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MED 1A: Leadership in Multicultural Health

Designed for undergraduates serving as staff for the Stanford Medical Youth Science Summer Residential Program (SRP). Structured opportunitie to learn, observe, participate in, and evaluate leadership development, multicultural health theories and practices, and social advocacy. Utilizes service learning as a pedagogical approach to developing an understanding of the intersections between identity, power and privilege and disparities (health, education, environment), fostering knowledge and skills to become social advocates to address forms of inequities. Students explore approaches for identifying and tackling issues of equity (health and education) as well as learn fundamental skills necessary to implement activities for the Summer Residential Program.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MED 51Q: Palliative Medicine, Hospice and End of Life Care for Diverse Americans

Introduces students to changing demographics of the aging and dying population in the United States. Topics include current issues in palliative medicine, hospice and end-of-life care for an increasingly diverse population. Includes simulated video case studies, real patient case discussions and collaborative field project. Application required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Periyakoil, V. (PI)

MED 149: Medical Interpreting at the Cardinal Free Clinics: The Qualified Bilingual Student Program

The quality of health care often depends as much on the interpreter as the provider. This foundation courses prepares bilingual students to work as medical interpreters in hospital and clinic settings. Students learn basic interpreting skills; ethics; communication techniques; medical vocabulary; key healthcare information; communication skills for advocacy; how to draft practical, working solutions, and professional development. By application only; must be an accepted Cardinal Free Clinic (CFC) interpreter volunteer. Applications accepted in Fall for Winter quarter and in Winter for Spring quarter. Students registering for this 2-unit course are required to interpret at the clinic a minimum of 2 weekend sessions; upon completion of this course, students can continue to volunteer at CFC for academic credit.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 157: Foundations for Community Health Engagement

Open to undergraduate, graduate, and MD students. Examination and exploration of community health principles and their application at the local level. Designed to prepare students to make substantive contributions in a variety of community health settings (e.g. clinics, government agencies, non-profit organization, advocacy groups). Topics include community health assessment; health disparities; health promotion and disease prevention; strategies for working with diverse, low-income, and underserved populations; and principles of ethical and effective community engagement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MED 158B: From Foodies to Freegans Practicum

Students work toward making change in the food system. This course matches students with a community partner in the local area who is working to address food issues, broadly defined. There are many ways to make meaningful impact, including working at Second Harvest Food Bank as a Health Ambassador, or to assist with the Healthy Cornerstore initiatives or Garden to Table with the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. Provides students with the opportunity to apply their academic area of concentration within a community-based context that fits their interests. Med 158A highly recommended but not required as a prerequisite.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 160: Physician Shadowing: Stanford Immersion in Medicine Series (SIMS)

Undergraduates are paired with a physician mentor at Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, or the Veteran's Administration Hospital. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Application and acceptance to the SIMS program.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 182: Early Clinical Experience at the Cardinal Free Clinics (MED 282)

The Cardinal Free Clinics, consisting of Arbor and Pacific Free Clinic, provide culturally appropriate, high quality transitional medical care for undeserved patient populations in the Bay Area. Students volunteer in various clinic roles to offer services including health education, interpretation, referrals, and labs. Clinical students are guided in the practice of medical interviews, history-taking and physical examinations as appropriate, and work with attending physicians to arrive at a diagnosis and management plan. By application only. Visit http://cfc.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 199: Undergraduate Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Advani, R. (PI); Ahmed, A. (PI); Ahuja, N. (PI); Akatsu, H. (PI); Al-Ahmad, A. (PI); Alizadeh, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Annes, J. (PI); Arai, S. (PI); Artandi, M. (PI); Artandi, S. (PI); Asch, S. (PI); Ashley, E. (PI); Assimes, T. (PI); Ayoub, W. (PI); Baiocchi, M. (PI); Banerjee, S. (PI); Barry, M. (PI); Basaviah, P. (PI); Basina, M. (PI); Basu, S. (PI); Bendavid, E. (PI); Benjamin, J. (PI); Berube, C. (PI); Bhalla, V. (PI); Bhatt, A. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blackburn, B. (PI); Blaschke, T. (PI); Blayney, D. (PI); Blish, C. (PI); Bouvier, D. (PI); Boxer, L. (PI); Braddock, C. (PI); Brinton, T. (PI); Brown, W. (PI); Carlson, R. (PI); Cartwright, C. (PI); Chan, D. (PI); Chang, C. (PI); Chen, A. (PI); Chertow, G. (PI); Cheung, R. (PI); Cho-Phan, C. (PI); Chu, G. (PI); Chua, K. (PI); Chung, L. (PI); Clarke, M. (PI); Clusin, W. (PI); Colevas, A. (PI); Colloff, E. (PI); Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI); Cooke, J. (PI); Cooper, A. (PI); Coutre, S. (PI); Crapo, L. (PI); Cullen, M. (PI); Das, A. (PI); Dash, R. (PI); Daugherty, T. (PI); David, S. (PI); Dawson, L. (PI); Deresinski, S. (PI); Desai, M. (PI); Desai, T. (PI); Dhillon, G. (PI); Dorman, J. (PI); Dosiou, C. (PI); DuBose, A. (PI); Edwards, L. (PI); Einav, S. (PI); Farquhar, J. (PI); Fathman, C. (PI); Fearon, W. (PI); Feldman, D. (PI); Felsher, D. (PI); Fisher, G. (PI); Fitzgerald, P. (PI); Ford, J. (PI); Ford, P. (PI); Fowler, M. (PI); Frayne, S. (PI); Friedland, S. (PI); Fries, J. (PI); Froelicher, V. (PI); Gabiola, J. (PI); Ganjoo, K. (PI); Garcia, G. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gardner, P. (PI); Gavi, B. (PI); Genovese, M. (PI); Gerson, L. (PI); Gesundheit, N. (PI); Giacomini, J. (PI); Glaseroff, A. (PI); Glenn, J. (PI); Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. (PI); Goldstein, M. (PI); Goodman, S. (PI); Goronzy, J. (PI); Gotlib, J. (PI); Gray, G. (PI); Greenberg, H. (PI); Greenberg, P. (PI); Gregory, P. (PI); Habtezion, A. (PI); Hallenbeck, J. (PI); Harman, S. (PI); Harrington, R. (PI); Harshman, L. (PI); Haskell, W. (PI); Heaney, C. (PI); Heidenreich, P. (PI); Henri, H. (PI); Ho, D. (PI); Hoffman, A. (PI); Holman, H. (PI); Holodniy, M. (PI); Hopkins, J. (PI); Horning, S. (PI); Hsia, H. (PI); Hunt, S. (PI); Ioannidis, J. (PI); Isom, R. (PI); Jernick, J. (PI); Ji, H. (PI); Johnston, L. (PI); Jones, E. (PI); Kahn, J. (PI); Kao, P. (PI); Kastelein, M. (PI); Katz, R. (PI); Katzenstein, D. (PI); Kenny, K. (PI); Khazeni, N. (PI); Khush, K. (PI); Killen, J. (PI); Kim, S. (PI); Kohrt, H. (PI); Kraemer, F. (PI); Krishnan, E. (PI); Kunz, P. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Kurian, A. (PI); Kuschner, W. (PI); Ladabaum, U. (PI); Lafayette, R. (PI); Laport, G. (PI); Lee, D. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Lee, P. (PI); Leung, L. (PI); Levitt, L. (PI); Levy, R. (PI); Levy, S. (PI); Liang, D. (PI); Liedtke, M. (PI); Lindsay, A. (PI); Lorig, K. (PI); Lowe, A. (PI); Lutchman, G. (PI); Majeti, R. (PI); McConnell, M. (PI); McLaughlin, T. (PI); Medeiros, B. (PI); Meyer, T. (PI); Miklos, D. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Milstein, A. (PI); Mitchell, B. (PI); Mohabir, P. (PI); Montoya, J. (PI); Morioka-Douglas, N. (PI); Musen, M. (PI); Neal, J. (PI); Negrin, R. (PI); Nevins, A. (PI); Nguyen, L. (PI); Nguyen, M. (PI); Nicolls, M. (PI); O' Callahan, P. (PI); Osterberg, L. (PI); Owens, D. (PI); Pao, A. (PI); Parnes, J. (PI); Parsonnet, J. (PI); Pasricha, P. (PI); Pegram, M. (PI); Periyakoil, V. (PI); Petersen, J. (PI); Pinto, H. (PI); Pompei, P. (PI); Popp, R. (PI); Posley, K. (PI); Price, E. (PI); Prochaska, J. (PI); Quertermous, T. (PI); Raffin, T. (PI); Rehkopf, D. (PI); Relman, D. (PI); Rizk, N. (PI); Robinson, B. (PI); Rockson, S. (PI); Rohatgi, R. (PI); Rosas, L. (PI); Rosen, G. (PI); Rosenberg, S. (PI); Rudd, P. (PI); Ruoss, S. (PI); Scandling, J. (PI); Schnittger, I. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Schroeder, J. (PI); Shafer, R. (PI); Shah, N. (PI); Shah, S. (PI); Sharp, C. (PI); Shieh, L. (PI); Shizuru, J. (PI); Shoor, S. (PI); Sikic, B. (PI); Singh, B. (PI); Singh, U. (PI); Spiekerkoetter, E. (PI); Srinivas, S. (PI); Stafford, R. (PI); Stefanick, M. (PI); Stertzer, S. (PI); Stevens, D. (PI); Stockdale, F. (PI); Strober, S. (PI); Studdert, D. (PI); Tai, J. (PI); Tamura, M. (PI); Tan, J. (PI); Telli, M. (PI); Tepper, R. (PI); Tompkins, L. (PI); Triadafilopoulos, G. (PI); Tsao, P. (PI); Upadhyay, D. (PI); Utz, P. (PI); Vagelos, R. (PI); Valantine, H. (PI); Verghese, A. (PI); Wakelee, H. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warvariv, V. (PI); Weill, D. (PI); Weinacker, A. (PI); Weng, W. (PI); Weyand, C. (PI); Wiedmann, T. (PI); Winkelmayer, W. (PI); Winkleby, M. (PI); Winslow, D. (PI); Winter, T. (PI); Witteles, R. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Yabu, J. (PI); Yang, P. (PI); Yeung, A. (PI); Yock, P. (PI); Zamanian, R. (PI); Zehnder, J. (PI); Zei, P. (PI); Zolopa, A. (PI); de Jesus Perez, V. (PI); Prochaska, J. (SI); Stafford, R. (SI); Chu, I. (GP); Hellman, E. (GP)

MED 213: Compassion Cultivation for the Physician-in-Training

Provides mentored practice and growth in students' knowledge, skills and attitudes in compassion cultivation for one's self and others. Integrates traditional contemplative practices with contemporary psychology and scientific research on compassion.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 220: Literature and Human Experimentation (AFRICAAM 223, COMPLIT 223, CSRE 123B, HUMBIO 175H)

This course introduces students to the ways literature has been used to think through the ethics of human subjects research and experimental medicine. We will focus primarily on readings that imaginatively revisit experiments conducted on vulnerable populations: namely groups placed at risk by their classification according to perceived human and cultural differences. We will begin with Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818), and continue our study via later works of fiction, drama and literary journalism, including Toni Morrison's Beloved, David Feldshuh's Miss Evers Boys, Hannah Arendt's Eichmann and Vivien Spitz's Doctors from Hell, Rebecca Skloot's Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, and Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go. Each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical and policy writings of the period; and our ultimate goal will be to understand modes of ethics deliberation that are possible via creative uses of the imagination, and literature's place in a history of ethical thinking about humane research and care.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ikoku, A. (PI)

MED 227: Bedside Ultrasound

For preclinical or clinical medical students, and others with permission. Introduces students to diagnostic ultrasound at the bedside. The normal anatomy of the heart, abdomen, and pelvis pertinent to ultrasound is taught. Some pathology involving these areas is also introduced. As the students' proficiency increases, those electing to can visit the Pacific Free Clinic to be introduced to scanning patients. 1 unit for class attendance only 2 units for class attendance and participation in the Pacific Free Clinic.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 234: Literature and Global Health (AFRICAAM 229, AFRICAST 229, COMPLIT 229, CSRE 129B, FRENCH 229, HUMBIO 175L)

This course examines the ways writers in literature and medicine have used the narrative form to explore the ethics of care in what has been called the developing world. We will begin with an introduction to global health ethics as a field rooted in philosophy and policy that address questions raised by practice in resource-constrained communities abroad. We will then spend the quarter understanding the way literature may deepen and even alter those questions. For instance: how have writers used scenes of practice in Africa, the Caribbean or South Asia to think through ideas of mercy, charity, beneficence and justice? How differently do they imagine such scenes when examining issues of autonomy, paternalism and language? To what extent, then, do novels and memoirs serve as sites of ethical inquiry? And how has literary study revealed the complexities of narrating care for underserved communities, and therefore presented close reading as a mode of ethics for global health? Readings will include prose fiction by Albert Camus, Joseph Conrad, Amitav Ghosh and Susan Sontag as well as physician memoirs featuring Frantz Fanon, Albert Schweitzer, Abraham Verghese and Paul Farmer.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ikoku, A. (PI)

MED 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135X, EDUC 335X, HUMBIO 26)

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 241: Clinical Skills for Patient Care in Free Clinics

Enrollment in this course is by application only for advanced volunteers at the Cardinal Free Clinics. Focus is on preparing students to gain early clinical experience by teaching basic skills such as taking patient histories, working with interpreters, providing motivational interviewing, and presenting cases to medical students or physicians. Students learn through classroom lectures and practice sessions. Upon successful completion of a competency assessment, students are able to serve in a clinic role in the Cardinal Free Clinics. Prerequisite: Advanced standing as a volunteer at the Cardinal Free Clinics.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 262: Economics of Health Improvement in Developing Countries (ECON 127)

Application of economic paradigms and empirical methods to health improvement in developing countries. Emphasis is on unifying analytic frameworks and evaluation of empirical evidence. How economic views differ from public health, medicine, and epidemiology; analytic paradigms for health and population change; the demand for health; the role of health in international development. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and ECON 102B.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Miller, G. (PI)

MED 275B: Biomedical Innovation Incubator

Introduction to medical device design and prototyping. Regulatory aspects, marketing, venture capital. 2 unit option: weekly seminar series and assignments; open to all. 5 unit option: weekly seminar series, hands-on medical device prototyping project in conjunction with Stanford MedicalnFaculty. 5 unit option by application only. Graduate students may take project option for 3 units. Project application and more information at bit.ly/ssbincubator.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Gardner, P. (PI)

MED 282: Early Clinical Experience at the Cardinal Free Clinics (MED 182)

The Cardinal Free Clinics, consisting of Arbor and Pacific Free Clinic, provide culturally appropriate, high quality transitional medical care for undeserved patient populations in the Bay Area. Students volunteer in various clinic roles to offer services including health education, interpretation, referrals, and labs. Clinical students are guided in the practice of medical interviews, history-taking and physical examinations as appropriate, and work with attending physicians to arrive at a diagnosis and management plan. By application only. Visit http://cfc.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 299: Directed Reading in Medicine

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Advani, R. (PI); Ahmed, A. (PI); Ahuja, N. (PI); Akatsu, H. (PI); Al-Ahmad, A. (PI); Alizadeh, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Annes, J. (PI); Arai, S. (PI); Artandi, M. (PI); Artandi, S. (PI); Asch, S. (PI); Ashley, E. (PI); Assimes, T. (PI); Ayoub, W. (PI); Banerjee, S. (PI); Barry, M. (PI); Basaviah, P. (PI); Basina, M. (PI); Basu, S. (PI); Bendavid, E. (PI); Benjamin, J. (PI); Berube, C. (PI); Bhalla, V. (PI); Bhatt, A. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blackburn, B. (PI); Blaschke, T. (PI); Blayney, D. (PI); Blish, C. (PI); Bouvier, D. (PI); Boxer, L. (PI); Braddock, C. (PI); Brinton, T. (PI); Brown, W. (PI); Carlson, R. (PI); Cartwright, C. (PI); Chakravarty, E. (PI); Chan, D. (PI); Chang, C. (PI); Chang, S. (PI); Chen, A. (PI); Chertow, G. (PI); Cheung, R. (PI); Chitkara, R. (PI); Cho-Phan, C. (PI); Chu, G. (PI); Chua, K. (PI); Chung, L. (PI); Clarke, M. (PI); Clusin, W. (PI); Colevas, A. (PI); Colloff, E. (PI); Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI); Cooke, J. (PI); Cooper, A. (PI); Coutre, S. (PI); Crapo, L. (PI); Cullen, M. (PI); Das, A. (PI); Dash, R. (PI); Daugherty, T. (PI); David, S. (PI); Dawson, L. (PI); Deresinski, S. (PI); Desai, M. (PI); Desai, T. (PI); Dhillon, G. (PI); Dorman, J. (PI); Dosiou, C. (PI); DuBose, A. (PI); Edwards, L. (PI); Einav, S. (PI); Farquhar, J. (PI); Fathman, C. (PI); Fearon, W. (PI); Feldman, D. (PI); Felsher, D. (PI); Fisher, G. (PI); Fitzgerald, P. (PI); Ford, J. (PI); Ford, P. (PI); Fowler, M. (PI); Frayne, S. (PI); Friedland, S. (PI); Fries, J. (PI); Froelicher, V. (PI); Gabiola, J. (PI); Ganjoo, K. (PI); Garcia, G. (PI); Garcia, R. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gardner, P. (PI); Gavi, B. (PI); Genovese, M. (PI); Gerson, L. (PI); Gesundheit, N. (PI); Giacomini, J. (PI); Glaseroff, A. (PI); Glenn, J. (PI); Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. (PI); Goldstein, M. (PI); Goodman, S. (PI); Goronzy, J. (PI); Gotlib, J. (PI); Gray, G. (PI); Greenberg, H. (PI); Greenberg, P. (PI); Gregory, P. (PI); Habtezion, A. (PI); Hallenbeck, J. (PI); Harman, S. (PI); Harrington, R. (PI); Harshman, L. (PI); Haskell, W. (PI); Heaney, C. (PI); Heidenreich, P. (PI); Henri, H. (PI); Ho, D. (PI); Hoffman, A. (PI); Holman, H. (PI); Holodniy, M. (PI); Hopkins, J. (PI); Horning, S. (PI); Hsia, H. (PI); Hunt, S. (PI); Ioannidis, J. (PI); Isom, R. (PI); Jernick, J. (PI); Jezmir, J. (PI); Ji, H. (PI); Johnston, L. (PI); Jones, E. (PI); Kahn, J. (PI); Kao, P. (PI); Kastelein, M. (PI); Katz, R. (PI); Katzenstein, D. (PI); Kenny, K. (PI); Khush, K. (PI); Killen, J. (PI); Kim, S. (PI); Kohrt, H. (PI); Kraemer, F. (PI); Krishnan, E. (PI); Kunz, P. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Kurian, A. (PI); Kuschner, W. (PI); Ladabaum, U. (PI); Lafayette, R. (PI); Laport, G. (PI); Lee, D. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Lee, P. (PI); Leung, L. (PI); Levitt, L. (PI); Levy, R. (PI); Levy, S. (PI); Liang, D. (PI); Liedtke, M. (PI); Lin, S. (PI); Lindsay, A. (PI); Lorig, K. (PI); Lowe, A. (PI); Lutchman, G. (PI); Majeti, R. (PI); McConnell, M. (PI); McLaughlin, T. (PI); Medeiros, B. (PI); Meyer, T. (PI); Miklos, D. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Milstein, A. (PI); Mitchell, B. (PI); Mohabir, P. (PI); Montoya, J. (PI); Morioka-Douglas, N. (PI); Musen, M. (PI); Neal, J. (PI); Negrin, R. (PI); Nevins, A. (PI); Nguyen, L. (PI); Nguyen, M. (PI); Nicolls, M. (PI); O' Callahan, P. (PI); Osterberg, L. (PI); Owens, D. (PI); Pao, A. (PI); Parnes, J. (PI); Parsonnet, J. (PI); Pasricha, P. (PI); Pegram, M. (PI); Periyakoil, V. (PI); Petersen, J. (PI); Pinto, H. (PI); Pompei, P. (PI); Popp, R. (PI); Posley, K. (PI); Price, E. (PI); Prochaska, J. (PI); Quertermous, T. (PI); Raffin, T. (PI); Rehkopf, D. (PI); Relman, D. (PI); Rizk, N. (PI); Robinson, B. (PI); Rockson, S. (PI); Rohatgi, R. (PI); Rosen, G. (PI); Rosenberg, S. (PI); Rudd, P. (PI); Ruoss, S. (PI); Scandling, J. (PI); Schillinger, E. (PI); Schnittger, I. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Schroeder, J. (PI); Shafer, R. (PI); Shah, N. (PI); Shah, S. (PI); Sharp, C. (PI); Shieh, L. (PI); Shizuru, J. (PI); Shoor, S. (PI); Sikic, B. (PI); Singh, B. (PI); Singh, U. (PI); Spiekerkoetter, E. (PI); Srinivas, S. (PI); Stafford, R. (PI); Stefanick, M. (PI); Stertzer, S. (PI); Stevens, D. (PI); Stockdale, F. (PI); Strober, S. (PI); Studdert, D. (PI); Tai, J. (PI); Tamura, M. (PI); Tan, J. (PI); Telli, M. (PI); Tepper, R. (PI); Tompkins, L. (PI); Tremmel, J. (PI); Triadafilopoulos, G. (PI); Tsao, P. (PI); Upadhyay, D. (PI); Utz, P. (PI); Vagelos, R. (PI); Valantine, H. (PI); Verghese, A. (PI); Wakelee, H. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warvariv, V. (PI); Weill, D. (PI); Weinacker, A. (PI); Weng, W. (PI); Weyand, C. (PI); Wiedmann, T. (PI); Winkelmayer, W. (PI); Winkleby, M. (PI); Winter, T. (PI); Witteles, R. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Yabu, J. (PI); Yang, P. (PI); Yeung, A. (PI); Yock, P. (PI); Zamanian, R. (PI); Zehnder, J. (PI); Zei, P. (PI); Zolopa, A. (PI); de Jesus Perez, V. (PI); Mendoza, F. (SI); Daniel, A. (GP); Hellman, E. (GP); Jezmir, J. (TA); Johnson, A. (GP)

MED 370: Medical Scholars Research

Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Advani, R. (PI); Ahmed, A. (PI); Ahuja, N. (PI); Akatsu, H. (PI); Al-Ahmad, A. (PI); Alizadeh, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Andrews, J. (PI); Annes, J. (PI); Arai, S. (PI); Artandi, M. (PI); Artandi, S. (PI); Asch, S. (PI); Ashley, E. (PI); Assimes, T. (PI); Ayoub, W. (PI); Banerjee, S. (PI); Barry, M. (PI); Basaviah, P. (PI); Basina, M. (PI); Basu, S. (PI); Bendavid, E. (PI); Benjamin, J. (PI); Berube, C. (PI); Bhalla, V. (PI); Bhatt, A. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blackburn, B. (PI); Blaschke, T. (PI); Blayney, D. (PI); Blish, C. (PI); Bollyky, P. (PI); Bouvier, D. (PI); Boxer, L. (PI); Braddock, C. (PI); Brinton, T. (PI); Brown, W. (PI); Carlson, R. (PI); Cartwright, C. (PI); Chan, D. (PI); Chang, C. (PI); Chang, S. (PI); Chen, A. (PI); Chertow, G. (PI); Cheung, L. (PI); Cheung, R. (PI); Chi, J. (PI); Cho-Phan, C. (PI); Chu, G. (PI); Chua, K. (PI); Chung, L. (PI); Clarke, M. (PI); Clusin, W. (PI); Colevas, A. (PI); Colloff, E. (PI); Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI); Cooke, J. (PI); Cooper, A. (PI); Coutre, S. (PI); Crapo, L. (PI); Cullen, M. (PI); Das, A. (PI); Dash, R. (PI); Daugherty, T. (PI); David, S. (PI); Dawson, L. (PI); Deresinski, S. (PI); Desai, M. (PI); Desai, T. (PI); Dhillon, G. (PI); Dorman, J. (PI); Dosiou, C. (PI); Doyle, R. (PI); DuBose, A. (PI); Edwards, L. (PI); Einav, S. (PI); Farquhar, J. (PI); Fathman, C. (PI); Fearon, W. (PI); Feldman, D. (PI); Felsher, D. (PI); Fisher, G. (PI); Fitzgerald, P. (PI); Ford, J. (PI); Ford, P. (PI); Fowler, M. (PI); Frayne, S. (PI); Friedland, S. (PI); Fries, J. (PI); Froelicher, V. (PI); Gabiola, J. (PI); Ganjoo, K. (PI); Garcia, G. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gardner, P. (PI); Gavi, B. (PI); Genovese, M. (PI); Gerson, L. (PI); Gesundheit, N. (PI); Giacomini, J. (PI); Glaseroff, A. (PI); Glenn, J. (PI); Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. (PI); Goldstein, M. (PI); Goodman, S. (PI); Goronzy, J. (PI); Gotlib, J. (PI); Gray, G. (PI); Greenberg, H. (PI); Greenberg, P. (PI); Gregory, P. (PI); Habtezion, A. (PI); Hallenbeck, J. (PI); Harman, S. (PI); Harrington, R. (PI); Harshman, L. (PI); Haskell, W. (PI); Heaney, C. (PI); Heidenreich, P. (PI); Henri, H. (PI); Ho, D. (PI); Hoffman, A. (PI); Holman, H. (PI); Holodniy, M. (PI); Hopkins, J. (PI); Horning, S. (PI); Hsia, H. (PI); Hunt, S. (PI); Ioannidis, J. (PI); Isom, R. (PI); Jernick, J. (PI); Ji, H. (PI); Johnston, L. (PI); Jones, E. (PI); Kahn, J. (PI); Kao, P. (PI); Kastelein, M. (PI); Katz, R. (PI); Katzenstein, D. (PI); Kenny, K. (PI); Khush, K. (PI); Killen, J. (PI); Kim, S. (PI); King, A. (PI); Kohrt, H. (PI); Kraemer, F. (PI); Krishnan, E. (PI); Kunz, P. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Kurian, A. (PI); Kuschner, W. (PI); Ladabaum, U. (PI); Lafayette, R. (PI); Laport, G. (PI); Lee, D. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Lee, P. (PI); Leung, L. (PI); Levitt, L. (PI); Levy, R. (PI); Levy, S. (PI); Liang, D. (PI); Liedtke, M. (PI); Lindsay, A. (PI); Lorig, K. (PI); Lowe, A. (PI); Luby, S. (PI); Lutchman, G. (PI); Majeti, R. (PI); McConnell, M. (PI); McLaughlin, T. (PI); Medeiros, B. (PI); Meyer, T. (PI); Miklos, D. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Milstein, A. (PI); Mitchell, B. (PI); Mohabir, P. (PI); Montoya, J. (PI); Morioka-Douglas, N. (PI); Musen, M. (PI); Neal, J. (PI); Negrin, R. (PI); Nevins, A. (PI); Nguyen, L. (PI); Nguyen, M. (PI); Nicolls, M. (PI); O' Callahan, P. (PI); Osterberg, L. (PI); Owens, D. (PI); Pao, A. (PI); Parnes, J. (PI); Parsonnet, J. (PI); Pasricha, P. (PI); Pegram, M. (PI); Periyakoil, V. (PI); Petersen, J. (PI); Pinto, H. (PI); Pompei, P. (PI); Popp, R. (PI); Posley, K. (PI); Price, E. (PI); Prochaska, J. (PI); Qi, S. (PI); Quertermous, T. (PI); Raffin, T. (PI); Ramchandran, K. (PI); Rehkopf, D. (PI); Relman, D. (PI); Rizk, N. (PI); Robinson, B. (PI); Rockson, S. (PI); Rohatgi, R. (PI); Rosen, G. (PI); Rosenberg, S. (PI); Rudd, P. (PI); Ruoss, S. (PI); Rydel, T. (PI); Scandling, J. (PI); Schnittger, I. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Schroeder, J. (PI); Shafer, R. (PI); Shah, N. (PI); Shah, S. (PI); Sharp, C. (PI); Shen, K. (PI); Shieh, L. (PI); Shizuru, J. (PI); Shoor, S. (PI); Sikic, B. (PI); Singh, B. (PI); Singh, U. (PI); Spiekerkoetter, E. (PI); Srinivas, S. (PI); Stafford, R. (PI); Stefanick, M. (PI); Stertzer, S. (PI); Stevens, D. (PI); Stockdale, F. (PI); Strober, S. (PI); Studdert, D. (PI); Tai, J. (PI); Tamura, M. (PI); Tan, J. (PI); Telli, M. (PI); Tepper, R. (PI); Tompkins, L. (PI); Tremmel, J. (PI); Triadafilopoulos, G. (PI); Tsao, P. (PI); Upadhyay, D. (PI); Utz, P. (PI); Vagelos, R. (PI); Valantine, H. (PI); Verghese, A. (PI); Wakelee, H. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warvariv, V. (PI); Weill, D. (PI); Weinacker, A. (PI); Weng, W. (PI); Weyand, C. (PI); Winkelmayer, W. (PI); Winkleby, M. (PI); Winter, T. (PI); Witteles, R. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Yabu, J. (PI); Yang, P. (PI); Yeung, A. (PI); Yock, P. (PI); Zamanian, R. (PI); Zehnder, J. (PI); Zei, P. (PI); Zolopa, A. (PI); Zulman, D. (PI); de Jesus Perez, V. (PI); Cullen, M. (SI)

MED 399: Graduate Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Advani, R. (PI); Ahmed, A. (PI); Ahuja, N. (PI); Akatsu, H. (PI); Al-Ahmad, A. (PI); Alizadeh, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Annes, J. (PI); Arai, S. (PI); Artandi, M. (PI); Artandi, S. (PI); Asch, S. (PI); Ashley, E. (PI); Assimes, T. (PI); Ayoub, W. (PI); Banerjee, S. (PI); Barry, M. (PI); Basaviah, P. (PI); Basina, M. (PI); Basu, S. (PI); Bendavid, E. (PI); Benjamin, J. (PI); Berube, C. (PI); Bhalla, V. (PI); Bhatt, A. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blackburn, B. (PI); Blaschke, T. (PI); Blayney, D. (PI); Blish, C. (PI); Bouvier, D. (PI); Boxer, L. (PI); Braddock, C. (PI); Brinton, T. (PI); Brown, W. (PI); Carlson, R. (PI); Cartwright, C. (PI); Chakravarty, E. (PI); Chan, D. (PI); Chang, C. (PI); Chen, A. (PI); Chertow, G. (PI); Cheung, R. (PI); Chitkara, R. (PI); Cho-Phan, C. (PI); Chu, G. (PI); Chua, K. (PI); Chung, L. (PI); Clarke, M. (PI); Clusin, W. (PI); Colevas, A. (PI); Colloff, E. (PI); Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI); Cooke, J. (PI); Cooper, A. (PI); Coutre, S. (PI); Crapo, L. (PI); Cullen, M. (PI); Das, A. (PI); Dash, R. (PI); Daugherty, T. (PI); David, S. (PI); Dawson, L. (PI); Deresinski, S. (PI); Desai, M. (PI); Desai, T. (PI); Dhillon, G. (PI); Dorman, J. (PI); Dosiou, C. (PI); DuBose, A. (PI); Einav, S. (PI); Farquhar, J. (PI); Fathman, C. (PI); Fearon, W. (PI); Feldman, D. (PI); Felsher, D. (PI); Fisher, G. (PI); Fitzgerald, P. (PI); Ford, J. (PI); Ford, P. (PI); Fowler, M. (PI); Frayne, S. (PI); Friedland, S. (PI); Fries, J. (PI); Froelicher, V. (PI); Gabiola, J. (PI); Ganjoo, K. (PI); Garber, A. (PI); Garcia, G. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gardner, P. (PI); Gavi, B. (PI); Genovese, M. (PI); Gerson, L. (PI); Gesundheit, N. (PI); Giacomini, J. (PI); Gibbons, P. (PI); Glaseroff, A. (PI); Glenn, J. (PI); Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. (PI); Goldstein, M. (PI); Goodman, S. (PI); Goronzy, J. (PI); Gotlib, J. (PI); Gray, G. (PI); Greenberg, H. (PI); Greenberg, P. (PI); Gregory, P. (PI); Habtezion, A. (PI); Hallenbeck, J. (PI); Harman, S. (PI); Harrington, R. (PI); Harshman, L. (PI); Haskell, W. (PI); Heaney, C. (PI); Heidenreich, P. (PI); Henri, H. (PI); Ho, D. (PI); Hoffman, A. (PI); Holman, H. (PI); Holodniy, M. (PI); Hopkins, J. (PI); Horning, S. (PI); Hsia, H. (PI); Hunt, S. (PI); Ioannidis, J. (PI); Isom, R. (PI); Javaid, B. (PI); Jernick, J. (PI); Ji, H. (PI); Johnston, L. (PI); Jones, E. (PI); Kahn, J. (PI); Kao, P. (PI); Kastelein, M. (PI); Katz, R. (PI); Katzenstein, D. (PI); Keeffe, E. (PI); Kenny, K. (PI); Khatri, P. (PI); Khazeni, N. (PI); Khush, K. (PI); Killen, J. (PI); Kim, S. (PI); King, A. (PI); Kohrt, H. (PI); Kraemer, F. (PI); Krishnan, E. (PI); Kunz, P. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Kurian, A. (PI); Kuschner, W. (PI); Ladabaum, U. (PI); Lafayette, R. (PI); Laport, G. (PI); Lee, D. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Lee, P. (PI); Leung, L. (PI); Levitt, L. (PI); Levy, R. (PI); Levy, S. (PI); Liang, D. (PI); Liedtke, M. (PI); Lindsay, A. (PI); Lorig, K. (PI); Lowe, A. (PI); Lutchman, G. (PI); Majeti, R. (PI); McConnell, M. (PI); McLaughlin, T. (PI); Medeiros, B. (PI); Meyer, T. (PI); Miklos, D. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Milstein, A. (PI); Mitchell, B. (PI); Mohabir, P. (PI); Montoya, J. (PI); Morioka-Douglas, N. (PI); Musen, M. (PI); Neal, J. (PI); Negrin, R. (PI); Nevins, A. (PI); Nguyen, L. (PI); Nguyen, M. (PI); Nicolls, M. (PI); O' Callahan, P. (PI); Osterberg, L. (PI); Owens, D. (PI); Pao, A. (PI); Parnes, J. (PI); Parsonnet, J. (PI); Pasricha, P. (PI); Pegram, M. (PI); Periyakoil, V. (PI); Petersen, J. (PI); Pinto, H. (PI); Pompei, P. (PI); Popp, R. (PI); Posley, K. (PI); Price, E. (PI); Prochaska, J. (PI); Quertermous, T. (PI); Raffin, T. (PI); Rehkopf, D. (PI); Relman, D. (PI); Rizk, N. (PI); Robinson, B. (PI); Rockson, S. (PI); Rohatgi, R. (PI); Rosen, G. (PI); Rosenberg, S. (PI); Rudd, P. (PI); Ruoss, S. (PI); Scandling, J. (PI); Schnittger, I. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Schroeder, J. (PI); Shafer, R. (PI); Shah, N. (PI); Shah, S. (PI); Sharp, C. (PI); Shieh, L. (PI); Shizuru, J. (PI); Shoor, S. (PI); Sikic, B. (PI); Singh, B. (PI); Singh, U. (PI); Spiekerkoetter, E. (PI); Srinivas, S. (PI); Stafford, R. (PI); Stefanick, M. (PI); Stertzer, S. (PI); Stevens, D. (PI); Stockdale, F. (PI); Strober, S. (PI); Studdert, D. (PI); Tai, J. (PI); Tamura, M. (PI); Tan, J. (PI); Telli, M. (PI); Tepper, R. (PI); Tompkins, L. (PI); Triadafilopoulos, G. (PI); Tsao, P. (PI); Upadhyay, D. (PI); Utz, P. (PI); Vagelos, R. (PI); Valantine, H. (PI); Van Dam, J. (PI); Verghese, A. (PI); Wakelee, H. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warvariv, V. (PI); Weill, D. (PI); Weinacker, A. (PI); Weng, W. (PI); Weyand, C. (PI); Winkelmayer, W. (PI); Winkleby, M. (PI); Winter, T. (PI); Witteles, R. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Yabu, J. (PI); Yang, P. (PI); Yeung, A. (PI); Yock, P. (PI); Zamanian, R. (PI); Zehnder, J. (PI); Zei, P. (PI); Zolopa, A. (PI); de Jesus Perez, V. (PI); Daniel, A. (GP); Hellman, E. (GP)

MED 70Q: Cancer and the Immune System

Preference to sophomores. Myths and facts surrounding the idea that the immune system is capable of recognizing malignant cells. The biological basis and function of effector arms of the immune system; how these mechanisms may be used to investigate the biological basis and potential therapy of cancer. How the immune system functions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Negrin, R. (PI)

MED 130: The Practice of Happiness

The Practice of Happiness is a 1-unit credit course that provides students with tools and strategies to develop a sustainable approach to their happiness and well-being. Students will learn breathwork- and meditation-based processes to decrease stress and increase happiness and peace. In addition, students will also engage in community-building group discussions, interactive processes, and study happiness-based research to discover for themselves what happiness is, and how it can be sustained as a personal practice. In addition to weekly sessions, there are 3 mandatory back-to-back sessions over a weekend in the quarter- hours will be Friday: 6:30pm - 10pm; Saturday/Sunday: 1pm - 5pm (exact dates TBD). See yesplus.stanford.edu for further insight into the program. Enrollment limited; priority to residents of Castano Hall; others selected by application.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 135: Community Leadership

Offered through Residential Education to residents of Castano House, Manzanita Park. Topics include: emotional intelligence, leadership styles, listening, facilitating meetings, group dynamics and motivation, finding purpose, fostering resilience. Students will lead discussions on personal development, relationships, risky behaviors, race, ethnicity, spirituality, integrity.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kao, P. (PI)

MED 143C: Patient Health Education in Community Clinics - Practicum (MED 243C)

Open to undergraduate, graduate, and medical students. For students currently volunteering in one of the course-affiliated clinic sites. Objective is to expand health education skills, discuss more complex health education topics, and reflect upon experiences in the clinic. Includes readings and online reflections. Pre-requisites: MED 143A/243A, Med 143B/243B.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 147: Methods in Community Assessment, Evaluation, and Research (MED 247)

Development of pragmatic skills for design, implementation, and analysis of structured interviews, focus groups, survey questionnaires, and field observations. Topics include: principles of community-based participatory research, including importance of dissemination; strengths and limitations of different study designs; validity and reliability; construction of interview and focus group questions; techniques for moderating focus groups; content analysis of qualitative data; survey questionnaire design; and interpretation of commonly-used statistical analyses.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Kiernan, M. (PI)

MED 176: Impact of Infectious Diseases on Human History (HUMBIO 176)

Impact of infectious diseases on human society. Some topics include: Plague of Justinian and 14th century; impact on exploration, trade and conquest; how slavery, malaria and yellow fever conspired to alter the New World; Microbes and war; diseases of poverty, tuberculosis and others; Cholera and public health; pandemic influenza; diseases of human progress. Students give a 30 minute presentation on a topic of their choosing that exemplifies an aspect of the impact of politics, societal influences, religion or other forces on infectious diseases.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MED 184: Team Leadership in the Cardinal Free Clinics (MED 284)

Open to Steering Committee and Managers of Cardinal Free Clinics. Introduction to skills for effective leadership, including: conflict resolution, team dynamics, leadership styles, personality types, giving and receiving feedback, and group decision-making. Utilizes hands-on-activities and real-life clinic scenarios. Applied learning through shifts at the Cardinal Free Clinics and related project work.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 200: The Medical Device Entrepreneur's Course Primer

This course provides students and entrepreneurs a solid understanding of the complex US regulatory framework governing medical devices, in vitro diagnostics and drug-device combination products. Through class lectures, research and team assignments, class participants learn the key regulatory, clinical and ethical issues in biomedical product innovation. Focuses specifically on US investigational and marketing submission types and preparation of submission outlines, key steps to develop a product that will meet US regulatory requirements and development of regulatory strategy for a novel product. While there are no technical prerequisites, the course projects are challenging, and thus are more suitable for graduate and advanced undergraduate students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 209: Health Law: Quality and Safety of Care

(Same as LAW 727) Concerns about the quality of health care, along with concerns about its cost and accessibility, are the focal points of American health policy. Considers how legislators, courts, and professional groups attempt to safeguard the quality and safety of the health care patients receive. The course approaches "regulation" in a broad sense. Focuses on regimes for determining who may deliver health care services (e.g. licensing and accreditation agencies), legal and ethical obligations providers owe to patients (e.g. confidentiality, informed consent), individual and institutional liability for substandard care, and various proposals for reforming the medical malpractice system. Includes discussion of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (aka, "Obamacare"), which is launching many new initiatives aimed at assuring or improving health care quality.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Studdert, D. (PI)

MED 222: The Medical Malpractice System

Focus is on policy and law pertaining to the medical malpractice system in the U.S. Readings include a mix of articles from the medical, law and health policy literatures, as well as some legal cases. Includes problem-based learning and small group work.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 223: Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Sciences Seminar

Weekly modified journal club primarily for CVP Scholarly Application students, Cardiovascular Institute graduate students, clinical and research fellows, and faculty. Open to other graduate students and medical students (Advanced undergraduate students with permission of instructor). Each meeting begins with an overview of a particular area by a faculty member, followed by presentation of a seminal paper in that area by a postdoctoral fellow or a graduate student. Discussion follows the presentation, after which the faculty moderator meets separately with the students for further questions and discussion.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 229: Introduction to Global Health

Provides an overview of global health and how it is similar to and different from public health and tropical medicine. Topics include the evolution, economics, politics of global health, major players in global health, and issues of geography, politics, humanitarianism, human rights, science, research, culture and disease.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 237: Health Law: Improving Public Health

(Same as Law 762) Examines how the law can be used to improve the public's health. Major themes explored include: what authority does the government have to regulate in the interest of public health? How are individual rights balanced against this authority? What are the benefits and pitfalls of using laws and litigation to achieve public health goals? Investigates these issues in several contexts, including the control and prevention of infectious disease, laws aimed at preventing obesity and associated noncommunicable diseases, tobacco regulation, ensuring access to medical care, reproductive health, lawsuits against tobacco, food and gun companies, and public health emergencies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Mello, M. (PI)

MED 243C: Patient Health Education in Community Clinics - Practicum (MED 143C)

Open to undergraduate, graduate, and medical students. For students currently volunteering in one of the course-affiliated clinic sites. Objective is to expand health education skills, discuss more complex health education topics, and reflect upon experiences in the clinic. Includes readings and online reflections. Pre-requisites: MED 143A/243A, Med 143B/243B.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 246: The Medical Interview for Spanish Speakers

Student led forum for practicing and learning medical Spanish related specifically to the medical interview. Prepares clinical students to interact more effectively with Spanish speaking patients in clinics. Classes are topical; each class includes a demonstration, medical vocabulary practice, and conversational practice on the topic of the day.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Garcia, G. (PI)

MED 247: Methods in Community Assessment, Evaluation, and Research (MED 147)

Development of pragmatic skills for design, implementation, and analysis of structured interviews, focus groups, survey questionnaires, and field observations. Topics include: principles of community-based participatory research, including importance of dissemination; strengths and limitations of different study designs; validity and reliability; construction of interview and focus group questions; techniques for moderating focus groups; content analysis of qualitative data; survey questionnaire design; and interpretation of commonly-used statistical analyses.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 248: Student Rounds

Teams of preclinical students meet weekly with a clinical student to hear the history and physical of a recent case the clinical student encountered on the wards. Following the presentation, the preclinical students work together under the guidance of the clinical student to develop a problem list and plan, which are then compared with the problem list, plan, and orders made by the actual admitting team. In the course of presenting the cases, the clinical student describes personal experiences and practical components of ward work and daily clinical routine.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Kenny, K. (PI)

MED 252: Outcomes Analysis (BIOMEDIN 251, HRP 252)

Methods of conducting empirical studies which use large existing medical, survey, and other databases to ask both clinical and policy questions. Econometric and statistical models used to conduct medical outcomes research. How research is conducted on medical and health economics questions when a randomized trial is impossible. Problem sets emphasize hands-on data analysis and application of methods, including re-analyses of well-known studies. Prerequisites: one or more courses in probability, and statistics or biostatistics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 255: The Responsible Conduct of Research

Forum. How to identify and approach ethical dilemmas that commonly arise in biomedical research. Issues in the practice of research such as in publication and interpretation of data, and issues raised by academic/industry ties. Contemporary debates at the interface of biomedical science and society regarding research on stem cells, bioweapons, genetic testing, human subjects, and vertebrate animals. Completion fulfills NIH/ADAMHA requirement for instruction in the ethical conduct of research. Prerequisite: research experience recommended.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 257C: Community Health Advocacy

Third of a three-quarter course series that provides students with knowledge and concrete skills for working with and advocating for underserved populations. Through coursework and placements in community health clinics and social service organizations, students broaden and deepen their understanding of the social and economic determinants of health, how they impact underserved populations, and the various levels at which these challenges can ¿ and should ¿ be addressed. Student engage in structured activities that center around supporting the mission of their placement organization: direct service with clients and design and implementation of a capacity-building project. Weekly evening classroom meetings serve as a forum for teaching and training, discussion of class readings and placement experiences, project development, and troubleshooting and support. Prerequisites: MED 257A/B.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 259: Oaxacan Health on Both Sides of the Border

Required for students participating in the Community Health in Oaxaca summer program. Introduction to the health literacy and health-seeking behaviors of Oaxacan and other Mexican migrants; the health challenges these groups face. Through discussion and reflection, students prepare for clinical work and community engagement in Oaxaca, while also gaining knowledge and insight to make connections between their experiences in Mexico and their health-related work with Mexican immigrants in the Bay Area. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). Prerequisite: application and acceptance into the Community Health in Oaxaca Summer Program (http://och.stanford.edu/oaxaca.html).
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 260: HIV: The Virus, the Disease, the Research (IMMUNOL 260)

Open to medical students, graduate students in biological sciences, undergraduates with strong biological background. Topics: immunopathogenesis immune deficits, opportunistic infections including TB, and malignancies; genomics viral genetic analyses that have traced the origin of HIV-1 and HIV-2 to primates, dated the spread of infection in humans, and characterized the evolution of the virus within infected individuals; antiretroviral drug development identification of drug targets, structure-based drug design, overcoming drug resistance, pivotal clinical trials, and role of community activism; clinical management solutions in high- and low-income countries; vaccine development learning from past failures and the future of engineering the human immune response. 4 units includes a final project assigned in consultation with the instructor to fit the individual student's background and area of HIV interest.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Shafer, R. (PI)

MED 271: Global Biodesign: Medical Technology in an International Context (BIOE 371)

(Same as OIT 587) This course examines the development and commercialization of innovative medical technologies in different global settings. Faculty and guest speakers from the medtech field will discuss the status of the industry, as well as opportunities in and challenges to medical technology innovation unique to seven primary geographic regions: Africa, China, Europe, India, Japan, United States and Latin America. Students will be exposed to the biodesign innovation process, which provides a proven approach for identifying important unmet medical needs and inventing meaningful solutions to address them. They will also explore key differences between the covered geographies, which range from emerging markets with vast bottom-of-the-pyramid and growing middle class populations, to well-established markets with sophisticated demands and shifting demographics. The class will utilize real-world case studies and class projects (for 3-unit students) to promote engagement and provide a hands-on learning experience. There is no 2 unit option for this course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 272B: Biodesign Innovation: Concept Development and Implementation (BIOE 374B, ME 368B)

Two-quarter sequence (see OIT384 for complete description of the sequence). The second quarter focuses on how to take a conceptual solution to a medical need forward into development and potential commercialization. Continuing work in teams with engineering and medical colleagues, students will learn the fundamentals of medical device prototyping; patent strategies; advanced planning for reimbursement and FDA approval; choosing a commercialization route (licensing vs. start-up); marketing, sales and distribution strategies; ethical issues including conflict of interest; fundraising approaches and cash requirements; financial modeling; essentials of developing a business or research plan/canvas; and strategies for assembling a development team. Final project presentations are made to a panel of prominent venture and corporate investors. New students (i.e. students who did not take OIT384 in the winter quarter) may be admitted, depending on team needs. Candidates need to submit an application at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/bdn/courses/bioe374app.jsp by March 1.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 284: Team Leadership in the Cardinal Free Clinics (MED 184)

Open to Steering Committee and Managers of Cardinal Free Clinics. Introduction to skills for effective leadership, including: conflict resolution, team dynamics, leadership styles, personality types, giving and receiving feedback, and group decision-making. Utilizes hands-on-activities and real-life clinic scenarios. Applied learning through shifts at the Cardinal Free Clinics and related project work.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 295: Advanced Cardiac Life Support

(For clinical MD students only) Prepares students to manage the victim of a cardiac arrest. Knowledge and skills necessary for resuscitation of critically ill patients. Clinical scenarios and small group discussions address cardiovascular pharmacology, arrhythmia recognition and therapy, acute coronary syndrome including myocardial infarction, ventricular dysrhythmias and defibrillation, and acute ischemic stroke. Requires pre-course preparation and an intensive two-day session on a Friday and Saturday. Students should get the approval of their Clerkship Coordinator before registering for the course. Recommended prerequisites: Medicine 300A, Pediatrics 300A, or Surgery 300A.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Giacomini, J. (PI)
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