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MATSCI 31: Chemical Principles: From Molecules to Solids (CHEM 31M)

A one-quarter course for students who have taken chemistry previously. This course will introduce the basic chemical principles that dictate how and why reactions occur and the structure and properties of important molecules and extended solids that make up our world. As the Central Science, a knowledge of chemistry provides a deep understanding of concepts in fields ranging from materials and environmental science and engineering to pharmacology and metabolism. Discussions of molecular structure will emphasize bonding models including Lewis structures, resonance, valence bond theory, and molecular orbital theory. Lectures will reveal the chemistry of materials of different dimensionality, with emphasis on symmetry, bonding, and electronic structure of molecules and solids. We will also discuss the kinetics and thermodynamics that govern reactivity and dictate solubility and acid-base equilibria. A two-hour weekly laboratory section accompanies the course to introduce laboratory techniques and reiterate lecture concepts through hands-on activities. Specific discussions and laboratories will emphasize the structure, properties, and applications of molecules used in medicine, perovskites and organic dyes used in solar cells, and the dramatically different properties of materials made with only carbon atoms: diamond, graphite, graphene. There will be three lectures, one two-hour laboratory session, an optional 80-minute problem solving session each week. The course will assume familiarity with stoichiometry, unit conversions, and gas laws. Students earning an AP chemistry score of 4 should take CHEM 31M. Students earning an AP score of 5 are welcome to take CHEM 31M, as a refresher, or will receive credit for CHEM 31M. Students who have taken AP chemistry, but scored a 3 or lower, are welcome to take the placement test to place into CHEM 31M. CHEM 31M cannot be used to replace grades earned in CHEM 31X because previously given the courses are not equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 100: Undergraduate Independent Study

Independent study in materials science under supervision of a faculty member.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 145: Kinetics of Materials Synthesis

The science of synthesis of nanometer scale materials. Examples including solution phase synthesis of nanoparticles, the vapor-liquid-solid approach to growing nanowires, formation of mesoporous materials from block-copolymer solutions, and formation of photonic crystals. Relationship of the synthesis phenomena to the materials science driving forces and kinetic mechanisms. Materials science concepts including capillarity, Gibbs free energy, phase diagrams, and driving forces. Prerequisites: MatSci 144. (Formerly 155)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Clemens, B. (PI)

MATSCI 150: Undergraduate Research

Participation in a research project.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MATSCI 151: Microstructure and Mechanical Properties (MATSCI 251)

Primarily for students without a materials background. Mechanical properties and their dependence on microstructure in a range of engineering materials. Elementary deformation and fracture concepts, strengthening and toughening strategies in metals and ceramics. Topics: dislocation theory, mechanisms of hardening and toughening, fracture, fatigue, and high-temperature creep. Undergraduates register in 151 for 4 units; graduates register for 251 in 3 units.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dauskardt, R. (PI)

MATSCI 163: Mechanical Behavior Laboratory (MATSCI 173)

Technologically relevant experimental techniques for the study of the mechanical behavior of engineering materials in bulk and thin film form, including tension testing, nanoindentation, and wafer curvature stress analysis. Metallic and polymeric systems. In addition to regularly scheduled lecture (M/W), this course includes a three-hour lab session every other week (T/W/Th). Register for lecture section in addition to one lab section. Undergraduates register for 163 in 4 units; graduates register in 173 for 3 units
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 164: Electronic and Photonic Materials and Devices Laboratory (MATSCI 174)

Lab course. Current electronic and photonic materials and devices. Device physics and micro-fabrication techniques. Students design, fabricate, and perform physical characterization on the devices they have fabricated. Established techniques and materials such as photolithography, metal evaporation, and Si technology; and novel ones such as soft lithography and organic semiconductors. Prerequisite: MATSCI 152 or 199 or consent of instructor. Undergraduates register in 164 for 4 units; graduates register in 174 for 3 units. Students are required to sign up for lecture and one lab section.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Salleo, A. (PI)

MATSCI 173: Mechanical Behavior Laboratory (MATSCI 163)

Technologically relevant experimental techniques for the study of the mechanical behavior of engineering materials in bulk and thin film form, including tension testing, nanoindentation, and wafer curvature stress analysis. Metallic and polymeric systems. In addition to regularly scheduled lecture (M/W), this course includes a three-hour lab session every other week (T/W/Th). Register for lecture section in addition to one lab section. Undergraduates register for 163 in 4 units; graduates register in 173 for 3 units
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 174: Electronic and Photonic Materials and Devices Laboratory (MATSCI 164)

Lab course. Current electronic and photonic materials and devices. Device physics and micro-fabrication techniques. Students design, fabricate, and perform physical characterization on the devices they have fabricated. Established techniques and materials such as photolithography, metal evaporation, and Si technology; and novel ones such as soft lithography and organic semiconductors. Prerequisite: MATSCI 152 or 199 or consent of instructor. Undergraduates register in 164 for 4 units; graduates register in 174 for 3 units. Students are required to sign up for lecture and one lab section.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Salleo, A. (PI)

MATSCI 193: Atomic Arrangements in Solids (MATSCI 203)

Atomic arrangements in perfect and imperfect solids, especially important metals, ceramics, and semiconductors. Elements of formal crystallography, including development of point groups and space groups. Undergraduates register in 193 for 4 units; graduates register in 203 for 3 units.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Reed, E. (PI)

MATSCI 201: Applied Quantum Mechanics I (EE 222)

Emphasis is on applications in modern devices and systems. Topics include: Schrödinger's equation, eigenfunctions and eigenvalues, solutions of simple problems including quantum wells and tunneling, quantum harmonic oscillator, coherent states, operator approach to quantum mechanics, Dirac notation, angular momentum, hydrogen atom, calculation techniques including matrix diagonalization, perturbation theory, variational method, and time-dependent perturbation theory with applications to optical absorption, nonlinear optical coefficients, and Fermi's golden rule. Prerequisites: MATH 52 and 53, EE 65 or PHYSICS 65 (or PHYSICS 43 and 45).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Miller, D. (PI)

MATSCI 203: Atomic Arrangements in Solids (MATSCI 193)

Atomic arrangements in perfect and imperfect solids, especially important metals, ceramics, and semiconductors. Elements of formal crystallography, including development of point groups and space groups. Undergraduates register in 193 for 4 units; graduates register in 203 for 3 units.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Reed, E. (PI)

MATSCI 230: Materials Science Colloquium

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MATSCI 251: Microstructure and Mechanical Properties (MATSCI 151)

Primarily for students without a materials background. Mechanical properties and their dependence on microstructure in a range of engineering materials. Elementary deformation and fracture concepts, strengthening and toughening strategies in metals and ceramics. Topics: dislocation theory, mechanisms of hardening and toughening, fracture, fatigue, and high-temperature creep. Undergraduates register in 151 for 4 units; graduates register for 251 in 3 units.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dauskardt, R. (PI)

MATSCI 299: Practical Training

Educational opportunities in high-technology research and development labs in industry. Qualified graduate students engage in internship work and integrate that work into their academic program. Following the internship, students complete a research report outlining their work activity, problems investigated, key results, and any follow-on projects they expect to perform. Student is responsible for arranging own employment. See department student services manager before enrolling.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

MATSCI 302: Solar Cells

In the last 15 years, the solar power market has grown in size by 100 times while solar modules prices have fallen by 20 times. Unsubsidized, solar power projects now compete favorably against fossil fuels in many countries and is on track to be the largest energy provider in the future. How did this happen? nnIn MatSci 302 we will take a comprehensive look at solar cells starting from the underlying device physics that are relevant to all photovoltaic cell technologies. We will then look at the undisputed king (silicon based solar cells); how do they work today and how will they develop in the future. Finally, we will look at why past challengers have failed and how future challengers can succeed. This class will be co-taught by Brian and Craig, who graduated from the Material Science PhD program in 2011 and then started PLANT PV, a startup that developed a solar technology from idea to protoype and then full implementation on production lines in China. The lecturers routinely visit manufacturing facilities in Asia and work closely with engineering staff at the largest solar cell makers in the world to implement their technology into production lines.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 303: Principles, Materials and Devices of Batteries

Thermodynamics and electrochemistry for batteries. Emphasis on lithium ion batteries, but also different types including lead acid, nickel metal hydride, metal air, sodium sulfur and redox flow. Battery electrode materials, electrolytes, separators, additives and electrode-electrolyte interface. Electrochemical techniques; advanced battery materials with nanotechnology; battery device structure. Prerequisites: undergraduate chemistry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chueh, W. (PI)

MATSCI 312: New Methods in Thin Film Synthesis

Materials base for engineering new classes of coatings and devices. Techniques to grow thin films at atomic scale and to fabricate multilayers/superlattices at nanoscale. Vacuum growth techniques including evaporation, molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), sputtering, ion beam assisted deposition, laser ablation, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and electroplating. Future direction of material synthesis such as nanocluster deposition and nanoparticles self-assembly. Relationships between deposition parameters and film properties. Applications of thin film synthesis in microelectronics, nanotechnology, and biology. SCPD offering.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wang, S. (PI)

MATSCI 346: Nanophotonics (EE 336)

Recent developments in micro- and nanophotonic materials and devices. Basic concepts of photonic crystals. Integrated photonic circuits. Photonic crystal fibers. Superprism effects. Optical properties of metallic nanostructures. Sub-wavelength phenomena and plasmonic excitations. Meta-materials. Prerequisite: Electromagnetic theory at the level of 242.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATSCI 381: Biomaterials in Regenerative Medicine (BIOE 361)

Materials design and engineering for regenerative medicine. How materials interact with cells through their micro- and nanostructure, mechanical properties, degradation characteristics, surface chemistry, and biochemistry. Examples include novel materials for drug and gene delivery, materials for stem cell proliferation and differentiation, and tissue engineering scaffolds. Prerequisites: undergraduate chemistry, and cell/molecular biology or biochemistry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Heilshorn, S. (PI)

MATSCI 384: Materials Advances for Neurotechnology: Materials Meet the Mind

The dichotomy between the material world and the mental world has driven the curiosity of scientists to explore the wonders of the brain, as well as motivated the continued innovations of novel technologies based on advances in materials science and engineering to understand the brain. This course introduces the basic principles of materials design and fabrication for probing the inner workings of the brain, discusses the fundamental challenges of state-of-the-art neurotechnologies, and explores the latest breakthroughs in materials-assisted neuroengineering. The course will cover the following topics: fundamentals of electrophysiology of the nervous system, mechanical and biochemical requirements of neural interfacing materials, materials for electrical neural interfaces (tungsten/carbon electrodes, Utah/Michigan/ECoG electrode arrays), materials for optical neural interfaces (optical fibers/waveguides for optogenetics, microprisms/GRIN lenses for fluorescence imaging of neural activity), and materials for biochemical neural interfaces (implantable microfluidic probes, neurotrophic scaffolds). Students will be able to speak the languages of both materials science and neuroengineering and acquire the knowledge and skills to understand and address pressing neuroscience challenges with materials advances. This course will include lectures, student discussions/presentations and guest lectures given by pioneers in related fields at Stanford and other schools/companies in the local area. nPrerequisite: undergraduate physics and chemistry; MATSCI 152, 158, 164, 190 or equivalents are recommended but not required prior to taking this course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hong, G. (PI)

MATSCI 385: Biomaterials for Drug Delivery (BIOE 385)

Fundamental concepts in engineering materials for drug delivery. The human body is a highly interconnected network of different tissues and there are all sorts of barriers to getting pharmaceutical drugs to the right place at the right time. Topics include drug delivery mechanisms (passive, targeted), therapeutic modalities and mechanisms of action, engineering principles of controlled release and quantitative understanding of drug transport, chemical and physical characteristics of delivery molecules and assemblies, significance of biodistribution and pharmacokinetic models, toxicity of biomaterials and drugs, and immune responses.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Appel, E. (PI)

MATSCI 400: Participation in Materials Science Teaching

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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