Print Settings
 

MED 52Q: What is a Human? Scientific and Mythological Approaches to Meaning

Reconciling our mythology and current scientific consensus is a worthwhile pursuit to establish a balanced, congruent personal philosophy toward life. nIn this sophomore seminar, we will first explore scientific perspectives on the origin and evolution of humans utilizing archaeology, genetics, and evolutionary psychology. With this framework secured, we will sample major religious texts such as Genesis, The New Testament, and Eastern texts. Throughout the course, each student will have opportunities to reflect deeply on his or her own personal worldview (past, present, and future) to tailor a personalized philosophy for life. This course will provide you with an overview of a fascinating subject that can impact progress on your life journey and career.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pottathil, V. (PI)

MED 121: Translational Research and Applied Medicine (MED 221)

(Same as MED 121; undergraduate students enroll in MED 121) Open to graduate students and medical students, this course enables students to learn basic principles in the design, performance and analysis of translational medical research studies. The course includes both didactic seminars from experts in translational medicine as well as the opportunity to design and present a translational research project. Students enrolling for 3 units are paired with a TRAM translational research project and work as a team with TRAM trainees and faculty on a weekly basis, as arranged by the instructor, and present a final project update at the end of the quarter.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 124: Global Child Health (HUMBIO 124C, PEDS 124)

This course introduces students to key challenges to the health and well being of children worldwide. We explicitly focus on child and public health problems in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) to reflect the global burden of disease among children. We will review the scope and magnitude of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality, as well as examine regional variations. We will then identify both medical and non-medical causes, effects of, as well as interventions to address, some of the biggest child health problems. The course will also prevent an overview of the role of culture, gender, and non-state actors (NGOs, foundations, etc.) on health and health policy. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 160: Physician Shadowing: Stanford Immersion in Medicine Series (SIMS)

Undergraduates are paired with a physician mentor at Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, or the Veteran's Administration Hospital. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Application and acceptance to the SIMS program.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 182: Early Clinical Experience at the Cardinal Free Clinics (MED 282)

The Cardinal Free Clinics, consisting of Arbor and Pacific Free Clinic, provide culturally appropriate, high quality transitional medical care for undeserved patient populations in the Bay Area. Students volunteer in various clinic roles to offer services including health education, interpretation, referrals, and labs. In clinic students are guided in the practice of medical interviews, history-taking and physical examinations as appropriate, and work with attending physicians to arrive at a diagnosis and management plan. Visit http://cfc.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 199: Undergraduate Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Advani, R. (PI); Ahmed, A. (PI); Ahuja, N. (PI); Akatsu, H. (PI); Al-Ahmad, A. (PI); Alizadeh, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Andrews, J. (PI); Annes, J. (PI); Arai, S. (PI); Artandi, M. (PI); Artandi, S. (PI); Asch, S. (PI); Ashley, E. (PI); Assimes, T. (PI); Ayoub, W. (PI); Baiocchi, M. (PI); Banerjee, S. (PI); Barry, M. (PI); Basaviah, P. (PI); Basina, M. (PI); Basu, S. (PI); Behal, R. (PI); Bendavid, E. (PI); Benjamin, J. (PI); Berube, C. (PI); Bhalla, V. (PI); Bhatt, A. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blackburn, B. (PI); Blaschke, T. (PI); Blayney, D. (PI); Blish, C. (PI); Bloom, G. (PI); Bollyky, P. (PI); Bouvier, D. (PI); Boxer, L. (PI); Braddock, C. (PI); Brinton, T. (PI); Brown, W. (PI); Bulow, K. (PI); Carlson, R. (PI); Cartwright, C. (PI); Chan, D. (PI); Chan, G. (PI); Chang, C. (PI); Chang, S. (PI); Chaudhuri, O. (PI); Chen, A. (PI); Chertow, G. (PI); Cheung, R. (PI); Chi, J. (PI); Cho-Phan, C. (PI); Chu, G. (PI); Chua, K. (PI); Chung, L. (PI); Clarke, M. (PI); Clusin, W. (PI); Colevas, A. (PI); Colloff, E. (PI); Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI); Cooke, J. (PI); Cooper, A. (PI); Coutre, S. (PI); Crapo, L. (PI); Crump, C. (PI); Cullen, M. (PI); Das, A. (PI); Dash, R. (PI); Daugherty, T. (PI); David, S. (PI); Dawson, L. (PI); Deresinski, S. (PI); Desai, M. (PI); Desai, T. (PI); Dhillon, G. (PI); Dorman, J. (PI); Dosiou, C. (PI); Downing, N. (PI); DuBose, A. (PI); Edwards, L. (PI); Einav, S. (PI); Fantl, W. (PI); Farquhar, J. (PI); Fathman, C. (PI); Fearon, W. (PI); Feldman, D. (PI); Felsher, D. (PI); Fisher, G. (PI); Fitzgerald, P. (PI); Ford, J. (PI); Ford, P. (PI); Fowler, M. (PI); Frayne, S. (PI); Friedland, S. (PI); Fries, J. (PI); Froelicher, V. (PI); Gabiola, J. (PI); Ganjoo, K. (PI); Garcia, G. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gardner, P. (PI); Gavi, B. (PI); Genovese, M. (PI); Gerson, L. (PI); Gesundheit, N. (PI); Giacomini, J. (PI); Glaseroff, A. (PI); Glenn, J. (PI); Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. (PI); Goldstein, M. (PI); Goodman, S. (PI); Goronzy, J. (PI); Gotlib, J. (PI); Gray, G. (PI); Greenberg, H. (PI); Greenberg, P. (PI); Gregory, P. (PI); Habtezion, A. (PI); Hallenbeck, J. (PI); Harman, S. (PI); Harrington, R. (PI); Harshman, L. (PI); Haskell, W. (PI); Heaney, C. (PI); Heidenreich, P. (PI); Henri, H. (PI); Ho, D. (PI); Hoffman, A. (PI); Holman, H. (PI); Holodniy, M. (PI); Hopkins, J. (PI); Horning, S. (PI); Hsia, H. (PI); Hunt, S. (PI); Ioannidis, J. (PI); Isom, R. (PI); Jernick, J. (PI); Ji, H. (PI); Johnston, L. (PI); Jones, E. (PI); Kahn, J. (PI); Kao, P. (PI); Kastelein, M. (PI); Katz, R. (PI); Katzenstein, D. (PI); Kenny, K. (PI); Khatri, P. (PI); Khazeni, N. (PI); Khush, K. (PI); Killen, J. (PI); Kim, S. (PI); Kohrt, H. (PI); Kraemer, F. (PI); Krishnan, E. (PI); Kummar, S. (PI); Kunz, P. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Kurian, A. (PI); Kuschner, W. (PI); Ladabaum, U. (PI); Lafayette, R. (PI); Laport, G. (PI); Laws, A. (PI); Lee, D. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Lee, P. (PI); Leung, L. (PI); Levin, E. (PI); Levitt, L. (PI); Levy, R. (PI); Levy, S. (PI); Liang, D. (PI); Liedtke, M. (PI); Lin, B. (PI); Lindsay, A. (PI); Lorenz, K. (PI); Lorig, K. (PI); Lotfi, J. (PI); Lowe, A. (PI); Lowsky, R. (PI); Luby, S. (PI); Lutchman, G. (PI); Majeti, R. (PI); McConnell, M. (PI); McLaughlin, T. (PI); Medeiros, B. (PI); Meyer, T. (PI); Miklos, D. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Milstein, A. (PI); Mitchell, B. (PI); Mohabir, P. (PI); Montoya, J. (PI); Morioka-Douglas, N. (PI); Musen, M. (PI); Narayan, S. (PI); Neal, J. (PI); Negrin, R. (PI); Nevins, A. (PI); Nguyen, L. (PI); Nguyen, M. (PI); Nguyen, P. (PI); Nicolls, M. (PI); O' Callahan, P. (PI); Okafor, P. (PI); Osterberg, L. (PI); Owens, D. (PI); Palaniappan, L. (PI); Pao, A. (PI); Parnes, J. (PI); Parsonnet, J. (PI); Pasricha, P. (PI); Pegram, M. (PI); Periyakoil, V. (PI); Petersen, J. (PI); Pinto, H. (PI); Pompei, P. (PI); Popp, R. (PI); Posley, K. (PI); Price, E. (PI); Prochaska, J. (PI); Puri, R. (PI); Quertermous, T. (PI); Raffin, T. (PI); Rehkopf, D. (PI); Relman, D. (PI); Rizk, N. (PI); Robinson, B. (PI); Rockson, S. (PI); Rohatgi, R. (PI); Rosas, L. (PI); Rosen, G. (PI); Rosenberg, S. (PI); Rudd, P. (PI); Ruoss, S. (PI); Rydel, T. (PI); Scandling, J. (PI); Schnittger, I. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Schroeder, J. (PI); Shafer, R. (PI); Shah, J. (PI); Shah, N. (PI); Shah, S. (PI); Sharp, C. (PI); Shen, K. (PI); Shieh, L. (PI); Shizuru, J. (PI); Shoor, S. (PI); Sikic, B. (PI); Singer, S. (PI); Singh, B. (PI); Singh, U. (PI); Skeff, K. (PI); Spiekerkoetter, E. (PI); Srinivas, S. (PI); Stafford, R. (PI); Stefanick, M. (PI); Stertzer, S. (PI); Stevens, D. (PI); Stockdale, F. (PI); Strober, S. (PI); Studdert, D. (PI); Tai, J. (PI); Tamura, M. (PI); Tan, J. (PI); Telli, M. (PI); Tepper, R. (PI); Tompkins, L. (PI); Tremmel, J. (PI); Triadafilopoulos, G. (PI); Tsao, P. (PI); Upadhyay, D. (PI); Utz, P. (PI); Vagelos, R. (PI); Valantine, H. (PI); Verghese, A. (PI); Wakelee, H. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warvariv, V. (PI); Weill, D. (PI); Weinacker, A. (PI); Weng, K. (PI); Weng, W. (PI); Weyand, C. (PI); Wiedmann, T. (PI); Winkelmayer, W. (PI); Winkleby, M. (PI); Winograd, C. (PI); Winslow, D. (PI); Winter, T. (PI); Witteles, R. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Yabu, J. (PI); Yang, P. (PI); Yeung, A. (PI); Yock, P. (PI); Zamanian, R. (PI); Zehnder, J. (PI); Zei, P. (PI); Zolopa, A. (PI); Zulman, D. (PI); de Jesus Perez, V. (PI); Gardner, C. (SI)

MED 201: Internal Medicine: Body as Text

Body as Text refers to the idea that every patient's body tells a story. The narrative includes the past and present of a person's social and medical condition; it is a demonstration of the phenotype. The art of reading the body as text was at its peak in the first half of the 20th century, but as technology has become ascendant, bedside skills and the ability to read the text have faded. Beyond scientific knowledge and medical facts, it is this often forgotten craft which is at the heart of the excitement of being an internist. This course introduces students to the art of the clinical exam, to developing a clinical eye, and learning to see the body in a completely different way. Enrollment will be based on a lottery system, for which details will be sent to first year students at the end of mini quarter.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 210: Principles and Practice of Healthcare Quality Improvement

This course will introduce students to foundational concepts in healthcare quality improvement, and provide tools for translating these principles into practice. Topics include: current state, A3, SMART goals, root-cause analysis, metrics and measures, PDCA cycles, process controls, systems, and sustainability. Students have the option of completing the course curriculum in conjunction with a quality improvement/patient safety project offered by the SMS Quality Improvement Interest Group. This course will meet for three in-class sessions throughout the quarter, with students reviewing the online materials before each session. Dinner will be served. May be repeated for credit up to three quarters with continued work on a quality improvement project, and all units count towards the Quality Improvement Scholarly Concentration.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 215A: Health Policy Graduate Student Tutorial I (HRP 201A)

Seminar series is the core tutorial for first-year Health Policy PhD students and all MS Health Policy students. Major themes in fields of study including health insurance, healthcare financing and delivery, health systems and reform and disparities in the US and globally, health and economic development, health law and policy, resource allocation, efficiency and equity, healthcare quality, measurement and the efficacy and effectiveness of interventions. Blocks of session led by Stanford expert faculty in particular fields of study. 2 unit registration requires written responses to assigned reading questions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Haberland, C. (PI)

MED 221: Translational Research and Applied Medicine (MED 121)

(Same as MED 121; undergraduate students enroll in MED 121) Open to graduate students and medical students, this course enables students to learn basic principles in the design, performance and analysis of translational medical research studies. The course includes both didactic seminars from experts in translational medicine as well as the opportunity to design and present a translational research project. Students enrolling for 3 units are paired with a TRAM translational research project and work as a team with TRAM trainees and faculty on a weekly basis, as arranged by the instructor, and present a final project update at the end of the quarter.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 223: Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Sciences Seminar

The focus of MED223 is to fine tune critical thinking skills by analyzing original publications and understanding the current complexities of the cardiovascular system. Students will attend a lecture series presented by prominent external speakers on Tuesdays and learn new approaches and technology from Stanford faculty on Thursdays. Assigned reading will be discussed and interpreted in class (1-2 papers per class).
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 224: Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation Lab (SE Lab) - Global & Planetary Health (HRP 224, PUBLPOL 224)

Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation Lab (SE Lab) - Global & Planetary Health is a Collaboratory workshop for students/fellows to design and develop innovative social ventures addressing key challenges in health and the environment, especially in support of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs 2030). Your mandate in identifying problems and designing solutions is broad and flexible! SE Lab is open to students and fellows across Stanford and combines design thinking exercises, short lectures & case studies, workshops, small group teamwork, presentations, guest speakers, and faculty, practitioner and peer feedback to support you and your team in generating and developing ideas and projects that will change the world! Join SE Lab with an idea or simply the desire to join a team. Enrollment limited to 30.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Bloom, G. (PI)

MED 228: Physicians and Social Responsibility

Social and political context of the roles of physicians and health professionals in social change; policy, advocacy, and shaping public attitudes. How physicians have influenced governmental policy on nuclear arms proliferation; environmental health concerns; physicians in government; activism through research; the effects of poverty on health; homelessness; and gun violence. Guest speakers from national and international NGOs.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Laws, A. (PI)

MED 239: Workshop For Ending Diagnostic Odysseys

Have you ever wondered how Dr. House solves difficult cases? Intrigued by Sherlock Holmes? Want to be a disease detective? In this project-based course, teams of students will work together to study cases of un-diagnosed rare and novel diseases. Like Dr. House, students will attempt to solve these medical mysteries. Course directors and team facilitators from Stanford's Center for Undiagnosed Diseases will introduce methods and approaches successful in solving past cases. Teams are expected to report on their findings at the completion of the quarter. Interested medical students may pursue follow-up research in subsequent quarters through Med Scholars. Co-Enrollment in the lecture-based course MED 244 is encouraged but not required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wheeler, M. (PI)

MED 244: Diagnostic Odysseys In Medicine (HUMBIO 44)

Medicine is rapidly evolving, with increasing emphasis on genetic testing, immunophenotyping and integration of technology to guide diagnosis. In this course, experts from Stanford and Silicon Valley will highlight exciting developments. Topics include the latest developments in genetics and genomics (including genome testing in clinical practice, direct to consumer testing, and frontiers in neurogenetics), immunophenotyping, utilization of databases to research diseases and the emerging field of machine learning and clinical decision support in optimizing diagnostic strategies. Students who wish to engage in a mentored multi-disciplinary team-based research project related to advanced diagnostic techniques can additionally enroll in MED 239.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hom, J. (PI)

MED 245: Leadership in Medicine: Developing your Moral Identity

In this leadership course students will either view videos of well-known leaders being interviewed or watch a live interview of the leader by a professional communications officer each week. With these interviews we will be highlighting the ethical challenges that these leaders faced and how they rose to these challenges, or fell short. These famous leaders will come from a variety of fields including academia, government, law, public service, the military or journalism. We will then hold small group discussions after the interviews to debate the decisions made by these leaders. Through discourse and deep reflection we aim to prepare students for their own leadership challenges of the future. Dinner will be provided.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 248: Student Rounds

Teams of preclinical students meet weekly with a clinical student to hear the history and physical of a recent case the clinical student encountered on the wards. Following the presentation, the preclinical students work together under the guidance of the clinical student to develop a problem list and plan, which are then compared with the problem list, plan, and orders made by the actual admitting team. In the course of presenting the cases, the clinical student describes personal experiences and practical components of ward work and daily clinical routine.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Kenny, K. (PI); Wang, J. (TA)

MED 253: Building for Digital Health (CS 342)

This project-based course will provide a comprehensive overview of key requirements in the design and full-stack implementation of a digital health research application. Several pre-vetted and approved projects from the Stanford School of Medicine will be available for students to select from and build. Student teams learn about all necessary approval processes to deploy a digital health solution (data privacy clearance/I RB approval, etc.) and be guided in the development of front-end and back-end infrastructure using best practices. The final project will be the presentation and deployment of a fully approved digital health research application. CS106A, CS106B, Recommended: CS193P/A, CS142, CS47, CS110. Limited enrollment for this course. Students need to submit their application online via: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfENFanSf9TL8fvCS9RSLOQ90g_NF2_lETx3pQ8Y8BjxToR7g/viewform
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Aalami, O. (PI)

MED 255: The Responsible Conduct of Research

Forum. How to identify and approach ethical dilemmas that commonly arise in biomedical research. Issues in the practice of research such as in publication and interpretation of data, and issues raised by academic/industry ties. Contemporary debates at the interface of biomedical science and society regarding research on stem cells, bioweapons, genetic testing, human subjects, and vertebrate animals. Completion fulfills NIH/ADAMHA requirement for instruction in the ethical conduct of research. Prerequisite: research experience recommended.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 265: Advanced Topics in the Economics of Health and Medical Care (HRP 257)

Emphasis is on research studies in health economics. Seminar style course focuses on health economics. Complimentary with HRP 256. Students will be expected to read and present papers to the group and discuss concepts with faculty. Restricted to second year or beyond PhD students in economics & economics-related disciplines.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 271: Global Biodesign: Medical Technology in an International Context (BIOE 371)

This course ( BIOE371, MED271) exposes students to the challenges and opportunities of developing and implementing innovative health technologies to help patients around the world. Non-communicable diseases, such as metabolic and chronic respiratory disease, now account for 7 in 10 deaths worldwide, creating the need for innovative health technologies that work across diverse global markets. At the beginning of the quarter, the course will provide an overview of the dynamic global health technology industry. Next, faculty members, guest experts, and students will discuss key differences and similarities when commercializing new products in the for-profit health technology sector across six important regions: the US and Europe, China and Japan, and India and Brazil. Finally, the course will explore critical ¿global health¿ issues that transcend international borders and how technology can be leveraged to address them. This section will culminate with an interactive debate focused on whether for-profit, nonprofit, or hybrid models are best for implementing sustainable global health solutions. The last class will be devoted to synthesis, reflection, and a discussion of career opportunities in the global health technology field.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 273: Biodesign for Digital Health (BIOE 273)

Health care is facing significant cross-industry challenges and opportunities created by a number of factors including: the increasing need for improved access to affordable, high-quality care; growing demand from consumers for greater control of their health and health data; the shift in focus from sick care to prevention and health optimization; aging demographics and the increased burden of chronic conditions; and new emphasis on real-world, measurable health outcomes for individuals and populations. Moreover, the delivery of health information and services is no longer tied to traditional brick and mortar hospitals and clinics: it has increasingly become "mobile," enabled by apps, sensors, wearables; simultaneously, it has been augmented and often revolutionized by emerging digital and information technologies, as well as by the data that these technologies generate. This multifactorial transformation presents opportunities for innovation across the entire cycle of care, from wellness, to acute and chronic diseases, to care at the end of life. But how does one approach innovation in digital health to address these health care challenges while ensuring the greatest chance of success? At Stanford Biodesign, we believe that innovation is a process that can be learned, practiced, and perfected; and, it starts with a need. In Biodesign for Digital Health, students will learn about digital health and the Biodesign needs-driven innovation process from over 50 industry experts. Over the course of ten weeks, these speakers join the teaching team in a dynamic classroom environment that includes lectures, panel discussions, and breakout sessions. These experts represent startups, corporations, venture capital firms, accelerators, research labs, health organizations, and more. Student teams will take actual digital and mobile health challenges and learn how to apply Biodesign innovation principles to research and evaluate needs, ideate solutions, and objectively assess them against key criteria for satisfying the needs. Teams take a hands-on approach with the support of need coaches and mentors. On the final day of class, teams present to a panel of digital health experts and compete for project extension funding. Friday section will be used for team projects and for scheduled workshops. Limited enrollment for this course. Students need to submit their application online via: https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_28ZWIF8RJsyMvCR
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Aalami, O. (PI); Yock, P. (PI)

MED 277: AI-Assisted Care (CS 337)

AI has been advancing quickly, with its impact everywhere. In healthcare, innovation in AI could help transforming of our healthcare system. This course offers a diverse set of research projects focusing on cutting edge computer vision and machine learning technologies to solve some of healthcare's most important problems. The teaching team and teaching assistants will work closely with students on research projects in this area. Research projects include Care for Senior at Senior Home, Surgical Quality Analysis, AI Assisted Parenting, Burn Analysis & Assessment and more. AI areas include Video Understanding, Image Classification, Object Detection, Segmentation, Action Recognition, Deep Learning, Reinforcement Learning, HCI and more. The course is open to students in both school of medicine and school of engineering.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 278: Stanford Health Consulting Group- Leadership

This course is application-based and will be composed of students who have taken ¿Stanford Health Consulting Group - Core¿ and who wish to take on leadership roles in organizing and managing the high-impact health care projects for the class, which address major strategic and operational challenges in health care delivery and innovation. Participants will select projects, define objectives and deliverables, manage teams of 4-8 students from the core class, and ultimately serve as a bridge between students, faculty sponsors, and other health care stakeholders. Enrollment requires permission from the Instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 279: Stanford Heath Consulting Group - Core

This course provides the opportunity to analyze and solve major strategic and operational challenges in health care delivery and innovation through interdisciplinary team projects. Teams will receive direct mentorship from Stanford Medicine faculty, health care leaders, and experienced student leads, with projects carefully defined to optimize high-impact experiential learning and leadership development. Projects will culminate with student-led presentations to faculty sponsors and other health care stakeholders, as well as opportunities for further dissemination of solutions.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 282: Early Clinical Experience at the Cardinal Free Clinics (MED 182)

The Cardinal Free Clinics, consisting of Arbor and Pacific Free Clinic, provide culturally appropriate, high quality transitional medical care for undeserved patient populations in the Bay Area. Students volunteer in various clinic roles to offer services including health education, interpretation, referrals, and labs. In clinic students are guided in the practice of medical interviews, history-taking and physical examinations as appropriate, and work with attending physicians to arrive at a diagnosis and management plan. Visit http://cfc.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 285: Global Leaders and Innovators in Human and Planetary Health (HRP 285)

Are you interested in innovative ideas and strategies for addressing urgent challenges in human and planetary health? This lecture series features a selection of noteworthy leaders, innovators and experts across diverse sectors such as: healthcare/medical innovation, foundations/venture capital, biotechnology/pharmaceuticals, social innovation/entrepreneurship health, tech/media and artificial intelligence (AI), human rights, global poverty/development, sustainable agriculture/hunger/nutrition. Co-convened by faculty, fellows and students collaborating across several Stanford centers, the course invites the discussion of global problems, perspectives and solutions in the fields of health and the environment. Light Dinner will be served. Students from all backgrounds are encouraged to enroll - registration open to all Stanford students and fellows. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 286: Health Information Technology and Strategy

Health Information technology was intended to help reduce and cost and improve the quality of health care services. TO date, this is little evidence that this goal has been achieved. This course is designed to explore economic frameworks that can help us to understand how health IT can achieve it's intended goals. These frameworks build from general business and economic models used successfully in other industries. The course will be utilize both business cases and lecture to prepare students to propose potential novel applications of health information technology solutions. Each student will have a team-based final project.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

MED 289: Introduction to Bioengineering Research (BIOE 390)

Preference to medical and bioengineering graduate students with first preference given to Bioengineering Scholarly Concentration medical students. Bioengineering is an interdisciplinary field that leverages the disciplines of biology, medicine, and engineering to understand living systems, and engineer biological systems and improve engineering designs and human and environmental health. Students and faculty make presentations during the course. Students expected to make presentations, complete a short paper, read selected articles, and take quizzes on the material.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 290: Independent Study with Presence and the Program in Bedside Medicine

Students work with their faculty mentor on projects and studies that are broadly centered around the vision and mission of Presence: The Art and Science of Human Connection and the Program in Bedside Medicine. Please see our websites for updated projects and initiatives - Presence + Program in Bedside Medicine. Currently, we focus on: How do we teach and emphasize to students, residents, physicians (and beyond) in the medical field the need to master bedside skills? How does bedside medicine affect patient care? How has patient care changed with the omnipresence of technology in our lives? How is bedside medicine going to change in the next few decades, centuries? In investigating these questions, students utilize scientific articles and data, engage patients, and collaborate with our faculty and staff. Independent study projects culminate in a presentation to our team, with the potential for posters or manuscripts. Students paired with faculty based on their area of interest and faculty/project needs.We emphasize the human connection with patients, and students are encouraged to engage patients within our program for teaching sessions, research studies, among other projects. Enrollment varies with and is limited to faculty need. Repeatable for credit; more than one-quarter of commitment expected.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

MED 295: Advanced Cardiac Life Support

(For clinical MD students only) Prepares students to manage the victim of a cardiac arrest. Knowledge and skills necessary for resuscitation of critically ill patients. Clinical scenarios and small group discussions address cardiovascular pharmacology, arrhythmia recognition and therapy, acute coronary syndrome including myocardial infarction, ventricular dysrhythmias and defibrillation, and acute ischemic stroke. Students should get the approval of their Clerkship Coordinator before registering for the course. nRecommended prerequisites: Medicine 300A, Pediatrics 300A, or Surgery 300A. nPrerequisite: EMED 201A
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 299: Directed Reading in Medicine

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Advani, R. (PI); Ahmed, A. (PI); Ahuja, N. (PI); Akatsu, H. (PI); Al-Ahmad, A. (PI); Alizadeh, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Andrews, J. (PI); Annes, J. (PI); Arai, S. (PI); Artandi, M. (PI); Artandi, S. (PI); Asch, S. (PI); Ashley, E. (PI); Assimes, T. (PI); Ayoub, W. (PI); Banerjee, S. (PI); Barry, M. (PI); Basaviah, P. (PI); Basina, M. (PI); Basu, S. (PI); Behal, R. (PI); Bendavid, E. (PI); Benjamin, J. (PI); Berube, C. (PI); Bhalla, V. (PI); Bhatt, A. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blackburn, B. (PI); Blaschke, T. (PI); Blayney, D. (PI); Blish, C. (PI); Bloom, G. (PI); Bollyky, P. (PI); Bouvier, D. (PI); Boxer, L. (PI); Braddock, C. (PI); Brinton, T. (PI); Brown, W. (PI); Bulow, K. (PI); Carlson, R. (PI); Cartwright, C. (PI); Chakravarty, E. (PI); Chan, D. (PI); Chan, G. (PI); Chang, C. (PI); Chang, S. (PI); Chen, A. (PI); Chertow, G. (PI); Cheung, R. (PI); Chi, J. (PI); Cho-Phan, C. (PI); Chu, G. (PI); Chua, K. (PI); Chung, L. (PI); Clarke, M. (PI); Clusin, W. (PI); Colevas, A. (PI); Colloff, E. (PI); Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI); Cooke, J. (PI); Cooper, A. (PI); Coutre, S. (PI); Crapo, L. (PI); Crump, C. (PI); Cullen, M. (PI); Das, A. (PI); Dash, R. (PI); Daugherty, T. (PI); David, S. (PI); Dawson, L. (PI); Deresinski, S. (PI); Desai, M. (PI); Desai, T. (PI); Dhillon, G. (PI); Dorman, J. (PI); Dosiou, C. (PI); DuBose, A. (PI); Edwards, L. (PI); Einav, S. (PI); Farquhar, J. (PI); Fathman, C. (PI); Fearon, W. (PI); Feldman, D. (PI); Felsher, D. (PI); Fisher, G. (PI); Fitzgerald, P. (PI); Ford, J. (PI); Ford, P. (PI); Fowler, M. (PI); Frayne, S. (PI); Friedland, S. (PI); Fries, J. (PI); Froelicher, V. (PI); Gabiola, J. (PI); Ganjoo, K. (PI); Garcia, G. (PI); Garcia, R. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gardner, P. (PI); Gavi, B. (PI); Genovese, M. (PI); Gerson, L. (PI); Gesundheit, N. (PI); Giacomini, J. (PI); Glaseroff, A. (PI); Glenn, J. (PI); Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. (PI); Goldstein, M. (PI); Goodman, S. (PI); Goronzy, J. (PI); Gotlib, J. (PI); Gray, G. (PI); Greenberg, H. (PI); Greenberg, P. (PI); Gregory, P. (PI); Habtezion, A. (PI); Hallenbeck, J. (PI); Harman, S. (PI); Harrington, R. (PI); Harshman, L. (PI); Haskell, W. (PI); Heaney, C. (PI); Heidenreich, P. (PI); Henri, H. (PI); Ho, D. (PI); Hoffman, A. (PI); Holman, H. (PI); Holodniy, M. (PI); Hopkins, J. (PI); Horning, S. (PI); Hsia, H. (PI); Hunt, S. (PI); Ioannidis, J. (PI); Isom, R. (PI); Jernick, J. (PI); Ji, H. (PI); Johnston, L. (PI); Jones, E. (PI); Kahn, J. (PI); Kao, P. (PI); Kastelein, M. (PI); Katz, R. (PI); Katzenstein, D. (PI); Kenny, K. (PI); Khatri, P. (PI); Khazeni, N. (PI); Khush, K. (PI); Killen, J. (PI); Kim, S. (PI); Kohrt, H. (PI); Kraemer, F. (PI); Krishnan, E. (PI); Kummar, S. (PI); Kunz, P. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Kurian, A. (PI); Kuschner, W. (PI); Ladabaum, U. (PI); Lafayette, R. (PI); Laport, G. (PI); Lee, D. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Lee, P. (PI); Leung, L. (PI); Levin, E. (PI); Levitt, J. (PI); Levitt, L. (PI); Levy, R. (PI); Levy, S. (PI); Liang, D. (PI); Liedtke, M. (PI); Lin, S. (PI); Lindsay, A. (PI); Lorig, K. (PI); Lowe, A. (PI); Lowsky, R. (PI); Luby, S. (PI); Lutchman, G. (PI); Majeti, R. (PI); McConnell, M. (PI); McLaughlin, T. (PI); Medeiros, B. (PI); Meyer, T. (PI); Miklos, D. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Milstein, A. (PI); Mitchell, B. (PI); Mohabir, P. (PI); Montoya, J. (PI); Morioka-Douglas, N. (PI); Musen, M. (PI); Narayan, S. (PI); Neal, J. (PI); Negrin, R. (PI); Nevins, A. (PI); Nguyen, L. (PI); Nguyen, M. (PI); Nguyen, P. (PI); Nicolls, M. (PI); O' Callahan, P. (PI); Osterberg, L. (PI); Owens, D. (PI); Pao, A. (PI); Parnes, J. (PI); Parsonnet, J. (PI); Pasricha, P. (PI); Pegram, M. (PI); Periyakoil, V. (PI); Petersen, J. (PI); Pinto, H. (PI); Pompei, P. (PI); Popp, R. (PI); Posley, K. (PI); Price, E. (PI); Prochaska, J. (PI); Puri, R. (PI); Quertermous, T. (PI); Raffin, T. (PI); Rehkopf, D. (PI); Relman, D. (PI); Rizk, N. (PI); Robinson, B. (PI); Rockson, S. (PI); Rohatgi, R. (PI); Rosas, L. (PI); Rosen, G. (PI); Rosenberg, S. (PI); Rudd, P. (PI); Ruoss, S. (PI); Rydel, T. (PI); Scandling, J. (PI); Schillinger, E. (PI); Schnittger, I. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Schroeder, J. (PI); Shafer, R. (PI); Shah, N. (PI); Shah, S. (PI); Sharp, C. (PI); Shen, K. (PI); Shieh, L. (PI); Shizuru, J. (PI); Shoor, S. (PI); Sikic, B. (PI); Singer, S. (PI); Singh, B. (PI); Singh, U. (PI); Skeff, K. (PI); Smith-Coggins, R. (PI); Spiekerkoetter, E. (PI); Srinivas, S. (PI); Stafford, R. (PI); Stefanick, M. (PI); Stertzer, S. (PI); Stevens, D. (PI); Stockdale, F. (PI); Strober, S. (PI); Studdert, D. (PI); Tai, J. (PI); Tamura, M. (PI); Tan, J. (PI); Telli, M. (PI); Tepper, R. (PI); Tompkins, L. (PI); Tremmel, J. (PI); Triadafilopoulos, G. (PI); Tsao, P. (PI); Upadhyay, D. (PI); Utz, P. (PI); Vagelos, R. (PI); Valantine, H. (PI); Verghese, A. (PI); Wakelee, H. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warvariv, V. (PI); Weill, D. (PI); Weinacker, A. (PI); Weng, K. (PI); Weng, W. (PI); Weyand, C. (PI); Wiedmann, T. (PI); Winkelmayer, W. (PI); Winkleby, M. (PI); Winslow, D. (PI); Winter, T. (PI); Witteles, R. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Yabu, J. (PI); Yang, P. (PI); Yeung, A. (PI); Yock, P. (PI); Zamanian, R. (PI); Zehnder, J. (PI); Zei, P. (PI); Zolopa, A. (PI); Zulman, D. (PI); de Jesus Perez, V. (PI); Mendoza, F. (SI); Jezmir, J. (TA)

MED 300A: Internal Medicine Core Clerkship

Closed to visitors. Teaches the natural history, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of medical illness. Emphasis is placed on acquiring the understanding, skills, and attitudes desirable in a scientific and compassionate physician. Students record histories, physical examinations, and laboratory data for patients for whom they are responsible and present their findings, together with their diagnoses and treatment plans, at rounds and conferences. Developing sound clinical reasoning skills is continuously emphasized. An essential aspect of the clerkship is the students¿ gradual assumption of direct responsibility for, and full-time involvement in, patient care with the house staff and faculty team. To take advantage of the differences in patient populations and teaching staffs of the four hospitals, students spend four weeks at either SUMC or PAVAMC, and four weeks at either SCVMC in San Jose or KPMC in Santa Clara. The resulting eight week experience is an integrated curriculum designed to cover the essentials of internal medicine. The Department of Medicine supervises a random draw-based assignment to two of the four locations shortly before the beginning of each odd-numbered clerkship period. A passing grade will require both a satisfactory performance at both clinical sites and passing the NBME Subject Exam at the end of 8 weeks. Prereq: MED 208 or INDE 206. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for eight weeks. 18 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Varies depending on site assignment. Students will be notified prior to the first day. Units: 12. Call Code: 4. Director: John Kugler, M.D. (jkugler@stanford.edu). Other Faculty: Staff. Coord: Nancy D¿Amico (650-721-1640), 1215 Welch Road, Mod B, Space #37, MC 5418. (SUMC, PAVAMC, SCVMC, KPMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 302A: Infectious Diseases Clerkship

Open to visitors. The infectious diseases clerkship features an active inpatient service at Stanford Hospital, which averages two to four new consults per day. As a consulting specialty service within the Department of Medicine, participants are able to see a wide variety of community-acquired and nosocomial infections. Particular emphasis is placed on clinical and diagnostic reasoning, as well as in developing a good working knowledge of antimicrobial agents and a rational approach for their use. The training and teaching opportunities are rich because of the case mix (medical, surgical, ICU) and broad patient populations that are seen at Stanford Hospital. The service is supervised on a daily basis by the infectious diseases fellow, who will work closely with students rotating on the clinical service. Students attend daily patient rounds, weekly infectious diseases conferences, and may attend other research or patient-care conferences at Stanford. Two-week rotations are possible, but four weeks is preferred. Prereq: Medicine 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12, full time for four weeks. A two-week rotation is also permissible. Maximum two students per period. Reporting Instructions: On the first day of the rotation, page the Stanford general infectious diseases fellow through the Stanford page operator: (650) 723-6661 at 8:00 am. The infectious diseases fellows¿ team room, L-134, is located in the Division of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine home office on the first floor of the Lane building. Units: 6. Call Code: 1. Director: Andrew Nevins, M.D. Other Faculty: Staff. Coord: Brenda Norrie (650-725-8338). (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 302B: Infectious Diseases Clerkship

Open to visitors. The infectious diseases clerkship features an active inpatient service at the Palo Alto VA, which averages one to three new consults per day. As a consulting specialty service within the Department of Medicine, participants are able to see a wide variety of community-acquired and nosocomial infections. Particular emphasis is placed on clinical and diagnostic reasoning, as well as in developing a good working knowledge of antimicrobial agents and a rational approach for their use. The training and teaching opportunities are rich because of the case mix (medical, surgical, ICU) and patient populations that are seen at the Palo Alto VA. The service is supervised on a daily basis by the infectious diseases fellow, who will work closely with students rotating on the clinical service. Students attend daily patient rounds, weekly infectious diseases conferences, and may attend other research or patient-care conferences at the VA and/or Stanford. Two-week rotations are possible, but four weeks is preferred. Course objectives and resources are provided at the beginning of the rotation. Prereq: Medicine 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 2 students per period. Reporting Instructions: On the first day of the rotation, page the Palo Alto VA infectious diseases fellow through the Stanford page operator: (650) 723-6661 at 8:30 am. Units: 6. Call Code: 1.Director: David Relman, M.D. Other Faculty: A. Chary, M. Holodniy, J. Parsonnet, C. Renault, U. Singh, D. Winslow. Coord: Marian Askew (650-493-5000 x64209, marian.askew@va.gov.) (PAVAMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 302C: Infectious Diseases Clerkship

Open to visitors. Teaches the skills of diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases, including acute illnesses seen in the economically disadvantaged, and subspecialty patient referrals. The format of the clerkship at SCVMC is the same as at SUMC and PAVAMC, but the patient population at SCVMC differs from that of the other two hospitals. Two infectious diseases teaching conferences are held weekly for all three hospital services, and there are two additional conferences per month at SCVMC. Consultations are provided to all general (medical, ob-gyn, surgical) and specialized (burn, rehabilitation, dialysis) units. Tuberculosis clinic and HIV clinic experiences are also available during the rotation. The director of the diagnostic microbiology laboratory will instruct students on diagnostic microbiology lab use and interpretation of results. The Infection Prevention nurses provide an orientation to hospital epidemiology. Students will be supervised by an attending, fellow and one to two residents. Students wishing to do this clerkship must get approval from Dr. Supriya Narasimhan first before registering. nPrereq: Medicine 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 2 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: SCVMC, Room 6C095, 6th floor, Old Main Hospital, SCVMC; Time: 8:30 am. Units: 6. Call Code: 1. Director: Supriya Narasimhan, M.D., (408-885-5304). Other Faculty: J. Gupta, J. Kim, S. Narasimhan, A. Polesky, M. Ray, H. Sahni, J. Szumowski. Coord: Melanie Bozarth (408-885-5395; melanie.bozarth@hhs.sccgov.org). (SCVMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 303A: Cardiology Clerkship - Inpatient/Outpatient Consult

Selective 1. Open to visitors. Emphasizes the acquisition of diagnostic skills related to cardiovascular evaluation. This experience is derived through active participation in the inpatient consultative cardiology program, which is directed by Dr. Stanley Rockson. In addition, at least three half days per week are spent in the outpatient setting, which encompasses aspects of preventive cardiology as well. Direct patient experiences are supplemented with one-on-one didactic sessions and directed reading. The elective also emphasizes the acquisition of ECG reading skills via electrocardiographic reading sessions. Prereq: Medicine 300A. Periods Avail: 4-12, full-time for four weeks. 2 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Dr. Rockson, CVRC CV-267; Time: 8:30 am. Units: 6. Call Code: 0. Director: Stanley Rockson, M.D. (650-725-7571). Other Faculty: Staff. Coord: Stanley Rockson, M.D. (650-725-7571). (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 303B: Cardiology Clerkship

Selective 1. Open to visitors. Exposes the students to all areas of clinical cardiology. Students participate in four half-day ambulatory care cardiology clinics, perform at least 3-5 new consultations per week, with each consultation being presented to an attending physician and having a consultation note written. Additionally, each student ¿rounds¿ five days a week on patients on the consultation service. Students read electrocardiograms almost daily. Their physical examinations are reviewed by the attending physician and/or cardiology fellow. They are exposed to all areas of clinical cardiologic testing: exercise treadmill/stress testing, radionuclide testing (thallium scans and radionuclide ejection fractions), cardiac ultrasound studies, cardiac catheterization and percutaneous transluminal coronary intervention (PTCI). Students follow each of their patients through these tests. When surgery is required, they observe the procedure in the operating room. Students participate in daily didactic sessions covering all areas of basic cardiology and are present at daily coronary care unit/medical intensive care unit rounds. Each student also has the opportunity to participate in any other ongoing medical or surgical teaching conferences as time permits. Prereq: None. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 5 students per period. (Upon request, 2 students may be added). Reporting Instructions: Where: PAVAMC, Second Floor, Rm E2-426; Time: 7:30 am. Units: 6. Call Code: 0. Director: John Giacomini, M.D. nOther Faculty: V. Froelicher, P. Heidenreich, P. Milner, M. Hlatky, W. Fearon, K. Friday. Coord: Donna Harris (650-858-3932), PAVAMC (111C). (PAVAMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 303C: Cardiology Clerkship

Selective 1. Open to visitors. Students are part of a cardiology team that consults on hospitalized patients, sees outpatients in seven half day sessions weekly, and attends didactic conferences including noon conferences, weekly Medicine grand-round as well as Cardiology Cath conferences. Opportunities are available to be involved in the various procedures performed by the department: stress test, echocardiogram, cardiac catheterization and implantable devices. We also encourage their participation with our Cardiovascular Surgeons for a complete cardiology experience. Prereq: Medicine 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks by arrangement only. 2 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Valley Specialty Center, 3rd Floor, Suite 340; Time: 9:00 a.m. Units: 6. Call Code: 0.Director: Susan Zhao, MD, FACC, Associate Chief, Division of Cardiology, SCVMC. Other Faculty: M. Aggarwal, H. Brewster, A. Deluna, H. Shiran, C. Smith, A. Swaminathan, E. Yu, S. Zhao. Coord: Sherry Hamamjy (408-885-4389, sherry.hamamjy@hhs.sccgov.org), Med Admin. (SCVMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 304A: Cardiovascular Medicine Clerkship - Inpatients

Selective 2. Open to visitors. General cardiology rotation remains part of the bread and butter core of internal medicine inpatient rotations. Together with the CCU/heart failure (PGY II) and the cardiology consult service (VA and Stanford), these rotations form the foundation of the cardiology knowledge base for students. Advances in diagnostic imaging, rapid bedside testing and evidence based clinical trials have allowed us to deliver coordinated complex care to our patients with ample opportunities for teaching and learning. The development of the skills and knowledge required for the practice of cardiac vascular medicine is an essential part of the educational process of internal medicine training. Cardiovascular diseases affect millions of Americans and now we have tools and drugs to treat and/or prevent this problem. It is an essential large component of a daily internal medicine practice. Involves four weeks of intensive experience with clinical cardiology inpatients. ECG reading will be included. Students are required to attend daily teaching rounds with the attending cardiologist and house staff, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine conferences, and formal teaching sessions, including electrocardiography. Cardiac patients who do not require CCU care, e.g. AF, NSTEMI, chest pain, SBE are admitted primarily via the ER 7 days a week. Students will work directly with R1 and a supervisory R2 Medicine Resident and Cardiology faculty member. Work day usually is from 7 am ¿ 7 pm with one day off/week. No night call as patients are covered by R2 and R3 night float residents. Please note: Visiting students must obtain approval from the clerkship director prior to applying for this clerkship. Please email your CV to Francesca Tongco at ftongco@stanford.edu. Prereq: Medicine 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 1 student per period (one additional student, requires approval from clerkship coordinator). Reporting Instructions: Where: General Cardiology Conference room (HD-116) on D-1 Ground for rounds; Time: 7:30 am. Units: 6. Call Code: 1. Director: John Schroeder, M.D. Other Faculty: R. Dash, W. Fearon, C. Haeffele, R. Harrington, K. Josan, A. Khandelwal, J. Knowles, D. Lee, N. Leeper, D. Liang, K. Mahaffey, D. Maron, V. Parikh, S. Rockson, F. Rodriguez, J. Spin, J. Wu, S. Wu, P. Yang. Coord: Francesca Mae G. Tongco (E-mail: ftongco@stanford.edu, Phone: (650) 723-5561). (SHC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 305A: Hematology Clerkship

Open to visitors. Exposes students to the conceptual basis of hematology, the factual information that is available, and the responses required for consultation and patient care in rapidly evolving and frequently complex clinical circumstances. Under the supervision of the resident, fellow, and faculty attending physician, students admit and follow patients on the very well balanced inpatient Hematology Service (Med VIII) and do consultations. Students also round with the Med VIII team in the morning and attend outpatient clinics in the afternoon. In addition, students participate in the bone marrow reading sessions two mornings a week. Students also learn the requirements for prospective clinical protocol research. There is a weekly research conference, a journal club and a patient-oriented post-clinic conference. Prereq: Medicine 300A. nPeriods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 2 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: F Ground, in basement of main hospital; Time: 7:45 am.; meet heme fellow and heme attending. Units: 6. Call Code: 0. Director: Michaela Liedtke, M.D. Other Faculty: L. Boxer, S. Coutre, J. Zehnder, C. Berube, J. Gotlib, B. Martin, L. Leung, B. Medeiros, M. Liedtke. Coord: Laura Wang (650-723-7078). (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 306A: Endocrinology and Metabolism Clerkship

Selective 1. Open to visitors. Provides students with a comprehensive experience in clinical endocrinology by combining inpatient and outpatient experiences at SCVMC, Stanford (SHC), and PAVA. Students will attend 6-7 clinics per week at the three institutions. Each clinic has approximately 15 to 30 patients who are seen by students, residents, and fellows with faculty members in endocrinology. In addition, students will participate in inpatient endocrine consultation services at Stanford (SHC). Clinical conferences, teaching rounds, grand rounds each week will cover a broad array of endocrine and metabolic problems in both clinical and research spheres. Working at the three hospitals during the clerkship will require travel. nPrereq: Medicine 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 2 students per period. nReporting Instructions: Where: Valley Specialty Center, Rm. 2Q261; Time: 8:15 am on Monday. Units: 6. Call Code: 0. Director: Kaniksha Desai, M.D. Other Faculty: Staff. Coord: Christina Sabathia (650-736-8274), S025. (SHC, PAVAMC, SCVMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 308A: Immunology/Rheumatology Clerkship

Open to visitors. A comprehensive clinical experience in rheumatology and clinical immunology. Students attend five weekly clinics in rheumatology, and clinical immunology, gaining familiarity with the evaluation of new patients and the longitudinal follow-up of complex rheumatological problems such as SLE and vasculitis and common rheumatological problems such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout and spondyloarthropathies. Inpatient consultations provide experience with management of the acute crisis. Journal clubs, noon conferences, and division rounds provide didactic teaching. The costs and benefits associated with evaluation and treatment are emphasized. Stanford Students wishing to do this clerkship must receive prior approval from Clerkship Director before registering. Please note: Visiting students must obtain approval from Angie Aberia prior to applying for this clerkship. Please email requests to aberia@stanford.edu. Interested students must send their CV and 2 letters of recommendation ¿ one from the clerkship director, and the other letter from an attending attesting to the students clinical abilities (i.e. proficient H&P¿s and exam skills). These must be sent to Angie at least 4 to 6 weeks prior to the start of the period that the student would like to enroll in. Prereq: Successful completion of a full medicine clerkship. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 1 student per period (More than one student only if reviewed & approved by clerkship director.) Reporting Instructions: Where: 1000 Welch Rd. Suite #203, see Angie Aberia (call one week prior to confirm); Time: 8:30 am. Units: 6. Call Code: 0. Director: Stanford Shoor, M.D. (650-725-5070). Other Faculty: C.G. Fathman, J. Fries, H. Holman, E. Lambert, S. Strober, L. Tarter, M. Genovese, W. Robinson, P. Utz, L. Chung, M. Lyon. Coord: Angelica R. Aberia (650-498-5630). (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 308C: Immunology/Rheumatology Clerkship

Open to visitors. Introduces students to patients with different forms of arthritis and related rheumatic diseases. Emphasis is on the specific examination of muscles, bones, and joints and important systemic signs and symptoms pertinent to the diagnosis of rheumatic diseases. Laboratory tests, X-rays, and biopsies are reviewed. Students see both new and returning patients and participate in both inpatient and outpatient consultations. Formal and informal participation in conferences is encouraged. The minimum clinical exposure necessary is two weeks full-time; four weeks full-time is preferable. Prereq: Medicine 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for two or four weeks. 1 student per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Check in with SCVMC Housestaff Office (Room 7C081), 751 S. Bascom Avenue, San Jose, between 8:00 and 8:30 am the first day of clerkship. Report to the Arthritis Clinic at Valley Specialty Center, 751 S. Bascom, 5th Floor; Time: 8:30 am. Units: 3 or 6. Call Code: 0. Director: Veronika Sharp, M.D. (408-885-6777). nOther Faculty: B. Amlani, J. Burkham, U. Marvi. Coord: Veronika Sharp, M.D., or secretary, Lupe Ibanez (408-885-6777). (SCVMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 311D: Advanced Medicine Clerkship

Selective 2. Closed to visitors. The Kaiser Permanente Santa Clara Medical Center offers a dynamic academic clinical clerkship in advanced medicine. Students serve as the primary provider for their patients: documenting H&P's, progress notes and discharge summaries, arranging and completing procedures, participating in daily follow-up care, and communicating with patients. Supervision is provided by the senior level resident and the teaching Hospitalist. There are weekly teaching didactics specifically for sub-interns and daily conferences. It is highly recommended that students register for this clerkship near the beginning or middle of their final year of clinicals. If you want to be sure to have a slot for a particular period, you should register to it as soon as possible as the slots are limited and fill quickly. Prereq: Medicine 300A. Periods Avail: 2-12, full-time for four weeks. 2 students per period. No adds or drops less than one week before start of each period. Reporting Instructions: Where: KPMC, Graduate Medical Education Office, Call 408-236-4921 for site location; Time: 7:00 am. Units: 6. Call Code: 5 (not overnight) nDirector: Sudhir S. Rajan, MD, FACP, FCCP. Other Faculty: Staff. Coord: Susan Krause (408-851-3836), KPMC, Santa Clara. (KPMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 312C: Advanced Medicine Clerkship

Selective 2. Open to visitors. Involves an advanced level of inpatient care responsibility. Under the close supervision of faculty and residents the student is expected to function as an intern, caring for the same number of patients and working the same hours. Beepers are provided; meals are free. Please note: Visiting students must obtain approval from Dr. Stephanie Chan prior to applying for this clerkship. Please email requests to Stephanie.Chan@hhs.sccgov.org. Interested students must send their transcript and evaluations from 2 core clerkships. These must be sent to Dr. Chan at least 4 to 6 weeks prior to the start of the period that the student would like to enroll in. nPrereq: Medicine 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12; full-time for four weeks. 6 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: SCVMC, Room 4C004, 4th Floor Conference Room in the Department of Medicine [Visitors call (408-885-5110) and bring proof of PPD and malpractice insurance to 7th Floor Room 54]; Time: 8:30 am. Units: 6. Call Code: 4. Director: Stephanie Chan, M.D. (408-885-7744). Other Faculty: Staff. Coord: Amy Luu (408-885-6300), amy.luu@sccgov.org. (SCVMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 313A: Ambulatory Medicine Core Clerkship

Required Clerkship. Closed to visitors. The combined ambulatory/emergency medicine core clerkship will comprise two weeks of ambulatory clinics and two weeks of emergency medicine shifts, for a total of four weeks. All students will attend Monday morning ambulatory didactics, and a simulation exercise run by the EM Simulation faculty on two Monday afternoons. The remaining two Monday afternoons will be set aside as flexible time for students to complete their Emergency Medicine asynchronous learning modules. Students will present interesting case presentations and take their final exam on the last Friday of the rotation. During the ambulatory block, students will attend general medicine and subspecialty clinics Tuesday-Friday, as well as participate in one Cardinal Free Clinic shift. Sites include SUMC, PAVA, SCVMC, Kaiser Santa Clara, Kaiser Fremont, and community clinics. During the emergency medicine block, students will work seven shifts, which will be a mixture of days, evenings, and overnights in the SUMC ED. Holidays in the EMed portion of this clerkship are treated as work days. Students in the EMed block can/will work on holidays. Prereq: None. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for 4 weeks only. 10 students per period for P1-P2. 12 students per period for P3-P12. Reporting Instructions: Varies depending on site assignment. The students are notified prior to the first day of the clerkship. No student may miss more than two clerkship days. Units: 6 Call Code: 2 (No call, but one required weekend ambulatory clinic shift during the ambulatory block and a mixture of at least 2 overnights and/or weekend shifts during the EMED block). Director: Jacqueline Tai-Edmonds, M.D. and Nounou Taleghani, M.D., Ph.D. Other Faculty: J. Tai-Edmonds, N. Taleghani, and others. Coord: Maria Alfonso (650-497-6702), malfonso@stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 314A: Advanced Medicine Clerkship

Selective 2. Open to visitors. Intended for students in their second clinical year who are able to proceed to an advanced experience similar to an internship. Students see patients with a wide variety of internal medical diseases in both the inpatient and outpatient settings, and gain experience in the practical aspects of internal medicine. The variety of patients and the contact with many private practitioners provide a valuable complement to other clerkship experiences. The clerkship experience is enhanced by exposure to a broad variety of patients as well as clinical teaching from community attendings and Stanford faculty. Please note: Visiting students must obtain approval from Nancy D'Amico prior to applying for this clerkship. Please email requests to ndamico@stanford.edu. Interested students must send their CV and 2 letters of recommendation ¿ one from the clerkship director, and the other letter from an attending attesting to the student's clinical abilities (i.e. proficient H&P¿s and exam skills). These must be sent to Nancy at least 4 to 6 weeks prior to the start of the period that the student would like to enroll in. Prereq: Medicine 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 5 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Students will be notified a week prior to the first day. Units: 6. Call Code: 4. Director: John Kugler, M.D. (jkugler@stanford.edu). Other Faculty: Staff. Coord: Nancy D¿Amico (650-721-1640), 1215 Welch Road, Mod B, Space #37, MC 5418. (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 317C: Medical ICU Clerkship

Open to visitors. An in-depth, four week rotation in the general medical ICU of the SCVMC. Students work as an integral part of a large ICU team aiding housestaff in managing a wide range of critically ill patients. Direct student participation in ICU activities is the essential element of this clerkship. With guidance, students gain experience with a variety of procedures, actively apply their knowledge of physiology, and hone their patient management skills. Prereq: Anesthesia 306A or Medicine 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks, longer by arrangement. 2 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: SCVMC, Valley Specialty Center, 5th Floor, Pulmonary Division Office; Time: 8:00 am. On the first day of their rotation, all medical students must sign-in at the Medical Staff Office Rm 7C054. Units: 6. Call Code: 4.Director: Vibha Mohindra, M.D. Other Faculty: C. Kirsch, J. Wehner, V. Mohindra, E. Hsiao, F. Kagawa, A, Friedenberg, W.Chen, A. Gohil. Coord: Eva Apolinar (408-885-2051), Building Q, Suite 5Q153, Valley Specialty Center. (SCVMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 318A: Palliative Medicine

Selective 1. Open to visitors. The Palliative Care: In Context clerkship provides medical students in-depth exposure to palliative care across the continuum of care including several ambulatory clinics, an inpatient consult service, and home and inpatient hospice care. Students will learn core communications strategies in disclosing bad news, eliciting and clarifying goals of care, and aiding in transitions in care. They will also learn physiology and pharmacology relevant for symptom management (e.g. pain, nausea, depression), as well as interact with patients confronting their own mortality. Students may complete 2 weeks (either inpatient or outpatient) for elective credit. Students who complete a 4 week rotation will receive Selective I credit. Prereq: None. Periods Avail: Starting from P7 of 2018-19, 1-12, full-time for two or four weeks. 3 student per period. Reporting Instructions: TBA. Units: 6. Call Code: 0. Director: Kavitha Ramchandran, M.D. (kavitha@stanford.edu). Coord: Laura J Lundi (llundi@stanford.edu). (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 321A: Inpatient Medical Oncology Clerkship

Selective 2. Open to visitors. Offers an intensive, inpatient, subspecialty care experience, equivalent to a subinternship. Students are responsible for 2 to 5 patients who are seriously ill with a broad range of internal medical problems in the setting of underlying malignant disease. Students work with the inpatient team composed of an attending, a medical oncology fellow, a medical resident and 3 medicine interns. Prereq: Medicine 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 1 student per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Stanford Hospital, F Ground (Oncology Fellow); Time: 8:00 am. Units: 6. Call Code: 2 (patients are admitted daily and the sub-intern will admit patients on a rotation basis with the team without overnight call, but may stay late some evenings.) Director: Sukhmani Kaur Padda, M.D. Other Faculty: Staff. Coord: Christina L. Kasson (650-725-5447, ckasson@stanford.edu). (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 322A: Outpatient Medical Oncology Clerkship

Selective 1. Open to visitors. Familiarizes students with the subspecialty of medical oncology through subspecialty patient care in clinics and tumor boards and attending the weekly conferences of the Division of Oncology. The experience draws heavily on and will expand skills in internal medicine, emphasizing differential diagnosis, physical examination, utilization of laboratory, X-ray, and imaging studies, as well as approaches to psycho-social problems for patients with suspected or established malignant disease. nPrereq: Medicine 300A . Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 3 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Cancer Center, CC-2233; Time: 9:00 am. nUnits: 6. Call Code: 0. Director: Sukhmani Kaur Padda, M.D. Other Faculty: Staff. Coord: Christina L. Kasson (650-725-5447, ckasson@stanford.edu). (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 323A: Trans-Disciplinary Breast Oncology

Selective 1. Closed to visitors. This one month trans-disciplinary breast oncology clerkship cuts across the relevant treatment modalities and emphasizes interdisciplinary, patient-centered care. Breast cancer is a highly prevalent disease often treated in early stages with medical, radiation and surgical therapies. The student will be in each clinic of these treatment clinics for one day every week, independently work up and discuss patients with assigned faculty, present new cases to the breast tumor board, and subsequently synthesize the visit notes and outpatient letters. At least one day per week, students will choose from additional care activities that shape the patient¿s experience, including observation of breast surgeries, wound care visits, radiation dosimetry planning or simulation, chemotherapy teaching or infusion, and medical oncology inpatient rounds. Furthermore, students are encouraged to identify patients with multiple visits that month and follow them across clinics for concentrated continuity. The clerkship offers a unique vantage point to learn about the shared decision-making and coordination of complex cancer care, in addition to the management of general health problems for breast cancer patients. Students further appreciate the longitudinal evolution of the patient¿s relationship with their cancer. There will be weekly debrief check-ins and short didactics to optimize the student's experience. Prereq: Any core clerkship. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 1 student per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Stanford Cancer Center CC-2241; Time: 8:30 am. Units: 6. Call Code: 5. Director: Melina Telli, M.D. Other Faculty: Staff.Coord: Kristin Schjaerve, kschjaer@stanford.edu, (650) 725-9057, 875 Blake Wilbur Dr. CC-2241. (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 325A: Gastroenterology Clerkship

Open to visitors. Involves participation in inpatient consultations and outpatient clinics. Students are responsible for evaluating patients with major diseases of the liver and gastrointestinal tract. They assume primary responsibility in both inpatient and outpatient settings and present cases regularly to the faculty attending physician. Daily inpatient rounds are made with the attending physician, fellow, and resident. Clinics are held on Mondays. Clinical conferences and journal clubs are held once weekly. Prereq: Medicine 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 1 student per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Endoscopy Unit, 300 Pasteur Dr, Basement Room H0262; Time: 8:30 am (Please ask for GI attending fellow). Units: 6. Call Code: 0. Director: Subhas Banerjee, M.D. (phone: 650-736-0431). Other Faculty: A. Aijaz, S. Banerjee, L. Becker, A. Cheung, J. Clarke, T. Daugherty, R. Dhanasekaran, D. Dronamraju, N. Fernandez-Becker, S. Friedland, G. Garcia, P. Garcia, J. Glenn, A. Goel, D. Grewal, J. Hwang, A. Kalra, K. Keyashian, R. Kim, R. Kumari, P. Kwo, U. Ladabaum, B. Limketkai, A. Lowe, D. Limsui, G. Lutchman, L. Neshatian, L. Nguyen, M. Nguyen, P. Okafor, W. Park, V. Pottathil, S. Sinha, I. Sonu, S. Streett. Coord: Abbey Hamilton (650-723-4519, abbeyh@stanford.edu). (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 325B: Gastroenterology Clerkship

Open to visitors. Gives students responsibility for both inpatient consultations and the evaluation and treatment of referred patients in the Gastroenterology clinic. Rounds with the faculty consultant, fellow and resident, as well as GI endoscopic procedures are conducted daily. Conferences on clinical gastroenterology, hepatology, gastrointestinal radiology, and gastrointestinal and liver histopathology are held weekly. A combined medical-surgical conference is held every other week. nPrereq: Medicine 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four or eight weeks. 1 student per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: PAVAMC, Bldg. 100, Endoscopy Suite; Time: 8:30 am. Units: 6. Call Code: 0.Director: Ramsey Cheung, M.D. nOther Faculty: R. Cheung, R. Soetikno, S. Matsui, B. Omary, S. Friedland. nCoord: Vivian Miller (493-5000 x65083), Rm. B2-130, Bldg.101, PAVAMC (111). (PAVAMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 325C: Gastroenterology Clerkship

Open to visitors. This clerkship provides experience in outpatient and inpatient gastroenterology (GI). In the mornings, students will evaluate outpatients referred to GI clinic and will also have an opportunity to observe outpatient endoscopic procedures, including upper endoscopy, colonoscopy, paracentesis, ERCP and endoscopic ultrasound. In the afternoons, students will evaluate inpatients who require GI consultation, observe inpatient procedures and participate in inpateint rounds with the GI team. Students will assume primary responsibility for the inpatients they provide consultation on. In addition to direct patient care, students will attend multiple didactic lectures and conferences, including a bi-weekly GI/Surgery conference, bi-weekly GI Radiology conference, bi-weekly GI Journal Club, monthly Liver Tumor Board, monthly GI Pathology conference and weekly Stanford multi-disciplinary (GI/Surgery/Radiology/Pathology) Digestive Diseases Clinical Conference. This clerkship is closed to registration unless given prior approval by Clerkship Coordinator. Prereq: Medicine 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 1 student per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: SCVMC, Valley Specialty Center, 5th Floor, GI Clinic; Time: 8:00 am. Units: 6. Call Code: 0. Director: Elizabeth Hwang, M.D. (408-793-2598). Other Faculty: A. Chen, S. Cummings, A. Davila, A. Ho, E. Hwang, A. Kamal, D. Lin, N. Shah, J. Williams. Coord: Louise Leprohon (408-885-7947), Louise.Leprohon@hhs.sccgov.org. (SCVMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 326A: Hepatology Clerkship

Open to visitors. Involves participation in inpatient consultations for 2 weeks and outpatient clinics for 2 weeks. The goals are to familiarize students with evaluation and management of patients with major liver diseases. Students are responsible for evaluating patients with major diseases of the liver diseases. They assume primary responsibility in both inpatient and outpatient settings and present cases regularly to the faculty attending physician. Daily inpatient rounds are made with the attending physician, fellow, and resident. Clinics are held on Mondays to Friday. Journal clubs are held once weekly. Pathology conferences are held on Thursday and radiology conferences on Friday. Patient care conferences are held on Tuesday and Friday. nPrereq: None. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 2 students per period. nReporting Instructions: Where: 750 Welch Road #210; Time: 8:30 am. Units: 6. Call Code: 0. Director: Mindie Nguyen, M.D., MAS (phone: 650-722-4478). Other Faculty: A. Ahmed, G. Lutchman, T. Daugherty, G. Garcia, P. Gregory, R. Kumari. Coord: Jeff Mathews (650-498-6084). (SUMC, PAVAMC, etc.)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 328A: Addiction Medicine

Open to visitors. This clerkship will teach students the fundamentals of addiction medicine from the perspective of primary care and interdisciplinary coordination of care. Clinic exposure will include opportunities to interact with substance use disordered patients in a variety of settings that may include: Methadone Clinic at Menlo Park VA and Community Clinics through O¿Connor Family Medicine Clinic, Stanford Family Medicine Clinic, Los Altos Primary Care and Suboxone and Alcohol Use Disorder Support Groups at Hoover Pavilion. There may be opportunities to rotate in a smoking cessation group, as well as at Kaiser CDRP. Students will learn about outpatient detoxification from opioids and alcohol, relapse prevention medications for opioid and alcohol use disorders and the culture of substance use recovery. Please contact Coordinator listed below for pre-approval before signing up. Prereq: A minimum of 2 clerkship experiences that may include: Family or Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, Surgery, OBGYN, Emergency, or Ambulatory (Urgent Care) Medicine. Periods Avail: 1-12, full time for 2 or 4 weeks. 2 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: TBA; Time: 8:00 am. Units: 3 or 6. Call Code: 0.Director: Chwen-Yuen Angie Chen, MD, FACP, FASAM (ChChen@stanfordhealthcare.org). Other Faculty: Staff Coord: Chwen-Yuen Angie Chen, MD, FACP, FASAM (ChChen@stanfordhealthcare.org). (SHC, etc.)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 330A: Pulomonary Medicine Clerkship

Open to visitors. Helps students develop the attitudes and skills necessary for the evaluation and management of patients with pulmonary disease. Students are expected to understand pulmonary disease in the context of internal medicine, using general as well as specific approaches to diagnosis. The clerkship affords direct patient involvement under supervision in the outpatient clinic and on inpatient consultation services. Critically ill patients with pulmonary disease in the ICU will be evaluated. Pulmonary function tests are evaluated daily, and student involvement in specialized studies is emphasized. Divisional clinical conferences are held weekly, and a joint medical-surgical conference bi-weekly. Each student has the option of spending one-half of the clerkship at the PAVAMC and one-half at the Stanford University Hospital on a rotational basis (that is, two weeks at the PAVAMC and two weeks at Stanford). These options are discussed and determined on the first day of the clerkship. Prereq: Medicine 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks (half-time at SUH; half-time at PAVAMC). 2 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: H3147; Time: 8:45 am nUnits: 6. Call Code: 1. Director: Peter N. Kao, M.D, Ph.D. Other Faculty: R. Chitkara, T. Desai, G. Dhillon, J. Holty, P. Kao, K. Kudelko, W. Kuschner, J. Levitt, P. Mohabir, M. Nicolls, H. Paintal, A. Rogers, S. Ruoss, Y. Sung, R. Van Wert, A. Weinacker, R. Zamanian, C. Zone, V. de Jesus Perez. Clerkship Coordinator: Kerri Keating keatingk@stanford.edu. SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 330C: Pulmonary Medicine Clerkship

Open to visitors. Affords students an opportunity to deal with a broad range of clinical pulmonary problems. Working as part of a busy consulting service, students develop a practical approach to evaluating and managing patients with respiratory disease. The spectrum of patients ranges from ambulatory outpatients, to patients with tuberculosis, to ICU patients with acute respiratory failure. The application of the basic principles of physiology to clinical problems is emphasized. Under supervision, students participate in interpreting pulmonary function tests and other diagnostic procedures. Prereq: Medicine 300A and consent of instructor. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 1 student per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Valley Specialty Center, 5th Floor, Room 5Q153; Time: 8:00 am. On the first day of their rotation, all medical students must sign-in at the Housestaff Office at SCVMC, Room 7C054. Units: 6. Call Code: 0. Director: Carl Kirsch, M.D. nOther Faculty: U. Barvalia, V. Chen, A. Gohil, E. Hsiao, V. Mohindra, J. Wehner. Coord: Angelica Segovia (408-885-2051), Building Q, Suite 5Q153, Valley Specialty Center. (SCVMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 331A: Advanced Work in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine

Open to visitors. The content of this clerkship is flexible. Students can do additional clinical work in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine or research work in the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine. Specific arrangements for content should be made with the faculty in advance. Prereq: Medicine 330 and consent of instructor. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for 4 weeks only. 1 student per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: H3147; Time: 9:00 am. Units: 6. Call Code: 1. Director: Peter Kao, M.D. Other Faculty: R. Chitkara, T. Desai, G. Dhillon, J. Holty, P. Kao, K. Kudelko, W. Kuschner, J. Levitt, P. Mohabir, M. Nicolls, H. Paintal, A. Rogers, S. Ruoss, Y. Sung, R. Van Wert, A. Weinacker, R. Zamanian, C. Zone, V. de Jesus Perez. Clerkship Coord: Kerri Keating keatingk@stanford.edu. (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 334A: Nephrology Clerkship

Open to visitors. Provides students with an introduction to clinical nephrology, including diseases of the kidney and disorders of fluid, electrolyte, and acid-base balance. The clerkship is available at SUMC. Students evaluate inpatients as members of the nephrology consulting team and see outpatients in the nephrology clinic once a week. They are taught to evaluate and manage a wide variety of acute and chronic disturbances of renal function, as well as hypertension, and fluid and electrolyte disorders. They also participate in the management of patients with end-stage renal disease. There is a weekly schedule of grand rounds, journal club, and a monthly renal biopsy conference. Students learn a systematic approach to patients with fluid, electrolyte, and acid-base abnormalities. Prereq: Medicine 300A, Surgery 300A or Pediatrics 300A are preferred but not required. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 2 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: 777 Welch Road Suite DE Palo Alto, CA 94304; Time: 8:30 am. Please email Erica Dillingham at edilling@stanford.edu or Shuchi Anand at sanand2@stanford.edu the week before you start. Units: 6. Call Code: 0.Director: Shuchi Anand, M.D., M.S. (650-723-6961). Other Faculty: T. Meyer, R, Lafayette, J. Scandling, J. Tan, Y. Lit, G. Chertow, V. Bhalla, A. Pao, M. Tamura, J. Yabu, N. Arora, R. Isom, T. Chang, S. Anand, T. Sirich, K. Erickson, P. Fatehi. Coord: Erica Dillingham (edilling@stanford.edu, 650-498-9446), 777 Welch Road Suite DE Palo Alto, CA 94304. (SUMC, PAVAMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 334C: Nephrology Clerkship

Open to visitors. Students see patients in the outpatient renal clinic, and on an active inpatient service. The diverse patient population at SCVMC enables student to encounter patients with a wide variety of acute and chronic renal diseases, hypertension, and fluid and electrolyte disturbances. The clerkship is also designed to acquaint students with a systematic approach to patients with fluid, electrolyte, and acid-base abnormalities. A series of seminars covering a broad range of topics in nephrology and designed specifically for medical students is given by the faculty. An optional self-study program on fluid and electrolytes consisting of 8 taped lectures with slides is also available. Weekly divisional nephrology conferences are held at SCVMC, and address various topics in nephrology. Additionally, there is a monthly nephrology resident conference, in addition to a monthly renal pathology conference. Videotaped lecture series on the entire field of nephrology are also available. Prereq: Medicine 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 2 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: SCVMC, Renal Dialysis Unit, 3rd Floor [Visitors call (408-885-5110) and bring proof of PPD and malpractice insurance as directed]; Time: 8:30 am. Units: 6. Call Code: 0. Director: Anjali Bhatt Saxena, M.D. Other Faculty: A. Saxena, J. Lugovoy, A. Jobalia, B. Young, N. Pham, F. Luo, staff. Coord: Mary Jane Monroe (408-885-7019). (SCVMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 338A: HIV Outpatient Elective

Closed to visitors. This clerkship provides medical students with an elective course of 2-4 weeks of outpatient ID experience. Clinical experiences will focus on antibiotic selection, utilization and stewardship, as well as the management of commonly encountered ID syndromes, including sexually transmitted infections, HIV, Tuberculosis, and viral hepatitis. Students will attend outpatient clinics at the Palo Alto Veterans Administration Medical Center, the Stanford affiliated Positive Care Clinic, and the San Mateo County Health System. There is potential flexibility for students interested in a focus area at a specific clinic or with a specific physician, to arrange more concentrated clinical work at one of the clinics with permission of the attending. Each student will be asked to prepare a small research project (e.g. a case or literature review) to be presented at the end of the rotation. Students planning on doing the outpatient ID rotation should contact Dr. Levy at vlevy@stanford.edu as soon as possible but at least 8 weeks prior to rotation beginning to verify there is period availability for the desired period of rotation and that all needed electronic medical record and infection control requirements have been obtained. This clerkship requires prior approval by Clerkship Director. Prereq: MED 208 or INDE 206 and completion of Internal Medicine core clerkship. Periods Avail: 3-12, full-time for two or four weeks. 1 student per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Dr. Levy will send the student a schedule, curriculum and orientation materials prior to starting the rotation of clinics and physicians. Units: 6. Call Code: 0. Director: Vivian Levy, M.D. (vlevy@stanford.edu or 650-573-3987) Other Faculty: Staff nCoord: Vivian Levy, M.D. (vlevy@stanford.edu or 650-573-3987) (SUMC, PAVAMC, etc.)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 339B: Advanced Medicine Clerkship

Selective 2. Closed to visitors. Intended for clinically experienced students who seek an advanced experience similar to an internship. Prereq: Medicine 300A. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 5 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: First Monday of rotation, Bldg 101; Time: 08:30 a.m. Units: 6. Call Code: 4. Director: Arlina Ahluwalia, M.D. (493-5000 x66759) Other Faculty: Staff. Coord: Alix Hayashida (493-5000 x64944), Bldg. 5, 3rd Fl Rm C-367. (PAVAMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 342A: Geriatric Medicine Clerkship

Selective 1. Open to visitors. This clinical experience introduces students to the principles of effective geriatric care in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Geriatric faculty and fellows work with students in various clinical settings including: 1) outpatient clinics at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System 2) outpatient clinic at Stanford University 3) a community skilled nursing facility in Palo Alto. The rotation emphasizes the evaluation and management of patients with multiple chronic conditions, such as diabetes, congestive heart failure, hypertension, urinary incontinence, mental status changes, functional impairments and gait problems. This clerkship requires written approval by Clerkship Director before you can enroll. Please contact Dr. Philip Choe at Philip.Choe@va.gov to check for availability of spots in the clerkship. Prereq: MED 208 or INDE 206. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 1 student per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: Arrange with clerkship coordinator; Time: Arrange with clerkship coordinator. Units: 6. Call Code: 0. Director: Philip Choe, D.O. (650-493-5000 x64740). Other Faculty: Staff. Coord: Philip Choe, D.O. (SUMC, PAVAMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 343B: Palliative Care Clerkship

Selective 1. Open to visitors. Teaches the natural history, prognostication, and management of serious illnesses. Emphasis is placed on acquiring the knowledge, skills, and attitudes desirable in a compassionate clinician-scholar physician. Students record history (with special assessment to symptoms, functional assessment, mood and cognitive assessment), physical examination, and pertinent laboratory data for patients for whom they are responsible and present their findings, together with their diagnoses and management care plans, at rounds, and daily team meetings. Provision of patient-centered, family-oriented care is continuously emphasized. An essential aspect of the clerkship is the students¿ gradual assumption of direct responsibility for, and full-time involvement in, care of patients with serious illness with the house staff, fellows and a large inter-disciplinary team and this is why we have structured this as a four week rotation. A passing grade will require both a satisfactory performance and a successful 30 minute formal presentation on palliative care topic of interest (student will discuss ideas with Course Director to identify potential topics of interest to them). Course highlights include (a) mentoring from the course director and a cadre of mentors including Palliative Care Attendings and Fellows (b)focus on skill building and practice with special focus on communication skills (c) opportunity to work closely with a multi-disciplinary team(d) learning to care for the patient and their family as the unit of care. This clerkship requires written approval by Clerkship Director before you can enroll. Please contact Dr. VJ Periyakoil at periyakoil@stanford.edu to check for availability of spots in the clerkship. Periods Avail: 1-12, for 4 weeks. 1 student per period. Reporting Instructions: Please email Dr. Periyakoil (periyakoil@stanford.edu) at least two weeks before your start date so that she can introduce you to the team, help create your training plan and give you detailed instructions of where to report, how to structure your days to maximize learning. Where: This will depend on the start day of the rotation as training activities vary by the day. Time: 8:00 am. Units: 6. Call Code: 0. Director: VJ Periyakoil, M.D. (periyakoil@stanford.edu). Other Faculty: Staff. Coord: VJ Periyakoil, M.D. (650-497-0332, periyakoil@stanford.edu). (SUMC, PAVAMC, SCVMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 344A: Clinical Elective in Quality Improvement, Patient Safety, and Organizational Change

Open to visitors. Mentored practice and growth in knowledge, skills, and attitudes in quality improvement, patient safety, and organizational change. Students engage in directed readings, attend sessions with experienced QI Champions, learn about quality improvement projects and processes at Stanford University, participate in ongoing quality and patient safety activities within the Department of Medicine and Stanford Hospital and Clinics, and design and begin a quality improvement/patient safety/organizational change project. Designed to allow the student to develop a mentoring relationship with a QI Champion who will serve as a role model, mentor, and educator. Contact Dr. Lisa Shieh at lshieh@stanford.edu if interested. nPrereq: None. Periods Avail: 1-12, full-time for four weeks. 3 students per period. nReporting Instructions: Where: 700 Welch Road, Suite 310B, Palo Alto, CA 94304; Time: TBA. Units: 6. Call Code: 0. Director: Lisa Shieh, M.D., Ph.D, FHM (650-724-2917, lshieh@stanford.edu) Other Faculty: K. Hooper, L. Shieh. Coord: Lisa Shieh, M.D., Ph.D, FHM (650-724-2917, lshieh@stanford.edu) (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Shieh, L. (PI)

MED 347A: Stanford Perioperative Medicine Roataion

Closed to visitors. The Stanford Perioperative Medicine elective is a two-week inpatient rotation that will provide the students a clinical immersive experience in co-management of surgical patients with clinical and didactic teaching. The students will rotate with Orthopedics and Neurosurgery co-management hospitalists. They will be expected to perform thorough histories and physical examinations of patients in inpatient setting and then formulate and implement treatment plans. This rotation will expose the students to learn effective ways to perform preoperative optimization, learn evidence based clinical practices to prevent and treat post operative complications and get involved in quality improvement projects pertaining to perioperative medicine. The students will learn about various medical and surgical conditions and understand how to effectively manage them. A learning session with the Anesthesiology department will be incorporated in the schedule during the rotation. Prereq: None. Periods Avail: 1-12, full time for two weeks, 2 students per two week period. Reporting Instructions: Student to report at 8 am on first day of the rotation at Stanford hospital Floor G, nursing station. Units: 3. Call Code: 0. Director: Sarita Khemani, M.D. Other Faculty: Stanford Medicine faculty and residents from multiple disciplines. Coord: Sarita Khemani, M.D. (650) 906-5070; skhemani@stanford.edu. (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 370: Medical Scholars Research

Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Advani, R. (PI); Ahmed, A. (PI); Ahuja, N. (PI); Akatsu, H. (PI); Al-Ahmad, A. (PI); Alizadeh, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Andrews, J. (PI); Annes, J. (PI); Arai, S. (PI); Artandi, M. (PI); Artandi, S. (PI); Asch, S. (PI); Ashley, E. (PI); Assimes, T. (PI); Ayoub, W. (PI); Banerjee, S. (PI); Barry, M. (PI); Basaviah, P. (PI); Basina, M. (PI); Basu, S. (PI); Behal, R. (PI); Bendavid, E. (PI); Benjamin, J. (PI); Berube, C. (PI); Bhalla, V. (PI); Bhatt, A. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blackburn, B. (PI); Blaschke, T. (PI); Blayney, D. (PI); Blish, C. (PI); Blumenfeld, Y. (PI); Bollyky, P. (PI); Bouvier, D. (PI); Boxer, L. (PI); Braddock, C. (PI); Braitman, L. (PI); Brinton, T. (PI); Brown, W. (PI); Bulow, K. (PI); Campen, C. (PI); Carlson, R. (PI); Cartwright, C. (PI); Chan, D. (PI); Chan, G. (PI); Chang, C. (PI); Chang, S. (PI); Chang, T. (PI); Chao, S. (PI); Chao, T. (PI); Chen, A. (PI); Chen, S. (PI); Chertow, G. (PI); Cheung, L. (PI); Cheung, R. (PI); Chi, J. (PI); Cho-Phan, C. (PI); Chu, C. (PI); Chu, G. (PI); Chua, K. (PI); Chung, L. (PI); Clarke, M. (PI); Clusin, W. (PI); Colevas, A. (PI); Colloff, E. (PI); Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI); Cooke, J. (PI); Cooper, A. (PI); Coutre, S. (PI); Crapo, L. (PI); Crump, C. (PI); Cullen, M. (PI); Czechowicz, A. (PI); Das, A. (PI); Dash, R. (PI); Daugherty, T. (PI); David, S. (PI); Davis, K. (PI); Dawson, L. (PI); Deresinski, S. (PI); Desai, M. (PI); Desai, T. (PI); Dhillon, G. (PI); Diver, E. (PI); Dorman, J. (PI); Dosiou, C. (PI); DuBose, A. (PI); Edwards, L. (PI); Einav, S. (PI); Farquhar, J. (PI); Fathman, C. (PI); Fearon, W. (PI); Feldman, D. (PI); Feldman, H. (PI); Felsher, D. (PI); Fisher, G. (PI); Fitzgerald, P. (PI); Flavin, K. (PI); Ford, J. (PI); Ford, P. (PI); Fowler, M. (PI); Frayne, S. (PI); Friedland, S. (PI); Fries, J. (PI); Froelicher, V. (PI); Gabiola, J. (PI); Ganjoo, K. (PI); Garcia, G. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gardner, P. (PI); Gavi, B. (PI); Genovese, M. (PI); Gerson, L. (PI); Gesundheit, N. (PI); Giacomini, J. (PI); Glaseroff, A. (PI); Glenn, J. (PI); Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. (PI); Goldstein, M. (PI); Gomez-Ospina, N. (PI); Goodman, S. (PI); Goronzy, J. (PI); Gotlib, J. (PI); Gray, G. (PI); Greenberg, H. (PI); Greenberg, P. (PI); Gregory, P. (PI); Habtezion, A. (PI); Hallenbeck, J. (PI); Harman, S. (PI); Harrington, R. (PI); Harshman, L. (PI); Haskell, W. (PI); Heaney, C. (PI); Heidenreich, P. (PI); Henri, H. (PI); Ho, D. (PI); Hoffman, A. (PI); Holman, H. (PI); Holodniy, M. (PI); Hopkins, J. (PI); Horning, S. (PI); Hsia, H. (PI); Hunt, S. (PI); Ioannidis, J. (PI); Isom, R. (PI); Jagannathan, P. (PI); Jernick, J. (PI); Ji, H. (PI); Johnston, L. (PI); Jones, E. (PI); Judy, A. (PI); Kahn, J. (PI); Kamal, R. (PI); Kao, P. (PI); Kastelein, M. (PI); Katz, R. (PI); Katzenstein, D. (PI); Kenny, K. (PI); Khan, C. (PI); Khatri, P. (PI); Khazeni, N. (PI); Khush, K. (PI); Killen, J. (PI); Kim, S. (PI); King, A. (PI); Kohrt, H. (PI); Kraemer, F. (PI); Kraus, E. (PI); Krishnan, E. (PI); Kummar, S. (PI); Kunz, P. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Kurian, A. (PI); Kuschner, W. (PI); Kwong, B. (PI); Ladabaum, U. (PI); Lafayette, R. (PI); Laport, G. (PI); Lee, A. (PI); Lee, D. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Lee, P. (PI); Leung, L. (PI); Levitt, L. (PI); Levy, R. (PI); Levy, S. (PI); Liang, D. (PI); Liedtke, M. (PI); Lin, S. (PI); Lindsay, A. (PI); Lorenz, K. (PI); Lorig, K. (PI); Lowe, A. (PI); Lowsky, R. (PI); Luby, S. (PI); Luhrmann, T. (PI); Lunn, M. (PI); Luo, L. (PI); Lutchman, G. (PI); Mahajan, V. (PI); Mahoney, M. (PI); Majeti, R. (PI); Mariano, E. (PI); McConnell, M. (PI); McLaughlin, T. (PI); Medeiros, B. (PI); Meyer, T. (PI); Miklos, D. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Milstein, A. (PI); Mitchell, B. (PI); Mohabir, P. (PI); Montoya, J. (PI); Moran-Miller, K. (PI); Morioka-Douglas, N. (PI); Musen, M. (PI); Myung, D. (PI); Narayan, S. (PI); Nazerali, R. (PI); Neal, J. (PI); Negrin, R. (PI); Nevins, A. (PI); Newberry, J. (PI); Nguyen, L. (PI); Nguyen, M. (PI); Nguyen, P. (PI); Nicolls, M. (PI); O' Callahan, P. (PI); Osterberg, L. (PI); Owens, D. (PI); Padda, S. (PI); Pao, A. (PI); Parnes, J. (PI); Parsonnet, J. (PI); Pasricha, P. (PI); Pegram, M. (PI); Pepper, J. (PI); Periyakoil, V. (PI); Petersen, J. (PI); Pinto, H. (PI); Pompei, P. (PI); Popp, R. (PI); Posley, K. (PI); Price, E. (PI); Prochaska, J. (PI); Qi, S. (PI); Quertermous, T. (PI); Raffin, T. (PI); Ramchandran, K. (PI); Rehkopf, D. (PI); Relman, D. (PI); Rizk, N. (PI); Robinson, B. (PI); Rockson, S. (PI); Rodriguez, F. (PI); Rohatgi, R. (PI); Rosas, L. (PI); Rosen, G. (PI); Rosenberg, S. (PI); Rudd, P. (PI); Ruoss, S. (PI); Rydel, T. (PI); Scandling, J. (PI); Schnittger, I. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Schroeder, J. (PI); Shafer, R. (PI); Shah, J. (PI); Shah, N. (PI); Shah, S. (PI); Sharp, C. (PI); Shaw, K. (PI); Shen, K. (PI); Shieh, L. (PI); Shizuru, J. (PI); Shoor, S. (PI); Sikic, B. (PI); Singer, S. (PI); Singh, B. (PI); Singh, U. (PI); Skeff, K. (PI); Spiekerkoetter, E. (PI); Srinivas, S. (PI); Stafford, R. (PI); Stefanick, M. (PI); Stertzer, S. (PI); Stevens, D. (PI); Stockdale, F. (PI); Strober, S. (PI); Studdert, D. (PI); Svec, D. (PI); Tabor, H. (PI); Tai, J. (PI); Tamura, M. (PI); Tan, J. (PI); Telli, M. (PI); Tepper, R. (PI); Tompkins, L. (PI); Tremmel, J. (PI); Triadafilopoulos, G. (PI); Tsao, P. (PI); Upadhyay, D. (PI); Utz, P. (PI); Vagelos, R. (PI); Valantine, H. (PI); Van Haren, K. (PI); Verghese, A. (PI); Wakelee, H. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Wang, T. (PI); Warvariv, V. (PI); Weill, D. (PI); Weinacker, A. (PI); Weng, K. (PI); Weng, W. (PI); Weyand, C. (PI); Wiedmann, T. (PI); Winkelmayer, W. (PI); Winkleby, M. (PI); Winter, T. (PI); Witteles, R. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Yabu, J. (PI); Yang, P. (PI); Yeung, A. (PI); Yock, P. (PI); Zamanian, R. (PI); Zehnder, J. (PI); Zei, P. (PI); Zolopa, A. (PI); Zulman, D. (PI); de Jesus Perez, V. (PI); Cullen, M. (SI)

MED 397A: MD Capstone Experience: Preparation for Residency

Closed to visitors. This 1-week clerkship provides senior medical students an opportunity to review and acquire a wide variety of knowledge and skills that are essential to preparing them for their first-year of residency and working effectively as interns. The capstone clerkship will include a significant emphasis on simulation-based learning as well as small group sessions, didactics, skills labs, and resident panels. Required skills and common experiences during internship will be specifically highlighted. The curriculum will consist of a common core curriculum, as well as additional learning opportunities specifically tailored to individual specialties. For those students who are not enrolled for the quarter in which the Capstone Clerkship is offered, please contact Brian Herman at bherman8@stanford.edu to register. Prereq: Completion of required core clerkships. Periods Avail: P11A (5/6/19-5/12/19) or P11B (5/20/19-5/26/19) for 2018-19; P11A (5/4/20-5/10/20) or P11B (5/18/20-5/24/20) for 2019-20; P11A (5/3/21-5/9/21) or P11B (5/17/21-5/23/21) for 2020-21, full-time for 1 week. 30 students maximum per period. Reporting Instructions: Course coordinator will send out reporting instructions with syllabus before the start of the clerkship. nUnits: 1. Call Code: 2 - You will be asked to do one evening session, but no overnight session. You also will be asked to return pages at night while at home. Director: Jeff Chi, M.D. and John Kugler, M.D. Other Faculty: Stanford Medicine faculty and residents from multiple disciplines. Coord: Brian Herman (650) 725-4677; bherman8@stanford.edu. (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Chi, J. (PI); Kugler, J. (PI)

MED 398A: Clinical Elective in Medicine

Closed to visitors. Provides an opportunity for a student in the clinical years to have a clinical experience in one of the fields of Medicine, of a quality and duration to be decided upon by the student and a faculty preceptor in the Department of Medicine. Please note: Students cannot add 398A clerkships directly to their fishbowl schedules through the regular shuffles. Please contact Caroline Cheang in the Office of Medical Student Affairs at cheang@stanford.edu or 650-498-7619 with the faculty preceptor¿s name and email address to add this clerkship. Prereq: MED 208 or INDE 206. Periods Avail: 1-12. Reporting Instructions: Where: TBA (designated faculty preceptor); Time: TBA Units: 1 to 12. Call Code: 0 (varies according to preceptor) Director: John Kugler, M.D. (jkugler@stanford.edu). Other Faculty: Staff. Coord: Nancy D¿Amico (650-721-1640), 1215 Welch Road, Mod B, Space #37, MC 5418. (SUMC, PAVAMC, SCVMC, KPMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

MED 399: Graduate Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Advani, R. (PI); Ahmed, A. (PI); Ahuja, N. (PI); Akatsu, H. (PI); Al-Ahmad, A. (PI); Alizadeh, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Andrews, J. (PI); Annes, J. (PI); Arai, S. (PI); Artandi, M. (PI); Artandi, S. (PI); Asch, S. (PI); Ashley, E. (PI); Assimes, T. (PI); Ayoub, W. (PI); Banerjee, S. (PI); Barry, M. (PI); Basaviah, P. (PI); Basina, M. (PI); Basu, S. (PI); Behal, R. (PI); Bendavid, E. (PI); Benjamin, J. (PI); Berube, C. (PI); Bhalla, V. (PI); Bhatt, A. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blackburn, B. (PI); Blaschke, T. (PI); Blayney, D. (PI); Blish, C. (PI); Bollyky, P. (PI); Bouvier, D. (PI); Boxer, L. (PI); Braddock, C. (PI); Brinton, T. (PI); Brown, W. (PI); Bulow, K. (PI); Carlson, R. (PI); Cartwright, C. (PI); Chan, D. (PI); Chan, G. (PI); Chang, C. (PI); Chang, S. (PI); Chen, A. (PI); Chertow, G. (PI); Cheung, R. (PI); Chi, J. (PI); Cho-Phan, C. (PI); Chu, G. (PI); Chua, K. (PI); Chung, L. (PI); Clarke, M. (PI); Clusin, W. (PI); Colevas, A. (PI); Colloff, E. (PI); Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI); Cooke, J. (PI); Cooper, A. (PI); Coutre, S. (PI); Crapo, L. (PI); Crump, C. (PI); Cullen, M. (PI); Das, A. (PI); Dash, R. (PI); Daugherty, T. (PI); David, S. (PI); Dawson, L. (PI); Deresinski, S. (PI); Desai, M. (PI); Desai, T. (PI); Dhillon, G. (PI); Dorman, J. (PI); Dosiou, C. (PI); DuBose, A. (PI); Einav, S. (PI); Farquhar, J. (PI); Fathman, C. (PI); Fearon, W. (PI); Feldman, D. (PI); Felsher, D. (PI); Fisher, G. (PI); Fitzgerald, P. (PI); Ford, J. (PI); Ford, P. (PI); Fowler, M. (PI); Frayne, S. (PI); Friedland, S. (PI); Fries, J. (PI); Froelicher, V. (PI); Gabiola, J. (PI); Ganjoo, K. (PI); Garcia, G. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gardner, P. (PI); Gavi, B. (PI); Genovese, M. (PI); Gerson, L. (PI); Gesundheit, N. (PI); Giacomini, J. (PI); Glaseroff, A. (PI); Glenn, J. (PI); Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. (PI); Goldstein, M. (PI); Goodman, S. (PI); Goronzy, J. (PI); Gotlib, J. (PI); Gray, G. (PI); Greenberg, H. (PI); Greenberg, P. (PI); Gregory, P. (PI); Habtezion, A. (PI); Hallenbeck, J. (PI); Harman, S. (PI); Harrington, R. (PI); Harshman, L. (PI); Haskell, W. (PI); Heaney, C. (PI); Heidenreich, P. (PI); Henri, H. (PI); Ho, D. (PI); Hoffman, A. (PI); Holman, H. (PI); Holodniy, M. (PI); Hopkins, J. (PI); Horning, S. (PI); Hsia, H. (PI); Hunt, S. (PI); Ioannidis, J. (PI); Isom, R. (PI); Jernick, J. (PI); Ji, H. (PI); Johnston, L. (PI); Jones, E. (PI); Kahn, J. (PI); Kao, P. (PI); Kastelein, M. (PI); Katz, R. (PI); Katzenstein, D. (PI); Kenny, K. (PI); Khatri, P. (PI); Khazeni, N. (PI); Khush, K. (PI); Killen, J. (PI); Kim, S. (PI); Kohrt, H. (PI); Kraemer, F. (PI); Krishnan, E. (PI); Kummar, S. (PI); Kunz, P. (PI); Kuo, C. (PI); Kurian, A. (PI); Kuschner, W. (PI); Ladabaum, U. (PI); Lafayette, R. (PI); Laport, G. (PI); Lee, D. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Lee, P. (PI); Leung, L. (PI); Levin, E. (PI); Levitt, J. (PI); Levitt, L. (PI); Levy, R. (PI); Levy, S. (PI); Liang, D. (PI); Liedtke, M. (PI); Lindsay, A. (PI); Lorig, K. (PI); Lowe, A. (PI); Lowsky, R. (PI); Luby, S. (PI); Lutchman, G. (PI); Majeti, R. (PI); McConnell, M. (PI); McLaughlin, T. (PI); Medeiros, B. (PI); Meyer, T. (PI); Miklos, D. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Milstein, A. (PI); Mitchell, B. (PI); Mohabir, P. (PI); Montoya, J. (PI); Morioka-Douglas, N. (PI); Musen, M. (PI); Narayan, S. (PI); Neal, J. (PI); Negrin, R. (PI); Nevins, A. (PI); Nguyen, L. (PI); Nguyen, M. (PI); Nguyen, P. (PI); Nicolls, M. (PI); O' Callahan, P. (PI); Osterberg, L. (PI); Owens, D. (PI); Pao, A. (PI); Parnes, J. (PI); Parsonnet, J. (PI); Pasricha, P. (PI); Pegram, M. (PI); Periyakoil, V. (PI); Petersen, J. (PI); Pinto, H. (PI); Pompei, P. (PI); Popp, R. (PI); Posley, K. (PI); Price, E. (PI); Prochaska, J. (PI); Puri, R. (PI); Quertermous, T. (PI); Raffin, T. (PI); Rehkopf, D. (PI); Relman, D. (PI); Rizk, N. (PI); Robinson, B. (PI); Rockson, S. (PI); Rohatgi, R. (PI); Rosas, L. (PI); Rosen, G. (PI); Rosenberg, S. (PI); Rudd, P. (PI); Ruoss, S. (PI); Rydel, T. (PI); Scandling, J. (PI); Schnittger, I. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Schroeder, J. (PI); Shafer, R. (PI); Shah, N. (PI); Shah, S. (PI); Sharp, C. (PI); Shen, K. (PI); Shieh, L. (PI); Shizuru, J. (PI); Shoor, S. (PI); Sikic, B. (PI); Singh, B. (PI); Singh, U. (PI); Skeff, K. (PI); Spiekerkoetter, E. (PI); Srinivas, S. (PI); Stafford, R. (PI); Stefanick, M. (PI); Stertzer, S. (PI); Stevens, D. (PI); Stockdale, F. (PI); Strober, S. (PI); Studdert, D. (PI); Tai, J. (PI); Tamura, M. (PI); Tan, J. (PI); Telli, M. (PI); Tepper, R. (PI); Tompkins, L. (PI); Tremmel, J. (PI); Triadafilopoulos, G. (PI); Tsao, P. (PI); Upadhyay, D. (PI); Utz, P. (PI); Vagelos, R. (PI); Valantine, H. (PI); Verghese, A. (PI); Wakelee, H. (PI); Wang, P. (PI); Warvariv, V. (PI); Weill, D. (PI); Weinacker, A. (PI); Weng, K. (PI); Weng, W. (PI); Weyand, C. (PI); Winkelmayer, W. (PI); Winkleby, M. (PI); Winter, T. (PI); Witteles, R. (PI); Wu, J. (PI); Wu, S. (PI); Yabu, J. (PI); Yang, P. (PI); Yeung, A. (PI); Yock, P. (PI); Zamanian, R. (PI); Zehnder, J. (PI); Zei, P. (PI); Zolopa, A. (PI); Zulman, D. (PI); de Jesus Perez, V. (PI)
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints