 (pianists).
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 4 units total)
Instructors: ; Nies, B. (PI)

MUSIC 183CZ: Interpretation of Musical Theater Repertoire

By audition only: Contact instructor prior to enrolling (bnies1@gmail.com). Ability to read music expected, but students with experience singing in musical theater can be accepted. For singers and pianists as partners. Performance class in a workshop setting along with lecture/discussion of important eras of musical theater history. Composers include Kern, Porter, Gershwin, Rodgers, Sondheim, Lloyd Weber, Jason Robert Brown and others. May be repeated for credit a total of 2 times. Enrollment limit: 20 (ten singers maximum). Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Recommended prerequisite: 170 (pianists).
Terms: Aut | Units: 0
Instructors: ; Nies, B. (PI)

MUSIC 183D: Musical Theater (TAPS 115)

In this workshop we will traverse the landscape of world of Musical Theater. It will serve as an introduction for the beginning actor and singer, and expand the more experienced performer's range in this genre. The world of Musical Theater is filled with stories of love, passion, joy, violence, heartbreak and rage. The class will include an introduction to vocal and movement skills for musical theater, beginning with exercises to build an ensemble and encourage a sense of play and relaxation in supportive environment. Our class must be a place where everyone feels safe. As ensemble members, we will be responsible for each other in this environment. nStudents will choose one solo song, and perform in a group number from this exciting discipline. The instructor will work with the actors on technique, utilization of action, specificity of language, personalization, and emotional truth. A professional coach from the theater community will conduct vocal coaching. Physical warm-ups and choreography will be suited for both the dancer and non-dancer.nThe class will culminate in the last week with live performance for friends and family.nSTUDENTS ARE ENCOURAGED TO BRING THEIR OWN SUGGESTIONS. (Isn't there a role you've always wanted to sing?)nRequired text: Broadway Musicals Show by Show: Sixth Edition - Stanley Green; Paperback
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

MUSIC 183E: Singing for Musicals (TAPS 183E)

This course provides training in vocal technique, stylistic musical phrasing, and acting for students interested in performing musical theater. Students will learn about the physical process of singing, including posture, breath support, and vocal exercises. They will incorporate vocal technique with the study of phrasing in different styles of Broadway repertoire, and apply both to the art of acting the song. Each student will work on solo selections and ensembles, and sing in most classes. Through understanding vocal technique, students will become more confident and joyful performers. The course will culminate in a final public workshop performance
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 8 units total)
Instructors: ; Jennings, K. (PI)

MUSIC 184A: Editing and Performing Early Music

This course is a practical workshop in early music vocal repertoire. The main focus of this course is to use original source material to explore editorial practice. Having prepared the score, students learn to perform the piece from an historically informed performance practice point of view. In addition to broadening the student's knowledge of vocal repertoire, the following skills are developed: text preparation, foreign language translation and diction; rehearsal for performance and/or recording. Prerequisite: vocal or instrumental instruction, as the class is open to singers or collaborative artists. May be repeated for credit a total of 4 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 12 units total)
Instructors: ; Catsalis, M. (PI)

MUSIC 184AZ: Editing and Performing Early Music

This course is a practical workshop in early music vocal repertoire. The main focus of this course is to use original source material to explore editorial practice. Having prepared the score, students learn to perform the piece from an historically informed performance practice point of view. In addition to broadening the student's knowledge of vocal repertoire, the following skills are developed: text preparation, foreign language translation and diction; rehearsal for performance and/or recording. Prerequisite: vocal or instrumental instruction, as the class is open to singers or collaborative artists. All participants must enroll. May be repeated for a total of 4 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Catsalis, M. (PI)

MUSIC 184B: Topics in Opera Stagecraft

This course is a practical workshop in vocal repertoire for the stage. Each quarter's offering emphasizes a specific genre or period, therefore the course can be repeated with permission of the instructor. In addition to broadening the student's knowledge of vocal repertoire, the following skills are developed: text preparation, foreign language translation and diction; rehearsal etiquette for performance and/or recording. Prerequisite: vocal or instrumental instruction, as the class is open to singers or collaborative artists. May be repeated for credit a total of 4 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 4 times (up to 12 units total)
Instructors: ; Catsalis, M. (PI)

MUSIC 184BZ: Topics in Opera Stagecraft

This course is a practical workshop in vocal repertoire for the stage. Each quarter's offering emphasizes a specific genre or period, therefore the course can be repeated with permission of the instructor. In addition to broadening the student's knowledge of vocal repertoire, the following skills are developed: text preparation, foreign language translation and diction; rehearsal etiquette for performance and/or recording. Prerequisite: vocal or instrumental instruction, as the class is open to singers or collaborative artists. May be repeated for credit a total of 4 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Aut | Units: 0 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Catsalis, M. (PI)

MUSIC 184C: Dramatic Vocal Arts: Songs and Scenes Onstage (TAPS 184C)

Studies in stagecraft, acting and performance for singers, culminating in a public performance. Repertoire to be drawn from the art song, opera, American Songbook and musical theater genres. Audition or consent of instructor required. May be repeated for credit a total of 4 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 8 units total)
Instructors: ; Catsalis, M. (PI)

MUSIC 184CZ: Dramatic Vocal Arts: Songs and Scenes Onstage

Studies in stagecraft, acting and performance for singers, culminating in a public performance. Repertoire to be drawn from the art song, opera, American Songbook and musical theater genres. Audition or consent of instructor required. May be repeated for credit a total of 4 times. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure. By enrolling in this course you are giving consent for the video and audio recording and distribution of your image and performance for use by any entity at Stanford University.
Terms: Win | Units: 0 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: ; Jimenez, N. (PI)

MUSIC 184D: Creating a Musical (TAPS 177C)

This practical, hands on class in the making of musicals explores all aspects of creating musical theater, including writing, composing, producing, directing, designing, and casting this most American of theater genres. The class will include direct engagement and discussion with the producers and artists of TheatreWorks Silicon Valley¿s production of The Bridges of Madison County, book by Marsha Norman and music by Jason Robert Brown, including off-campus field trip to rehearsal of the show. The class will explore the creation of several renowned musicals including Stephen Sondheim¿s Merrily We Roll Along, and will include live Skype interviews with Broadway composers Andrew Lippa (The Wild Party), Paul Gordon (Jane Eyre), and David Hein and Irene Sankoff (Come from Away, winner of the 2017 Drama Desk Award for Best Musical). The quarter will culminate in the creation, production, and performance of several mini-musicals created by members of the class. Instructor Robert Kelley is the Founding Artistic Director of TheatreWorks Silicon Valley, where he has directed 170 productions, including many world and regional premieres.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: ; Kelley, R. (PI)

MUSIC 184E: Musical Theater Dance Styles (DANCE 102)

Students will be able to demonstrate period specificity, character of style through learning different musical theater dances from the early 20th C.to the present. ALL students will participate in an end of quarter showing of the choreography developed and composed in class. nClass will be supplemented with the occasional guest, DJ accompaniment and video viewing.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Hayes, A. (PI)

MUSIC 185: Technologies of Musical Expression

Music is made and experienced through technology created for it. These technologies allow for expression but influence the result. This course will utilize special collections, acoustical tools, music-making apps, live musicians, and media both historical and modern to reflect on the ways people make music expressive. The course is designed around creative projects and hands on experiences with digital and analogue media, player pianos, archival manuscripts, and sound sculptures to stimulate discussion about the role of technology in our musical experiences. Projects can include performances using digital and analogue media, performance art, creating player piano rolls, or performance ethnographies, etc. WAYS credit for 3 units and grade only.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

MUSIC 186: Religion and Music in South Asia (MUSIC 286, RELIGST 259)

How music and other arts in South Asia are intertwined with religion. Classical, devotional, folk, and popular examples introduce Gods as musicians, sound as God, music as yoga, singing as devotion, music as ¿ecstasy¿-inducing, music as site for doctrinal argument, music and religion as vehicles for nationalism. Co-taught by professors of Music and Religious Studies, focusing Hinduism and Islam in India, Pakistan, and the diaspora. Music practice along with academic study; guest artists and films; no background required.
Last offered: Spring 2013 | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom

MUSIC 186B: American Song in the 20th Century and after (AMSTUD 186B, MUSIC 286B)

Critical and creative exploration of song in the Americas. About twenty-five key examples will guide discussion of the interactions between words, music, performance and culture. Weekly listening, reading and assignments will be organized around central themes: love, sex and romance; war and politics; labor and money; place; identity; society and everyday life. Genres include art song; blues, gospel, jazz and country; pop, soul, rock and hip-hop; bossa nova, nueva canción and salsa; electronic and experimental. Takehome and in-class assignments will include critical and creative writing, and music composition, production and performance; final projects may emphasize any of the above.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

MUSIC 187: Music and Culture from the Land of Fire: Introduction to Azerbaijani Mugham

Nestled in the Caucasus, Azerbaijan is a crossroads between East and West; its rich musical heritage contains threads of Turkish, Central Asian, Persian, Caucasian, Russian, and Arabic traditions. In this course, master-musician Imamyar Hasanov teaches students to perform and appreciate Azeri music. Content includes classical mugham, Eastern theory, improvisation and microtonality. We¿ll discuss Azeri music culture, supplemented by guest lecturers and Skype¿ interviews with musicians in Azerbaijan. Open to students with any experience playing a musical instrument (including voice). No previous experience with Azeri music necessary. Supported by the SF World Music Festival.Questions? Email schultza@stanford.edu.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED

MUSIC 192A: Foundations of Sound-Recording Technology

For upper division undergraduates and graduate students; preference given to Music majors with MST specialization. Topics: elementary electronics; the physics of sound transduction and microphone operation, selection, and placement; mixing consoles; connectors and device interconnection; grounding and shielding; principles of analog magnetic recording; operation maintenance of recording equipment; and principles of recording engineering. Enrollment limited. Prerequisites: MUSIC 150, algebra, physics basics, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: ; Kadis, J. (PI)

MUSIC 192B: Advanced Sound Recording Technology

Topics: noise reduction techniques; dynamics and time-delay audio effects; the principles of digital audio; disk- and tape-based digital recorders; digital audio workstations and editing; advanced multitrack techniques; SMPTE and MIDI time code and device synchronization; MIDI sequencing and synchronization. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/courses/. Prerequisite: 192A.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE
Instructors: ; Kadis, J. (PI)

MUSIC 192C: Session Recording

Independent engineering of recording sessions. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Prerequisites: 192A,B.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 30 units total)
Instructors: ; Kadis, J. (PI)

MUSIC 197: Undergraduate Teaching Apprenticeship

Work in an apprentice-like relationship with faculty teaching a student-initiated course. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2
Instructors: ; Applebaum, M. (PI)

MUSIC 200A: Proseminar in Musicology and Music Bibliography

Introduction to research in music, bibliographical materials, major issues in the field, philosophy, and methods in music history. Guest lecturers and individual research topics.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

MUSIC 200B: Proseminar in Ethnomusicology

A graduate-level introduction to the field of ethnomusicology. Issues and debates are traced through the history of the discipline, with emphasis on influences from anthropology, performance studies, linguistics, and cultural studies. Topics include music and: social organization, "culture," structure, practice, comparison, representation, globalization, identity, transcription, and embodiment.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | Units: 3-5

MUSIC 201: CCRMA Colloquium

Weekly review of work being done in the field, research taking place at CCRMA, and tools to make the most of the CCRMA technical facilities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable 18 times (up to 18 units total)
Instructors: ; Worthey, N. (PI)

MUSIC 202: Picturing Performance, Re-Envisioning the Arts (MUSIC 102)

Critical and creative exploration of the performing body as captured on film. Viewing/listening includes musicals, dance and opera on film, music video, experimental film and video, and moments of heightened musicality in feature film. Focus on examples of moving media that possess a kinship with music through gesture, rhythm or affect and through visual parameters like décor, lighting, texture, camera movement and editing. Requirements include choosing and documenting a live performance, producing a short audiovisual work involving post-production, and weekly reading and viewing/listening assignments. No previous videomaking experience required. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 8 units total)
Instructors: ; Vernallis, C. (PI)

MUSIC 208C: Architecture, Acoustics and Ritual in Byzantium (ARTHIST 208C, ARTHIST 408C, CLASSICS 175, MUSIC 408C, REES 208C, REES 408C, RELIGST 208C, RELIGST 308C)

Onassis Seminar "Icons of Sound: Architecture, Acoustics and Ritual in Byzantium". This year-long seminar explores the creation and operations of sacred space in Byzantium by focusing on the intersection of architecture, acoustics, music, and ritual. Through the support of the Onassis Foundation (USA), nine leading scholars in the field share their research and conduct the discussion of their pre-circulated papers. The goal is to develop a new interpretive framework for the study of religious experience and assemble the research tools needed for work in this interdisciplinary field.
Last offered: Spring 2014 | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable 3 times (up to 9 units total)

MUSIC 220A: Fundamentals of Computer-Generated Sound

What are the basic tools that computer music researchers and artists use to create sound? This course will include a summary of digital synthesis techniques (additive, subtractive, wavetable, frequency modulation and physical-modeling), signal processing techniques for digital effects, (reverberation, panning, filters), and basic psychoacoustics. Programming experience is recommended, but not required. Course will use the ChucK computer music language. Majors (undergraduate or graduate) must take for 4 units. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4

MUSIC 220B: Compositional Algorithms, Psychoacoustics, and Computational Music

The use of high-level programming language as a compositional aid in creating musical structures. Advanced study of sound synthesis techniques. Simulation of a reverberant space and control of the position of sound within the space. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/. Prerequisite: 220A.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: ; Wang, G. (PI)

MUSIC 220C: Research Seminar in Computer-Generated Music

Individual projects in composition, psychoacoustics, or signal processing. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 220B.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Chafe, C. (PI)

MUSIC 220D: Research in Computer-Generated Music

Independent research projects in composition, psychoacoustics, or signal processing. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 220C.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

MUSIC 221: Topics in the History of Theory

The intersection of music theory and compositional practice in different eras of Western music history. Primary sources in music theory and issues such as notation, rhythm, mode, dissonance treatment, counterpoint, tonality, form, rhetoric, affect and imitation, expression, linear analysis, 12-tone and set theory, in light of relevant repertoire and modern scholarship. May be repeated for credit a total of 5 times.
Last offered: Winter 2012 | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable 6 times (up to 30 units total)

MUSIC 222: Sound in Space

Historical background, techniques and theory on the use of space in music composition and diffusion. Listening and analysis of relevant pieces. Experimental work in spatialization techniques leading to short studies to be diffused in concert at the end of the quarter.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Units: 1-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

MUSIC 223: Composition for Electronic Musicians

Composition for any combination of acoustic and electroacoustic instrumentation, computer-generated sound, invented instruments, sound-sculptures, and multi-disciplinary elements including theater and visual media. Project-based laboratory to advance original student works, supported by lectures on the fundamentals of composition. Concert performance of final works. Taught at CCRMA with a focus on engendering deliberate conversation on the enrichment of a cultural context for new media. Open to undergraduates and graduates.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | Units: 1-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 3 times (up to 12 units total)

MUSIC 223T: Computer Music Improvisation and Algorithmic Performance

This seminar will investigate how to approach configuring a set of composition tools for real time composition. Composition programming, ensemble rehearsal, and performance. Determining algorithmic composition beginning by imagining a process or a structure, applying a mapping process to transform that structure (which resides in the conceptual domain), into sound (which may reveal the original conception). Investigation of gestural mapping that occurs when a sonic result is achieved by an act of interpretation, whether it be reading a score and/or improvising.
Last offered: Autumn 2012 | Units: 2-4

MUSIC 230: Advanced Orchestral Conducting

May be repeated for credit a total of 8 times. Prerequisite: 130B.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable 9 times (up to 36 units total)
Instructors: ; Phillips, P. (PI)

MUSIC 231: Advanced Choral Conducting

Individual instruction continuing trajectory of Music 130C. Focus on gestural technique and analysis of works by genre and historical period. May be repeated for credit a total of 8 times. Prerequisite: 130C.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable 9 times (up to 36 units total)
Instructors: ; Sano, S. (PI)

MUSIC 236: Future Media, Media Archaeologies (ARTSTUDI 236)

Hand-on. Media technologies from origins to the recent past. Students create artworks based on Victorian era discoveries and inventions, early developments in electronic media, and orphaned technologies. Research, rediscover, invent, and create devices of wonder and impossible objects. Readings in history and theory. How and what media technologies mediate.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | Units: 3-4

MUSIC 241J: Studies in Music of the Renaissance (MUSIC 141J)

Prerequisites: MUSIC 21, MUSIC 40. (WIM at 4-unit level only.)
| Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit

MUSIC 242J: Studies in Music of the Baroque: Monteverdi's Theater Music (MUSIC 142J)

Prerequisites: MUSIC 22, MUSIC 41. (WIM at 4-unit level only.)
Last offered: Winter 2016 | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit

MUSIC 242K: Studies in Music of the Baroque: Handel the Cosmopolitan (MUSIC 142K)

Music history seminar on the operatic, sacred, and instrumental works of G.F. Handel as examples of the diversity, cosmopolitanism, expression, formal and technical features, and social uses of music in the first half of eighteenth century. Traces Handel¿s career from his native Germany to an elite Roman circle of musical connoisseurs, and to the Italian opera company he founded in London and his transformation of Italian opera into a new genre of English oratorio. By analyzing Handel¿s works in context, we examine the aesthetic, harmonic, and dramatic principles of the major European Baroque art-music genres. Prerequisites: MUSIC 22, MUSIC 41. (WIM at 4-unit level only.)
Last offered: Winter 2017 | Units: 4-5

MUSIC 243J: Studies in Music of the Classical Period: Franz Joseph Haydn

Music and Musicians in the Age of EnlightenmentnPrerequisites: MUSIC 22, MUSIC 41. (WIM at 4-unit level only.)
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit

MUSIC 243K: Studies in Music of the Classical Period: Mozart's Operas (MUSIC 143K)

Aesthetic, musical, and dramatic principles of 18th-century comic opera explored through W.A. Mozart's Abduction from the Seraglio, Marriage of Figaro, Don Giovanni, Così fan tutte, and Magic Flute. Comic strategies of exaggeration, farce, stock characters, ethnic caricature, and topsy-turvy social inversion; national traditions of Italian opera buffa and German Singspiel; musical forms and elements including recitative, aria, and ensemble. How Mozart's operas reflect 18th-century ideas about music, social organization, political authority, gender, sexuality, and rhetoric. Prerequisites: MUSIC 22, MUSIC 41. (WIM at 4-unit level only.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4
Instructors: ; Hadlock, H. (PI)

MUSIC 244L: Studies in Music of the Romantic Period: Wagner: The Ring of the Nibelung (MUSIC 144L)

Richard Wagner's cycle of four operas, "Der Ring des Nibelungen" (1848-74), is one of the key documents of the mid nineteenth-century revolutionary fervor in Europe and a monument of radical artistic modernism of the period. The course will examine the artistic features of this unique work and place it in the complex ideological context of its time. Prerequisites: MUSIC 23, MUSIC 42 (WIM at 4-unit level only.)
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4
Instructors: ; Berger, K. (PI)

MUSIC 245J: Studies in Western Art Music Since 1900: The Music & Ideas of Charles Ives (MUSIC 145J)

Prerequisites: MUSIC 23, MUSIC 42. (WIM at 4-unit level only.)
Last offered: Spring 2015 | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit

MUSIC 245K: Studies in Western Art Music Since 1900: Concepts of New Music (MUSIC 145K)

A survey of the history of Western classical music in the twentieth century, concentrating on shifts in the concept of New Music in the first half of the century. The aim is twofold: to study in depth a representative selection of works and to develop a historiographical framework for that study. Relevant concepts to be examined include Expressionism, Neo-Classicism, New Objectivity, Serialism, Aleatoricism, and Minimalism -- all of them key terms used by music historians and critics to describe and delineate the multifaceted phenomenon of "New Music." Composers to be studied include Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Berg, Weill, Shostakovich, Reich and Glass, and others. Prerequisites: MUSIC 23, MUSIC 42. (WIM course for Music majors.)
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: ; Hinton, S. (PI)

MUSIC 246J: Studies in Ethnomusicology: Listening to the Local: Music Ethnography of the Bay Area (ANTHRO 146J, CSRE 146J, MUSIC 146J)

An introduction to music ethnography through student research on musical life in the Bay Area. Focus is on the intersections of music, social life, and cultural practice by engaging with people as they perform music and culture in situ. Techniques taught include participant-observation, interviewing and oral history, writing field-notes, recording, transcription, analysis, and ethnographic writing. Pre-/co-requisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 units only.)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: ; Schultz, A. (PI)

MUSIC 246K: Studies in Ethnomusicology: Music of South Asia (MUSIC 146K)

Focuses on the history, theory, and practice of South Asian music with particular emphasis on the classical traditions of North and South India. Also addresses regional folk, popular, and devotional musical styles of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Topics include: raga, tala, vocal and instrumental genres, improvisation, aesthetics, music transmission, musical nationalism, social organization of musicians, music and ritual, music and gender, and technology. Lecture with discussion, some singing (no experience necessary), guest performances, reading, listening, and analysis. Pre-/corequisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 or 5 units only.)
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Units: 3-5

MUSIC 246L: Studies in Ethnomusicology: Musics of Africa and the African Diaspora (AFRICAAM 146L, AFRICAST 246L, MUSIC 146L)

An introduction to musics of Africa and the African Diaspora. Topics include: music and nationalism, religion, embodiment, diaspora, migration, resistance, gender, globalization, and race. Musical regions and nations may include: Zimbabwe, South Africa, West Africa, Central Africa, Somalia, Ethiopia, the Caribbean, and the United States. This is a seminar-based course in which students will write short reflective papers and a final, research-based paper.Pre- or co-requisite for WIM credit: Music 22. WIM at 4 or 5 letter-graded units only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: ; Schultz, A. (PI)

MUSIC 247J: Studies in Music, Media, and Popular Culture: The Soul Tradition in African American Music (AFRICAAM 19, AMSTUD 147J, CSRE 147J, MUSIC 147J)

The African American tradition of soul music from its origins in blues, gospel, and jazz to its influence on today's r&b, hip hop, and dance music. Style such as rhythm and blues, Motown, Southern soul, funk, Philadelphia soul, disco, Chicago house, Detroit techno, trip hop, and neo-soul. Soul's cultural influence and global reach; its interaction with politics, gender, place, technology, and the economy. Pre-/corequisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 units only.)
Last offered: Winter 2015 | Units: 3-4

MUSIC 247K: Studies in Music, Media, and Popular Culture: Music and Urban Film (MUSIC 147K)

How music and sound work in urban cinema. What happens when music's capacity to transform everyday reality combines with the realism of urban films? Provides an introduction to traditional theories of film music and film sound; considers how new technologies and practices have changed the roles of music in film. Readings discuss film music, realistic cinema, urban musical practices and urban culture. Viewing includes action/adventure, Hindi film, documentary, film noir, hip hop film, the musical, and borderline cases by Jean-Luc Godard, Spike Lee, Wong Kar-Wai and Tsai Ming-Liang. Pre- or corequisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 unit level only.)
Last offered: Winter 2016 | Units: 3-4

MUSIC 247L: Studies in Music, Media, and Popular Culture: Latin American Music and Globalization (CHILATST 147L, CSRE 147L, MUSIC 147L)

Focuses on vernacular music of Latin America and the Caribbean, including Mexico, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Peru, Brazil, Colombia, and Argentina. Musical examples discussed in relation to: globalization, migration, colonialism, nationalism, diaspora, indigeneity, politics, religion, dance, ethnicity, and gender. How music reflects and shapes cultures, identities, and social structures. Genres addressed: bachata, bossa nova, cumbia, forro, ranchero, reggaeton, rock, salsa, tango, and others. Seminar, guest performances, reading, listening, and analysis. Pre-/corequisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 units only.)
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 8 units total)

MUSIC 248J: Studies in Perf Practice: Reactions to the Record: Early Recordings, Lost Styles, and Music's Future (MUSIC 148J)

This is a seminar on the transformation of musical style in the era of recordings in light of their roots in cultural trends, including shifting hierarchies between composer and performer, work and notation, text and act. Early recordings will be studied as documents of musical values and conceptions different from those around us today. Methodologies of performance analysis will be explored and used to contextualize sources, which include historic recordings from Stanford's Archive of Recorded Sound, performance documents, and field research with performers, composers, critics, and listeners. Repertoire includes works for orchestra, piano, strings, chamber ensemble and voice. Outstanding contributions from seminar members may be featured in the Music Department¿s May 2014 Reactions to the Record symposium. May be repeated for credit. Pre- or corequisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4-unit level only.)
Last offered: Spring 2016 | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit

MUSIC 250A: Physical Interaction Design for Music

This lab and project-based course explores how we can physically interact with real-time electronic sound. Students learn to use and design sensors, circuits, embedded computers, communication protocols and sound synthesis. Advanced topics include real-time media, haptics, sound synthesis using physical model analogs, and human-computer interaction theory and practice. Course culminates in musical performance with or exhibition of completed design projects. A $50 lab fee will be added to your bill upon enrollment in this course. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: ; Wang, G. (PI)

MUSIC 250B: Interactive Sound Art

A project based course where students will create Interactive Sound Art Installations focusing on the acoustical properties of reverberation. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/courses/250b/.
Last offered: Winter 2013 | Units: 1-4

MUSIC 251: Psychophysics and Music Cognition

Lecture, lab and experiment-based course in perception, psychoacoustics, cognition, and neuroscience of music. (WIM at 4 or 5 units only.)
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5
Instructors: ; Berger, J. (PI)

MUSIC 252: Introduction to Music Notation Software

Learn to use music notation programs Finale®, Sibelius® and open-source alternatives.
Last offered: Autumn 2012 | Units: 1-2

MUSIC 253: Symbolic Musical Information (CS 275A)

Focus on symbolic data for music applications including advanced notation systems, optical music recognition, musical data conversion, and internal structure of MIDI files.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4

MUSIC 254: Music Query, Analysis, and Style Simulation (CS 275B)

Leveraging off three synchronized sets of symbolic data resources for notation and analysis, the lab portion introduces students to the open-source Humdrum Toolkit for music representation and analysis. Issues of data content and quality as well as methods of information retrieval, visualization, and summarization are considered in class. Grading based primarily on student projects. Prerequisite: 253 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4

MUSIC 255: Intermedia Workshop (ARTSTUDI 239, MUSIC 155)

Students develop and produce intermedia works. Musical and visual approaches to the conceptualisation and shaping of time-based art. Exploration of sound and image relationship. Study of a wide spectrum of audiovisual practices including experimental animation, video art, dance, performance, non-narrative forms, interactive art and installation art. Focus on works that use music/sound and image as equal partners. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: consent of instructors, and one of FILMPROD 114, ARTSTUDI 131, 138, 167, 177, 179, or MUSIC 123, or equivalent. May be repeated for credit
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 8 units total)

MUSIC 256A: Music, Computing, Design I: Art of Design for Computer Music (CS 476A)

Creative design for computer music software. Programming, audiovisual design, as well as software design for musical tools, instruments, toys, and games. Provides paradigms and strategies for designing and building music software, with emphases on interactive systems, aesthetics, and artful product design. Course work includes several programming assignments and a "design+implement" final project. Prerequisite: experience in C/C++ and/or Java.See https://ccrma.stanford.edu/courses/256a/
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4
Instructors: ; Wang, G. (PI)

MUSIC 256B: Music, Computing, Design II: Virtual and Augmented Reality for Music (CS 476B)

Aesthetics, design, and exploration of creative musical applications of virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR), centered around VR and mobile technologies. Comparison between AR, VR, and traditional software design paradigms for music. Topics include embodiment, interaction design, novel instruments, social experience, software design + prototyping. Prerequisite: MUSIC 256A / CS 476A.
Last offered: Winter 2016 | Units: 3-4

MUSIC 257: Neuroplasticity and Musical Gaming

What changes in a musician's brain after hours and years of daily practice? How do skills that make a great violinist transfer to other abilities? Can directed neuroplasticity be used to target skill learning? This course will include fundamentals of psychoacoustics and auditory neuroscience. Focus will be development of video games that use perceptually motivated tasks to drive neural change. Emphasis will be on music, linguistic, and acoustic based skills. Programming experience is highly recommended, but not required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: ; Crum, P. (PI)

MUSIC 258: Orchestration and Timbral Analysis

Hands-on approach to orchestration and applied computational timbral analysis. For Music majors with a concentration or interest in composition or MST. Assignments in orchestration and timbre analysis, and computer-based timbre analysis. Final project involving either computer-based analysis or an advanced orchestration assignment. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/courses/255/.
| Units: 1-4

MUSIC 264: Musical Engagement: Use correlation analysis and big data to identify and predict musical behaviors

The course will use data analysis to explore why people engage in music. The course will be one part lab, one part seminar, meeting once a week for two hours. Students will learn to apply correlation analysis to a vast corpus of actual performance data using the latest analytics and query tools, developing insights into what motivates the musical preferences and behaviors of both performers and listeners. A basic proficiency in Java, MatLab, and SQL query language will be developed along the way.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 12 units total)

MUSIC 269: Research in Performance Practices

Directed reading and research. May be repeated for credit a total of 5 times.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 6 times (up to 30 units total)

MUSIC 272A: Advanced Piano

Private lessons and group masterclass weekly. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)

MUSIC 272B: Advanced Organ

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Morgan, R. (PI)

MUSIC 272C: Advanced Harpsichord

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Bar-David, E. (PI)

MUSIC 272D: Advanced Jazz Piano

By invitation only; priority to majors and jazz-ensemble participants. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Low, M. (PI)

MUSIC 272E: Advanced Fortepiano

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Barth, G. (PI)

MUSIC 272F: Advanced Carillon

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Zerlang, T. (PI)

MUSIC 272G: Advanced Gu-Zheng

Private lesson weekly. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; You, H. (PI)

MUSIC 273: Advanced Voice

Private lessons and group master class weekly. May be repeated for credit. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit

MUSIC 274A: Advanced Violin

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)

MUSIC 274B: Advanced Viola

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)

MUSIC 274C: Advanced Violoncello

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)

MUSIC 274D: Advanced Contrabass

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Moyer, B. (PI)

MUSIC 274E: Advanced Viola da Gamba

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.htmlfor class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Dornenburg, J. (PI)

MUSIC 274F: Advanced Classical Guitar

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Ferguson, C. (PI)

MUSIC 274G: Advanced Harp

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Chauvel, M. (PI)

MUSIC 274H: Advanced Baroque Violin

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Martin, A. (PI)

MUSIC 274I: Advanced Jazz Bass

Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Thurston-Milgrom, J. (PI)

MUSIC 274J: Advanced Jazz Guitar

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Vandivier, R. (PI)

MUSIC 275A: Advanced Flute

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)

MUSIC 275B: Advanced Oboe

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; May, C. (PI)

MUSIC 275C: Advanced Clarinet

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Brandenburg, M. (PI)

MUSIC 275D: Advanced Bassoon

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Olivier, R. (PI)

MUSIC 275E: Advanced Recorder/Early Winds

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Myers, H. (PI)

MUSIC 275F: Advanced Saxophone

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Henderson, D. (PI)

MUSIC 275G: Advanced Baroque Flute

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Ellison, G. (PI)

MUSIC 275H: Advanced Jazz Saxophone

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; McCarthy, C. (PI)

MUSIC 276A: Advanced French Horn

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Ragent, L. (PI)

MUSIC 276B: Advanced Trumpet

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Luftman, A. (PI)

MUSIC 276C: Advanced Trombone

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Kenley, M. (PI)

MUSIC 276D: Advanced Tuba

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Clements, T. (PI)

MUSIC 276E: Advanced Jazz Trumpet

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Worley, J. (PI)

MUSIC 277: Advanced Percussion

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: (http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Mach, L. (PI)

MUSIC 277A: Advanced Drum Set

May be repeated for credit a total of 15 times. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: ( http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 14 times (up to 42 units total)
Instructors: ; Rokeach, D. (PI)

MUSIC 280: TA Training Course

Required for doctoral students serving as teaching assistants. Orientation to resources at Stanford, guest presentations on the principles of common teaching activities, supervised teaching experience. Students who entered in the Autumn should take 280 in the Spring prior to the Autumn they begin teaching.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Haag, K. (PI); Roman, I. (PI)

MUSIC 286: Religion and Music in South Asia (MUSIC 186, RELIGST 259)

How music and other arts in South Asia are intertwined with religion. Classical, devotional, folk, and popular examples introduce Gods as musicians, sound as God, music as yoga, singing as devotion, music as ¿ecstasy¿-inducing, music as site for doctrinal argument, music and religion as vehicles for nationalism. Co-taught by professors of Music and Religious Studies, focusing Hinduism and Islam in India, Pakistan, and the diaspora. Music practice along with academic study; guest artists and films; no background required.
Last offered: Spring 2013 | Units: 4-5

MUSIC 286B: American Song in the 20th Century and after (AMSTUD 186B, MUSIC 186B)

Critical and creative exploration of song in the Americas. About twenty-five key examples will guide discussion of the interactions between words, music, performance and culture. Weekly listening, reading and assignments will be organized around central themes: love, sex and romance; war and politics; labor and money; place; identity; society and everyday life. Genres include art song; blues, gospel, jazz and country; pop, soul, rock and hip-hop; bossa nova, nueva canción and salsa; electronic and experimental. Takehome and in-class assignments will include critical and creative writing, and music composition, production and performance; final projects may emphasize any of the above.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | Units: 3-4

MUSIC 300A: Medieval Notation

Western notation of the Middle Ages and Renaissance: principles, purposes, and transcription.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: ; Mahrt, W. (PI)

MUSIC 300B: Renaissance Notation

Western notation of the Middle Ages and Renaissance: principles, purposes, and transcription.
Last offered: Autumn 2016 | Units: 3-4

MUSIC 300C: Medieval Methodologies (DLCL 300, ENGLISH 300)

An introduction to the essential tool-kit for medievalists, this course will give all medievalists a great head start in knowing how to access and interpret major works and topics in the field. Stanford's medieval faculty will explain the key sources and methods in the major disciplines from History to Religion, French to Arabic, English to Chinese, and Art History to German and Music. In so doing, students will be introduced to the breadth and interdisciplinary potential of Medieval Studies. A workshop devoted to Digital Technologies and Codicology/Palaeography will offer elementary training in these fundamental skills.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3
Instructors: ; Griffiths, F. (PI)

MUSIC 302: Research in Musicology

Directed reading and research. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 14 times (up to 70 units total)

MUSIC 305A: Analysis and Repertoire: Medieval and Renaissance

Analytical approaches to genres, styles, forms, and techniques of Western music from [chant and early polyphony through the sixteenth century]. Issues of aesthetics, history, and interpretation viewed through representative repertoire, readings, and analytical methods.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: ; Mahrt, W. (PI)

MUSIC 305B: Analysis and Repertoire: Baroque to Early Romantic

Analytical approaches to genres, styles, forms, and techniques of Western music from the seventeenth through the mid-nineteenth centuries. Issues of aesthetics, history, and interpretation viewed through representative repertoire, readings, and analytical methods.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: ; Grey, T. (PI)

MUSIC 305C: Analysis and Repertoire: Late-Romantic to Contemporary

Analytical approaches to genres, styles, materials and techniques of Western music from the mid-nineteenth century through the present. Questions of aesthetics, history and performance explored through musical analysis. Representative repertoire and readings, and a range of analytical methods.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: ; Kronengold, C. (PI)

MUSIC 305D: Analysis from a Compositional Perspective

Introduction to analysis, examining diverse examples in part chosen from, otherwise supplementing and illuminating, the graduate composers' qualifying exam list; consideration of aesthetic premises and motivations, and of implications for contemporary compositional practice.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: ; Ulman, E. (PI)

MUSIC 310: Research Seminar in Musicology

For graduate students. Topics vary each quarter. May be repeated for credit a total of 8 times.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable 9 times (up to 45 units total)

MUSIC 312A: Aesthetics and Criticism of Music, Ancients and Moderns: Plato to Nietzsche

For graduate students. Primary texts focusing on the nature, purposes, and uses of music and other arts.
Last offered: Autumn 2016 | Units: 3-4

MUSIC 312B: Aesthetics and Criticism of Music, Contemporaries: Heidegger to Today

For graduate students. Primary texts focusing on the nature, purposes, and uses of music and other arts.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | Units: 3-4

MUSIC 318: Advanced Acoustics

Current topics. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

MUSIC 319: Research Seminar on Computational Models of Sound Perception

All aspects of auditory perception, often with emphasis on computational models. Topics: music perception, signal processing, auditory models, pitch perception, speech, binaural hearing, auditory scene analysis, basic psychoacoustics, and neurophysiology. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/courses/. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)
Instructors: ; Slaney, M. (PI)

MUSIC 320A: Introduction to Audio Signal Processing Part I: Spectrum Analysis

Digital signal representations and transforms for music and audio research. Topics: complex numbers, sinusoids, spectrum representation, sampling and aliasing, the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT), Fourier theorems, z transform, Laplace transform, and associated Matlab software. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/courses/320/.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4
Instructors: ; Smith, J. (PI)

MUSIC 320B: Introduction to Audio Signal Processing Part II: Digital Filters

Digital filters for music and audio research. Topics: digital filter structures, frequency response, z transforms, transfer-function analysis, and associated Matlab software. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/courses/320/.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4
Instructors: ; Smith, J. (PI)

MUSIC 321: Readings in Music Theory

Directed reading and research. May be repeated for credit a total of 15 times.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 75 units total)

MUSIC 323: Doctoral Seminar in Composition

Illustrated discussions of compositional issues and techniques. Presentation of relevant topics, including students' own compositional practice. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 60 units total)

MUSIC 324: Graduate Composition Forum

Community forum for all graduate student composers. Discussion of completed and in-progress work by students, faculty, and visiting composers. Repertoire listening sessions. Planning of upcoming Department events. Special area exam topic presentations, final doctoral project presentations, and review of portfolios. Many sessions are open to the public.May be repeated for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 18 times (up to 18 units total)
Instructors: ; Kapuscinski, J. (PI)

MUSIC 325: Individual Graduate Projects in Composition

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

MUSIC 330: Musicology Dissertation Colloquium

Weekly meetings for all musicology students 4th year and beyond to discuss research and writing strategies, share and critique work in progress, and discuss issues in professional development (preparing abstracts, conference papers, C.V. and job interviews, book reviews, submitting articles for publication). Open to 3rd-year students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Hadlock, H. (PI)

MUSIC 333: Food, Text, Music: A Multidisciplinary Lab on the Art of Feasting (FRENCH 166, FRENCH 366, MUSIC 133)

Students cook a collection of unfamiliar recipes each week while learning about the cultural milieus in which they originated. The course focuses on the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, a time of great banquets that brought together chefs, visual artists, poets, musicians, and dancers. Students read late-medieval cookbooks under the guidance of professional chefs, learn songs and poetry with the help of visiting performers, and delve into a burgeoning scholarly literature on food history and sensory experience. We will also study trade routes and food networks, the environmental impact of large-scale banquets, the science of food, and the politics of plenty. This course may count towards the Medieval component of the French major, and corresponds to DLCL 121, a course requirement for the Medieval Studies Minor. Students interested in applying for course need to email Professors Galvez and Rodin (mailto:mgalvez@stanford.edu and mailto:jrodin@stanford.edu) with a statement of intent and dietary restrictions/preferences.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | Units: 3-5

MUSIC 341: Ph.D Dissertation

May be repeated for credit a total of 5 times.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable 6 times (up to 60 units total)

MUSIC 351A: Seminar in Music Perception and Cognition I

A seminar on topics in music perception and cognition. Students will study and discuss recent research as well as design and implement experiments.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 10 times (up to 30 units total)

MUSIC 351B: Seminar in Music Perception and Cognition II: Musical Gesture

Exploring how musical activities are related to gestural communication by surveying recent human behavioural literature and forming own interest-driven research questions. Reviewed research topics include different techniques in music gesture recording and analysis, auditory perception related to gesture, and issues related to educational and therapeutic applications. The class activities involve discussions on articles and on experimental designs for possible research proposals.
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | Units: 1-3

MUSIC 364: Data-Driven Research in Music Cognition

Project-based course exploring the impact of music on human behavior using evidence of user engagement with music in large-scale datasets including publicly available industrial and social-media data and corpuses published for research purposes. Data-driven research complements laboratory-based behavioral and imaging research by focusing on framing and addressing music-related questions using pre-existing datasets. Class meetings include lectures, guest speakers, and student discussions of background literature and projects. Assignments include weekly readings, labs, and a final project. Basic musical proficiency is required. Experience with programming, data visualization, statistics, or music cognition is desirable.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | Units: 2-4

MUSIC 390: Practicum Internship

On-the-job training under the guidance of experienced, on-site supervisors. Meets the requirements for curricular practical training for students on F-1 visas. Students submit a concise report detailing work activities, problems worked on, and key results. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: qualified offer of employment and consent of adviser.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

MUSIC 399: D.M.A. Final Project

May be repeated for credit a total of 5 times.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable 6 times (up to 60 units total)

MUSIC 408C: Architecture, Acoustics and Ritual in Byzantium (ARTHIST 208C, ARTHIST 408C, CLASSICS 175, MUSIC 208C, REES 208C, REES 408C, RELIGST 208C, RELIGST 308C)

Onassis Seminar "Icons of Sound: Architecture, Acoustics and Ritual in Byzantium". This year-long seminar explores the creation and operations of sacred space in Byzantium by focusing on the intersection of architecture, acoustics, music, and ritual. Through the support of the Onassis Foundation (USA), nine leading scholars in the field share their research and conduct the discussion of their pre-circulated papers. The goal is to develop a new interpretive framework for the study of religious experience and assemble the research tools needed for work in this interdisciplinary field.
Last offered: Spring 2014 | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 9 units total)

MUSIC 420A: Signal Processing Models in Musical Acoustics

Computational methods in musical sound synthesis and digital audio effects based on acoustic physical models. Topics: mass-spring-dashpot systems; electric circuit analogies; finite difference schemes; state-space models and the modal representation; impedance; ports; acoustic simulation using delay lines, digital filters, and nonlinear elements; interpolation and sampling-rate conversion; delay effects; wave digital filters; real-time computational models for musical instruments and effects, both acoustic and electronic. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/courses/420/. Prerequisites: MUSIC 320A and MUSIC 320B or equivalent; PHYSICS 21 or equivalent course applying Newton's laws of motion; and CS 106B or equivalent programming in C and C++.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Units: 3-4

MUSIC 421A: Audio Applications of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT)

Spectrum analysis and signal processing using Fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs) with emphasis on audio applications. Topics: Fourier theorems; FFT windows; spectrum analysis; spectrograms; sinusoidal modeling; spectral modeling synthesis; FFT convolution; FIR filter design and system identification; overlap-add and filter-bank-summation methods for short-time Fourier analysis, modification, and resynthesis. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/courses/421/. Prerequisites: Music 320A and Music 320B or equivalent background in spectrum analysis and linear systems.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: ; Smith, J. (PI)

MUSIC 421N: Deep Learning for Music and Audio

Seminar reviewing the development of deep-learning methods in music and audio fields. See the course website for latest information: http://ccrma.stanford.edu/courses/mus421n/
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Smith, J. (PI)

MUSIC 422: Perceptual Audio Coding

History and basic principles: development of psychoacoustics-based data-compression techniques; perceptual-audio-coder applications (radio, television, film, multimedia/internet audio, DVD, EMD). In-class demonstrations: state-of-the-art audio coder implementations (such as AC-3, MPEG) at varying data rates; programming simple coders. Topics: audio signals representation; quantization; time to frequency mapping; introduction to psychoacoustics; bit allocation and basic building blocks of an audio codec; perceptual audio codecs evaluation; overview of MPEG-1, 2, 4 audio coding and other coding standards (such asAC-3). Prerequisites: knowledge of digital audio principles, familiarity with C programming. Recommended: 320, EE 261. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: ; Bosi, M. (PI)

MUSIC 423: Graduate Research in Music Technology

Research discussion, development, and presentation by graduate students, visiting scholars, and CCRMA faculty in the areas of music and/or audio technology. Permission of instructor required. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/courses/423/ for latest information. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit (up to 990 units total)

MUSIC 424: Signal Processing Techniques for Digital Audio Effects

Techniques for dynamic range compression, reverberation, equalization and filtering, panning and spatialization, digital emulation of analog processors, and implementation of time-varying effects. Single-band and multiband compressors, limiters, noise gates, de-essers, convolutional reverberators, parametric and linear-phase equalizers, wah-wah and envelope-following filters, and the Leslie. Students develop effects algorithms of their own design in labs. Prerequisites: digital signal processing, sampling theorem, digital filtering, and the Fourier transform at the level of 320 or EE 261; Matlab and modest C programming experience. Recommended: 420 or EE 264; audio effects in mixing and mastering at the level of 192.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4

MUSIC 434: Gender and Performance (FEMGEN 434, FILMSTUD 434, TAPS 344A)

This seminar seeks to investigate relationships between performance, gender, and the body politic through a discussion of embodiment, body cultures, queerness, desire, representation. Through a weekly engagement with film texts from across the world as well as theoretical perspectives on gender and performance in various geo-political contexts, we will explore the intersections of gender with race, class, national discourse, and performance traditions. The seminar is conceived to be interdisciplinary and participants are encouraged to introduce and work with texts from other disciplines, including visual arts, theatre, dance, literature etc. No prior engagement with film studies is required. Screening times may range from 90 to 180 minutes.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | Units: 5

MUSIC 451A: Basics in Auditory and Music Neuroscience

Understanding basic concepts and techniques in cognitive neuroscience using electroencephalography (EEG) specific to auditory perception and music cognition via seminar and laboratory exercise work. Acquiring and practicing skills in experimental design, data analysis, and interpretation, writing for scientific reports and research proposals, and giving a critical review of others' scientific work. Seminar discusses related literature in neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, psychology, and neuroimaging. Laboratory focuses on electroencephalography (EEG) techniques, classic paradigms for recording evoked response, and associated data analysis methods.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5
Instructors: ; Fujioka, T. (PI)

MUSIC 451B: Advanced Research in Auditory and Music Neuroscience

Advancing research skills in cognitive neuroscience specific to auditory perception and music cognition by doing individual research project. Activities include surveying literature, designing own study, discussing other¿s research and giving constructive criticisms, writing research proposals, reports and critical reviews. Laboratory works covers advanced electroencephalography (EEG) recording and analysis techniques. Seminar discusses related literature in basic and clinical research in neurophysiology and neuropsychology. Final project is aimed at producing presentable data based on hypothesis-driven experiment. Prerequisite: Music 451A.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | Units: 2-5

MUSIC 451C: Auditory EEG Research III: Coordinated Actions and Hyperscanning

Advancing EEG research skills in cognitive neuroscience specific to music cognition by conducting a group research project. In particular, this course focuses on basics for 2-person EEG (hyperscanning) paradigms and explores how coordinated actions and social interactions during musical ensemble are processed in the two brains. Laboratory works covers advanced electroencephalography (EEG) recording and analysis techniques specifically for oscillation and phase coherence across brain areas and between subjects. Seminar activities include surveying literature, discussing research articles and giving criticisms, and writing research reports. Lab scheduled separately Prerequisite: Music 451A
Last offered: Winter 2016 | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 20 units total)
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