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MED 1B: Identity, Power and Privilege in Multicultural Health

An independent study service learning course designed to develop students' understanding of the intersection between identity, power, privilege, and disparities (health, education, environment). Students submit a written reflective term paper based on their experience as staff for the Summer Residential Program as well as their understanding of how constructs of identity, power and privilege impact low-income and underrepresented students in their pursuit of higher education. Prerequisite MED 1A.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ned, J. (PI)

MED 50Q: Respiration

Preference to sophomores. Topics include: the biological basis for use of oxygen for aerobic metabolism in animals, human lung physiology and pathophysiology, comparative physiology of respiration in fish, birds and mammals, new insights into mammalian lung development, current challenges in human respiratory health including air pollution and lung cancer. Student presentations on specific topics based on literature research developed in consultation with the instructor. Application required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kao, P. (PI)

MED 51Q: Palliative Medicine, Hospice and End of Life Care for Diverse Americans

Introduces students to changing demographics of the aging and dying population in the United States. Topics include current issues in palliative medicine, hospice and end-of-life care for an increasingly diverse population. Includes simulated video case studies, real patient case discussions and collaborative field project. Application required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Periyakoil, V. (PI)

MED 88Q: Dilemmas in Current Medical Practice

Preference to sophomores. Social, political, scientific, and economic forces influencing medical practice. Spiraling costs, impaired access to health care, and disillusionment toward the health care system. Attempts by government and medical insurers to control costs through managed care and health maintenance organizations. Medical education and how it has affected the practice of medicine. Alternative health care, preventive medicine, and the doctor-patient relationship. The paradox of health in America: why do so many people who are healthy feel unhealthy? Mandatory observation of instructors in their medical practices.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 121: Translational Research and Applied Medicine (MED 221)

(Same as MED 121; undergraduate students enroll in MED 121) Open to graduate students and medical students, this course enables students to learn basic principles in the design, performance and analysis of translational medical research studies. The course includes both didactic seminars from experts in translational medicine as well as the opportunity to design and present a translational research project. Students enrolling for 3 units are paired with a TRAM translational research project and work as a team with TRAM trainees and faculty on a weekly basis, as arranged by the instructor, and present a final project update at the end of the quarter.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 130: Yesplus: Meditation practices for wellbeing

The Practice of Happiness is a 1-unit credit course that provides students with tools and strategies to develop a sustainable approach to their happiness and well-being. Students will learn breathwork- and meditation-based processes to decrease stress and increase happiness and peace. In addition, students will also engage in community-building group discussions, interactive processes, and study happiness-based research to discover for themselves what happiness is, and how it can be sustained as a personal practice. In addition to weekly sessions, there are 3 mandatory back-to-back sessions over a weekend in the quarter- hours will be Friday: 6:30pm - 10pm; Saturday/Sunday: 1pm - 5pm (exact dates TBD). See yesplus.stanford.edu for further insight into the program. Enrollment limited; priority to residents of Castano Hall; others selected by application.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 143A: Patient Health Education in Community Clinics (MED 243A)

Open to undergraduate, graduate, and medical students. Principles of health education, health coaching, theories of behavior change, methods for risk reduction. Presentations of health education modules, focusing on topics prevalent among underserved populations. Students apply theoretical frameworks to health education activities in the Cardinal Free Clinics. Application required.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 149: Medical Interpreting at the Cardinal Free Clinics: The Qualified Bilingual Student Program

The quality of health care often depends as much on the interpreter as the provider. This foundation courses prepares bilingual students to work as medical interpreters in hospital and clinic settings. Students learn basic interpreting skills; ethics; communication techniques; medical vocabulary; key healthcare information; communication skills for advocacy; how to draft practical, working solutions, and professional development. By application only; must be an accepted Cardinal Free Clinic (CFC) interpreter volunteer. Applications accepted in Fall for Winter quarter and in Winter for Spring quarter. Students registering for this 2-unit course are required to interpret at the clinic a minimum of 2 weekend sessions; upon completion of this course, students can continue to volunteer at CFC for academic credit.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 160: Physician Shadowing: Stanford Immersion in Medicine Series (SIMS)

Undergraduates are paired with a physician mentor at Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, or the Veteran's Administration Hospital. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Application and acceptance to the SIMS program.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 161A: Community Health Advocacy

First of a three-quarter course series providing students with knowledge and concrete skills for working with and advocating for underserved populations. Through coursework and placements in community health clinics and social service organizations, students broaden and deepen their understanding of the social and economic determinants of health, how they impact underserved populations, and the various levels at which these challenges can be addressed. Fellows engage in structured activities centered around supporting the mission of placement organizations. Students must apply and be accepted into the program the winter preceding enrollment; application information at och.stanford.edu. Additional prerequisites: Med 157 or equivalent coursework. Spanish language proficiency required for most placements.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 182: Early Clinical Experience at the Cardinal Free Clinics (MED 282)

The Cardinal Free Clinics, consisting of Arbor and Pacific Free Clinic, provide culturally appropriate, high quality transitional medical care for undeserved patient populations in the Bay Area. Students volunteer in various clinic roles to offer services including health education, interpretation, referrals, and labs. Clinical students are guided in the practice of medical interviews, history-taking and physical examinations as appropriate, and work with attending physicians to arrive at a diagnosis and management plan. By application only. Visit http://cfc.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 184B: Team Leadership in the Cardinal Free Clinics II (MED 284B)

Continuation of MED 184A/MED 284A. Introduction to skills for effective leadership, including: conflict resolution, team dynamics, leadership styles, personality types, giving and receiving feedback, and group decision-making. Utilizes hands-on-activities and real-life clinic scenarios. Applied learning through shifts at the Cardinal Free Clinics and related project work. Enrollment limited to Cardinal Free Clinic Managers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Osborn, K. (GP)

MED 199: Undergraduate Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Advani, R. (PI); Ahmed, A. (PI); Ahuja, N. (PI); Akatsu, H. (PI); Al-Ahmad, A. (PI); Alizadeh, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Andrews, J. (PI); Annes, J. (PI); Arai, S. (PI); Artandi, M. (PI); Artandi, S. (PI); Asch, S. (PI); Ashley, E. (PI); Assimes, T. (PI); Ayoub, W. (PI); Baiocchi, M. (PI); Banerjee, S. (PI); Barry, M. (PI); Basaviah, P. (PI); Basina, M. (PI); Basu, S. (PI); Behal, R. (PI); Bendavid, E. (PI); Benjamin, J. (PI); Berube, C. (PI); Bhalla, V. (PI); Bhatt, A. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blackburn, B. (PI); Blaschke, T. (PI); Blayney, D. (PI); Blish, C. (PI); Bollyky, P. (PI); Bouvier, D. (PI); Boxer, L. (PI); Braddock, C. (PI); Brinton, T. (PI); Brown, W. (PI); Bulow, K. (PI); Carlson, R. (PI); Cartwright, C. (PI); Chan, D. (PI); Chan, G. (PI); Chang, C. (PI); Chang, S. (PI); Chen, A. (PI); Chertow, G. (PI); Cheung, R. (PI); Chi, J. (PI); Cho-Phan, C. (PI); Chu, G. (PI); Chua, K. (PI); Chung, L. (PI); Clarke, M. (PI); Clusin, W. (PI); Colevas, A. (PI); Colloff, E. (PI); Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI); Cooke, J. (PI); Cooper, A. (PI); Coutre, S. (PI); Crapo, L. (PI); Crump, C. (PI); Cullen, M. (PI); Das, A. (PI); Dash, R. (PI); Daugherty, T. (PI); David, S. (PI); Dawson, L. (PI); Deresinski, S. (PI); Desai, M. (PI); Desai, T. (PI); Dhillon, G. (PI); Dorman, J. (PI); Dosiou, C. (PI); DuBose, A. (PI); Edwards, L. (PI); Einav, S. (PI); Farquhar, J. (PI); Fathman, C. (PI); Fearon, W. (PI); Feldman, D. (PI); Felsher, D. (PI); Fisher, G. (PI); Fitzgerald, P. (PI); Ford, J. (PI); Ford, P. (PI); Fowler, M. (PI); Frayne, S. (PI); Friedland, S. (PI); Fries, J. (PI); Froelicher, V. (PI); Gabiola, J. (PI); Ganjoo, K. (PI); Garcia, G. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gardner, P. (PI); Gavi, B. (PI); Genovese, M. (PI); Gerson, L. (PI); Gesundheit, N. (PI); Giacomini, J. (PI); Glaseroff, A. (PI); Glenn, J. (PI); Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. (PI); Goldstein, M. (PI); Goodman, S. (PI); Goronzy, J. (PI); Gotlib, J. (PI); Gray, G. (PI); Greenberg, H. (PI); Greenberg, P. (PI); Gregory, P. (PI); Habtezion, A. (PI); Hallenbeck, J. (PI); Harman, S. (PI); Harrington, R. (PI); Harshman, L. (PI); Haskell, W. (PI); Heaney, C. (PI); Heidenreich, P. (PI); Henri, H. (PI); Ho, D. (PI); Hoffman, A. (PI); Holman, H. (PI); Holodniy, M. (PI); Hopkins, J. (PI); Horning, S. (PI); Hsia, H. (PI); Hunt, S. (PI); Ioannidis, J. (PI); Isom, R. (PI); Jernick, J. (PI); Ji, H. (PI); Johnston, L. (PI); Jones, E. (PI); Kahn, J. (PI); Kao, P. (PI); Kastelein, M. (PI); Katz, R. (PI); Katzenstein, D. (PI); Kenny, K. (PI); Khatri, P. (PI); Khazeni, N. (PI); Khush, K. (PI); Killen, J. (PI); Kim, S. (PI); Kohrt, H. (PI); Kraemer, F. (PI); Krishnan, E. (PI); Kummar, S. (PI); Kunz, P. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Kurian, A. (PI); Kuschner, W. (PI); Ladabaum, U. (PI); Lafayette, R. (PI); Laport, G. (PI); Laws, A. (PI); Lee, D. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Lee, P. (PI); Leung, L. (PI); Levitt, L. (PI); Levy, R. (PI); Levy, S. (PI); Liang, D. (PI); Liedtke, M. (PI); Lindsay, A. (PI); Lorig, K. (PI); Lowe, A. (PI); Lowsky, R. (PI); Luby, S. (PI); Lutchman, G. (PI); Majeti, R. (PI); McConnell, M. (PI); McLaughlin, T. (PI); Medeiros, B. (PI); Meyer, T. (PI); Miklos, D. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Milstein, A. (PI); Mitchell, B. (PI); Mohabir, P. (PI); Montoya, J. (PI); Morioka-Douglas, N. (PI); Musen, M. (PI); Narayan, S. (PI); Neal, J. (PI); Negrin, R. (PI); Nevins, A. (PI); Nguyen, L. (PI); Nguyen, M. (PI); Nguyen, P. (PI); Nicolls, M. (PI); O' Callahan, P. (PI); Osterberg, L. (PI); Owens, D. (PI); Palaniappan, L. (PI); Pao, A. (PI); Parnes, J. (PI); Parsonnet, J. (PI); Pasricha, P. (PI); Pegram, M. (PI); Periyakoil, V. (PI); Petersen, J. (PI); Pinto, H. (PI); Pompei, P. (PI); Popp, R. (PI); Posley, K. (PI); Price, E. (PI); Prochaska, J. (PI); Quertermous, T. (PI); Raffin, T. (PI); Rehkopf, D. (PI); Relman, D. (PI); Rizk, N. (PI); Robinson, B. (PI); Rockson, S. (PI); Rohatgi, R. (PI); Rosas, L. (PI); Rosen, G. (PI); Rosenberg, S. (PI); Rudd, P. (PI); Ruoss, S. (PI); Rydel, T. (PI); Scandling, J. (PI); Schnittger, I. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Schroeder, J. (PI); Shafer, R. (PI); Shah, N. (PI); Shah, S. (PI); Sharp, C. (PI); Shen, K. (PI); Shieh, L. (PI); Shizuru, J. (PI); Shoor, S. (PI); Sikic, B. (PI); Singh, B. (PI); Singh, U. (PI); Skeff, K. (PI); Spiekerkoetter, E. (PI); Srinivas, S. (PI); Stafford, R. (PI); Stefanick, M. (PI); Stertzer, S. (PI); Stevens, D. (PI); Stockdale, F. (PI); Strober, S. (PI); Studdert, D. (PI); Tai, J. (PI); Tamura, M. (PI); Tan, J. (PI); Telli, M. (PI); Tepper, R. (PI); Tompkins, L. (PI); Tremmel, J. (PI); Triadafilopoulos, G. (PI); Tsao, P. (PI); Upadhyay, D. (PI); Utz, P. (PI); Vagelos, R. (PI); Valantine, H. (PI); Verghese, A. (PI); Wakelee, H. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warvariv, V. (PI); Weill, D. (PI); Weinacker, A. (PI); Weng, K. (PI); Weng, W. (PI); Weyand, C. (PI); Wiedmann, T. (PI); Winkelmayer, W. (PI); Winkleby, M. (PI); Winograd, C. (PI); Winslow, D. (PI); Winter, T. (PI); Witteles, R. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Yabu, J. (PI); Yang, P. (PI); Yeung, A. (PI); Yock, P. (PI); Zamanian, R. (PI); Zehnder, J. (PI); Zei, P. (PI); Zolopa, A. (PI); Zulman, D. (PI); de Jesus Perez, V. (PI); Gardner, C. (SI); Reguindin, A. (GP)

MED 200A: Practical Applications for Qualitative Data Analysis

(Same as PEDS 202A) First quarter of a two-quarter course. Gain experience analyzing qualitative data using qualitative analysis software (i.e. Nvivo, Dedoose). Conduct analysis using your own or existing data sources. Explore multiple qualitative data analysis topics through class lectures, foundational readings and hands-on learning. Core topics include: grounded theory, qualitative data analysis approaches, software-based analysis, cleaning and coding of data, and interpreting data. Note: Preference will be given to medical students and undergraduate students that have successfully completed an introductory qualitative methods course. Enrollment in subsequent MED 202B required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 201: Internal Medicine: Body as Text

Body as Text refers to the idea that every patient's body tells a story. The narrative includes the past and present of a person's social and medical condition; it is a demonstration of the phenotype. The art of reading the body as text was at its peak in the first half of the 20th century, but as technology has become ascendant, bedside skills and the ability to read the text have faded. Beyond scientific knowledge and medical facts, it is this often forgotten craft which is at the heart of the excitement of being an internist. This course introduces students to the art of the clinical exam, to developing a clinical eye, and learning to see the body in a completely different way. Enrollment will be based on a lottery system, for which details will be sent to first year students at the end of mini quarter.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 203: Patient Partner Skills: in Care Transitions

A clinical and quality improvement experience for pre-clerkship medical students. The course provides early clinical experience for pre-clerkship medical students, to engage with patients in multiple healthcare environments (inpatient medicine/outpatient medicine/skilled nursing facilities/patients¿ homes). Students gain an understanding of the challenges patients face during the transitions, and learn and help design quality improvement initiatives to improve patient outcomes and reduce readmissions. Course features include working as part of an interdisciplinary healthcare team and promoting patient empowerment. Students work closely with Stanford Department of Medicine faculty and with Stanford Internal Medicine residents, and are trained to use health coaching, motivational interviewing, and shared decision-making skills.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 215A: Health Policy PhD Core Seminar I--First Year (HRP 201A)

Seminar series is the core tutorial for first-year Health Policy and Health Services Research graduate students. Major themes in fields of study including health insurance, healthcare financing and delivery, health systems and reform and disparities in the US and globally, health and economic development, health law and policy, resource allocation, efficiency and equity, healthcare quality, measurement and the efficacy and effectiveness of interventions. Blocks of session led by Stanford expert faculty in particular fields of study.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Haberland, C. (PI)

MED 221: Translational Research and Applied Medicine (MED 121)

(Same as MED 121; undergraduate students enroll in MED 121) Open to graduate students and medical students, this course enables students to learn basic principles in the design, performance and analysis of translational medical research studies. The course includes both didactic seminars from experts in translational medicine as well as the opportunity to design and present a translational research project. Students enrolling for 3 units are paired with a TRAM translational research project and work as a team with TRAM trainees and faculty on a weekly basis, as arranged by the instructor, and present a final project update at the end of the quarter.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 223: Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Sciences Seminar

The focus of MED223 is to fine tune critical thinking skills by analyzing original publications and understanding the current complexities of the cardiovascular system. Students will attend a lecture series presented by prominent external speakers on Tuesdays and learn new approaches and technology from Stanford faculty on Thursdays. Assigned reading will be discussed and interpreted in class (1-2 papers per class).
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 227: Bedside Ultrasound

For preclinical or clinical medical students, and others with permission. Introduces students to diagnostic ultrasound at the bedside. The normal anatomy of the heart, abdomen, and pelvis pertinent to ultrasound is taught. Some pathology involving these areas is also introduced. As the students' proficiency increases, those electing to can visit the Pacific Free Clinic to be introduced to scanning patients. 1 unit for class attendance only 2 units for class attendance and observation in Stanford Echo Labs.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Thompson, N. (PI)

MED 228: Physicians and Social Responsibility

Social and political context of the roles of physicians and health professionals in social change; policy, advocacy, and shaping public attitudes. How physicians have influenced governmental policy on nuclear arms proliferation; environmental health concerns; physicians in government; activism through research; the effects of poverty on health; homelessness; and gun violence. Guest speakers from national and international NGOs.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Laws, A. (PI)

MED 232: Discussions in Global Health

The goal of this interactive series is to encourage students to think broadly about the variety of activities encompassed within global health and the roles of various entities, including NGOs, governments, and healthcare providers, in responding to large-scale health crises, building health systems, and caring for patients in developing countries. Examines challenges in global health such as organizing medical responses to natural disasters, providing healthcare to societies in conflict, and integrating traditional and modern approaches to healing. Case studies are used to critique strategies employed by organizations that work to improve medical care in poor settings.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Barry, M. (PI); Hyde, E. (TA)

MED 233: Global Health: Beyond Diseases and International Organizations

Provides multidisciplinary trainees insight into over-arching themes of global health. Topics include systemic issues affecting healthcare progress globally, ethical and thoughtful approaches to solving these issues, as well as economics, water sanitation, public health, organizations in global health, human rights, involvement in NGOs, ethics of overseas work, and other non-medical aspects of this subject. This course will cover some of the essentials of patient care while working in the field as well including child health care, malaria, TB, and HIV.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 243A: Patient Health Education in Community Clinics (MED 143A)

Open to undergraduate, graduate, and medical students. Principles of health education, health coaching, theories of behavior change, methods for risk reduction. Presentations of health education modules, focusing on topics prevalent among underserved populations. Students apply theoretical frameworks to health education activities in the Cardinal Free Clinics. Application required.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 246: The Medical Interview for Spanish Speakers

Student led forum for practicing and learning medical Spanish related specifically to the medical interview. Prepares clinical students to interact more effectively with Spanish speaking patients in clinics. Classes are topical; each class includes a demonstration, medical vocabulary practice, and conversational practice on the topic of the day.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Garcia, G. (PI)

MED 248: Student Rounds

Teams of preclinical students meet weekly with a clinical student to hear the history and physical of a recent case the clinical student encountered on the wards. Following the presentation, the preclinical students work together under the guidance of the clinical student to develop a problem list and plan, which are then compared with the problem list, plan, and orders made by the actual admitting team. In the course of presenting the cases, the clinical student describes personal experiences and practical components of ward work and daily clinical routine.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Kenny, K. (PI)

MED 249: Topics in Health Economics I (ECON 249, HRP 249)

Course will cover various topics in health economics, from theoretical and empirical perspectives. Topics will include public financing and public policy in health care and health insurance; demand and supply of health insurance and healthcare; physicians' incentives; patient decision-making; competition policy in healthcare markets, intellectual property in the context of pharmaceutical drugs and medical technology; other aspects of interaction between public and private sectors in healthcare and health insurance markets. Key emphasis on recent work and empirical methods and modelling. Prerequisites: Micro and Econometrics first year sequences (or equivalent).nCurricular prerequisites (if applicable): First year graduate Microeconomics and Econometrics sequences (or equivalent)
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MED 255: The Responsible Conduct of Research

Forum. How to identify and approach ethical dilemmas that commonly arise in biomedical research. Issues in the practice of research such as in publication and interpretation of data, and issues raised by academic/industry ties. Contemporary debates at the interface of biomedical science and society regarding research on stem cells, bioweapons, genetic testing, human subjects, and vertebrate animals. Completion fulfills NIH/ADAMHA requirement for instruction in the ethical conduct of research. Prerequisite: research experience recommended.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 255C: The Responsible Conduct of Research for Clinical and Community Researchers (CHPR 255)

Engages clinical researchers in discussions about ethical issues commonly encountered during their clinical research careers and addresses contemporary debates at the interface of biomedical science and society. Graduate students required to take RCR who are or will be conducting clinical research are encouraged to enroll in this version of the course. Prequisite: research experience recommended.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 273: Biodesign for Mobile Health (BIOE 273)

This course examines the emerging mobile health industry. Mobile health refers to the provision of health services and information via digital technologies such as mobile phones and wearable sensors. Faculty from Stanford University and other academic institutions, as well as guest lecturers from the mobile health industry discuss factors driving needs in the field, explore opportunities and challenges that characterize the emerging mobile health innovation landscape, and present an overview of the technologies, initiatives, and companies that are transforming the way we access health care today.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 282: Early Clinical Experience at the Cardinal Free Clinics (MED 182)

The Cardinal Free Clinics, consisting of Arbor and Pacific Free Clinic, provide culturally appropriate, high quality transitional medical care for undeserved patient populations in the Bay Area. Students volunteer in various clinic roles to offer services including health education, interpretation, referrals, and labs. Clinical students are guided in the practice of medical interviews, history-taking and physical examinations as appropriate, and work with attending physicians to arrive at a diagnosis and management plan. By application only. Visit http://cfc.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 284B: Team Leadership in the Cardinal Free Clinics II (MED 184B)

Continuation of MED 184A/MED 284A. Introduction to skills for effective leadership, including: conflict resolution, team dynamics, leadership styles, personality types, giving and receiving feedback, and group decision-making. Utilizes hands-on-activities and real-life clinic scenarios. Applied learning through shifts at the Cardinal Free Clinics and related project work. Enrollment limited to Cardinal Free Clinic Managers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Osborn, K. (GP)

MED 289: Introduction to Bioengineering Research (BIOE 390)

Preference to medical and bioengineering graduate students with first preference given to Bioengineering Scholarly Concentration medical students. Bioengineering is an interdisciplinary field that leverages the disciplines of biology, medicine, and engineering to understand living systems, and engineer biological systems and improve engineering designs and human and environmental health. Students and faculty make presentations during the course. Students expected to make presentations, complete a short paper, read selected articles, and take quizzes on the material.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 290: Independent Study with the Program in Bedside Medicine

Students work with their faculty mentor on projects and studies that are broadly centered around the following questions: How do we teach and emphasize to students, residents, physicians (and beyond) in the medical field the need to master bedside skills? How does bedside medicine effect patient care? How has patient care changed with the omnipresence of technology in our lives? How is bedside medicine going to change in the next few decades, centuries? In investigating these questions, students utilize scientific articles and data, engage patients, and collaborate with BedMed faculty and staff. Independent study projects culminate in a presentation to the BedMed team, with the potential for posters or manuscripts. Students paired with faculty based on their area of interest and faculty/project needs. As the Program in Bedside Medicine emphasizes the human connection with patients, students are encouraged to engage patients within our program for teaching sessions, research studies, among other projects. Most of the faculty students with whom students will work are a part of the Stanford Medicine 25 Initiative: http:/stanfordmedicine25.stanford.edu/about/. Students are encouraged to develop relevant projects with the initiative as a foundation. Enrollment varies with and is limited to faculty need. Repeatable for credit; more than one quarter of commitment expected.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 295: Advanced Cardiac Life Support

(For clinical MD students only) Prepares students to manage the victim of a cardiac arrest. Knowledge and skills necessary for resuscitation of critically ill patients. Clinical scenarios and small group discussions address cardiovascular pharmacology, arrhythmia recognition and therapy, acute coronary syndrome including myocardial infarction, ventricular dysrhythmias and defibrillation, and acute ischemic stroke. Requires pre-course preparation and an intensive two-day session on a Friday and Saturday. Students should get the approval of their Clerkship Coordinator before registering for the course. Recommended prerequisites: Medicine 300A, Pediatrics 300A, or Surgery 300A. Prerequisite: EMED 201A
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Giacomini, J. (PI)

MED 299: Directed Reading in Medicine

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Advani, R. (PI); Ahmed, A. (PI); Ahuja, N. (PI); Akatsu, H. (PI); Al-Ahmad, A. (PI); Alizadeh, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Andrews, J. (PI); Annes, J. (PI); Arai, S. (PI); Artandi, M. (PI); Artandi, S. (PI); Asch, S. (PI); Ashley, E. (PI); Assimes, T. (PI); Ayoub, W. (PI); Banerjee, S. (PI); Barry, M. (PI); Basaviah, P. (PI); Basina, M. (PI); Basu, S. (PI); Behal, R. (PI); Bendavid, E. (PI); Benjamin, J. (PI); Berube, C. (PI); Bhalla, V. (PI); Bhatt, A. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blackburn, B. (PI); Blaschke, T. (PI); Blayney, D. (PI); Blish, C. (PI); Bollyky, P. (PI); Bouvier, D. (PI); Boxer, L. (PI); Braddock, C. (PI); Brinton, T. (PI); Brown, W. (PI); Bulow, K. (PI); Carlson, R. (PI); Cartwright, C. (PI); Chakravarty, E. (PI); Chan, D. (PI); Chan, G. (PI); Chang, C. (PI); Chang, S. (PI); Chen, A. (PI); Chertow, G. (PI); Cheung, R. (PI); Chi, J. (PI); Cho-Phan, C. (PI); Chu, G. (PI); Chua, K. (PI); Chung, L. (PI); Clarke, M. (PI); Clusin, W. (PI); Colevas, A. (PI); Colloff, E. (PI); Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI); Cooke, J. (PI); Cooper, A. (PI); Coutre, S. (PI); Crapo, L. (PI); Crump, C. (PI); Cullen, M. (PI); Das, A. (PI); Dash, R. (PI); Daugherty, T. (PI); David, S. (PI); Dawson, L. (PI); Deresinski, S. (PI); Desai, M. (PI); Desai, T. (PI); Dhillon, G. (PI); Dorman, J. (PI); Dosiou, C. (PI); DuBose, A. (PI); Edwards, L. (PI); Einav, S. (PI); Farquhar, J. (PI); Fathman, C. (PI); Fearon, W. (PI); Feldman, D. (PI); Felsher, D. (PI); Fisher, G. (PI); Fitzgerald, P. (PI); Ford, J. (PI); Ford, P. (PI); Fowler, M. (PI); Frayne, S. (PI); Friedland, S. (PI); Fries, J. (PI); Froelicher, V. (PI); Gabiola, J. (PI); Ganjoo, K. (PI); Garcia, G. (PI); Garcia, R. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gardner, P. (PI); Gavi, B. (PI); Genovese, M. (PI); Gerson, L. (PI); Gesundheit, N. (PI); Giacomini, J. (PI); Glaseroff, A. (PI); Glenn, J. (PI); Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. (PI); Goldstein, M. (PI); Goodman, S. (PI); Goronzy, J. (PI); Gotlib, J. (PI); Gray, G. (PI); Greenberg, H. (PI); Greenberg, P. (PI); Gregory, P. (PI); Habtezion, A. (PI); Hallenbeck, J. (PI); Harman, S. (PI); Harrington, R. (PI); Harshman, L. (PI); Haskell, W. (PI); Heaney, C. (PI); Heidenreich, P. (PI); Henri, H. (PI); Ho, D. (PI); Hoffman, A. (PI); Holman, H. (PI); Holodniy, M. (PI); Hopkins, J. (PI); Horning, S. (PI); Hsia, H. (PI); Hunt, S. (PI); Ioannidis, J. (PI); Isom, R. (PI); Jernick, J. (PI); Ji, H. (PI); Johnston, L. (PI); Jones, E. (PI); Kahn, J. (PI); Kao, P. (PI); Kastelein, M. (PI); Katz, R. (PI); Katzenstein, D. (PI); Kenny, K. (PI); Khatri, P. (PI); Khazeni, N. (PI); Khush, K. (PI); Killen, J. (PI); Kim, S. (PI); Kohrt, H. (PI); Kraemer, F. (PI); Krishnan, E. (PI); Kummar, S. (PI); Kunz, P. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Kurian, A. (PI); Kuschner, W. (PI); Ladabaum, U. (PI); Lafayette, R. (PI); Laport, G. (PI); Lee, D. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Lee, P. (PI); Leung, L. (PI); Levitt, J. (PI); Levitt, L. (PI); Levy, R. (PI); Levy, S. (PI); Liang, D. (PI); Liedtke, M. (PI); Lin, S. (PI); Lindsay, A. (PI); Lorig, K. (PI); Lowe, A. (PI); Lowsky, R. (PI); Luby, S. (PI); Lutchman, G. (PI); Majeti, R. (PI); McConnell, M. (PI); McLaughlin, T. (PI); Medeiros, B. (PI); Meyer, T. (PI); Miklos, D. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Milstein, A. (PI); Mitchell, B. (PI); Mohabir, P. (PI); Montoya, J. (PI); Morioka-Douglas, N. (PI); Musen, M. (PI); Narayan, S. (PI); Neal, J. (PI); Negrin, R. (PI); Nevins, A. (PI); Nguyen, L. (PI); Nguyen, M. (PI); Nguyen, P. (PI); Nicolls, M. (PI); O' Callahan, P. (PI); Osterberg, L. (PI); Owens, D. (PI); Pao, A. (PI); Parnes, J. (PI); Parsonnet, J. (PI); Pasricha, P. (PI); Pegram, M. (PI); Periyakoil, V. (PI); Petersen, J. (PI); Pinto, H. (PI); Pompei, P. (PI); Popp, R. (PI); Posley, K. (PI); Price, E. (PI); Prochaska, J. (PI); Quertermous, T. (PI); Raffin, T. (PI); Rehkopf, D. (PI); Relman, D. (PI); Rizk, N. (PI); Robinson, B. (PI); Rockson, S. (PI); Rohatgi, R. (PI); Rosas, L. (PI); Rosen, G. (PI); Rosenberg, S. (PI); Rudd, P. (PI); Ruoss, S. (PI); Rydel, T. (PI); Scandling, J. (PI); Schillinger, E. (PI); Schnittger, I. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Schroeder, J. (PI); Shafer, R. (PI); Shah, N. (PI); Shah, S. (PI); Sharp, C. (PI); Shen, K. (PI); Shieh, L. (PI); Shizuru, J. (PI); Shoor, S. (PI); Sikic, B. (PI); Singh, B. (PI); Singh, U. (PI); Skeff, K. (PI); Smith-Coggins, R. (PI); Spiekerkoetter, E. (PI); Srinivas, S. (PI); Stafford, R. (PI); Stefanick, M. (PI); Stertzer, S. (PI); Stevens, D. (PI); Stockdale, F. (PI); Strober, S. (PI); Studdert, D. (PI); Tai, J. (PI); Tamura, M. (PI); Tan, J. (PI); Telli, M. (PI); Tepper, R. (PI); Tompkins, L. (PI); Tremmel, J. (PI); Triadafilopoulos, G. (PI); Tsao, P. (PI); Upadhyay, D. (PI); Utz, P. (PI); Vagelos, R. (PI); Valantine, H. (PI); Verghese, A. (PI); Wakelee, H. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warvariv, V. (PI); Weill, D. (PI); Weinacker, A. (PI); Weng, K. (PI); Weng, W. (PI); Weyand, C. (PI); Wiedmann, T. (PI); Winkelmayer, W. (PI); Winkleby, M. (PI); Winter, T. (PI); Witteles, R. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Yabu, J. (PI); Yang, P. (PI); Yeung, A. (PI); Yock, P. (PI); Zamanian, R. (PI); Zehnder, J. (PI); Zei, P. (PI); Zolopa, A. (PI); Zulman, D. (PI); de Jesus Perez, V. (PI); Mendoza, F. (SI); Jezmir, J. (TA); Johnson, A. (GP)

MED 370: Medical Scholars Research

Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Advani, R. (PI); Ahmed, A. (PI); Ahuja, N. (PI); Akatsu, H. (PI); Al-Ahmad, A. (PI); Alizadeh, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Andrews, J. (PI); Annes, J. (PI); Arai, S. (PI); Artandi, M. (PI); Artandi, S. (PI); Asch, S. (PI); Ashley, E. (PI); Assimes, T. (PI); Ayoub, W. (PI); Banerjee, S. (PI); Barry, M. (PI); Basaviah, P. (PI); Basina, M. (PI); Basu, S. (PI); Behal, R. (PI); Bendavid, E. (PI); Benjamin, J. (PI); Berube, C. (PI); Bhalla, V. (PI); Bhatt, A. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blackburn, B. (PI); Blaschke, T. (PI); Blayney, D. (PI); Blish, C. (PI); Bollyky, P. (PI); Bouvier, D. (PI); Boxer, L. (PI); Braddock, C. (PI); Brinton, T. (PI); Brown, W. (PI); Bulow, K. (PI); Carlson, R. (PI); Cartwright, C. (PI); Chan, D. (PI); Chan, G. (PI); Chang, C. (PI); Chang, S. (PI); Chang, T. (PI); Chen, A. (PI); Chertow, G. (PI); Cheung, L. (PI); Cheung, R. (PI); Chi, J. (PI); Cho-Phan, C. (PI); Chu, C. (PI); Chu, G. (PI); Chua, K. (PI); Chung, L. (PI); Clarke, M. (PI); Clusin, W. (PI); Colevas, A. (PI); Colloff, E. (PI); Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI); Cooke, J. (PI); Cooper, A. (PI); Coutre, S. (PI); Crapo, L. (PI); Crump, C. (PI); Cullen, M. (PI); Das, A. (PI); Dash, R. (PI); Daugherty, T. (PI); David, S. (PI); Dawson, L. (PI); Deresinski, S. (PI); Desai, M. (PI); Desai, T. (PI); Dhillon, G. (PI); Dorman, J. (PI); Dosiou, C. (PI); DuBose, A. (PI); Edwards, L. (PI); Einav, S. (PI); Farquhar, J. (PI); Fathman, C. (PI); Fearon, W. (PI); Feldman, D. (PI); Felsher, D. (PI); Fisher, G. (PI); Fitzgerald, P. (PI); Ford, J. (PI); Ford, P. (PI); Fowler, M. (PI); Frayne, S. (PI); Friedland, S. (PI); Fries, J. (PI); Froelicher, V. (PI); Gabiola, J. (PI); Ganjoo, K. (PI); Garcia, G. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gardner, P. (PI); Gavi, B. (PI); Genovese, M. (PI); Gerson, L. (PI); Gesundheit, N. (PI); Giacomini, J. (PI); Glaseroff, A. (PI); Glenn, J. (PI); Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. (PI); Goldstein, M. (PI); Goodman, S. (PI); Goronzy, J. (PI); Gotlib, J. (PI); Gray, G. (PI); Greenberg, H. (PI); Greenberg, P. (PI); Gregory, P. (PI); Habtezion, A. (PI); Hallenbeck, J. (PI); Harman, S. (PI); Harrington, R. (PI); Harshman, L. (PI); Haskell, W. (PI); Heaney, C. (PI); Heidenreich, P. (PI); Henri, H. (PI); Ho, D. (PI); Hoffman, A. (PI); Holman, H. (PI); Holodniy, M. (PI); Hopkins, J. (PI); Horning, S. (PI); Hsia, H. (PI); Hunt, S. (PI); Ikoku, A. (PI); Ioannidis, J. (PI); Isom, R. (PI); Jernick, J. (PI); Ji, H. (PI); Johnston, L. (PI); Jones, E. (PI); Kahn, J. (PI); Kamal, R. (PI); Kao, P. (PI); Kastelein, M. (PI); Katz, R. (PI); Katzenstein, D. (PI); Kenny, K. (PI); Khatri, P. (PI); Khazeni, N. (PI); Khush, K. (PI); Killen, J. (PI); Kim, S. (PI); King, A. (PI); Kohrt, H. (PI); Kraemer, F. (PI); Krishnan, E. (PI); Kummar, S. (PI); Kunz, P. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Kurian, A. (PI); Kuschner, W. (PI); Kwong, B. (PI); Ladabaum, U. (PI); Lafayette, R. (PI); Laport, G. (PI); Lee, D. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Lee, P. (PI); Leung, L. (PI); Levitt, L. (PI); Levy, R. (PI); Levy, S. (PI); Liang, D. (PI); Liedtke, M. (PI); Lin, S. (PI); Lindsay, A. (PI); Lorenz, K. (PI); Lorig, K. (PI); Lowe, A. (PI); Lowsky, R. (PI); Luby, S. (PI); Lutchman, G. (PI); Majeti, R. (PI); McConnell, M. (PI); McLaughlin, T. (PI); Medeiros, B. (PI); Meyer, T. (PI); Miklos, D. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Milstein, A. (PI); Mitchell, B. (PI); Mohabir, P. (PI); Montoya, J. (PI); Morioka-Douglas, N. (PI); Musen, M. (PI); Narayan, S. (PI); Neal, J. (PI); Negrin, R. (PI); Nevins, A. (PI); Nguyen, L. (PI); Nguyen, M. (PI); Nguyen, P. (PI); Nicolls, M. (PI); O' Callahan, P. (PI); Osterberg, L. (PI); Owens, D. (PI); Pao, A. (PI); Parnes, J. (PI); Parsonnet, J. (PI); Pasricha, P. (PI); Pegram, M. (PI); Periyakoil, V. (PI); Petersen, J. (PI); Pinto, H. (PI); Pompei, P. (PI); Popp, R. (PI); Posley, K. (PI); Price, E. (PI); Prochaska, J. (PI); Qi, S. (PI); Quertermous, T. (PI); Raffin, T. (PI); Ramchandran, K. (PI); Rehkopf, D. (PI); Relman, D. (PI); Rizk, N. (PI); Robinson, B. (PI); Rockson, S. (PI); Rohatgi, R. (PI); Rosas, L. (PI); Rosen, G. (PI); Rosenberg, S. (PI); Rudd, P. (PI); Ruoss, S. (PI); Rydel, T. (PI); Scandling, J. (PI); Schnittger, I. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Schroeder, J. (PI); Shafer, R. (PI); Shah, N. (PI); Shah, S. (PI); Sharp, C. (PI); Shen, K. (PI); Shieh, L. (PI); Shizuru, J. (PI); Shoor, S. (PI); Sikic, B. (PI); Singh, B. (PI); Singh, U. (PI); Skeff, K. (PI); Spiekerkoetter, E. (PI); Srinivas, S. (PI); Stafford, R. (PI); Stefanick, M. (PI); Stertzer, S. (PI); Stevens, D. (PI); Stockdale, F. (PI); Strober, S. (PI); Studdert, D. (PI); Svec, D. (PI); Tabor, H. (PI); Tai, J. (PI); Tamura, M. (PI); Tan, J. (PI); Telli, M. (PI); Tepper, R. (PI); Tompkins, L. (PI); Tremmel, J. (PI); Triadafilopoulos, G. (PI); Tsao, P. (PI); Upadhyay, D. (PI); Utz, P. (PI); Vagelos, R. (PI); Valantine, H. (PI); Verghese, A. (PI); Wakelee, H. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warvariv, V. (PI); Weill, D. (PI); Weinacker, A. (PI); Weng, K. (PI); Weng, W. (PI); Weyand, C. (PI); Winkelmayer, W. (PI); Winkleby, M. (PI); Winter, T. (PI); Witteles, R. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Yabu, J. (PI); Yang, P. (PI); Yeung, A. (PI); Yock, P. (PI); Zamanian, R. (PI); Zehnder, J. (PI); Zei, P. (PI); Zolopa, A. (PI); Zulman, D. (PI); de Jesus Perez, V. (PI); Cullen, M. (SI)

MED 399: Graduate Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Advani, R. (PI); Ahmed, A. (PI); Ahuja, N. (PI); Akatsu, H. (PI); Al-Ahmad, A. (PI); Alizadeh, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Andrews, J. (PI); Annes, J. (PI); Arai, S. (PI); Artandi, M. (PI); Artandi, S. (PI); Asch, S. (PI); Ashley, E. (PI); Assimes, T. (PI); Ayoub, W. (PI); Banerjee, S. (PI); Barry, M. (PI); Basaviah, P. (PI); Basina, M. (PI); Basu, S. (PI); Behal, R. (PI); Bendavid, E. (PI); Benjamin, J. (PI); Berube, C. (PI); Bhalla, V. (PI); Bhatt, A. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blackburn, B. (PI); Blaschke, T. (PI); Blayney, D. (PI); Blish, C. (PI); Bollyky, P. (PI); Bouvier, D. (PI); Boxer, L. (PI); Braddock, C. (PI); Brinton, T. (PI); Brown, W. (PI); Bulow, K. (PI); Carlson, R. (PI); Cartwright, C. (PI); Chan, D. (PI); Chan, G. (PI); Chang, C. (PI); Chang, S. (PI); Chen, A. (PI); Chertow, G. (PI); Cheung, R. (PI); Chi, J. (PI); Cho-Phan, C. (PI); Chu, G. (PI); Chua, K. (PI); Chung, L. (PI); Clarke, M. (PI); Clusin, W. (PI); Colevas, A. (PI); Colloff, E. (PI); Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI); Cooke, J. (PI); Cooper, A. (PI); Coutre, S. (PI); Crapo, L. (PI); Crump, C. (PI); Cullen, M. (PI); Das, A. (PI); Dash, R. (PI); Daugherty, T. (PI); David, S. (PI); Dawson, L. (PI); Deresinski, S. (PI); Desai, M. (PI); Desai, T. (PI); Dhillon, G. (PI); Dorman, J. (PI); Dosiou, C. (PI); DuBose, A. (PI); Einav, S. (PI); Farquhar, J. (PI); Fathman, C. (PI); Fearon, W. (PI); Feldman, D. (PI); Felsher, D. (PI); Fisher, G. (PI); Fitzgerald, P. (PI); Ford, J. (PI); Ford, P. (PI); Fowler, M. (PI); Frayne, S. (PI); Friedland, S. (PI); Fries, J. (PI); Froelicher, V. (PI); Gabiola, J. (PI); Ganjoo, K. (PI); Garcia, G. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gardner, P. (PI); Gavi, B. (PI); Genovese, M. (PI); Gerson, L. (PI); Gesundheit, N. (PI); Giacomini, J. (PI); Glaseroff, A. (PI); Glenn, J. (PI); Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. (PI); Goldstein, M. (PI); Goodman, S. (PI); Goronzy, J. (PI); Gotlib, J. (PI); Gray, G. (PI); Greenberg, H. (PI); Greenberg, P. (PI); Gregory, P. (PI); Habtezion, A. (PI); Hallenbeck, J. (PI); Harman, S. (PI); Harrington, R. (PI); Harshman, L. (PI); Haskell, W. (PI); Heaney, C. (PI); Heidenreich, P. (PI); Henri, H. (PI); Ho, D. (PI); Hoffman, A. (PI); Holman, H. (PI); Holodniy, M. (PI); Hopkins, J. (PI); Horning, S. (PI); Hsia, H. (PI); Hunt, S. (PI); Ioannidis, J. (PI); Isom, R. (PI); Jernick, J. (PI); Ji, H. (PI); Johnston, L. (PI); Jones, E. (PI); Kahn, J. (PI); Kao, P. (PI); Kastelein, M. (PI); Katz, R. (PI); Katzenstein, D. (PI); Kenny, K. (PI); Khatri, P. (PI); Khazeni, N. (PI); Khush, K. (PI); Killen, J. (PI); Kim, S. (PI); Kohrt, H. (PI); Kraemer, F. (PI); Krishnan, E. (PI); Kummar, S. (PI); Kunz, P. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Kurian, A. (PI); Kuschner, W. (PI); Ladabaum, U. (PI); Lafayette, R. (PI); Laport, G. (PI); Lee, D. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Lee, P. (PI); Leung, L. (PI); Levitt, J. (PI); Levitt, L. (PI); Levy, R. (PI); Levy, S. (PI); Liang, D. (PI); Liedtke, M. (PI); Lindsay, A. (PI); Lorig, K. (PI); Lowe, A. (PI); Lowsky, R. (PI); Luby, S. (PI); Lutchman, G. (PI); Majeti, R. (PI); McConnell, M. (PI); McLaughlin, T. (PI); Medeiros, B. (PI); Meyer, T. (PI); Miklos, D. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Milstein, A. (PI); Mitchell, B. (PI); Mohabir, P. (PI); Montoya, J. (PI); Morioka-Douglas, N. (PI); Musen, M. (PI); Narayan, S. (PI); Neal, J. (PI); Negrin, R. (PI); Nevins, A. (PI); Nguyen, L. (PI); Nguyen, M. (PI); Nguyen, P. (PI); Nicolls, M. (PI); O' Callahan, P. (PI); Osterberg, L. (PI); Owens, D. (PI); Pao, A. (PI); Parnes, J. (PI); Parsonnet, J. (PI); Pasricha, P. (PI); Pegram, M. (PI); Periyakoil, V. (PI); Petersen, J. (PI); Pinto, H. (PI); Pompei, P. (PI); Popp, R. (PI); Posley, K. (PI); Price, E. (PI); Prochaska, J. (PI); Quertermous, T. (PI); Raffin, T. (PI); Rehkopf, D. (PI); Relman, D. (PI); Rizk, N. (PI); Robinson, B. (PI); Rockson, S. (PI); Rohatgi, R. (PI); Rosas, L. (PI); Rosen, G. (PI); Rosenberg, S. (PI); Rudd, P. (PI); Ruoss, S. (PI); Rydel, T. (PI); Scandling, J. (PI); Schnittger, I. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Schroeder, J. (PI); Shafer, R. (PI); Shah, N. (PI); Shah, S. (PI); Sharp, C. (PI); Shen, K. (PI); Shieh, L. (PI); Shizuru, J. (PI); Shoor, S. (PI); Sikic, B. (PI); Singh, B. (PI); Singh, U. (PI); Skeff, K. (PI); Spiekerkoetter, E. (PI); Srinivas, S. (PI); Stafford, R. (PI); Stefanick, M. (PI); Stertzer, S. (PI); Stevens, D. (PI); Stockdale, F. (PI); Strober, S. (PI); Studdert, D. (PI); Tai, J. (PI); Tamura, M. (PI); Tan, J. (PI); Telli, M. (PI); Tepper, R. (PI); Tompkins, L. (PI); Tremmel, J. (PI); Triadafilopoulos, G. (PI); Tsao, P. (PI); Upadhyay, D. (PI); Utz, P. (PI); Vagelos, R. (PI); Valantine, H. (PI); Verghese, A. (PI); Wakelee, H. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warvariv, V. (PI); Weill, D. (PI); Weinacker, A. (PI); Weng, K. (PI); Weng, W. (PI); Weyand, C. (PI); Winkelmayer, W. (PI); Winkleby, M. (PI); Winter, T. (PI); Witteles, R. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Yabu, J. (PI); Yang, P. (PI); Yeung, A. (PI); Yock, P. (PI); Zamanian, R. (PI); Zehnder, J. (PI); Zei, P. (PI); Zolopa, A. (PI); Zulman, D. (PI); de Jesus Perez, V. (PI)
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