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MATH 20: Calculus

The definite integral, Riemann sums, antiderivatives, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and the Mean Value Theorem for integrals. Integration by substitution and by parts. Area between curves, and volume by slices, washers, and shells. Initial-value problems, exponential and logistic models, direction fields, and parametric curves. Prerequisite: Math 19 or equivalent. If you have not previously taken a calculus course at Stanford then you must have taken the math placement diagnostic (offered through the Math Department website) in order to register for this course.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATH 21: Calculus

Review of limit rules. Sequences, functions, limits at infinity, and comparison of growth of functions. Review of integration rules, integrating rational functions, and improper integrals. Infinite series, special examples, convergence and divergence tests (limit comparison and alternating series tests). Power series and interval of convergence, Taylor polynomials, Taylor series and applications. Prerequisite: Math 20 or equivalent. If you have not previously taken a calculus course at Stanford then you must have taken the math placement diagnostic (offered through the Math Department website) in order to register for this course.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATH 21A: Calculus, ACE

Students attend MATH 21 lectures with different recitation sessions: two hours per week instead of one, emphasizing engineering applications. Prerequisite: application; see https://web.stanford.edu/dept/soe/osa/ace.fb
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATH 51: Linear Algebra, Multivariable Calculus, and Modern Applications

This course provides unified coverage of linear algebra and multivariable differential calculus. It discusses applications connecting the material to many quantitative fields. Linear algebra in large dimensions underlies the scientific, data-driven, and computational tasks of the 21st century. The linear algebra portion of the course includes orthogonality, linear independence, matrix algebra, and eigenvalues as well as ubiquitious applications: least squares, linear regression, Markov chains (relevant to population dynamics, molecular chemistry, and PageRank), singular value decomposition (essential in image compression, topic modeling, and data-intensive work in the natural sciences), and more. The multivariable calculus material includes unconstrained optimization via gradients and Hessians (used for energy minimization in physics and chemistry), constrained optimization (via Lagrange multipliers, crucial in economics), gradient descent and the multivariable Chain Rule (which underlie many machine learning algorithms, such as backpropagation), and Newton's method (a crucial part of how GPS works). The course emphasizes computations alongside an intuitive understanding of key ideas, making students well-prepared for further study of mathematics and its applications to other fields. The widespread use of computers makes it more important, not less, for users of math to understand concepts: in all scientific fields, novel users of quantitative tools in the future will be those who understand ideas and how they fit with applications and examples. This is the only course at Stanford whose syllabus includes nearly all the math background for CS 229, which is why CS 229 and CS 230 specifically recommend it (or other courses resting on it). For frequently asked questions about the differences between Math 51 and CME 100, see the FAQ on the placement page on the math department website. Prerequisite: 21, 42, or the math placement diagnostic (offered through the Math Department website) in order to register for this course.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATH 51A: Linear Algebra, Multivariable Calculus, and Modern Applications, ACE

Students attend MATH 51 lectures with different recitation sessions: three hours per week instead of two, emphasizing engineering applications. Prerequisite: application; see https://web.stanford.edu/dept/soe/osa/ace.fb
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 6 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATH 52: Integral Calculus of Several Variables

Iterated integrals, line and surface integrals, vector analysis with applications to vector potentials and conservative vector fields, physical interpretations. Divergence theorem and the theorems of Green, Gauss, and Stokes. Prerequisite: 51 or equivalents.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATH 53: Ordinary Differential Equations with Linear Algebra

Ordinary differential equations and initial value problems, systems of linear differential equations with constant coefficients, applications of second-order equations to oscillations, matrix exponentials, Laplace transforms, stability of non-linear systems and phase plane analysis, numerical methods. Prerequisite: 51 or equivalents.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATH 63CM: Modern Mathematics: Continuous Methods

A proof-based course on ordinary differential equations, continuing themes from Math 61CM and Math 62CM. Topics include linear systems of differential equations and necessary tools from linear algebra, stability and asymptotic properties of solutions to linear systems, existence and uniqueness theorems for nonlinear differential equations with some applications to manifolds, behavior of solutions near an equilibrium point, and Sturm-Liouville theory. Prerequisites: Math 61CM and Math 62CM.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; White, B. (PI)

MATH 63DM: Modern Mathematics: Discrete Methods

Third part of a proof-based sequence in discrete mathematics. This course covers several topics in probability (random variables, independence and correlation, concentration bounds, the central limit theorem) and topology (metric spaces, point-set topology, continuous maps, compactness, Brouwer's fixed point and the Borsuk-Ulam theorem), with some applications in combinatorics. Prerequisites: 61DM or 61CM
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Tokieda, T. (PI)

MATH 101: Math Discovery Lab

MDL is a discovery-based project course in mathematics. Students work independently in small groups to explore open-ended mathematical problems and discover original mathematics. Students formulate conjectures and hypotheses; test predictions by computation, simulation, or pure thought; and present their results to classmates. No lecture component; in-class meetings reserved for student presentations, attendance mandatory. Admission is by application: http://math101.stanford.edu. Motivated students with any level of mathematical background are encouraged to apply. WIM
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Church, T. (PI)

MATH 104: Applied Matrix Theory

Linear algebra for applications in science and engineering: orthogonality, projections, spectral theory for symmetric matrices, the singular value decomposition, the QR decomposition, least-squares, the condition number of a matrix, algorithms for solving linear systems. MATH 113 offers a more theoretical treatment of linear algebra. MATH 104 and EE 103/CME 103 cover complementary topics in applied linear algebra. The focus of MATH 104 is on algorithms and concepts; the focus of EE 103 is on a few linear algebra concepts, and many applications. Prerequisites: MATH 51 and programming experience on par with CS 106.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATH 106: Functions of a Complex Variable

Complex numbers, analytic functions, Cauchy-Riemann equations, complex integration, Cauchy integral formula, residues, elementary conformal mappings. (Math 116 offers a more theoretical treatment.) Prerequisite: 52.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Zaman, A. (PI)

MATH 107: Graph Theory

An introductory course in graph theory establishing fundamental concepts and results in variety of topics. Topics include: basic notions, connectivity, cycles, matchings, planar graphs, graph coloring, matrix-tree theorem, conditions for hamiltonicity, Kuratowski's theorem, Ramsey and Turan-type theorem. Prerequisites: 51 or equivalent and some familiarity with proofs is required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Manners, F. (PI)

MATH 110: Applied Number Theory and Field Theory

Number theory and its applications to modern cryptography. Topics: congruences, finite fields, primality testing and factorization, public key cryptography, error correcting codes, and elliptic curves, emphasizing algorithms. WIM.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fox, J. (PI)

MATH 113: Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory

Algebraic properties of matrices and their interpretation in geometric terms. The relationship between the algebraic and geometric points of view and matters fundamental to the study and solution of linear equations. Topics: linear equations, vector spaces, linear dependence, bases and coordinate systems; linear transformations and matrices; similarity; eigenvectors and eigenvalues; diagonalization. (Math 104 offers a more application-oriented treatment.)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATH 115: Functions of a Real Variable

The development of real analysis in Euclidean space: sequences and series, limits, continuous functions, derivatives, integrals. Basic point set topology. Honors math majors and students who intend to do graduate work in mathematics should take 171. Prerequisite: 21.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATH 120: Groups and Rings

Recommended for Mathematics majors and required of honors Mathematics majors. Similar to 109 but altered content and more theoretical orientation. Groups acting on sets, examples of finite groups, Sylow theorems, solvable and simple groups. Fields, rings, and ideals; polynomial rings over a field; PID and non-PID. Unique factorization domains. WIM.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATH 122: Modules and Group Representations

Modules over PID. Tensor products over fields. Group representations and group rings. Maschke's theorem and character theory. Character tables, construction of representations. Prerequisite: Math 120. Also recommended: 113.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Zaman, A. (PI)

MATH 137: Mathematical Methods of Classical Mechanics

Newtonian mechanics. Lagrangian formalism. E. Noether's theorem. Oscillations. Rigid bodies. Introduction to symplectic geometry. Hamiltonian formalism. Legendre transform. Variational principles. Geometric optics. Introduction to the theory of integrable systems. Prerequisites: 51, 52, 53, or 61CM, 62CM, 63CM.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chatterjee, S. (PI)

MATH 143: Differential Geometry

Geometry of curves and surfaces in three-space and higher dimensional manifolds. Parallel transport, curvature, and geodesics. Surfaces with constant curvature. Minimal surfaces.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fredrickson, L. (PI)

MATH 154: Algebraic Number Theory

Properties of number fields and Dedekind domains, quadratic and cyclotomic fields, applications to some classical Diophantine equations. Prerequisites: 120 and 121, especially modules over principal ideal domains and Galois theory of finite fields.
Terms: Spr, alternate years, not given next year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tsai, C. (PI)

MATH 158: Basic Probability and Stochastic Processes with Engineering Applications (CME 298)

Calculus of random variables and their distributions with applications. Review of limit theorems of probability and their application to statistical estimation and basic Monte Carlo methods. Introduction to Markov chains, random walks, Brownian motion and basic stochastic differential equations with emphasis on applications from economics, physics and engineering, such as filtering and control. Prerequisites: exposure to basic probability.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ying, L. (PI)

MATH 159: Discrete Probabilistic Methods

Modern discrete probabilistic methods suitable for analyzing discrete structures of the type arising in number theory, graph theory, combinatorics, computer science, information theory and molecular sequence analysis. Prerequisite: STATS 116/MATH 151 or equivalent. Typically in alternating years.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kwan, M. (PI)

MATH 171: Fundamental Concepts of Analysis

Recommended for Mathematics majors and required of honors Mathematics majors. Similar to 115 but altered content and more theoretical orientation. Properties of Riemann integrals, continuous functions and convergence in metric spaces; compact metric spaces, basic point set topology. Prerequisite: 61CM or 61DM or 115 or consent of the instructor. WIM
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATH 172: Lebesgue Integration and Fourier Analysis

Similar to 205A, but for undergraduate Math majors and graduate students in other disciplines. Topics include Lebesgue measure on Euclidean space, Lebesgue integration, L^p spaces, the Fourier transform, the Hardy-Littlewood maximal function and Lebesgue differentiation. Prerequisite: 171 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hershkovits, O. (PI)

MATH 197: Senior Honors Thesis

Honors math major working on senior honors thesis under an approved advisor carries out research and reading. Satisfactory written account of progress achieved during term must be submitted to advisor before term ends. May be repeated 3 times for a max of 9 units. Contact department student services specialist to enroll.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

MATH 199: Reading Topics

For math majors only. Undergraduates pursue a reading program under the direction of a math faculty member; topics limited to those topics not in regular department course offerings. Credit can fulfill the elective requirement for math majors. May be repeated for credit. Undergraduates may take this course at most 3 times, only enroll in one section per quarter, and complete up to 9 units total. Please contact the student services specialist for the enrollment proposal form at least 2 weeks before enrollment for the quarter closes.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATH 210C: Lie Theory

Topics in Lie groups, Lie algebras, and/or representation theory. Prerequisite: math 210B. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tsai, C. (PI)

MATH 215C: Differential Geometry

This course will be an introduction to Riemannian Geometry. Topics will include the Levi-Civita connection, Riemann curvature tensor, Ricci and scalar curvature, geodesics, parallel transport, completeness, geodesics and Jacobi fields, and comparison techniques. Prerequisites 146 or 215B
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Luk, J. (PI)

MATH 226: Numerical Solution of Partial Differential Equations (CME 306)

Hyperbolic partial differential equations: stability, convergence and qualitative properties; nonlinear hyperbolic equations and systems; combined solution methods from elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic problems. Examples include: Burger's equation, Euler equations for compressible flow, Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible flow. Prerequisites: MATH 220A or CME 302.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ying, L. (PI)

MATH 228: Stochastic Methods in Engineering (CME 308, MS&E 324)

The basic limit theorems of probability theory and their application to maximum likelihood estimation. Basic Monte Carlo methods and importance sampling. Markov chains and processes, random walks, basic ergodic theory and its application to parameter estimation. Discrete time stochastic control and Bayesian filtering. Diffusion approximations, Brownian motion and an introduction to stochastic differential equations. Examples and problems from various applied areas. Prerequisites: exposure to probability and background in analysis.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Glynn, P. (PI)

MATH 230C: Theory of Probability III (STATS 310C)

Continuous time stochastic processes: martingales, Brownian motion, stationary independent increments, Markov jump processes and Gaussian processes. Invariance principle, random walks, LIL and functional CLT. Markov and strong Markov property. Infinitely divisible laws. Some ergodic theory. Prerequisite: 310B or MATH 230B. http://statweb.stanford.edu/~adembo/stat-310c/
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dembo, A. (PI)

MATH 234: Large Deviations Theory (STATS 374)

Combinatorial estimates and the method of types. Large deviation probabilities for partial sums and for empirical distributions, Cramer's and Sanov's theorems and their Markov extensions. Applications in statistics, information theory, and statistical mechanics. Prerequisite: MATH 230A or STATS 310. Offered every 2-3 years. http://statweb.stanford.edu/~adembo/large-deviations/
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dembo, A. (PI)

MATH 235A: Topics in combinatorics

This advanced course in extremal combinatorics covers several major themes in the area. These include extremal combinatorics and Ramsey theory, the graph regularity method, and algebraic methods.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fox, J. (PI)

MATH 237A: Topics in Financial Math: Market microstructure and trading algorithms

Introduction to market microstructure theory, including optimal limit order and market trading models. Random matrix theory covariance models and their application to portfolio theory. Statistical arbitrage algorithms.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Papanicolaou, G. (PI)

MATH 257C: Symplectic Geometry and Topology

Continuation of 257B. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Varolgunes, U. (PI)

MATH 263C: Topics in Representation Theory

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bump, D. (PI)

MATH 272: Topics in Partial Differential Equations

Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATH 298: Graduate Practical Training

Only for mathematics graduate students. Students obtain employment in a relevant industrial or research activity to enhance their professional experience. Students submit a concise report detailing work activities, problems worked on, and key results. May be repeated for credit up to 3 units. Prerequisite: qualified offer of employment and consent of department. Prior approval by Math Department is required; you must contact the Math Department's Student Services staff for instructions before being granted permission to enroll.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ryzhik, L. (PI)

MATH 355: Graduate Teaching Seminar

Required of and limited to first-year Mathematics graduate students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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