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LINGUIST 1: Introduction to Linguistics

The cognitive organization of linguistic structure and the social nature of language use. Why language learning is difficult. Why computers have trouble understanding human languages. How languages differ from one another. How and why speakers of the same language speak differently. How language is used strategically. *** Sections are mandatory. Please sign up for one of the sections at enrollment
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 47N: Languages, Dialects, Speakers

Preference to freshmen. Variation and change in languages from around the world; the roots, historical development, and linguistic and social structures of variation; how languages differ from one another and how issues in linguistics connect to other social and cultural issues; the systematic study of language.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Anttila, A. (PI)

LINGUIST 52N: Spoken Sexuality: Language and the Social Construction of Sexuality (FEMGEN 52N)

The many ways language is used in the construction of sexuality and sexual identity. How language is used as a resource for performing and perceiving sexual identity. Drawing on linguistic analyses of pronunciation, word choice, and grammar, questions such as: Is there a gay accent? Why isn't there a lesbian accent? How do transgendered people modify their linguistic behavior when transitioning? How are unmarked (heterosexual) identities linguistically constructed? Sexuality as an issue of identity, as well as of desire. Iconic relations between elements of language such as breathy voice quality and high pitch, and aspects of desire such as arousal and excitement. How language encodes ideologies about sexuality; how language is used to talk about sexuality in public discourses about gay marriage and bullying, as well as in personal narratives of coming out. How language encodes dominant ideologies about sexuality, evident in labels for sexual minorities as well as terminology for sex acts. Discussions of readings, explorations of how sexuality is portrayed in popular media, and analyses of primary data. Final research paper on a topic of student choice.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Podesva, R. (PI)

LINGUIST 65: African American Vernacular English (AFRICAAM 21)

The English vernacular spoken by African Americans in big city settings, and its relation to Creole English dialects spoken on the S. Carolina Sea Islands (Gullah), in the Caribbean, and in W. Africa. The history of expressive uses of African American English (in soundin' and rappin'), and its educational implications. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rickford, J. (PI)

LINGUIST 90: Teaching Spoken English

Practical approach to teaching English to non-native speakers. Teaching principles and the features of English which present difficulties. Preparation of lessons, practice teaching in class, and tutoring of non-native speaker.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Geda, K. (PI)

LINGUIST 105: Phonetics (LINGUIST 205A)

The study of speech sounds: how to produce them, how to perceive them, and their acoustic properties. The influence of production and perception systems on sound change and phonological patterns. Acoustic analysis and experimental techniques. Lab exercises. Prerequisite: 110 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sumner, M. (PI)

LINGUIST 110: Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology

Differences in the sounds of the world's languages and how these sounds are made by the human vocal tract. Theories that account for cross-linguistic similarities in the face of differences.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Anttila, A. (PI)

LINGUIST 121: Crosslinguistic Syntax

A data-driven introduction to the methods of syntactic analysis, and their results. Emphasis is on understanding how languages are systematically alike and different in their basic sentence structure. Focuses on building up syntactic argumentation skills via the collective development of a partial formal theory of sentence structure, which attempts to model native speaker knowledge. Draws on data from a diverse array of the world's languages, including but not limited to English. Enrollment in the discussion section is required. Prerequisites: Linguistics 1, or Linguistics 120, or permission of instructor. Satisfies the WIM requirement for Linguistics majors.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Harizanov, B. (PI)

LINGUIST 130A: Introduction to Semantics and Pragmatics (LINGUIST 230A)

Linguistic meaning and its role in communication. Topics include ambiguity, vagueness, presupposition, intonational meaning, and Grice's theory of conversational implicature. Applications to issues in politics, the law, philosophy, advertising, and natural language processing. Those who have not taken logic, such as PHIL 150 or 151, should also enroll in 130C. Pre- or corequisite: 120, 121, consent of instructor, or graduate standing in Linguistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Potts, C. (PI)

LINGUIST 130B: Introduction to Lexical Semantics

Introduction to basic concepts and issues in the linguistic study of word meaning. The course focuses on the core semantic properties and internal organization of the four major word classes in natural languages: nouns, adjectives, prepositions, verbs. This course draws on material from English and other languages to illustrate the range of word meanings found across languages and to investigate possible word meanings. Prerequisites: Linguist 1 or equivalent or permission of the instructor. Linguist 130A is not a prerequisite for this course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 157: Sociophonetics (LINGUIST 257)

The study of phonetic aspects of sociolinguistic variation and the social significance of phonetic variation. Acoustic analysis of vowels, consonants, prosody, and voice quality. Hands-on work on collaborative research project. Prerequisite: 110 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Podesva, R. (PI)

LINGUIST 160: Introduction to Language Change

Principles of historical linguistics:, the nature of language change. Kinds and causes of change, variation and diffusion of changes through populations, differentiation of dialects and languages, determination and classification of historical relationships among languages, the reconstruction of ancestral languages and intermediate changes, parallels with cultural and genetic evolutionary theory, and implications of variation and change for the description and explanation of language in general. Prerequisite: introductory course in linguistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kiparsky, P. (PI)

LINGUIST 163A: Endangered Languages and Language Revitalization (ANTHRO 163A, ANTHRO 263A, LINGUIST 263, NATIVEAM 163)

Languages around the world are dying at such a rapid rate that the next century could see half of the world's 6800 languages and cultures become extinct unless action is taken now. This course looks at how and why languages die, and what is lost from a culture when that occurs. We will investigate how this trend can be reversed by methods of language documentation and description, the use of innovative technologies, multimodal fieldwork, writing dictionaries and grammars for different audiences, language planning, and data creation, annotation, preservation, and dissemination. We will focus on a number of current programs around the world to revitalize languages. Finally, the course will examine ethical modes of fieldwork within endangered language communities, and the possibilities of successful collaborations and capacity building, focusing especially on Northern California Indian peoples and their languages.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ogilvie, S. (PI)

LINGUIST 180: From Languages to Information (CS 124, LINGUIST 280)

Extracting meaning, information, and structure from human language text, speech, web pages, genome sequences, social networks, or any less structured information. Methods include: string algorithms, edit distance, language modeling, naive Bayes, inverted indices, vector semantics. Applications such as question answering, sentiment analysis, information retrevial, text classification, social network models, machine translation, genomic sequence alignment, spell checking, speech processing. Prerequisite: CS103, CS107, CS109.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jurafsky, D. (PI)

LINGUIST 183: Programming and Algorithms for Natural Language Processing (LINGUIST 283)

Construction of computer programs for linguistic processes such as string search, morphological, syntactic, and semantic analysis and generation, and simple machine translation. Emphasis is on the algorithms that have proved most useful for solving such problems.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kay, M. (PI)

LINGUIST 188: Natural Language Understanding (CS 224U, LINGUIST 288)

Project-oriented class focused on developing systems and algorithms for robust machine understanding of human language. Draws on theoretical concepts from linguistics, natural language processing, and machine learning. Topics include lexical semantics, distributed representations of meaning, relation extraction, semantic parsing, sentiment analysis, and dialogue agents, with special lectures on developing projects, presenting research results, and making connections with industry. Prerequisites: one of LINGUIST 180, CS 124, CS 224N, CS224S, or CS221; and logical/semantics such as LINGUIST 130A or B, CS 157, or PHIL150
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 191: Linguistics and the Teaching of English as a Second/Foreign Language (LINGUIST 291)

Methodology and techniques for teaching languages, using concepts from linguistics and second language acquisition theory and research. Focus is on teaching English, but most principles and techniques applicable to any language. Optional 1-unit seminar in computer-assisted language learning.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 200: Foundations of Linguistic Theory

Theories that have shaped contemporary linguistics; recurrent themes and descriptive practice. Strong background in Linguistics or permission of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kiparsky, P. (PI)

LINGUIST 205A: Phonetics (LINGUIST 105)

The study of speech sounds: how to produce them, how to perceive them, and their acoustic properties. The influence of production and perception systems on sound change and phonological patterns. Acoustic analysis and experimental techniques. Lab exercises. Prerequisite: 110 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sumner, M. (PI)

LINGUIST 210B: Advanced Phonology

A comparison of Stratal OT, Transderivational OT, and rule-based approaches, primarily on the empirical basis of stress, syllable structure, and prosodic organization. Course may be repeated once.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 222A: Foundations of Syntactic Theory I

The roles of the verb and the lexicon in the determination of sentence syntax and their treatment in modern grammatical theories. Empirical underpinnings of core phenomena, including the argument/adjunct distinction, argument structure and argument realization, control and raising, operations on argument structure and grammatical function changing rules. Motivations for a lexicalist approach rooted in principles of lexical expression and subcategorization satisfaction. Prerequisite: 120 or permission of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Levin, B. (PI)

LINGUIST 222B: Foundations of Syntactic Theory II

The nature of unbounded dependency constructions and their treatment in modern grammatical theories. Filler-gap dependencies, island constraints, and the relation between grammar and processing. Prerequisite: 222A.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Harizanov, B. (PI)

LINGUIST 225: Seminar in Syntax: Head Movement

Seminar on advanced topics in syntax. Topics may vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Harizanov, B. (PI)

LINGUIST 230A: Introduction to Semantics and Pragmatics (LINGUIST 130A)

Linguistic meaning and its role in communication. Topics include ambiguity, vagueness, presupposition, intonational meaning, and Grice's theory of conversational implicature. Applications to issues in politics, the law, philosophy, advertising, and natural language processing. Those who have not taken logic, such as PHIL 150 or 151, should also enroll in 130C. Pre- or corequisite: 120, 121, consent of instructor, or graduate standing in Linguistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Potts, C. (PI)

LINGUIST 236: SEM IN SEMANTICS: Reasoning with Quantifiers (PSYCH 236C)

Description: Team project-oriented class exploring linguistic, psychological, and computational models of how people reason about statements involving quantifiers and related devices, including negation and negative polarity items, superlatives, and definite descriptions. One-third of the class time will be devoted to covering core material and recent papers; the remaining two-thirds will be for project development with guidance from the instructors. Prerequisite: Linguist 230B or permission from the instructors
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 257: Sociophonetics (LINGUIST 157)

The study of phonetic aspects of sociolinguistic variation and the social significance of phonetic variation. Acoustic analysis of vowels, consonants, prosody, and voice quality. Hands-on work on collaborative research project. Prerequisite: 110 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Podesva, R. (PI)

LINGUIST 263: Endangered Languages and Language Revitalization (ANTHRO 163A, ANTHRO 263A, LINGUIST 163A, NATIVEAM 163)

Languages around the world are dying at such a rapid rate that the next century could see half of the world's 6800 languages and cultures become extinct unless action is taken now. This course looks at how and why languages die, and what is lost from a culture when that occurs. We will investigate how this trend can be reversed by methods of language documentation and description, the use of innovative technologies, multimodal fieldwork, writing dictionaries and grammars for different audiences, language planning, and data creation, annotation, preservation, and dissemination. We will focus on a number of current programs around the world to revitalize languages. Finally, the course will examine ethical modes of fieldwork within endangered language communities, and the possibilities of successful collaborations and capacity building, focusing especially on Northern California Indian peoples and their languages.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ogilvie, S. (PI)

LINGUIST 265: African American Vernacular English

Linguistics 265 is a new, advanced course on African American Vernacular English, intended for graduate students in Linguistics, Education and other fields, and fornundergraduate majors in Linguistics. Students who have taken Linguistics 65 or its equivalent, or who have had an undergraduate introduction to linguistics, arenalso eligible to take this course.nnThe course will discuss in detail some of the descriptive, historical and sociolinguistic literature on AAVE, beginning with the classic book length works on AAVE writtennby William Labov, Walt Wolfram and Ralph Fasold, but including some of the most recent research-based articles on the subject in current and recent journals. Researchninterests of students in the course will help to determine the specific foci within these broad parameters.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rickford, J. (PI)

LINGUIST 280: From Languages to Information (CS 124, LINGUIST 180)

Extracting meaning, information, and structure from human language text, speech, web pages, genome sequences, social networks, or any less structured information. Methods include: string algorithms, edit distance, language modeling, naive Bayes, inverted indices, vector semantics. Applications such as question answering, sentiment analysis, information retrevial, text classification, social network models, machine translation, genomic sequence alignment, spell checking, speech processing. Prerequisite: CS103, CS107, CS109.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jurafsky, D. (PI)

LINGUIST 283: Programming and Algorithms for Natural Language Processing (LINGUIST 183)

Construction of computer programs for linguistic processes such as string search, morphological, syntactic, and semantic analysis and generation, and simple machine translation. Emphasis is on the algorithms that have proved most useful for solving such problems.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kay, M. (PI)

LINGUIST 286: Information Retrieval and Web Search (CS 276)

Text information retrieval systems; efficient text indexing; Boolean, vector space, and probabilistic retrieval models; ranking and rank aggregation; evaluating IR systems. Text clustering and classification: classification algorithms, latent semantic indexing, taxonomy induction; Web search engines including crawling and indexing, link-based algorithms, and web metadata. Prerequisites: CS 107, CS 109, CS 161.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 288: Natural Language Understanding (CS 224U, LINGUIST 188)

Project-oriented class focused on developing systems and algorithms for robust machine understanding of human language. Draws on theoretical concepts from linguistics, natural language processing, and machine learning. Topics include lexical semantics, distributed representations of meaning, relation extraction, semantic parsing, sentiment analysis, and dialogue agents, with special lectures on developing projects, presenting research results, and making connections with industry. Prerequisites: one of LINGUIST 180, CS 124, CS 224N, CS224S, or CS221; and logical/semantics such as LINGUIST 130A or B, CS 157, or PHIL150
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 291: Linguistics and the Teaching of English as a Second/Foreign Language (LINGUIST 191)

Methodology and techniques for teaching languages, using concepts from linguistics and second language acquisition theory and research. Focus is on teaching English, but most principles and techniques applicable to any language. Optional 1-unit seminar in computer-assisted language learning.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 130C: Logic Laboratory (LINGUIST 230E)

Typically taken in conjunction with 130A/230A.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

LINGUIST 141: Language and Gesture

History of work on gesture, gestural systems associated with particular languages/cultures, and with specific activities - music, sports, traffic management, stock exchanges, etc. Examine gesture developmentally and how gesture is represented in painting and animation.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Clark, E. (PI)

LINGUIST 155F: Seminar in Sociolinguistics: Language and Social Interaction (LINGUIST 255F)

Figures of personhood, personas, character types, and stereotypes in the study of linguistic variation. What are the significant differences among these types? Are these social types merely the vehicles through which social meanings travel or do they constitute the meanings themselves?
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Podesva, R. (PI)

LINGUIST 162: History Through Language

What we can learn about the human past through human language, especially where proper historical records are absent. Studying population migrations through language spread. Different types of change in different social environments: grammatical "simplification" of imperial languages vs. complexity of tribal languages. Effects of contact on languages. Methods for reconstructing linguistic past: comparative method, linguistic paleontology, computational phylogenetic methods.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 195A: Undergraduate Research Workshop

Designed for undergraduates beginning or working on research projects in linguistics. Participants present and receive feedback on their projects and receive tips on the research and writing process.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

LINGUIST 197A: Undergraduate Research Seminar

May be repeat for credit
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jurafsky, D. (PI)

LINGUIST 230B: Semantics and Pragmatics I

Expands on 130A/230A. Detailed study of selected topics in formal semantics and pragmatics. Prerequisites: LINGUIST 130A/230A or permission from instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lassiter, D. (PI)

LINGUIST 230E: Logic Laboratory (LINGUIST 130C)

Typically taken in conjunction with 130A/230A.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

LINGUIST 241: Language Acquisition II

Pragmatics and acquisition. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Clark, E. (PI)

LINGUIST 246: Foundations of Psycholinguistics

Basic readings in language processing and language use, with a historical dimension; discussion each week in class of the relevant papers.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Clark, E. (PI)

LINGUIST 255C: Seminar in Sociolinguistics: Sociogrammar

Seminar style course exploring the literature on sociolinguistic variation in morphology and syntax from the 1960s to the present, and its implication for (socio)linguistic theory, especially in relation to (and in contrast with) socio-phonetics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 255E: Seminar in Sociolinguistics: Complicating Representations

In this seminar, we will explore the interface between social theory and spoken language understanding. In doing so, we expect to complicate simplistic notions of representations and question what language users store and how they link sound patterns with linguistic and social meaning. Through deep readings of the literature and discussions, we hope to arrive at a number of individual project proposals that take what we know about spoken language understanding to inform our understanding of complex representations that integrate language and the social world.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 255F: Seminar in Sociolinguistics: Language and Social Interaction (LINGUIST 155F)

Figures of personhood, personas, character types, and stereotypes in the study of linguistic variation. What are the significant differences among these types? Are these social types merely the vehicles through which social meanings travel or do they constitute the meanings themselves?
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Podesva, R. (PI)

LINGUIST 275: Probability and Statistics for linguists

Introduction to probability and statistical inference, with a focus on conceptual and practical issues relevant to theoretical, experimental, and corpus linguistics. Data analysis and modeling using R. Course project will involve reproducing a published modeling result or statistical analysis in full detail.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lassiter, D. (PI)

LINGUIST 390: M.A. Project

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

LINGUIST 395: Research Workshop

Restricted to students in the doctoral program. Student presentations of research toward qualifying papers.May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Anttila, A. (PI)

LINGUIST 396: Research Projects in Linguistics

Mentored research project for first-year graduate students in linguistics.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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