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LAW 201: Civil Procedure I

This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum. This course is a study of the process of civil litigation from the commencement of a lawsuit through final judgment under modern statutes and rules of court, with emphasis on the federal rules of civil procedure. May include class participation, written assignments, or other elements. Your instructor will advise you of the basis for grading.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 205: Contracts

This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum. It provides exposure to basic contract law. The course will identify the scope and purpose of the legal protection accorded to interests predicated on contract and will focus on problems of contract formation, interpretation, performance, and remedies for breach.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 219: Legal Research and Writing

Legal Research and Writing is a two-unit course taught as a simulation. Students work on a legal problem starting with an initial interview, and they conduct fact investigation and legal research related to that problem. Students receive rigorous training in reading and analyzing legal authority, and in using persuasive strategies--legal analysis, narrative, rhetoric, legal theory, and public policy--to frame and develop legal arguments. Students write predictive memos and persuasive briefs, and are introduced to the professional norms of ethics, timeliness, and courtesy. This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 223: Torts

This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum. It considers issues involved in determining whether the law should require a person to compensate for harm intentionally or unintentionally caused. These problems arise in situations as diverse as automobile collisions, operations of nuclear facilities, and consumption of defective food products. Among other considerations, the course explores various resolutions in terms of their social, economic, and political implications.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 240A: Discussion (1L): Asian Americans and the Law

This discussion seminar will consider the legal treatment of Asian Americans. We will read materials about the history of citizenship, exclusion, and internment, and discuss contemporary issues affecting the individuals of Asian descent in the American legal system. This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Ho, D. (PI)

LAW 240B: Discussion (1L): Comparative Approaches to Law and Inequality

In this discussion seminar, we will examine how various countries across Europe and Latin American, as well as the United States, seek to deploy law to promote equality for subordinated groups---including especially racial minorities and women. We will examine how laws seeking to promote racial and gender equality, often developed first in the United States, came to be transplanted elsewhere, and how in the process these were transformed in significant ways. Topics will include anti-discrimination law, harassment law, affirmative action (including but not limited to quotas), and parental leave. How and why did the law change as it was transplanted from one legal system and culture into another? To the extent that different legal systems have adopted different approaches, which is preferable---and according to what metrics? Moreover, to the extent that we prefer an approach deployed elsewhere, what are the chances of adopting some version of it here in the United States (or vice versa)? This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Kessler, A. (PI)

LAW 240C: Discussion (1L): Corporate Social Responsibility

How can a company's managers safeguard the firm's financial value for its shareholders while, at the same time, operating ethically and purposively benefiting other stakeholders, including its employees and the communities in which the firm operates? Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is rooted in the idea that shareholder value is not the only measure of a firm's value and, indeed, that the exclusive pursuit of profits may produce social harms. The seminar will consider a variety of legal issues related to CSR, including: 1. The meaning and measure of environmental, social, and governance (ESG) criteria for corporations. 2. The voluntary or mandatory disclosure of a company's environmental and social harms or risks. 3. When is it legally and ethically appropriate for corporate managers or institutional investors to compromise shareholder value in the pursuit of social and environment goals? 4. Constituency statutes and benefit corporations that reflect interests other than profit maximization. 5. The power of investors to influence corporate behavior through capital allocation-investments (including impact investing) and divestments-and shareholder activism. 6. The power of other stakeholders, including consumers and employees, to influence corporate behavior. This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F

LAW 240D: Discussion (1L): Criminal Legal Histories

This seminar will trace the roots of four critical aspects of the American criminal justice system: jury independence and the power of jurors to render verdicts according to conscience; plea bargaining and the progressive marginalization of juries; penitentiaries and the displacement of other forms of punishment; and the criminalization of recreational drugs. Though modern criminal justice policy will inform our conversation, the readings will be historical with an emphasis on primary source documents. We will examine the forces driving legal evolution and the historian's tools in mapping those forces. This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Fisher, G. (PI)

LAW 240E: Discussion (1L): Dress Codes: Law, Status, Sex, and Power

Dress codes may seem a bit old fashioned, but in fact we are constantly told who should wear what and when. Rules---written and implied---divide formal from casual attire and children's clothing from that of adults. There are rules for what to wear in each season of the year and rules about the right attire for different times of the day. And, of course, there are rules about the types of clothing men may wear and about the clothing suitable for women. Adherence to such rules is considered by many to be an important signal of breeding and even character: accordingly, immediate social sanctions---and indirect professional consequences---can follow from breaking them. Some dress codes are job requirements or house rules of an organization or establishment---flouting them can get one fired, kicked out of school or barred from a restaurant. Finally, there are laws about clothing, enforced by police or government officials. Break these rules and you may find yourself facing a fine or even a jail sentence. Why is attire so rule bound? Why and when is clothing important enough to become the subject of written treatises, rules and regulations, legislative proclamations and judicial edicts? This seminar will explore dress codes, from the sumptuary laws of the late Middle Ages to the unstated norms of the 21st century, and discover what they can tell us about the significance of clothing---our most conspicuous medium of self-expression---and its relationship to individual identity, community cohesiveness and social order. This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Ford, R. (PI)

LAW 240F: Discussion (1L): Feminist Jurisprudence

This discussion seminar will consider some of the major theoretical writings of the past 40 years in feminist legal theory, and explore the application of different theoretical approaches to contemporary issues in the law. Likely readings include Catherine MacKinnon, Robin West, Janet Halley, and Angela Harris. Possible topics include campus sexual misconduct codes, the Me Too movement, the meaning of consent, and the legal treatment of the family. This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Fried, B. (PI)

LAW 240G: Discussion (1L): Innovation and Inequality

Throughout history, innovation has been a leading driver of economic growth and has helped lift communities out of poverty, and the importance of knowledge goods to the global economy has only increased with the rise of computing and information technologies. Legal institutions incentivize innovation and allocate access to knowledge goods through a variety of mechanisms, including intellectual property, direct funding through grants and national laboratories, tax incentives, and innovation inducement prizes. In this discussion group, we will examine how these bodies of law are used both to reinforce and subvert existing power structures and inequalities, including issues related to gender, race, geography, and income. We will discuss inequalities among innovators as well as inequalities in access to new innovations, or in who those innovations are made for. We will also consider how these issues might be addressed through legal reforms either internal or external to innovation laws. This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Ouellette, L. (PI)

LAW 240H: Discussion (1L): Measuring Access to Justice and Access to Information in Marginalized Communities

In this discussion seminar, we will explore the intersection of access to information and access to justice. Our current social and technological moment promises increased access to basic legal information without economic or geographic boundaries. But access and accessibility remain influenced by identity, privilege, and power. What are our collective expectations for governments to provide legal information in the digital age? How does access to free, easy-to-use, reliable legal information -- or the lack thereof -- have an impact on low-income and other marginalized communities, particularly in how they exercise their rights and protect themselves from harm? By examining how some of the most vulnerable populations access legal information, we can better assess the concept of open government with an eye toward informing and improving access to justice efforts. Topics to be explored through readings and discussion include: 1) the adequacy of pro se litigants' access to legal information within the American prison system; 2) measuring the impact of U.S. states and municipalities that contract with private companies to publish public laws; 3) ways in which technology might help close the justice gap in low-income communities v. how technology can expose vulnerable communities to new forms of victimization; 4) creative and unique systems of information-sharing within the homeless population and how legal organizations might penetrate those systems to combat disenfranchisement of the homeless and provide them with broader access to legal services; and 5) the fragility of freedom of information laws in democracies and whether these laws contribute to a more informed public. This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Williams, B. (PI)

LAW 240I: Discussion (1L): Prosecutors and Defense Attorneys as Agents of Change

What opportunities do prosecutors and defense attorneys have to help reform the criminal justice system and the wider society? And how can they best take advantage of those opportunities? We will explore these questions by reading and discussing three books: J Anthony Lukas, Big Trouble: A Murder in a Small Western Town Sets Off a Struggle for the Soul of America (1998); Gilbert King, Devil in the Grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of a New America (2013); and Emily Bazelon, Charged: The New Movement to Transform American Prosecution and End Mass Incarceration (2019). This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Sklansky, D. (PI)

LAW 240J: Discussion (1L): Religion and the Practice of Law

This seminar will focus on the dynamic interplay between religious identity, community, and worldview, and the study, practice, and profession of law. As a defining force for so many across the globe, and in the norms through which human beings recognize their rights and arrange their affairs, religion has a unique and abiding impact on the work and life of aspiring and practicing lawyers--for believers and nonbelievers alike. Whether as first-year law students or seasoned practitioners, the need to anticipate, appreciate, and reconcile religious perspectives is both a vital professional skill and an illuminating resource for self-understanding and mutual respect. The class will meet across three on-campus sessions and a closing offsite dinner, and will include a collaborative exploration of primary and secondary sources, as well as custom conversational frameworks. Topics will include religion and cross-cultural lawyering, religion and legal systems, the role of faith in judicial decision-making, and law as a vocation (with attendant self-care dynamics). Befitting the overarching goals of diversity and inclusion in the discussion series generally, and the central importance of particularized themes of bridgebuilding, this seminar is warmly and equally open to students of any religious tradition and those of no religion at all. This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Sonne, J. (PI)

LAW 240K: Discussion (1L): Representations of Criminal Lawyers in Popular Culture Through the Lens of Bias

This discussion group will explore the portrayal of criminal lawyers in popular films and will engage in critical analysis of how misconceptions about the criminal justice system and biases against women, people of color and the poor are amplified on the big screen. Source materials will include numerous mass-market films juxtaposed against authoritative law review and other commentary to afford in-depth discussion. This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Tyler, R. (PI)

LAW 240L: Discussion (1L): Robot Ethics

We will consider the developing legal and ethical problems of robots and artificial intelligence (AI), particularly self-directed and learning AIs. How do self-driving cars (or autonomous weapons systems) value human lives? How do we trade off accuracy against other values in predictive algorithms? At what point should we consider AIs autonomous entities with their own rights and responsibilities? And how can courts and legislatures set legal rules robots can understand and obey? This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Lemley, M. (PI)

LAW 240M: Discussion (1L): The Central Park Five Case

This discussion seminar will focus on racial factors in the criminal justice system, using the Central Park 5 case and the Netflix series "When They See Us" as the jumping off point for the discussion. Following each episode of the series, the seminar will discuss the investigation, the trial, incarceration and post incarceration experiences. Although there may be some readings, the primary material will be the Netflix series. I hope to have some additional help with the discussion by asking a few outside players to join the class. Participants could include George Gascon, the San Francisco District Attorney who has been a leader in the investigation of racism in enforcement of the laws, Linda Farstein, the main prosecutor in the case who was the Chief of the New York DA's sex crimes unit, and one of the Three Strikers whose release was secured by Stanford's Three Strike Project. If they are available, these outside participants will join the discussion in order to be a resource and to provide color and insight into the topics being covered. Note: This seminar will meet in San Francisco and transportation will be provided. This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Mills, D. (PI)

LAW 240N: Discussion (1L): Theories and Critiques of Legal Education

Much of the basic structure of twenty-first-century American legal education was put in place by late nineteenth-century Harvard Law School Dean Christopher Columbus Langdell. This seminar will begin by examining the impetus for and nature of Langdell's reforms then consider various twentieth- and twenty-first-century critiques and modifications of legal education, including Duncan Kennedy's Legal Education and the Reproduction of Hierarchy and the work of critical race theorists like Patricia Williams and Lani Guinier. We will conclude by examining the most significant change within law schools over the past century, the rise of clinical legal education, reading parts of the Carnegie Report on Legal Education and Sam Moyn's recent critique of clinical education as well as a range of responses to his piece. Throughout the seminar, we will pay attention to the historical and social contexts out of which proposals for changing legal education arose as well as to how we might assess the contemporary structure of legal education in light of its history. This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Meyler, B. (PI)

LAW 240O: Discussion (1L): Whose Justice? Which Rationality?

Reasonable people sometimes disagree. How can reflective individuals hope to evaluate those disagreements? Fundamental notions of justice and rationality seem to dominate particular traditions in different places and different times. How can a twenty-first century product of American or other cultures decide which of various compelling ideas of justice and rationality is most persuasive to us? How can anyone escape the accidents of birth and tribal worldview? We will approach these questions through Alastair MacIntyre's provocative book of that name: Whose Justice? Which Rationality? (Univ. Of Notre Dame Press 1988). Whether or not MacIntyre¿s neo-Aristotelian approach to the fundamental questions of ethical theory ultimately prove persuasive, his attempt to find alternatives to the utilitarian and Kantian relics of the Enlightenment will, I hope, open a conversation about what we believe and why. This discussion seminar will meet four times during the Fall quarter. You will be notified of the meeting times by the instructor. Specific dates, time, and location will also be listed in "Notes" below. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; McConnell, M. (PI)

LAW 400: Directed Research

Directed Research is an extraordinary opportunity for students beyond the first-year to research problems in any field of law. Directed research credit may not be awarded for work that duplicates the work of a course, clinic, or externship for which the student has registered. Directed research credit may be awarded for work that expands on work initially assigned in, or conceived during, a course, clinic, or externship, but only if the continued work represents a meaningful and substantial contribution to the already existing project, significantly beyond mere editing or polishing. If a student seeks to continue or expand on work that the student initiated previously (whether for a course, clinic, externship, or otherwise) a student must (1) share the initial work with the professor supervising the directed research, to the extent that work is non-privileged, and (2) obtain permission for the expansion from the instructor or supervisor who supervised the initial project. The final product must be embodied in a paper or other form of written work involving a substantial independent effort on the part of the student. A student must submit a detailed petition of at least 250 words, approved by the sponsoring faculty member, outlining his or her proposed project and demonstrating that the research is likely to result in a significant scholarly contribution. A student may petition for "Directed Research: Curricular Development" when the work involves assisting a Law School faculty member in developing concepts or materials for new and innovative law school courses. Both the supervising faculty member and the Associate Dean for Curriculum must approve petition for "Directed Research: Curricular Development." Students must meet with the instructor frequently for the purposes of report and guidance. Unit credit is by arrangement. Students whose projects warrant more than four units should consider a Senior Thesis or the Research Track (See SLS Student Handbook for requirements and limitations). With the approval of the instructor, successful completion of a directed research project of two units or more may satisfy the JD writing requirement to the extent of one research writing course (R course). See Directed Research under Curricular Options in the SLS Student Handbook for requirements and limitations. Directed Research petitions are available on the Law School Registrar's Office website (see Forms and Petitions). Elements used in grading: Paper and as agreed to by instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mixed H/P/R/F or MP/R/F
Instructors: ; McConnell, M. (PI)

LAW 403: Senior Thesis

An opportunity for third-year students to engage in original research and to prepare a substantial written-work product on the scale of a law review article. The thesis topic should be chosen no later than two weeks after the beginning of the seventh term of law study and may be chosen during the sixth term. The topic is subject to the approval of the thesis supervisor, who may be any member of the Law School faculty under whose direction the student wishes to write the thesis and who is willing to assume the responsibility therefor. An oral defense of the thesis before members of the faculty, including the thesis supervisor, will be conducted late in the student's ninth academic term. Acceptance of the thesis for credit requires the approval of the thesis supervisor and one or more other members of the faculty who will be selected by the supervisor. Satisfactory completion of the senior thesis will satisfy graduation requirements to the extent of (a) 5 - 8 units of credit and (b) two research courses. The exact requirements for a senior thesis are in the discretion of the supervising faculty member. Special Instructions: Two Research credits are possible. Elements used in grading: Paper and as agreed to by instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5-8 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mixed H/P/R/F or MP/R/F

LAW 406: Research Track

The Research Track is for students who wish to carry out a research project of a scope larger than that contemplated for a Senior Thesis. Research Track projects are to be supervised by two or more professors, at least one of whom must be a member of the Law School faculty. At least one faculty member in addition to the supervisors must read the written product of the research, and the student must defend the written work orally before the readers. Students will be admitted to Research Track only if they have a demonstrated capability for substantial independent research, and propose a significant and well-formulated project at the time of application. Special Instructions: Two Research credits are possible. Elements used in grading: Paper and as agreed to by instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 9-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mixed H/P/R/F or MP/R/F

LAW 411: Directed Professional Writing

Directed professional writing projects involve professional writing, such as motions, briefs, proposed legislation, and congressional testimony, undertaken with the assistance of --- and in collaboration with --- a faculty member. Directed professional writing credit is designed to allow a student, or a small group of students working together, to receive academic credit for their work tackling real-world problems. Only projects supervised by a member of the faculty (tenured, tenure-track, senior lecturer, or professor from practice) may qualify for Directed Professional Writing credit. It will not necessarily be appropriate to require each member of the team to write the number of pages that would be required for an individual directed research project earning the number of units that each team member will earn for the team project. The page length guidelines applicable to individual papers may be considered in determining the appropriate page length, but the faculty supervisor has discretion to make the final page-length determination. Students must meet with the instructor frequently for the purposes of report and guidance. Unit credit is by arrangement. A petition will not be approved for work assigned or performed in a course, clinic, or externship for which the student has or will receive credit. See Directed Professional Writing under Curricular Options in the SLS Student Handbook for requirements and limitations. Directed Professional Writing petitions are available on the Law School Registrar's Office website (see Forms and Petitions). Elements used in grading: As agreed to by instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mixed H/P/R/F or MP/R/F

LAW 802: TGR: Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR

LAW 806Y: Policy Practicum: Justice By Design: Eviction + Debt Collection

Client: Judicial Council of California (https://www.courts.ca.gov/policyadmin-jc.htm). Three out of five people in civil cases have no lawyer, but are often navigating issues of profound importance to their lives. At the same time, the courts are trying to manage a massive volume of cases, with particularly large numbers of cases concerning debt collection and housing. How can courts help people resolve their problems, and still operate efficiently? This policy practicum partners student researchers with courts that are interested in reimagining how one very common type of case -- eviction -- could work better for all involved. We will work on site at court, with observations, interviews, ride-alongs, and workshops to understand how these cases work and what outcomes result. Students will map opportunities for change and a vision of what a redesign process might look like. This class is part of an ongoing partnership with the Judicial Council of California to redesign the civil justice system so that it works better for all litigants, especially those who are without lawyers. Students will learn how to do design research, facilitate multi-stakeholder system redesign, and envision a government innovation process. This work will feed directly into future pilots, reforms and studies on how to make housing court more efficient, accessible, and just. Though students need to be available for the 6 hours a week designated as class time -- MW 9:30-12:20 -- not all of that time will be used. Much of our time will be taken up with court visits and related activities. Group projects will be a major part of the work. Students must take both the fall and winter quarters in order to receive credit for the course. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 806Z: Policy Practicum: "Every Vote Counts" Voting Verification Project

Client: ACLU of Northern California (https://www.aclunc.org/). California recently passed SB 759, the "Every Vote Counts Act," to codify requirements allowing voters a chance to fix their ballot in case of a signature mismatch. SB 759 requires elections officials notify voters of mismatched signatures at least 8 days prior to the certification of an election. Ballots would be counted by elections officials if a signature verification statement is returned no later than 5:00 p.m. two days prior to certification. However, the law does not specify in great detail what steps counties must take to contact voters. Prior to the bill's passage, a report by the California Voter Foundation revealed substantial variation in how counties dealt with contacting voters and allowing them to verify mismatched signatures. There haven't yet been any public reports tracking how counties have implemented/are planning to implement the requirements of SB 759. This policy lab will map how the implementation of state statutes and guidelines dealing with vote-by-mail signature verification varies between California counties. Research questions for each county include: (1) What criteria does a signature need to meet to "not appear to be the same" (and therefore result in a ballot being invalidated)? (2) What remedial steps are taken, with regards to SB 759, if an election worker determines there is a "signature mismatch" before the statutory deadline? To answer these questions, students will conduct a survey of county election officials and administrative materials. We anticipate the final project will be the results of our county-by-county survey work, plus a report highlighting best practices. The report informs the ACLU of Northern California (pending completion of any final administrative requirements) and a broader audience of California policy-makers, voting rights advocacy groups, and county election officials. Students will research legal and policy frameworks, interview policy makers and state administrative officials, develop targeted policy recommendations, and brief policy makers on recommendations. If you have any questions, please reach out to Tom Westphal (tomwest@stanford.edu) or William Janover (wjanover@stanford.edu).. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F

LAW 807A: Policy Practicum: Federal Indian Law: Yurok Legal Assistance

Client: Yurok Tribe. Students will assist the client, the Office of the Tribal Attorney of the Yurok Tribe (the largest federally recognized Native nation in California), by conducting legal research on a variety of possible topics, including interstate water law, economic development, sovereign immunity, and tribal agriculture. The exact scope and nature of the research will be determined in consultation with the client. Students will produce policy memos based on their research to share with the client. Coursework or background in federal Indian law is helpful but not required. The project will likely involve travel to present research before the Tribal Council. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Ablavsky, G. (PI)

LAW 807B: Policy Practicum: What we can do to Mitigate Climate Warming

Client: Steyer-Taylor Center for Climate Energy and Finance. We will take as a given the well-established scientific evidence establishing the causal connection between greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and global warming, and the likelihood that current trajectories of fossil fuel use are leading to catastrophic climate change. Beginning with this premise, we ask how individuals and nonprofit organizations and institutions can use their power and authority to mitigate climate change, whether acting on their own or influencing decisions by governments and businesses. We will start by mapping the major sources of GHG emissions and the direct and external costs and benefits of reducing emissions now and in the future. We then examine strategies for reducing them, including voluntary action and influencing government policies, business practices and investment decisions. Among other things, we shall inquire into the role of positive investments in renewable resources and new technologies, and whether refusing to invest in certain enterprises can reduce GHG emissions. We will also look at the influence that residents, employees, consumers, regulators, and other stakeholders may exert, whether acting individually or as part of social movements. The two instructors have considerable knowledge about climate and investment policies, and plan to draw on expertise in ethics, social movements, finance, and other related areas. The mandate of the Stanford Law and Policy Lab is to conduct impartial, evidence-informed policy analysis. Rather than deliver a set of specific recommendations, this practicum seeks to identify and assess the pros and cons of plausible strategies. In addition to a written report, we plan to convene a forum, open to members of the Stanford community, to discuss our findings. Although the Policy Lab practicums are designed mainly for law students, they are open to students from throughout the University. Admission is by petition. Given the scope of work, this practicum may continue into the winter quarter, but students need only commit themselves for the Autumn. Elements use in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 881: Externship Companion Seminar

The practice of public interest law -- whether in the criminal or civil context, or a government or non-profit setting -- requires an attorney to consider a host of issues distinct from one in private practice. How should decisions be made about priorities with limited resources? Where an organization has a broad social justice mission, where does litigation on behalf of individual clients or a group of clients fit in? Prior to initiating litigation or advancing a defense, what quantum of evidence should an attorney require? What role, if any, should an attorney's personal beliefs play in a course of representation? Through directed supervision of their externships, as well as participation in weekly seminars, students will evaluate such questions in the context of their practical experience. Students are required to write weekly reflection papers of 2 to 3 pages. Elements used in grading: Attendance, class participation, weekly reflection papers and final reflection paper.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Winn, M. (PI)

LAW 882: Externship, Civil Law

Following approval of a student's application, the Civil Standard Externship Program (SEP) allows second and third year students to obtain academic credit for externing with select non-profit public interest, public policy, and government agencies in the Bay Area for one quarter. The Civil SEP allows students to (a) gain experience in a field where a clinical course is not offered, or (b) pursue advanced work in an area of prior clinical practice. Students may extern for 20, 24, 30, or 34 hours per week. For a complete description of the Civil SEP, students should read the Externship Handbook, which is available from the Levin Center for Public Service and Public Interest Law or online at: http://www.law.stanford.edu/organizations/programs-and-centers/john-and-terry-levin-center-for-public-service-and-public-interest-law/externship-program-0 . Students wishing to enroll in an externship must meet various requirements that are set out in the Handbook. Students participating in the Civil SEP must also concurrently enroll in the Externship Companion Seminar (Law 881). An externship that otherwise meets the criteria for obtaining EL credit will be approved for EL credit when the field placement provides specialized experience complementary to a student's intended career path and comparable benefits cannot be obtained through other EL coursework at Stanford. Grading Elements used: Full participation and attendance, satisfactory evaluation by field placement supervisor, weekly reflection papers of two to three pages. .
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5-12 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Winn, M. (PI)

LAW 883: Externship, Criminal Law

Following approval of a student's application, the Criminal Standard Externship Program (SEP) allows second and third year students to work for credit in criminal prosecutors' and defenders' offices in the Bay Area for one quarter. Students may extern for 20, 24, 30, or 34 hours per week. For a complete description of the Criminal SEP, students should read the Externship Handbook, which is available from the Levin Center for Public Service and Public Interest Law or online at: http://www.law.stanford.edu/organizations/programs-and-centers/john-and-terry-levin-center-for-public-service-and-public-interest-law/externship-program-0 . Students wishing to enroll in an externship must meet various requirements that are set out in the Handbook. Students participating in the Criminal SEP must also concurrently enroll in the Externship Companion Seminar. An externship that otherwise meets the criteria for obtaining EL credit will be approved for EL credit when the field placement provides specialized experience complementary to a student's intended career path and comparable benefits cannot be obtained through other EL coursework at Stanford. Grading Elements used: Full participation and attendance, satisfactory evaluation by field placement supervisor, weekly reflection papers of two to three pages.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5-12 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Winn, M. (PI)

LAW 884: Externship, Special Circumstances

Following approval of a student's application, the Special Circumstances Externship Program (SCEP) allows second and third year students to work for credit for one quarter in non-profit public interest, public policy, and government agencies outside of the Bay Area. Standards for approval of a SCEP placement are similar to those for Directed Research proposals, although they are higher. Because there is a preference for local civil and criminal SEP placements (see Law 882 and Law 883), your SCEP proposal must explain (a) how it meets the goals of the externship program; and (b) why a similar project cannot be accomplished in one of the placements offered in the Bay Area. SCEP placements outside the Bay Area must be full-time. Students wishing to undertake a SCEP placement obtain the supervision of a faculty member who will oversee their externship and an accompanying tutorial. For a full description of the SCEP, students should read the Externship Handbook, which is available from the Levin Center for Public Service and Public Interest Law or online at: http://www.law.stanford.edu/organizations/programs-and-centers/john-and-terry-levin-center-for-public-service-and-public-interest-law/externship-program-0. Students wishing to enroll in an externship must meet the various requirements that are set out in the Handbook. An externship that otherwise meets the criteria for obtaining EL credit will be approved for EL credit when the field placement provides specialized experience complementary to a student's intended career path and comparable benefits cannot be obtained through other EL coursework at Stanford. Grading Elements used: Full participation and attendance, satisfactory evaluation by field placement supervisor, weekly reflection papers of three to five pages, and a final reflection paper of a length to be determined by your faculty supervisor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 12 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F

LAW 902: Advanced Community Law Clinic

The Advanced Community Law Clinic offers law students who already have some significant civil clinical experience the opportunity to work under supervision on more advanced projects and cases being handled by the Stanford Community Law Clinic, including litigation and other matters. Advanced Clinic students will also work with Clinical Supervising Attorneys to provide direction and guidance to those enrolled in the Community Law Clinic for the first time, in areas in which Advanced Clinic students have already acquired some expertise. In addition, Advanced Clinic students may function as team leaders on larger projects in which the Clinic is engaged. Advanced students may arrange with the instructor to receive between two and seven units. No student may receive more than 27 overall clinical credits, however, during the course of the student's law school career. Special Instructions: Completion of the Community Law Clinic (Law 902A,B,C) or its equivalent is a prerequisite for the advanced clinic. Elements used in grading: Participation, reflective paper and project.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-7 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 904: Advanced Criminal Defense Clinic

Advanced clinic allows students who have taken the Criminal Defense Clinic to continue working on cases. Participation in case rounds is required. Advanced clinic may be taken for 2-7 units. Students may not enroll in any clinic (basic or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. Students must have taken Criminal Defense Clinic (Law 904A,B,C). Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, written assignments and case work.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-7 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Luban, S. (PI); Tyler, R. (PI)

LAW 904A: Criminal Defense Clinic: Clinical Practice

Students in the Criminal Defense Clinic represent local residents in a wide range of misdemeanor cases in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties. Students are California Bar Certified and thus appear in court and argue cases with faculty standing by. Students take the lead role in all aspects of case development, including interviewing clients and witnesses, investigating facts, developing case strategy, negotiating with prosecutors, drafting and arguing motions, and occasionally trying cases before judges and juries. Common charges include drug use and possession, assault, theft, and vandalism. While students have primary responsibility for all aspects of their cases, all work is closely supervised. The Criminal Defense Clinic is an intensive, fast-paced, and demanding program of education and practical skills, taught through introductory training and ongoing workshops and skills practicums. The Clinic also addresses broader systemic issues such as implicit bias in the legal system, immigration consequences, economic disparities, and addiction. The goal of the Clinic is to train students how to conduct a criminal case while engaging in thoughtful reflection and providing holistic representation. The Clinic's broader goal is to provide lawyering skills and habits of mind transferrable to any student's chosen field of practice. While the work is often challenging and sometimes heartbreaking, it offers students a unique opportunity to put their skills, intellect, and compassion to use by serving people in a moment of great need. Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses - - The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 units. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend a few inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four units. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, written assignments and case work and professionalism.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Luban, S. (PI); Tyler, R. (PI)

LAW 904B: Criminal Defense Clinic: Clinical Methods

Students in the Criminal Defense Clinic represent local residents in a wide range of misdemeanor cases in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties. Students are California Bar Certified and thus appear in court and argue cases with faculty standing by. Students take the lead role in all aspects of case development, including interviewing clients and witnesses, investigating facts, developing case strategy, negotiating with prosecutors, drafting and arguing motions, and occasionally trying cases before judges and juries. Common charges include drug use and possession, assault, theft, and vandalism. While students have primary responsibility for all aspects of their cases, all work is closely supervised. The Criminal Defense Clinic is an intensive, fast-paced, and demanding program of education and practical skills, taught through introductory training and ongoing workshops and skills practicums. The Clinic also addresses broader systemic issues such as implicit bias in the legal system, immigration consequences, economic disparities, and addiction. The goal of the Clinic is to train students how to conduct a criminal case while engaging in thoughtful reflection and providing holistic representation. The Clinic's broader goal is to provide lawyering skills and habits of mind transferrable to any student's chosen field of practice. While the work is often challenging and sometimes heartbreaking, it offers students a unique opportunity to put their skills, intellect, and compassion to use by serving people in a moment of great need. Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses - - The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 units. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend a few inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four units. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, written assignments and case work and professionalism.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Luban, S. (PI); Tyler, R. (PI)

LAW 904C: Criminal Defense Clinic: Clinical Coursework

Students in the Criminal Defense Clinic represent local residents in a wide range of misdemeanor cases in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties. Students are California Bar Certified and thus appear in court and argue cases with faculty standing by. Students take the lead role in all aspects of case development, including interviewing clients and witnesses, investigating facts, developing case strategy, negotiating with prosecutors, drafting and arguing motions, and occasionally trying cases before judges and juries. Common charges include drug use and possession, assault, theft, and vandalism. While students have primary responsibility for all aspects of their cases, all work is closely supervised. The Criminal Defense Clinic is an intensive, fast-paced, and demanding program of education and practical skills, taught through introductory training and ongoing workshops and skills practicums. The Clinic also addresses broader systemic issues such as implicit bias in the legal system, immigration consequences, economic disparities, and addiction. The goal of the Clinic is to train students how to conduct a criminal case while engaging in thoughtful reflection and providing holistic representation. The Clinic's broader goal is to provide lawyering skills and habits of mind transferrable to any student's chosen field of practice. While the work is often challenging and sometimes heartbreaking, it offers students a unique opportunity to put their skills, intellect, and compassion to use by serving people in a moment of great need. Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses - - The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 units. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend a few inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four units. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, written assignments and case work and professionalism.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Luban, S. (PI); Tyler, R. (PI)

LAW 908: Advanced Environmental Law Clinic

The Advanced Environmental Law Clinic provides students who have already taken the Environmental Law Clinic the opportunity to continue intense individual project work. Advanced students often work on matters they worked on as full-time students, but they also have the chance to work on new matters and develop new skills. Advanced students work closely with supervising faculty on their designated projects and are expected to take increasing responsibility for managing their work and representing clients. In addition, advanced students often serve as mentors to less experienced full-time students and thereby receive training in basic team building and supervision. Advanced students may arrange to receive between two and seven units. No student may receive more than 27 total clinical units during the course of the student's law school career. Elements used in grading: TBA.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-7 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 908A: Environmental Law Clinic: Clinical Practice

Students enrolled in the Clinic provide legal assistance to national, regional and grassroots non-profit organizations on a variety of environmental issues, with a focus on complex natural resource conservation and biodiversity matters at the interface of law, science and policy. Working under the direct supervision of practicing environmental attorneys, Clinic students help screen new matters and potential clients; formulate strategies; research and develop factual and legal issues; and prosecute administrative and litigation proceedings. During the term, students may meet with clients, opposing counsel or agency decision-makers; review and prepare administrative records; develop expert testimony; draft comment letters, petitions, pleading or briefs; and/or attend and present arguments in administrative and court hearings. In regular one-on-one meetings with supervising faculty, there is a heavy emphasis on learning how to write persuasively and present oral arguments. Indeed, in any given quarter, our students typically prepare a mix of state and federal, and trial and appellate, court pleadings, and because all of our hearings during the academic year are conducted by students, many students also have the opportunity to present oral argument in front of one or more judges. In addition, students participate in a regular seminar where we examine strategic, ethical and substantive issues arising out of the Clinic's work. The Clinic is a particularly good place to learn how to conduct effective legal research, marshal facts in support of legal arguments, and, above all, write well. We practice at all levels of state and federal court and before many local, state and federal administrative agencies. Our work involves extensive motions practice and brief writing, and often involves administrative petitions and policy papers. Our work is inherently cross-disciplinary. No prior environmental experience or background is necessary, but an interest in learning about environmental and natural resources law is important. Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses - - The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 units. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend a few inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four units. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: Attendance and participation in class, professionalism, timeliness, initiative, and follow-through on project work and other class requirements.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 908B: Environmental Law Clinic: Clinical Methods

Students enrolled in the Clinic provide legal assistance to national, regional and grassroots non-profit organizations on a variety of environmental issues, with a focus on complex natural resource conservation and biodiversity matters at the interface of law, science and policy. Working under the direct supervision of practicing environmental attorneys, Clinic students help screen new matters and potential clients; formulate strategies; research and develop factual and legal issues; and prosecute administrative and litigation proceedings. During the term, students may meet with clients, opposing counsel or agency decision-makers; review and prepare administrative records; develop expert testimony; draft comment letters, petitions, pleading or briefs; and/or attend and present arguments in administrative and court hearings. In regular one-on-one meetings with supervising faculty, there is a heavy emphasis on learning how to write persuasively and present oral arguments. Indeed, in any given quarter, our students typically prepare a mix of state and federal, and trial and appellate, court pleadings, and because all of our hearings during the academic year are conducted by students, many students also have the opportunity to present oral argument in front of one or more judges. In addition, students participate in a regular seminar where we examine strategic, ethical and substantive issues arising out of the Clinic's work. The Clinic is a particularly good place to learn how to conduct effective legal research, marshal facts in support of legal arguments, and, above all, write well. We practice at all levels of state and federal court and before many local, state and federal administrative agencies. Our work involves extensive motions practice and brief writing, and often involves administrative petitions and policy papers. Our work is inherently cross-disciplinary. No prior environmental experience or background is necessary, but an interest in learning about environmental and natural resources law is important. Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses - - The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 units. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend a few inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four units. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: Attendance and participation in class, professionalism, timeliness, initiative, and follow-through on project work and other class requirements.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 908C: Environmental Law Clinic: Clinical Coursework

Students enrolled in the Clinic provide legal assistance to national, regional and grassroots non-profit organizations on a variety of environmental issues, with a focus on complex natural resource conservation and biodiversity matters at the interface of law, science and policy. Working under the direct supervision of practicing environmental attorneys, Clinic students help screen new matters and potential clients; formulate strategies; research and develop factual and legal issues; and prosecute administrative and litigation proceedings. During the term, students may meet with clients, opposing counsel or agency decision-makers; review and prepare administrative records; develop expert testimony; draft comment letters, petitions, pleading or briefs; and/or attend and present arguments in administrative and court hearings. In regular one-on-one meetings with supervising faculty, there is a heavy emphasis on learning how to write persuasively and present oral arguments. Indeed, in any given quarter, our students typically prepare a mix of state and federal, and trial and appellate, court pleadings, and because all of our hearings during the academic year are conducted by students, many students also have the opportunity to present oral argument in front of one or more judges. In addition, students participate in a regular seminar where we examine strategic, ethical and substantive issues arising out of the Clinic's work. The Clinic is a particularly good place to learn how to conduct effective legal research, marshal facts in support of legal arguments, and, above all, write well. We practice at all levels of state and federal court and before many local, state and federal administrative agencies. Our work involves extensive motions practice and brief writing, and often involves administrative petitions and policy papers. Our work is inherently cross-disciplinary. No prior environmental experience or background is necessary, but an interest in learning about environmental and natural resources law is important. Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses - - The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 credits. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend a few inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four credits. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical credits during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: Attendance and participation in class, professionalism, timeliness, initiative, and follow-through on project work and other class requirements.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 910: Advanced Immigrants' Rights Clinic

The Immigrants' Rights Advanced Clinic offers the opportunity for students who have already successfully completed the Immigrants' Rights Clinic to pursue: a specific immigrants' rights advocacy project; advanced individual client representation; and/or working with the clinic director to provide direction/guidance to those enrolled in the Clinic for the first time. All advanced Clinic projects will be jointly designed by the director and the advanced student. Advanced students providing guidance/direction to first-time students will receive additional training on providing supervision. Special instructions: Advanced students are expected to attend the case-rounds portion of the weekly seminar, and to participate as needed in the lecture/discussion portion of the seminar. Advanced students may arrange with the instructor to receive between two and seven units. No student may receive more than 27 overall clinical units, however, during the course of the student's law school career. Elements used in grading: Attendance and participation in class, project work, writing assignments, and case preparation.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-7 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 912: Advanced International Human Rights and Conflict Resolution Clinic

The International Human Rights & Conflict Resolution Advanced Clinic offers the opportunity for students who have already successfully completed Clinic quarter to pursue one or more specific projects in conjunction with the Clinic, either independently or in collaboration with colleague(s) enrolled in the regular clinic. Any travel will be strictly contingent on the Advanced Clinical student's availability and the needs of the project. Advanced Clinical students are expected to participate in as much of the regular clinical seminar and seminar simulations as possible given pre-existing scheduling constraints and previous experience. Advanced students may arrange with the instructor to receive between two and seven units. No student may receive more than 27 overall clinical units, however, during the course of the student's law school career. Elements used in grading: Project work, writing assignments, case preparation, attendance and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-7 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 912A: International Human Rights and Conflict Resolution Clinic: Clinical Practice

In the past half-century, human rights advocates have transformed a marginal utopian ideal into a central element of global discourse and practice. This Clinic gives students the opportunity to work directly with the actors and organizations behind this remarkable development as they navigate the vast challenges faced by human rights advocates and victims. In addition to operating within the human rights framework, students will also have occasion to study and contribute to efforts to resolve situations of tension and ongoing conflict using tools of transitional justice and conflict mitigation. The course aims to help students develop a broad range of multidisciplinary human rights advocacy skills--including factual documentation; litigation before national, regional, and international institutions; community empowerment strategies; and client enfranchisement and representation--through in-class sessions, role play exercises, and engagement in, and critical assessment of, clinical projects in human rights. This Clinic involves both a weekly seminar as well as work directly with clients and partner organizations (i.e. Clinic Projects). Together, these experiences give students the chance to reflect upon a number of foundational questions including: What are the origins of the human rights movement and where is it headed? What does it mean to be a human rights activist? What are the main challenges and dilemmas facing those engaged in rights promotion and defense? How is conflict resolution consistent with human rights advocacy? When and where are these approaches in tension? Students will also be confronted with the ethical and strategic issues that arise in the course of doing human rights work and balancing the often differing agendas of western international nongovernmental organizations (INGOs) and their counterparts in the (frequently non-western) developing world. In some sessions, part of the class will be devoted to presentations by students and clinical rounds in line with greater Mills Legal Clinic model. These presentations will consider one or more issues that arise in the course of students' own engagement in advocacy projects through the Clinic. During the course of the quarter, in addition to their work for their clients and partners, students will also be required to write several short, critical reflection papers or thought pieces (2-4 pages, double-spaced, or 500-1,000 words) on the readings, their Clinic Project(s), and/or human rights events on campus. Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses. The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 units. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. As a general rule, students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work/projects (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four units. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical work product (i.e., the students' substantive contributions); clinical methods (which includes consideration of the students' lawyering skills, leadership, and professionalism); and clinical coursework (which focuses on the students' seminar participation, simulations, and reflection papers). Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Elements used in grading include: Attendance, class participation, written assignments, professionalism, ability to work with others successfully, creative thinking, peer review, and commitment to the clinical enterprise. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and the clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 912B: International Human Rights and Conflict Resolution Clinic: Clinical Methods

In the past half-century, human rights advocates have transformed a marginal utopian ideal into a central element of global discourse and practice. This Clinic gives students the opportunity to work directly with the actors and organizations behind this remarkable development as they navigate the vast challenges faced by human rights advocates and victims. In addition to operating within the human rights framework, students will also have occasion to study and contribute to efforts to resolve situations of tension and ongoing conflict using tools of transitional justice and conflict mitigation. The course aims to help students develop a broad range of multidisciplinary human rights advocacy skills--including factual documentation; litigation before national, regional, and international institutions; community empowerment strategies; and client enfranchisement and representation--through in-class sessions, role play exercises, and engagement in, and critical assessment of, clinical projects in human rights. This Clinic involves both a weekly seminar as well as work directly with clients and partner organizations (i.e. Clinic Projects). Together, these experiences give students the chance to reflect upon a number of foundational questions including: What are the origins of the human rights movement and where is it headed? What does it mean to be a human rights activist? What are the main challenges and dilemmas facing those engaged in rights promotion and defense? How is conflict resolution consistent with human rights advocacy? When and where are these approaches in tension? Students will also be confronted with the ethical and strategic issues that arise in the course of doing human rights work and balancing the often differing agendas of western international nongovernmental organizations (INGOs) and their counterparts in the (frequently non-western) developing world. In some sessions, part of the class will be devoted to presentations by students and clinical rounds in line with greater Mills Legal Clinic model. These presentations will consider one or more issues that arise in the course of students' own engagement in advocacy projects through the Clinic. During the course of the quarter, in addition to their work for their clients and partners, students will also be required to write several short, critical reflection papers or thought pieces (2-4 pages, double-spaced, or 500-1,000 words) on the readings, their Clinic Project(s), and/or human rights events on campus. Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses. The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 units. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. As a general rule, students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work/projects (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four units. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical work product (i.e., the students' substantive contributions); clinical methods (which includes consideration of the students' lawyering skills, leadership, and professionalism); and clinical coursework (which focuses on the students' seminar participation, simulations, and reflection papers). Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Elements used in grading include: Attendance, class participation, written assignments, professionalism, ability to work with others successfully, creative thinking, peer review, and commitment to the clinical enterprise. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and the clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 912C: International Human Rights and Conflict Resolution Clinic: Clinical Coursework

In the past half-century, human rights advocates have transformed a marginal utopian ideal into a central element of global discourse and practice. This Clinic gives students the opportunity to work directly with the actors and organizations behind this remarkable development as they navigate the vast challenges faced by human rights advocates and victims. In addition to operating within the human rights framework, students will also have occasion to study and contribute to efforts to resolve situations of tension and ongoing conflict using tools of transitional justice and conflict mitigation. The course aims to help students develop a broad range of multidisciplinary human rights advocacy skills--including factual documentation; litigation before national, regional, and international institutions; community empowerment strategies; and client enfranchisement and representation--through in-class sessions, role play exercises, and engagement in, and critical assessment of, clinical projects in human rights. This Clinic involves both a weekly seminar as well as work directly with clients and partner organizations (i.e. Clinic Projects). Together, these experiences give students the chance to reflect upon a number of foundational questions including: What are the origins of the human rights movement and where is it headed? What does it mean to be a human rights activist? What are the main challenges and dilemmas facing those engaged in rights promotion and defense? How is conflict resolution consistent with human rights advocacy? When and where are these approaches in tension? Students will also be confronted with the ethical and strategic issues that arise in the course of doing human rights work and balancing the often differing agendas of western international nongovernmental organizations (INGOs) and their counterparts in the (frequently non-western) developing world. In some sessions, part of the class will be devoted to presentations by students and clinical rounds in line with greater Mills Legal Clinic model. These presentations will consider one or more issues that arise in the course of students' own engagement in advocacy projects through the Clinic. During the course of the quarter, in addition to their work for their clients and partners, students will also be required to write several short, critical reflection papers or thought pieces (2-4 pages, double-spaced, or 500-1,000 words) on the readings, their Clinic Project(s), and/or human rights events on campus. Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses. The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 units. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. As a general rule, students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work/projects (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four units. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical work product (i.e., the students' substantive contributions); clinical methods (which includes consideration of the students' lawyering skills, leadership, and professionalism); and clinical coursework (which focuses on the students' seminar participation, simulations, and reflection papers). Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Elements used in grading include: Attendance, class participation, written assignments, professionalism, ability to work with others successfully, creative thinking, peer review, and commitment to the clinical enterprise. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and the clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 914: Advanced Juelsgaard Intellectual Property and Innovation Clinic

Advanced clinic allows students who have taken the Advanced Juelsgaard Intellectual Property and Innovation Clinic to continue working on cases. Advanced clinic may be taken for 2-7 units. Students may not enroll in any clinic (basic or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. Elements used in grading: TBA.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-7 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Malone, P. (PI)

LAW 914A: Juelsgaard Intellectual Property and Innovation Clinic: Clinical Practice

The Juelsgaard Intellectual Property and Innovation Clinic provides students the opportunity to understand and advocate for sound innovation policies. Students in the clinic will help shape the course and outcome of significant legal and policy debates before courts, legislators, regulatory bodies, and other policy makers. Our work focuses on the relationship between law, regulation and innovation in areas ranging from biotechnology to information technology, pharmaceuticals, clean technology, and the creation and distribution of information. Students will represent a variety of NGOs and non-profit entities and, in certain cases, groups or associations of innovators, entrepreneurs, technology users or consumers, economists, technologists, legal academics, and the like, and occasionally individual inventors, start-ups, journalists, or researchers. Students will address their client's complex issues through tools that may include amicus briefs; comments or testimony in rulemaking and regulatory proceedings (i.e., DMCA exemption requests, comments to OSTP on issues such as open access, privacy or open data, comments to the FTC as part of IP and innovation hearings and reports, comments to the PTO or FDA, etc.); comments or testimony on proposed legislation; and whitepapers or other "best practices" documents to encourage sensible and balanced legal approaches to innovation and creativity. Our policy advocacy will often involve intertwined factual, technological, business, economic, political and public relations considerations along with the substantive legal issues. Students in the clinic may be called upon to collaborate with technologists, researchers, doctors, economists, social scientists, industry experts, and others to develop and articulate the appropriate policy advocacy for their clients. The clinic seminar will focus on student-led workshops regarding client projects, and on engaging with current thinking around innovation, innovation economics and the impact of IP, antitrust, and other law and regulation on innovation. We will explore the process of policy advocacy, including various policy levers, the types of tools available to advocates and the strategies and tactics that may be employed, and will consider and critique a variety of case studies of previous advocacy, situating them in the larger context in which these efforts occurred. Students will critically examine the role of lawyers advocating for the public interest and for sound and sensible innovation policy outcomes and bring those lessons to bear on their own clinic work. A background in technology may be useful in some cases but is not necessary to a successful experience in the clinic. - - Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses - - The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 units. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend a few inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four units. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: Attendance, preparation for and participation in clinic seminar; reflection papers; and clinical case and project work including specific elements of methodical analysis, critical thinking, close reading, efficient writing, effective collaboration, and strategy development, applicable across client and seminar work.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Malone, P. (PI)

LAW 914B: Juelsgaard Intellectual Property and Innovation Clinic: Clinical Methods

The Juelsgaard Intellectual Property and Innovation Clinic provides students the opportunity to understand and advocate for sound innovation policies. Students in the clinic will help shape the course and outcome of significant legal and policy debates before courts, legislators, regulatory bodies, and other policy makers. Our work focuses on the relationship between law, regulation and innovation in areas ranging from biotechnology to information technology, pharmaceuticals, clean technology, and the creation and distribution of information. Students will represent a variety of NGOs and non-profit entities and, in certain cases, groups or associations of innovators, entrepreneurs, technology users or consumers, economists, technologists, legal academics, and the like, and occasionally individual inventors, start-ups, journalists, or researchers. Students will address their client's complex issues through tools that may include amicus briefs; comments or testimony in rulemaking and regulatory proceedings (i.e., DMCA exemption requests, comments to OSTP on issues such as open access, privacy or open data, comments to the FTC as part of IP and innovation hearings and reports, comments to the PTO or FDA, etc.); comments or testimony on proposed legislation; and whitepapers or other "best practices" documents to encourage sensible and balanced legal approaches to innovation and creativity. Our policy advocacy will often involve intertwined factual, technological, business, economic, political and public relations considerations along with the substantive legal issues. Students in the clinic may be called upon to collaborate with technologists, researchers, doctors, economists, social scientists, industry experts, and others to develop and articulate the appropriate policy advocacy for their clients. The clinic seminar will focus on student-led workshops regarding client projects, and on engaging with current thinking around innovation, innovation economics and the impact of IP, antitrust, and other law and regulation on innovation. We will explore the process of policy advocacy, including various policy levers, the types of tools available to advocates and the strategies and tactics that may be employed, and will consider and critique a variety of case studies of previous advocacy, situating them in the larger context in which these efforts occurred. Students will critically examine the role of lawyers advocating for the public interest and for sound and sensible innovation policy outcomes and bring those lessons to bear on their own clinic work. A background in technology may be useful in some cases but is not necessary to a successful experience in the clinic. - - Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses - - The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 units. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend a few inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four units. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: Attendance, preparation for and participation in clinic seminar; reflection papers; and clinical case and project work including specific elements of methodical analysis, critical thinking, close reading, efficient writing, effective collaboration, and strategy development, applicable across client and seminar work.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Malone, P. (PI)

LAW 914C: Juelsgaard Intellectual Property and Innovation Clinic: Clinical Coursework

The Juelsgaard Intellectual Property and Innovation Clinic provides students the opportunity to understand and advocate for sound innovation policies. Students in the clinic will help shape the course and outcome of significant legal and policy debates before courts, legislators, regulatory bodies, and other policy makers. Our work focuses on the relationship between law, regulation and innovation in areas ranging from biotechnology to information technology, pharmaceuticals, clean technology, and the creation and distribution of information. Students will represent a variety of NGOs and non-profit entities and, in certain cases, groups or associations of innovators, entrepreneurs, technology users or consumers, economists, technologists, legal academics, and the like, and occasionally individual inventors, start-ups, journalists, or researchers. Students will address their client's complex issues through tools that may include amicus briefs; comments or testimony in rulemaking and regulatory proceedings (i.e., DMCA exemption requests, comments to OSTP on issues such as open access, privacy or open data, comments to the FTC as part of IP and innovation hearings and reports, comments to the PTO or FDA, etc.); comments or testimony on proposed legislation; and whitepapers or other "best practices" documents to encourage sensible and balanced legal approaches to innovation and creativity. Our policy advocacy will often involve intertwined factual, technological, business, economic, political and public relations considerations along with the substantive legal issues. Students in the clinic may be called upon to collaborate with technologists, researchers, doctors, economists, social scientists, industry experts, and others to develop and articulate the appropriate policy advocacy for their clients. The clinic seminar will focus on student-led workshops regarding client projects, and on engaging with current thinking around innovation, innovation economics and the impact of IP, antitrust, and other law and regulation on innovation. We will explore the process of policy advocacy, including various policy levers, the types of tools available to advocates and the strategies and tactics that may be employed, and will consider and critique a variety of case studies of previous advocacy, situating them in the larger context in which these efforts occurred. Students will critically examine the role of lawyers advocating for the public interest and for sound and sensible innovation policy outcomes and bring those lessons to bear on their own clinic work. A background in technology may be useful in some cases but is not necessary to a successful experience in the clinic. - - Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses - - The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 units. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend a few inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four units. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: Attendance, preparation for and participation in clinic seminar; reflection papers; and clinical case and project work including specific elements of methodical analysis, critical thinking, close reading, efficient writing, effective collaboration, and strategy development, applicable across client and seminar work.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Malone, P. (PI)

LAW 916: Advanced Organizations and Transactions Clinic

(Formerly Law 279) Advanced clinic allows students who have taken the Organizations & Transactions Clinic to work on ongoing projects. Advanced students may arrange with the instructor to receive between two and seven units. No student may receive more than 27 overall clinical credits, however, during the course of the student's law school career. Students must have taken Organizations & Transactions Clinic (Law 272). Elements used in grading: Written assignments and client interactions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-7 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 916A: Organizations and Transactions Clinic: Clinical Practice

The O&T Clinic is Stanford's only corporate experiential course involving representation of real clients. We're designed for both students interested in M&A, capital markets, emerging company, tech transactions or other corporate work, and those wanting to explore a non-litigation, advisory-oriented practice. Prior experience in business or corporate law is welcome but certainly not necessary. Students represent multiple clients during the term. Our clients are all established nonprofit corporations. Most generate annual revenues in the range of $1 - $100 million, and some are larger. These clients have boards of directors, run complex programs, own brands and other intellectual property, and engage in a range of transactions, yet are small enough that our contact is almost always the CEO, CFO, general counsel, or other senior executive. O&T client engagements provide students with opportunities to assess facts; develop advice; read and write contracts, corporate governance materials, emails and other client communications; lead meetings and calls with clients; collaborate with colleagues; and manage projects. Our practice is document-intensive and service-oriented; we focus on clear communication and crisp execution. The course includes a class that generally meets twice a week. Class meetings center on student-led workshops regarding client projects and on orientation to corporate practice, including discussion of core commercial relationships such as acquisition, credit, and licensing, and practice skills such as transaction planning and management. Guests often join us; those are occasions for informal conversations with general counsels and law firm partners. Information about prior projects is available from the instructors and on the SLS website. Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses - - The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 units. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend a few inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four units. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: The syllabus includes specific expectations and criteria relating to methodical analysis, close reading, efficient writing, effective collaboration, and crisp execution, applicable across client and seminar work.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 916B: Organizations and Transactions Clinic: Clinical Methods

The O&T Clinic is Stanford's only corporate experiential course involving representation of real clients. We're designed for both students interested in M&A, capital markets, emerging company, tech transactions or other corporate work, and those wanting to explore a non-litigation, advisory-oriented practice. Prior experience in business or corporate law is welcome but certainly not necessary. Students represent multiple clients during the term. Our clients are all established nonprofit corporations. Most generate annual revenues in the range of $1 - $100 million, and some are larger. These clients have boards of directors, run complex programs, own brands and other intellectual property, and engage in a range of transactions, yet are small enough that our contact is almost always the CEO, CFO, general counsel, or other senior executive. O&T client engagements provide students with opportunities to assess facts; develop advice; read and write contracts, corporate governance materials, emails and other client communications; lead meetings and calls with clients; collaborate with colleagues; and manage projects. Our practice is document-intensive and service-oriented; we focus on clear communication and crisp execution. The course includes a class that generally meets twice a week. Class meetings center on student-led workshops regarding client projects and on orientation to corporate practice, including discussion of core commercial relationships such as acquisition, credit, and licensing, and practice skills such as transaction planning and management. Guests often join us; those are occasions for informal conversations with general counsels and law firm partners. Information about prior projects is available from the instructors and on the SLS website. Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses - - The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 units. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend a few inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four units. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: The syllabus includes specific expectations and criteria relating to methodical analysis, close reading, efficient writing, effective collaboration, and crisp execution, applicable across client and seminar work.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 916C: Organizations and Transactions Clinic: Clinical Coursework

The O&T Clinic is Stanford's only corporate experiential course involving representation of real clients. We're designed for both students interested in M&A, capital markets, emerging company, tech transactions or other corporate work, and those wanting to explore a non-litigation, advisory-oriented practice. Prior experience in business or corporate law is welcome but certainly not necessary. Students represent multiple clients during the term. Our clients are all established nonprofit corporations. Most generate annual revenues in the range of $1 - $100 million, and some are larger. These clients have boards of directors, run complex programs, own brands and other intellectual property, and engage in a range of transactions, yet are small enough that our contact is almost always the CEO, CFO, general counsel, or other senior executive. O&T client engagements provide students with opportunities to assess facts; develop advice; read and write contracts, corporate governance materials, emails and other client communications; lead meetings and calls with clients; collaborate with colleagues; and manage projects. Our practice is document-intensive and service-oriented; we focus on clear communication and crisp execution. The course includes a class that generally meets twice a week. Class meetings center on student-led workshops regarding client projects and on orientation to corporate practice, including discussion of core commercial relationships such as acquisition, credit, and licensing, and practice skills such as transaction planning and management. Guests often join us; those are occasions for informal conversations with general counsels and law firm partners. Information about prior projects is available from the instructors and on the SLS website. Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses - - The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 units. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend a few inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four units. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: The syllabus includes specific expectations and criteria relating to methodical analysis, close reading, efficient writing, effective collaboration, and crisp execution, applicable across client and seminar work.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 918: Advanced Religious Liberty Clinic

Advanced clinic allows students who have taken the Religious Liberty Clinic to continue working on cases. Participation in rounds is required. Advanced clinic may be taken for 2-7 units; general rule of thumb is 4 hours of work per week per unit. Students may not enroll in any clinic (basic or advanced) which would result in earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school enrollment. Elements used in grading: Class participation, written assignments, and case work. Students must have taken Religious Liberty Clinic.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-7 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Huq, Z. (PI); Sonne, J. (PI)

LAW 920: Advanced Supreme Court Litigation Clinic

The Advanced Supreme Court Litigation Clinic provides an opportunity for students who have already successfully completed the Supreme Court Litigation Clinic to continue their work in the Clinic. Work includes research and drafting petitions for certiorari and oppositions, merits briefs, and amicus briefs, compiling joint appendices, and preparing advocates for oral argument, as well as commenting on drafts of briefs being filed by lawyers in other cases. Advanced students will also continue to participate in the Clinic's discussion of cases during case rounds. For a more elaborate description of the clinic's content, see the course description for Course Number 436-0-01. Special instructions: Admission is by consent of instructor. Advanced students may arrange with the instructor to receive between two and seven units. No student may receive more than 27 overall clinical units, however, during the course of the student's law school career. Students have the option to receive R credit upon instructor approval. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Projects and participation.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-7 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 920A: Supreme Court Litigation Clinic: Clinical Practice

The Supreme Court Litigation Clinic will expose students to the joys and frustrations of litigation before the Supreme Court of the United States. The bulk of the clinic will be run as a small law firm working on live cases before the Court. Students will participate in drafting petitions for certiorari and oppositions, merits briefs, and amicus briefs, compiling joint appendices, and preparing advocates for oral argument, as well as commenting (the technical term is "kibbitzing") on drafts of briefs being filed by lawyers in other cases. The precise nature of the cases will depend on the Court's docket, but in recent Terms, the clinic's cases have involved federal criminal law and procedure, habeas corpus, constitutional and statutory antidiscrimination and employment law, bankruptcy law, and the First Amendment. Our aim is to involve students as fully as possible in this type of litigation. The Clinic begins with an intensive introduction to the distinctive nature of Supreme Court practice, including the key differences between merits arguments and the certiorari process, the role of amicus briefs, and the Supreme Court Rules. After that, seminar meetings will be devoted primarily to collaborative work on the cases the clinic is handling. While students will be primarily responsible for working in teams on one case at a time, they will also be expected to acquire familiarity with the issues raised in other students' cases and will both edit each others' substantive work and assist each other and the instructors with the technical production work attendant on filing briefs with the Supreme Court. The course will involve substantial amounts of legal research. The Supreme Court operates on a tight, and unyielding deadline, and students must be prepared both to complete their own work in a timely fashion and to assist one another and the instructors on other cases. The instructors will not ask students to do any kind of "grunt work" that they themselves will not also be handling, but grunt work there will be: proofreading, cite-checking, dealing with the joint appendix, and the like. The nature of the work product means that while students will average thirty hours per week on their case-related work, that work will surely be distributed unevenly across the quarter. Unlike most other courts, the Supreme Court has no student practice rules. Thus, students will not be able to argue cases before the Court. But they will participate in moot courts on their cases, as both advocates and Justices. Each student will also have the opportunity to travel to Washington to see the Court in session, preferably with respect to a case on which the student has worked. Ideally students will already have experience with persuasive doctrinal writing, through a course like Federal Pretrial Litigation or through intensive supervision during their summer jobs or other clinics. Admission to the Clinic is by consent of the instructors. Students will need to submit a writing sample that reflects their facility with doctrinal legal arguments and the name of at least one reference who can comment on their legal analytic ability. - - Special instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses - - The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 units. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend a few inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four units. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical units during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: Written work, editing of other student's written work, attendance, class and moot court participation.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 920B: Supreme Court Litigation Clinic: Clinical Methods

The Supreme Court Litigation Clinic will expose students to the joys and frustrations of litigation before the Supreme Court of the United States. The bulk of the clinic will be run as a small law firm working on live cases before the Court. Students will participate in drafting petitions for certiorari and oppositions, merits briefs, and amicus briefs, compiling joint appendices, and preparing advocates for oral argument, as well as commenting (the technical term is "kibbitzing") on drafts of briefs being filed by lawyers in other cases. The precise nature of the cases will depend on the Court's docket, but in recent Terms, the clinic's cases have involved federal criminal law and procedure, habeas corpus, constitutional and statutory antidiscrimination and employment law, bankruptcy law, and the First Amendment. Our aim is to involve students as fully as possible in this type of litigation. The Clinic begins with an intensive introduction to the distinctive nature of Supreme Court practice, including the key differences between merits arguments and the certiorari process, the role of amicus briefs, and the Supreme Court Rules. After that, seminar meetings will be devoted primarily to collaborative work on the cases the clinic is handling. While students will be primarily responsible for working in teams on one case at a time, they will also be expected to acquire familiarity with the issues raised in other students' cases and will both edit each others' substantive work and assist each other and the instructors with the technical production work attendant on filing briefs with the Supreme Court. The course will involve substantial amounts of legal research. The Supreme Court operates on a tight, and unyielding deadline, and students must be prepared both to complete their own work in a timely fashion and to assist one another and the instructors on other cases. The instructors will not ask students to do any kind of "grunt work" that they themselves will not also be handling, but grunt work there will be: proofreading, cite-checking, dealing with the joint appendix, and the like. The nature of the work product means that while students will average thirty hours per week on their case-related work, that work will surely be distributed unevenly across the quarter. Unlike most other courts, the Supreme Court has no student practice rules. Thus, students will not be able to argue cases before the Court. But they will participate in moot courts on their cases, as both advocates and Justices. Each student will also have the opportunity to travel to Washington to see the Court in session, preferably with respect to a case on which the student has worked. Ideally students will already have experience with persuasive doctrinal writing, through a course like Federal Pretrial Litigation or through intensive supervision during their summer jobs or other clinics. Admission to the Clinic is by consent of the instructors. Students will need to submit a writing sample that reflects their facility with doctrinal legal arguments and the name of at least one reference who can comment on their legal analytic ability. - - Special instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses - - The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 credits. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend a few inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four credits. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical credits during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: Written work, editing of other student's written work, attendance, class and moot court participation.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 920C: Supreme Court Litigation Clinic: Clinical Coursework

The Supreme Court Litigation Clinic will expose students to the joys and frustrations of litigation before the Supreme Court of the United States. The bulk of the clinic will be run as a small law firm working on live cases before the Court. Students will participate in drafting petitions for certiorari and oppositions, merits briefs, and amicus briefs, compiling joint appendices, and preparing advocates for oral argument, as well as commenting (the technical term is "kibbitzing") on drafts of briefs being filed by lawyers in other cases. The precise nature of the cases will depend on the Court's docket, but in recent Terms, the clinic's cases have involved federal criminal law and procedure, habeas corpus, constitutional and statutory antidiscrimination and employment law, bankruptcy law, and the First Amendment. Our aim is to involve students as fully as possible in this type of litigation. The Clinic begins with an intensive introduction to the distinctive nature of Supreme Court practice, including the key differences between merits arguments and the certiorari process, the role of amicus briefs, and the Supreme Court Rules. After that, seminar meetings will be devoted primarily to collaborative work on the cases the clinic is handling. While students will be primarily responsible for working in teams on one case at a time, they will also be expected to acquire familiarity with the issues raised in other students' cases and will both edit each others' substantive work and assist each other and the instructors with the technical production work attendant on filing briefs with the Supreme Court. The course will involve substantial amounts of legal research. The Supreme Court operates on a tight, and unyielding deadline, and students must be prepared both to complete their own work in a timely fashion and to assist one another and the instructors on other cases. The instructors will not ask students to do any kind of "grunt work" that they themselves will not also be handling, but grunt work there will be: proofreading, cite-checking, dealing with the joint appendix, and the like. The nature of the work product means that while students will average thirty hours per week on their case-related work, that work will surely be distributed unevenly across the quarter. Unlike most other courts, the Supreme Court has no student practice rules. Thus, students will not be able to argue cases before the Court. But they will participate in moot courts on their cases, as both advocates and Justices. Each student will also have the opportunity to travel to Washington to see the Court in session, preferably with respect to a case on which the student has worked. Ideally students will already have experience with persuasive doctrinal writing, through a course like Federal Pretrial Litigation or through intensive supervision during their summer jobs or other clinics. Admission to the Clinic is by consent of the instructors. Students will need to submit a writing sample that reflects their facility with doctrinal legal arguments and the name of at least one reference who can comment on their legal analytic ability. - - Special instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses - - The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 credits. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend a few inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four credits. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical credits during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: Written work, editing of other student's written work, attendance, class and moot court participation.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 922: Advanced Youth and Education Advocacy Clinic

The Youth and Education Advocacy Advanced Clinic provides an opportunity for students who have already successfully completed the Education Advocacy Clinic to continue their advocacy work in the Clinic and/or to pursue a discrete project related to educational equity advocacy. Examples of projects include strategic policy research and management consulting for public education institutions on specific topics (e.g., accountability programs, community outreach and engagement, school climate); investigation and preparation for impact litigation; and community education and outreach on a specific education-related issue. All projects will be jointly designed by the instructor and the advanced student. Advanced students will also continue to participate in the Clinic's discussion of cases during case rounds. Special instructions: Admission is by consent of instructor. Advanced students may arrange with the instructor to receive between two and seven units. No student may receive more than 27 overall clinical units, however, during the course of the student's law school career. Elements used in grading: Projects and class participation.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-7 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Ford, T. (PI); Koski, W. (PI)

LAW 1009: Corporate Finance I

The course discusses many of the major financial decisions made by corporate managers and investors. Topics include criteria for making investment decisions, valuation of financial assets and liabilities, relations between risk and return, capital structure choice, payout policy, the effective use and valuation of derivative securities, risk management and executive compensation. Essential in many of these decisions is the process of valuation, which will be an important emphasis of the course. Our goal is to understand general principles and then apply them in practically important scenarios. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments, Midterm, Final Exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 1013: Corporations

This course is an introduction to the basic legal rules and principles governing corporations and is the foundation for advanced business courses. We focus on the conflicts that arise between managers, investors, and creditors and we examine how law, markets, and contracts can reduce these conflicts and thereby improve firm value. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, written assignments, midterm, final exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Daines, R. (PI)

LAW 1018: Derivatives

The course will examine the legal, regulatory, trading and risk management aspects of the $600 trillion notional over-the-counter and cleared derivatives markets. Derivatives have historically not been well-understood by regulators or the public and have been blamed for causing or contributing to the economic crisis. This course will offer students the opportunity to understand how various derivative products are designed, traded and risk-managed and what role regulators play in the derivatives industry. In addition, students will focus on understanding key legal contracts that underpin the global derivatives industry, in particular focusing on the ISDA© Master Agreement and Credit Support Annex, as well as documentation supporting credit derivatives and other common derivative types. Students will also consider the shifting regulatory landscape for financial institutions and hedge funds as it relates to the way in which these products are traded, with rates and credit products migrating to clearinghouses. The course will conclude with an examination of the economic crisis that erupted with Lehman Brothers' bankruptcy in September 2008 and the consequent policy reactions to that event from a derivatives and bankruptcy perspective. Elements used in grading: attendance, written homework assignments and a final exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Summe, K. (PI)

LAW 1029: Taxation I

This course provides an overview of the federal income tax. Elements used in grading: Class participation and final exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Bankman, J. (PI)

LAW 1033: Trusts and Estates

This course will cover the following topics: intestacy; will execution and revocation; will provisions and interpretations; restrictions on the right to devise; probate; creation, amendment and termination of trusts; revocable and irrevocable trusts; trust provisions; charitable trusts; trust administration; and durable powers of attorneys, advanced health care directives and conservatorships. Elements used in grading: Final exam (In-School: open book, essay).
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Pearson, B. (PI)

LAW 1034: Real Estate Transactions and Commercial Development

Real Estate Transactions and Commercial Development examines the structuring, negotiation and documentation of commercial real estate transactions. Working both individually and in groups, students will learn the requisite skills for drafting and negotiating leases, letters of intent, sale contracts and related financing documents. As time permits, development-related matters will be explored, including the legal aspects of site acquisition, design and construction. Classes will be a mixture of lectures, interactive discussions, and several mock negotiations. Elements used in grading: Class attendance, individual and group project participation, and written assignments. No final exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Kleiman, D. (PI)

LAW 1047: Business, Social Responsibility, and Human Rights

Large corporations now routinely spend millions of dollars to protect human rights and the environment. Shell Nigeria builds hospitals and schools in the Niger Delta. Nike employs hundreds of inspectors to improve conditions for the factory workers who produce its shoes across Asia and Latin America. Technology companies such as Facebook have scrambled to fend off the threat of new regulation since the Cambridge Analytica revelations. Other examples abound, across industries and around the globe. "Don't be evil" (Google's former motto) may be one motivation for these companies, but something more mundane is also at work: many companies believe they will do well, financially, if they do good, ethically. This course examines questions that lawyers in large law firms, corporations, NGOs, and government agencies regularly confront: --What does it mean for a company to "do good"? Should it care? --When does it serve a company's interest to take costly action to address human rights, labor, and environmental concerns? --What tactics have activists used to shift public opinion, media frames, and the law, and thereby change companies' incentives? We will learn through seminar-style discussion, lectures, role play, and small group exercises. Several guest speakers with experience in business, advocacy, or in between will provide insights from their experiences on the ground. Special Instructions: Students have the option to write a long research paper in lieu of the final exam with consent of instructor. After the term begins, students enrolled in the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Written Assignments; Final Exam or Final Paper. Cross-listed with International Policy (INTLPOL 358).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; O'Connell, J. (PI)

LAW 2002: Criminal Procedure: Investigation

The law school offers two survey courses dealing with constitutional criminal procedure. "Criminal Adjudication" covers the formal pretrial and trial processes, including the right of counsel, prosecutorial charging criteria, grand juries, bail, speedy trial, discovery, plea bargaining, trial by jury, and double jeopardy. This course, "Criminal Investigation," covers police investigation in the form of searches and seizures, interrogations, lineups, and undercover operations, and hence examines the Fourth and Fifth (and, to a limited extent, the Sixth) Amendment rules regulating the police in these endeavors. It also incorporates some of the federal laws governing electronic communications and privacy. Students may take both Criminal Investigation and Criminal Adjudication. (There is, of course, no requirement to do so.) Elements used in grading: Final exam (in-class, open book), plus small adjustments for exceptional class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Weisberg, R. (PI)

LAW 2008: Three Strikes Project: Criminal Justice Reform & Individual Representation

This seminar offers an opportunity to study mass incarceration, criminal justice reform, and post-conviction litigation in real time. In many ways, the era of mass incarceration began in California with the enactment of the "Three Strikes and You're Out" sentencing law in 1994. Today, California leads political and policy trends in the opposite direction with a number of critical reforms to the state's justice system. In this seminar students read and analyze a variety of cases and articles, examining the evolution of incarceration and sentencing policies in California and across the country. Students also assist with live litigation on behalf of inmates sentenced to life in prison for nonviolent crimes. Students also have the opportunity to contribute to ongoing research, public policy analysis and advocacy in the area of criminal justice reform. The class focuses largely on California's Three Strikes law as a case study in the history, politics, constitutional doctrine, and reform of criminal justice policy throughout the country. Students will test their skills in the field by assisting with the representation of individual inmates sentenced to long prison terms for nonviolent crimes in state and federal courts. The Project has been intimately involved in the movement to reduce incarceration in California and throughout the country, partnering with the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and Obama administration on different projects including direct legislative reform, impact litigation, executive clemency, and prisoner reentry. Students enrolled in the seminar quickly become involved in all aspects of the Project's work, including assistance with different stages of ongoing litigation. Students will visit a Project client in prison, conduct factual investigations, and draft petitions on our clients' behalf. The Project is an active, fast-paced organization that depends on the hard work and contributions of law students enrolled in this seminar. This seminar offers the opportunity to both study the theory behind the law and to hone practical litigation and advocacy skills in and out of the courtroom. The seminar will meet for 3 hours per week, including 1 hour individual meetings with Project director Mike Romano. CONSENT APPLICATION: Interested students must apply to enroll in the seminar by sending a one-page statement of interest and resume by email with the subject line "application" to Mike Romano (mromano@stanford.edu). Applications will be considered on a rolling basis. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Romano, M. (PI)

LAW 2403: Federal Courts

This is a course about the role of the federal courts in our constitutional democracy. It covers a series of topics about how those courts--which most students will deal with either as law clerks or lawyers--operate in a context characterized by the separation of powers and federalism. The course takes a pragmatic approach to deciding what counts as relevant federal courts jurisprudence. Its primary aim is to cover the central problems that law clerks, practicing lawyers, and policy-makers encounter in the world. Broadly speaking, it will address three large questions. First, we will examine the federal judiciary's basic structure. This means looking at the extent (and limits) to Congress's power under the Constitution to allocate cases to (different) federal courts, and to shuffle cases between federal courts and state courts. Second, we will consider how legal obligations can be enforced against state and federal actors. We will mainly be concerned with constitutional and statutory rules. We will consider a variety of different kinds of immunity and a range of mechanisms for obtaining relief. Third, we will look at how federal and state courts interact. This means looking at a series of abstention doctrines. We focus in particular on anti-suit injunctions and on federal habeas corpus. The latter is now a large part of many federal courts' docket. Elements used in grading: attendance, class participation and take-home exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Huq, A. (PI)

LAW 2503: Energy Law

Modern energy systems aim to deliver a supply of reliable, low-cost, and clean energy; in turn, they require major capital investments in infrastructure projects, some of which have the features of a natural monopoly and therefore require ongoing economic regulation. The U.S. energy system today is subject to a complex regime of state and federal laws. We will examine the historical role of state-level electric utility regulation, tracing its evolution into the various forms of regulated and deregulated energy markets now in use in the U.S. electricity and natural gas sectors. Contemporary energy law increasingly involves a delicate federalist balance where state and federal regulators share overlapping authority in contested policy areas that are subject to major technological and economic change. Finally, we will interrogate the contested ideals of regulation and competition, which private, non-profit, and governmental stakeholders deploy in legal and political fora to advance private gain and public goods. Students who complete the class will gain a historical understanding of how economic regulation of the energy sector has evolved since the early 20th century, a durable conceptual framework for understanding modern energy law and policy debates, and a practical understanding of energy law designed for future practitioners. Non-law students interested in energy issues are highly encouraged to take this course, as energy law literacy is essential to careers in the sector. Elements used in grading: class participation, short written assignments, and a one-day take-home final exam. Cross-listed with Environment and Resources (ENVRES 226).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Cullenward, D. (PI)

LAW 2519: Water Law

This course will study how society allocates and protects its most crucial natural resource -- water. The emphasis will be on current legal and policy debates, although we will also examine the history of water development and politics. Although the course will focus on United States law and policy, insights from the course are applicable to water regimes throughout the world, and we will occasionally look at law and policy elsewhere in the world for comparison. Among the many issues that we will consider are: how to allocate water during periods of scarcity (particularly as climate change leads to more extremes); alternative means of responding to the world's growing demands for water (including active conservation); the appropriate role for the market and private companies in meeting society's water needs; protection of threatened groundwater resources; environmental limits on water development (including the U.S. Endangered Species Act and the "public trust" doctrine); constitutional issues in water governance; Indian water rights; protection of water quality; challenges to substantively reforming existing water law; and interstate and international disputes over water. Students will be expected to participate actively in classroom discussions. Elements Used in Grading: Class participation, attendance and final exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Thompson, B. (PI)

LAW 3005: Law and Biosciences Workshop

This workshop seminar will provide students with the opportunity to examine and critique cutting-edge research and work in the field of law and the biosciences presented by different speakers from Stanford and elsewhere. Although it is open to all students, the seminar is designed especially for those with an interest in the field who wish to stay abreast of current issues, work, and ideas. In each class, an academic expert, policy maker, or practitioner will present his or her current research or work and engage in a robust discussion. This class is worth one unit. It will meet five times for 1 hour, 50 minutes per session; students will need to attend at all five sessions and, for each session attended, write a reflection piece of roughly three double-spaced pages, due just before the speaker's presentation. The class is open to first-year Law School students in Winter Quarter. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, and written assignments.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Greely, H. (PI)

LAW 3502: Art and the Law

This course covers the legal, public policy, and ethical issues that concern artists, art dealers, auction houses, museums, collectors, and others who comprise the world of visual art. Our focus will be on artists' rights (including copyright, resale royalties, moral rights, and freedom of expression issues), how the markets in art function (such as the artist-dealer relationship, auction rules, and issues faced by collectors), and the legal and ethical rules governing the collection, donation, and display of visual art, particularly for museums and their donors. The course focuses on certain recurrent themes: How do statutes and courts define (or attempt to define) art, and how is art defined differently for different legal purposes? How does the special character of art justify or require different treatment under the law from that accorded other tangible personal property, and how does (and should) the expressive nature of art affect the way it is owned, protected, regulated, or funded? We anticipate having two or three visitors to the class during the quarter, such as a gallery owner, auctioneer, and museum director. In addition, we will also have the students participate in at least one or two interactive negotiation simulation exercises inspired by real situations and controversies in the art world. Graduate students from other departments and schools are welcome to take this course with the permission of the instructors. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, final exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 3505: Law and Culture in American Fiction

This seminar explores the interplay of legal and literary representations in nineteenth and twentieth century American culture. Each week, a novel or story is paired with relevant legal and historical readings. Central themes include the ways literary texts register changes in property law, the law of contracts, intellectual property and legal constructions of race, gender, and privacy, especially as they relate to the maintenance of personal identity, community stability, and linguistic meaning. The terms and stakes of these relationships inform our readings of both fiction and legal texts (often cases). The writers whose work we will consider include James Fenimore Cooper, Herman Melville, Henry James, Nella Larsen, Willa Cather, William Faulkner, and Sherman Alexie. We will also consider the points of contact between literary narrative and narrative in law. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, written assignments and final paper. Automatic grading penalty waived for writers. Special instructions: Course requirements include class attendance and participation, three short response papers, and two longer papers. For Research "R" credit, students may petition to complete one long paper based on independent research. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Sassoubre, T. (PI)

LAW 4005: Introduction to Intellectual Property

This is an overview course covering the basics of intellectual property law -- trade secrets, patents, copyrights, and trademarks, as well as selected other state intellectual property rights. This course is designed both for those who are interested in pursuing IP as a career, and those who are looking only for a basic knowledge of the subject. There are no prerequisites, and a scientific background is not required. Elements used in grading: Class participation and final exam (4-hour, open-book, in-class final).
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Ouellette, L. (PI)

LAW 4007: Intellectual Property: Copyright

Copyright law is the engine that drives not only such traditional entertainment and information industries as music, book publishing, news and motion pictures, but also software, video games and other digital products. This course examines in depth all aspects of copyright law and practice, as well as the business and policy challenges and opportunities that the Internet and other new technologies present for the exploitation of copyrighted works. There are no prerequisites for this class. Elements used in grading: Final Exam (In-School, open book).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Goldstein, P. (PI)

LAW 4011: Intellectual Property: The Business & Law of Technology & Patent Licensing

If you practice in any technology-related area (whether transactions, corporate, or litigation), you will encounter licensing, as it is the principal means by which technology and patent rights are disseminated, exploited and commercialized. It is fundamental to Silicon Valley and beyond, including in software, mobile, consumer devices, autonomous cars, semiconductors and pharmaceuticals. This is a practice-oriented course covering the fundamentals of licensing technology and patents, including business considerations, drafting, negotiations and strategic considerations. We will also consider the role of licensing in mergers and acquisitions, litigation and antitrust contexts. The course is structured based on a real-world hypothetical involving entrepreneurs who spin out university-developed inventions into startup companies and then seek to commercialize the technology and patents to leading companies in a specified technology industry (such as smartphones, autonomous cars, "internet of things" or the like). We will also have a guest lecturer from a major technology company with significant licensing dimensions (which in the past have included Google, Waymo, and Qualcomm). Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Final Exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 4012: Intellectual Property: Trademark and Unfair Competition Law

This course will consider the protection and enforcement of trademarks and related state rights in brands and names, including the right of publicity. There is no prerequisite, though some students will have taken Introduction to Intellectual Property. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Exam (Open-book one-day take-home).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Lemley, M. (PI)

LAW 4039: Regulating Artificial Intelligence

Even just a generation ago, interest in "artificial intelligence" (AI) was largely confined to academic computer science, philosophy, engineering research and development efforts, and science fiction. Today the term is widely understood to encompass not only long-term efforts to simulate the kind of general intelligence humans reflect, but also fast-evolving technologies (such as elaborate convolutional neural networks leveraging vast amounts of data) increasingly affecting finance, transportation, health care, national security, advertising and social media, and a variety of other fields. Conceived for students with interest in law, business, public policy, design, and ethics, this highly interactive course surveys current and emerging legal and policy problems related to how law structures humanity's relationship to artificially-constructed intelligence. To deepen students' understanding of current and medium-term problems in this area, the course explores definitions and foundational concepts associated with "artificial intelligence," likely directions for the evolution of AI, and different types of legally-relevant concerns raised by those developments and by the use of existing versions of AI. We will consider distinct settings where regulation of AI is emerging as a challenge or topic of interest, including autonomous vehicles, autonomous weapons, AI in social media/communications platforms, and systemic AI safety problems; doctrines and legal provisions relevant to the development, control, and deployment of AI such as the European Union's General Data Protection Regulation; the connection between the legal treatment of manufactured intelligence and related bodies of existing law, such as administrative law, torts, constitutional principles, criminal justice, and international law; and new legal arrangements that could affect the development and use of AI. We will also cover topics associated with the development and design of AI as they relate to the legal system, such as measuring algorithmic bias and explainability of AI models. Cross-cutting themes will include: how law affects the way important societal decisions are justified, the balance of power and responsibility between humans and machines in different settings, the incorporation of multiple values into AI decision making frameworks, the interplay of norms and formal law, the technical complexities that may arise as society scales deployment of AI systems, and similarities and differences to other domains of human activity raising regulatory trade-offs and affected by technological change. Note: The course is designed both for students who want a survey of the field and lack any technical knowledge, as well as for students who want to gain tools and ideas to deepen their existing interest or background in the topic. Students with longer-term interest in or experience with the subject are welcome to do a more technically-oriented paper or project in connection with this class. But technical knowledge or familiarity with AI is not a prerequisite, as various optional readings and some in-class material will help provide necessary background. Requirements: The course involves a mix of lectures, in-class activities, and student-led discussion and presentations. Requirements include attendance, participation in planning and conducting at least one student-led group presentation or discussion, two short 3-5 pp. response papers for other class sessions, and either an exam or a 25-30 pp. research paper. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer, with consent of the instructor, from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement. CONSENT APPLICATION: We will try to accommodate as many people as possible with interest in the course. But to facilitate planning and confirm your level of interest, please fill out an application (available at https://bit.ly/2MJIem9) by September 4, 2019. Applications received after September 4, 2019 will be considered on a rolling basis if space is available. The application is also available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Cuellar, M. (PI)

LAW 4048: Regulating Internet Speech Platforms

Internet platforms like Google and Facebook play an enormous role in our online speech and information environment today. This class will review the intermediary liability laws that shape platforms' decisions about online content, and examine how successfully those laws achieve their goals. Students will be encouraged to think pragmatically about the legal, operational, and product design choices platforms may make in response to particular laws, drawing on the instructor's experience handling such questions as Associate General Counsel at Google. Readings and discussions will focus primarily on current US law, with some attention to European laws and to proposed or pending legislation. Important themes of the class include Constitutional and human rights constraints on intermediary liability laws; legal limits (or lack thereof) on platforms' enforcement of privatized speech rules under their Community Guidelines or Terms of Service; global enforcement of national laws requiring platforms to remove content; and connections between platform liability and other areas of law such as consumer protection or privacy. Students will be responsible for three written assignments. The longest will be a final paper of 15 pages. The other two will both be short responses to the week's reading. Up to three students, with consent of instructor, will have the option to write an independent research paper for 3 units. After the term begins, students (max 3) accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Students will be graded based on Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, and a Final Paper. Admission to the class is based on lottery, but in admitting students from the waitlist the instructor may prioritize based on students' degree programs.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Keller, D. (PI)

LAW 4049: Hack Lab

This course aims to give students a solid understanding of the most common types of attacks used in cybercrime and cyberwarfare. Taught by a long-time cybersecurity practitioner, a recovering cyberlaw litigator, and a group of hearty, motivated TAs, each session will begin with a lecture covering the basics of an area of technology and how that technology has been misused in the past. Students will then complete a lab section, with the guidance of the instructor and assistants, where they attack a known insecure system using techniques and tools seen in the field. Each week, there will be a second lecture on the legal and policy impacts of the technologies and techniques we cover. By the end of the course, students are expected to have a basic understanding of some of the most common offensive techniques in use today as well as a comprehensive overview of the most important aspects of cyberpolicy and law. No computer science background is required. All students must have access to a Windows, Mac OS X or Linux laptop. Students must enroll in the lecture as well as one Computer Lab (Lab meets 50 minutes once a week). Special Instructions: This class is limited to 120 students with 30 spots for SLS students. If more than 30 SLS students wish to enroll, instructor permission is required. Elements used in grading: Class participation, written assignments, take-home midterm, and a final exam. Cross-listed with International Policy (INTLPOL 268). Law students see INTLPOL listing for Computer Lab section meeting times.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 5007: International Business Negotiation

This course is structured around a quarter-long, simulated negotiation exercise which provides an in-depth study of the structuring and negotiating of an international business transaction. This class will be taught in counterpart with a class at Berkeley Law School. Students in this class will represent a U.S. pharmaceutical company, and the students in the class at Berkeley will represent an African agricultural production company. The two companies are interested in working together to exploit a new technology developed by the pharmaceutical company that uses the cassava produced by the African agricultural production company. The form of their collaboration could be a joint venture, a licensing agreement or a long term supply contract. The negotiations between the two classes will take place through written exchanges and through real-time negotiation which will be conducted both in-person and via videoconferences. The purpose of the course is to provide students with an opportunity (i) to experience the sequential development of a business transaction over an extended negotiation, (ii) to study the business and legal issues and strategies that impact the negotiation, (iii) to gain insight into the dynamics of negotiating and structuring international business transactions, (iv) to learn about the role that lawyers and law play in these negotiations, (v) to give students experience in drafting communications, and (vi) to provide negotiating experience in a context that replicates actual legal practice with an unfamiliar opposing party (here, the students at Berkeley). Students will also learn about the legal and business issues that may arise in joint ventures, supply agreements and licensing agreements. The thrust of this course is class participation and active involvement in the negotiations process. Students are expected to spend time outside of class, working in teams, to prepare the written exchanges, to prepare for the live negotiations, and to prepare for class discussions. Class discussions will focus on the strategy for, and progress of, the negotiations; collective evaluation of the class's preparation for, and performance in, the negotiations; and the substantive legal, business and policy matters that impact on the negotiations. In addition to the regular Monday class, classes will meet for the live negotiations on one Thursday evening (DLA Palo Alto Office, 2000 University Avenue) at 7:00 PM (10/17), and three Saturday mornings and one Sunday morning at 10:30 AM (10/5, 10/12, 10/26 and 11/10) in the San Francisco office of DLA Piper (555 Mission Street; close to Montgomery St. BART station). [The Sunday class is scheduled to accommodate the MPRE exam on Saturday, 11/9] Due to the Thursday, Saturday and Sunday classes, this class will conclude on November 11. Admission to this class is by consent of instructor. The maximum class size is 21, which will include students from GSB or other departments. Attention Waitlist Students: Students on the waitlist for the course will be admitted if spots are available on the basis of their position on the waitlist and degree of study; all waitlist students are encouraged to attend the first class and will be notified as spaces become available. Attention Non-Law Students: You must complete and submit both a consent form and a Non-Law Student Course Add Request Form to the Law School Registrar's Office (Room 100). See Stanford Non-Law Student Course Registration on the SLS Registrar's Office website. Prerequisites: A course in basic negotiations (e.g., Law 7821) or comparable prior experience is recommended. A primer on basic negotiations skills will be offered at a time TBD as an alternative for students who have not had a prior negotiations class or experience. Elements used in grading: Class participation, written assignments and final paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Finkelstein, J. (PI)

LAW 5008: International Commercial Arbitration

This course provides a rigorous introduction to the law, theory and practice of international commercial arbitration. International commercial arbitration which has become the default means of settling international disputes and with clients increasingly involved in international business transactions and cross-border activity, is a rapidly growing practice area in law firms of every size. The practice is peripatetic, with many international arbitration lawyers basing themselves in law firms in New York, Washington D.C., Paris, Hong Kong, Singapore, and other major world commercial centers. The course will deal with the internationalist elements of the subject matter, but also examine international commercial arbitration from an American perspective. Students can expect to review both foreign and US commentaries, statutes and case law. The course will comprise of five main topics: (1) an introduction to the field of international commercial arbitration; (2) the agreement to arbitrate; (3) the arbitrators; (4) the arbitration process; and (5) the arbitral award. The intent is to provide a strong academic understanding of the various theories and principles, but with a strong practical bent. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Final Exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Tan, D. (PI)

LAW 5038: Jewish Law: Introduction and Topics

This course will provide an overview of the field of Jewish Law and will seek to provide a few case studies of topics in Jewish Law. All the readings are in English and this course presupposes no background in Jewish Law. Jewish Law is the world's oldest complex legal systems with distinct and idiosyncratic approaches to family, commercial, ritual and many other areas of law. It also has developed an elaborate "conflicts of law" sub-literature focusing on when should Jewish Law apply and when should some other legal system apply, reflecting the long history of the Jewish community in the diaspora as a minority. In this course, we will consider how Jewish law approaches a number of specific topics and we will ponder as well the proper interaction between Jewish law and secular legal norms, Jewish Law and changes in technology, Jewish law and sovereignty, Jewish Law and Bioethics and Jewish law and Family. Other topics will be added as we all see fit. Students who are interested in making a presentation on an area of their choice are welcome to do so. The course will seek to include an optional supplementary "field trip" to see a rabbinical court in action in California. The Learning Outcomes provided by this court include the following: Students who take this course will: 1. Exhibit knowledge and understanding of key concepts in substantive law, procedural law, and legal thought in Jewish Law. 2. Demonstrate facility with legal analysis and reasoning in the Jewish Legal tradition and will demonstrate the ability to conduct legal research in Jewish Law. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer, with consent of the instructor, from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Final Paper. Cross-listed with Jewish Studies (JEWISHST 265).
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Broyde, M. (PI)

LAW 5040: Law, Lawyers, and Transformation in Democratic South Africa

Registration for this class took place in Spring 2019. Enrollment in the class is currently closed. South Africa's transition to democracy in 1994 marked the formal end of the comprehensive political, economic, and social system of racial subordination known as apartheid. The country has changed dramatically since then, as the government has built several million new housing units, created social welfare systems, and created an array of government and private sector programs to combat discrimination and redress the effects of subordination. Yet the country remains among the most unequal in the world, with 64% of black South Africans living below the poverty line, compared to 1% of whites. Most non-white South Africans receive poor education, live in substandard housing, and have limited employment opportunities. In the last five years, discontent with the pace of economic and social transformation has boiled over. In 2015, university campuses erupted in protests. Students' demands quickly expanded from the removal of statutes of white colonizers to wider "decolonization" of university faculty and curricula and the expansion of access to higher education. "Born-free" student activists are now calling for faster, more radical transformation not just of campuses but of the society as a whole; many denounce what they see as the Mandela generation's overly conciliatory approach to white privilege in the economy, society, and interpersonal relations. Since 2018 there is new dynamism at the top, too: many South Africans believe that their new President, Cyril Ramaphosa, will curtail corruption and expand redistributive economic and social policies. This course provides an opportunity to engage South Africa at this exciting historical moment, through intensive study during a week at Stanford and meetings with lawyers, activists, community members, and possibly students, journalists, and politicians during a week in Cape Town. We will focus on how lawyers are struggling for social justice and economic and social transformation--sometimes through ambitious arguments using South Africa's highly progressive constitution, but more often by supporting social movements day to day. Our learning will be grounded in specific cases, such as of the shackdwellers movement Abahlali baseMjondolo; Equal Education, an organization of high school-age students; and pioneering class actions on behalf of injured gold miners. These will enable us to explore various ways law and lawyers fit into social change, the challenges and rewards of such work, and how their perspectives overlap with and diverge from those of their clients. At the same time, we will draw connections between this work and the grand debates and historical arc described above. While comparing South Africa with the United States will not be a primary purpose of the course, we may well see interesting parallels and divergences, and will have some space to discuss those, among ourselves and perhaps with our South African interlocutors. The format of the course will be unusual: We will return to campus before the Fall quarter and spend the week of September 9 preparing intensively at Stanford. We will meet daily for approximately three hours of discussion, collaborative exercises, and some lecturing, as well as read assigned material outside class. We will (a) learn some essential background on apartheid; current legal, political, economic, and social conditions; and our case studies; (b) begin to analyze legal activism methods and the challenges of transformation; and (c) prepare topics and specific questions for our meetings in South Africa, which students will lead. The following weekend we will fly to Cape Town, where we will spend the week of September 16 learning from visits to organizations and communities, and possibly one or two museums or other sites, as well as from discussions with a range of South Africans. We will return the weekend before the Fall quarter begins. Stanford Law School is committed to equal access to field study courses regardless of financial situation. The School covers nearly all expenses during the trip, but students must pay for their own transportation to and from South Africa. Students who qualify for financial aid can receive a supplemental award to cover those transportation costs. Elements use in grading: The course grade will be based on a series of short papers (one or more of which may be due after our return), active in-class engagement with the assigned materials, and preparation for and participation in interviews during the trip, and. The course is open to rising 2Ls and 3Ls. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; O'Connell, J. (PI)

LAW 5101: Afghanistan Legal Education Project (ALEP) Seminar

The Afghanistan Legal Education Project (ALEP) Seminar is only open to student preselected in spring 2019. The ALEP Seminar will begin with an intensive bootcamp taught by ALEP leadership and members of the law faculty at American University of Afghanistan (AUAF). We will explore the Afghan sociopolitical and legal context, rule of law efforts and challenges in Afghanistan, and the role of legal education in legal development. Participants will learn from Afghan law professors about Shari'a law, customary law, Afghan civil law, and the challenges presented by Afghanistan's pluralistic legal system in preparation to work on legal curriculum to be taught at AUAF. The bootcamp, held in Asia, will be highly participatory and requires full attendance. During the remainder of the quarter, participants will receive training in curriculum creation and organizational development in preparation for authoring an Afghan legal textbook and assuming ALEP programmatic responsibilities. Consent Process: Only students selected in spring 2019 have consent to take the ALEP Seminar. Their names will be given to the Registrar, who will automatically enroll them in the course in fall 2019. Elements used in grading: Grading is based on mandatory attendance of the bootcamp, participation, assignments, and authoring a new chapter and/or revision of an existing textbook chapter. Note: Regular deadline for submission of R-Paper to be waived for ALEP Seminar.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F

LAW 5103: State-Building and the Rule of Law Seminar

The State-Building and the Rule of Law Seminar is centrally concerned with bridging theory and practice. The seminar introduces the key theories relevant to state-building generally, and strengthening the rule of law in particular. This course explores the multidisciplinary nature of development --- through readings, lectures, guest lectures, case studies, and seminar discussions --- and asks how lawyers fit in and contribute to the process? The set of developing countries considered within the scope of this workshop is broad. It includes, among others, states engaged in post-conflict reconstruction, e.g., Cambodia, Timor Leste, Rwanda, Iraq, Sierra Leone; states still in conflict, e.g., Afghanistan, Somalia; the poorest states of the world that may not fall neatly into the categories of conflict or post-conflict, e.g., Nepal, Haiti; least developed states that are not marked by high levels of violent conflict at all, e.g., Bhutan; and more developed states at critical stages of transition, e.g., Tunisia, Georgia, Hungary. Grading is based on participation, a presentation of research or a proposal, and, in consultation with the professor, a research paper. The research paper may be a group project (Section 01) graded MP/R/F or an individual in-depth research proposal either of which could be the basis for future field research (Section 02) graded H/P/R/F. Students approved for Section 01 or Section 02 may receive EL credit or R credit. Automatic grading penalty waived for submission of the final work products. CONSENT APPLICATION: The seminar is open by consent to up to sixteen (16) JD, SPILS, and LLM students, and graduate students from other departments within Stanford University. This course is taught in conjunction with the India Field Study component (Law 5026). Students may enroll for this course alone or for both this course and Law 5026 with consent of the instructor (12 students will come to India). To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Cross-listed with International Policy (INTLPOL 352).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Mixed H/P/R/F or MP/R/F

LAW 5201: Foreign Legal Study: Bucerius Law School

This course is for J.D. students who have been approved by the Law School to study at one of the following schools: Bucerius Law School (BLS) -- Hamburg, Germany, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) -- Jerusalem, Israel, Institut d'Études Politiques de Paris (Sciences Po) -- Paris, France, National University of Singapore (NUS) -- Singapore, Peking University Law School (PKU) -- Beijing, China, University of Vienna -- Vienna, Austria, and Waseda University Law School (WLS) -- Tokyo, Japan. See Foreign Legal Study Program at https://law.stanford.edu/education/only-at-sls/global-initiative/foreign-legal-studies-program/ for details. Elements used in grading: Satisfactory evaluation of course work at the exchange institution.
Units: 9-14 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Weiner, A. (PI)

LAW 5204: Foreign Legal Study: Hebrew University of Jerusalem

This course is for J.D. students who have been approved by the Law School to study at one of the following schools: Bucerius Law School (BLS) -- Hamburg, Germany, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) -- Jerusalem, Israel, Institut d'Études Politiques de Paris (Sciences Po) -- Paris, France, National University of Singapore (NUS) -- Singapore, Peking University Law School (PKU) -- Beijing, China, University of Vienna -- Vienna, Austria, and Waseda University Law School (WLS) -- Tokyo, Japan. See Foreign Legal Study Program at https://law.stanford.edu/education/only-at-sls/global-initiative/foreign-legal-studies-program/ for details. Elements used in grading: Satisfactory evaluation of course work at the exchange institution.
Units: 9-14 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Weiner, A. (PI)

LAW 5207: Foreign Legal Study: Institut d'Etudes Politiques de Paris

This course is for J.D. students who have been approved by the Law School to study at one of the following schools: Bucerius Law School (BLS) -- Hamburg, Germany, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) -- Jerusalem, Israel, Institut d'Études Politiques de Paris (Sciences Po) -- Paris, France, National University of Singapore (NUS) -- Singapore, Peking University Law School (PKU) -- Beijing, China, University of Vienna -- Vienna, Austria, and Waseda University Law School (WLS) -- Tokyo, Japan. See Foreign Legal Study Program at https://law.stanford.edu/education/only-at-sls/global-initiative/foreign-legal-studies-program/ for details. Elements used in grading: Satisfactory evaluation of course work at the exchange institution.
Units: 9-14 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Weiner, A. (PI)

LAW 5210: Foreign Legal Study: National University of Singapore

This course is for J.D. students who have been approved by the Law School to study at one of the following schools: Bucerius Law School (BLS) -- Hamburg, Germany, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) -- Jerusalem, Israel, Institut d'Études Politiques de Paris (Sciences Po) -- Paris, France, National University of Singapore (NUS) -- Singapore, Peking University Law School (PKU) -- Beijing, China, University of Vienna -- Vienna, Austria, and Waseda University Law School (WLS) -- Tokyo, Japan. See Foreign Legal Study Program at https://law.stanford.edu/education/only-at-sls/global-initiative/foreign-legal-studies-program/ for details. Elements used in grading: Satisfactory evaluation of course work at the exchange institution.
Units: 9-14 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Weiner, A. (PI)

LAW 5213: Foreign Legal Study: Peking University Law School

This course is for J.D. students who have been approved by the Law School to study at one of the following schools: Bucerius Law School (BLS) -- Hamburg, Germany, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) -- Jerusalem, Israel, Institut d'Études Politiques de Paris (Sciences Po) -- Paris, France, National University of Singapore (NUS) -- Singapore, Peking University Law School (PKU) -- Beijing, China, University of Vienna -- Vienna, Austria, and Waseda University Law School (WLS) -- Tokyo, Japan. See Foreign Legal Study Program at https://law.stanford.edu/education/only-at-sls/global-initiative/foreign-legal-studies-program/ for details. Elements used in grading: Satisfactory evaluation of course work at the exchange institution.
Units: 9-14 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Weiner, A. (PI)

LAW 5216: Foreign Legal Study: Waseda University

This course is for J.D. students who have been approved by the Law School to study at one of the following schools: Bucerius Law School (BLS) -- Hamburg, Germany, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) -- Jerusalem, Israel, Institut d'Études Politiques de Paris (Sciences Po) -- Paris, France, National University of Singapore (NUS) -- Singapore, Peking University Law School (PKU) -- Beijing, China, University of Vienna -- Vienna, Austria, and Waseda University Law School (WLS) -- Tokyo, Japan. See Foreign Legal Study Program at https://law.stanford.edu/education/only-at-sls/global-initiative/foreign-legal-studies-program/ for details. Elements used in grading: Satisfactory evaluation of course work at the exchange institution.
Units: 9-14 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Weiner, A. (PI)

LAW 5219: Foreign Legal Study: University of Vienna

This course is for J.D. students who have been approved by the Law School to study at one of the following schools: Bucerius Law School (BLS) -- Hamburg, Germany, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) -- Jerusalem, Israel, Institut d'Études Politiques de Paris (Sciences Po) -- Paris, France, National University of Singapore (NUS) -- Singapore, Peking University Law School (PKU) -- Beijing, China, University of Vienna -- Vienna, Austria, and Waseda University Law School (WLS) -- Tokyo, Japan. See Foreign Legal Study Program at https://law.stanford.edu/education/only-at-sls/global-initiative/foreign-legal-studies-program/ for details. Elements used in grading: Satisfactory evaluation of course work at the exchange institution.
Units: 9-14 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Weiner, A. (PI)

LAW 5801: Legal Studies Workshop

The Legal Studies Workshop is designed to support students working on a piece of legal scholarship with an eye to publication. The workshop will meet every other week in the fall, winter, and spring quarters, and (we expect) most quarters over the following two years. Students may sign up for as many quarters they wish, and will receive one credit for each quarter they are enrolled. Each session will be devoted to presentations of one or two student works-in-progress. Every student is expected to present his or her own work at least once over the quarters she or he is enrolled in the Workshop, and to provide constructive oral feedback on others' work. We welcome students who are just starting to explore their interest in an academic career; if you have any questions about whether the course is suitable for you, please contact Prof. Barbara Fried (bfried@stanford.edu) or Prof. Bernadette Meyler (bmeyler@law.stanford.edu). Attendance is mandatory (except of course for extenuating circumstances). There are no written requirements for the course, and no requirement that the work presented be original to the Workshop. Students may wish to use the Workshop as an opportunity to expand on seminar papers or pursue independent research projects for which they are getting separate credit through one of the research tracks (e.g., directed research, dissertation). Whether students are working on a new project or revising an old, the expectation is that students will develop their topics independently of the course. Students who would like to participate in the Workshop but feel they need help in developing a workable research topic should consult faculty members ahead of time. Elements used in grading: Class participation and attendance. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Classes will be held at one of the professor's home. The specific location will be sent to students prior to the first class meeting.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F

LAW 5809: Is there an American Legal Canon?

Is there a "canon" of American legal scholarship? And if so, how does it shape our understanding of, or the way we talk about, the law today? In many other academic disciplines, a central element of any course of advanced study is an encounter with a "canon" of some sort. This is a core set of texts that are perceived as foundational, and that are commonly used as reference points for scholarly advances. In other disciplines, the canon can be an object of emulation or criticism. Indeed, the very idea of a "canon" of legal scholarly is often subject to contestation, e.g., given the barriers women and minority scholars have faced. Drawing on the model of those foundational courses in other disciplines, this seminar aims to provide students with a working knowledge of a set of scholarly writings that can plausibly be characterized as an American "canon." At the same time, the seminar aims to elicit from students a critical engagement with this putative "canon." Particular attention is paid to the manner in which the canon either includes or marginalizes certain voices. Hence, one part of the seminar involves reading material that might be part of an expanded, more diversely populated canon. The seminar is designed for two kinds of student. First, it is a useful course of study for students either interested in academia or those thinking about whether academia might be the right path for them (and indeed, the seminar is modeled on a course at Chicago designed for prospective academics, or those considering that path). Second, the course is a chance to take a deeper dive into ideas that lurk behind many first-course private-law and public-law courses. During the seminar, students will read and discuss a range of texts, many drawn from Fisher and Kennedy's The Canon of American Legal Thought. Students will be asked to write response papers and to lead discussion on certain readings. The precise set-up of the course will depend, however, on enrollment. Finally, students will also have the option of doing a longer paper for additional credit (section 02). After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section 01 (2 units) into section 02 (3 units) with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: class participation, short papers, and optional final research paper. Paper extensions will be granted with instructor permission. No automatic grading penalty for late papers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Huq, A. (PI)

LAW 6001: Legal Ethics

This course will explore issues involving professional responsibility. Topics will include the role of advocates, the adversary system, the conditions of practice, diversity, candor, and confidentiality, conflicts of interest, lawyer-client relationships, regulatory structures, access to justice, pro bono service, and legal education. Special Instructions: Grades will be based on class participation and (1) short reflection essays on the readings and a short research paper or (2) a long paper. A maximum of 10 students will be permitted to write the long paper for R credit. After the term begins, 10 students can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. If more than 10 students apply to write a long paper for R credit, a lottery will be run to determine the 10 students accepted in section (02). This class is designated as fulfilling the Ethics requirement (and the R requirement with instructor consent). Elements used in grading: Attendance, class participation, and either long paper or short reflection essays on the readings and short research paper.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Rhode, D. (PI); Sze, E. (GP)

LAW 7001: Administrative Law

Federal agencies make an astounding number of policy decisions, engaging in more lawmaking and adjudication than Congress and the federal courts, respectively. These policy decisions range from the seemingly trivial, such as the size of holes in Swiss cheese, to matters of life-and-death importance, such as how to limit emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and mercury. These agencies also range in age, organization, and duties. There is the postal service, which was created over 200 years ago, and changed almost 50 years ago from a cabinet-level department to a government corporation. On the newer side, there is the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which was established in 2011 to protect consumers in the financial arena and faces considerable scrutiny on constitutional and other grounds. In this quarter of Administrative Law, we will consider the creation and control of the modern administrative state. Topics will include the structure of administrative agencies and their place in a governing scheme of separated but overlapping powers, delegation of authority to agencies, types and requirements of agency decisionmaking, availability and scope of judicial review of agency action (and inaction), and other forms of agency oversight. We will apply concepts through many recent examples. A variety of policy areas will be considered, including (among others) national security, financial regulation, health care, the environment, food and drugs, and telecommunications. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Exam. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. This course will be capped at 65 students, randomly selected.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; O'Connell, A. (PI)

LAW 7010: Constitutional Law: The Fourteenth Amendment

This course examines various aspects of the Fourteenth Amendment, with special attention paid to equal protection and substantive due process. We will examine many contested constitutional questions, including, for example: How did gay and lesbian relationships go so quickly from being subject to criminal prohibition to being eligible for marriage? What justifies the Supreme Court's striking down a law mandating segregated schools, when it had upheld an analogous law half a century earlier? Must the law treat all individuals identically, or may and should it grant special protections to members of historically disadvantaged groups? To what sources might (and should) a judge look to give content to vague constitutional terms like "equal protection" and "due process"? How can we distinguish "law" from "politics" in this area? Readings will include judicial opinions and some scholarly commentary. Class discussion will be supplemented with group exercises of various sorts. Elements used in grading: Class participation and exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Banks, R. (PI)

LAW 7014: Constitutional Theory

The guiding question of this course will be how we should think about the role of the U.S. Constitution in American law and American life. In considering this issue, we will address debates about constitutional interpretation (including both originalism and living constitutionalism), the nature and features of constitutional change within the American context, the role of federalism and the separation of powers in the constitutional scheme, and the nature of American constitutionalism as opposed to English and continental European models. We will tackle these debates in the context of some specific contemporary controversies about the Constitution, including: How do the civil rights movement and other social movements impact our understanding of the Constitution?; Does the Constitution reject a European-style inquisitorial process in favor of an Anglo-American vision of due process?; How important is consensus within the Supreme Court to establishing the legitimacy of constitutional meanings?; Why do we have nine Supreme Court justices, and; What is the Constitution, and how much does it include outside of the written document? Throughout we will be contemplating the extent to which our interpretation of the constitution depends on our vision of American democracy and the good society. Requirements for the course include regular class participation and either four response papers or a substantial research paper; students who take the research paper option will receive four units and 'R' credit. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Special Instructions: This class is limited to 16 students by lottery. If applicable, openings will be filled from the waitlist in waitlist order. Four additional spots may be reserved for 2Ls at the discretion of the instructor. If determined by the instructor, four 2Ls will be admitted from the waitlist in waitlist order. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation; Response Papers or Final Paper.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Meyler, B. (PI)

LAW 7041: Statutory Interpretation

Statutory law is the dominant source of contemporary law, and it is the form of law that lawyers are likely to confront most often in almost any area of practice. It is also an area of vibrant intellectual debate, as scholars, Supreme Court justices, and others debate the methods and aims of statutory interpretation. This course will stress both the practical and theoretical dimensions of interpretation. Students will learn and apply the methods of statutory interpretation. We will also spend considerable time on contemporary controversies, such as debates about textualist, purposive and dynamic interpretation; about the use of legislative history and canons of construction; about the special interpretive problems that arise in the context of direct democracy; and about the democratic and constitutional foundations of statutory interpretation itself. Readings will draw from political science as well as law. Elements used in grading: Class participation and final exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Schacter, J. (PI)

LAW 7042: Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity and the Law

This seminar will focus on how the law regulates sexuality. We will approach the material as an exercise in advanced constitutional law, exploring how courts have used--or might use--federal or state constitutional provisions to address issues regarding a wide array of issues involving sexuality. The core of the class will relate to contemporary controversies concerning sexual orientation and gender identity (including, for example, how sexual orientation and gender identity are defined, regulation of sexual conduct, marriage and parenting rights of same-sex couples, and religious liberty debates, among others). But we will also discuss other issues, including polygamy/polyamory and asexuality. We will maintain an interdisciplinary focus throughout as we consider how social, cultural, and political forces shape, and are shaped by, legal doctrine. All students taking the seminar for 2 units will either write a final research paper of approximately 18 pages (for R credit) or a take a final exam. Students who wish to write a longer R paper (approx. 26 pages) may enroll in the seminar for 3 units. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Students taking the course for R credit can take the course for either 2 or 3 units, depending on the paper length. Elements used in grading: Class participation; and paper or exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Schacter, J. (PI)

LAW 7051: Local Government Law

This course will examine the source, scope and limits of local government power. It will consider the relationship of local governments to state and federal government and of the relationship of local governments to the individuals and communities within and around them. Specific themes will include the potential of local governments to be responsive democratic communities, the potential of local governments to become isolated or exclusive enclaves, and the effect of local governments on the metropolitan political economy. The course will examine state and federal doctrine that affects local government, political/ social theory and urban planning/ development literature. Students may write papers in lieu of the final exam. Upon instructor consent, students interested in writing should enroll in Law 427-0-02. Students who do not receive a spot in section 02 may enroll in section 01. Elements used in grading: Exam or paper and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Ford, R. (PI)

LAW 7063: Youth Law and Policy

This course examines current issues in youth law and policy with a focus on the potential and collateral effects of law on certain subpopulations of vulnerable youth. Substantively, the course focuses on case law and statutes in delinquency, dependency, education, public benefits, and health access with an attention to cross-section themes of poverty, economic justice, race, and youth voice. By the end of the course, students will have developed a better understanding of how litigation, legislation, and policy in youth law come about through examining recent developments in the field and the tools advocates have used to enact change. Any student may write a paper in lieu of the final exam with consent of instructor. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from the exam section (01) into paper section (02), with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments; Exam or Final Paper.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 7071: Philanthropy and Civil Society

Associated with the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS). Year-long workshop for doctoral students and advanced undergraduates writing senior theses on the nature of civil society or philanthropy. Focus is on pursuit of progressive research and writing contributing to the current scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and philanthropy. Accomplished in a large part through peer review. Readings include recent scholarship in aforementioned fields. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 units. Cross-listed with Education (EDUC 374), Political Science (POLISCI 334) and Sociology (SOC 374).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F

LAW 7510: Research Design for Empirical Legal Studies

Empirical legal studies have become popular in the U.S. and are now spreading to non-U.S. law faculties as well. Usually the term applies to analyses of quantitative data and the researcher relies on data collected by others. But the term "empirical" properly encompasses both qualitative and quantitative data, including interviews, legal documents, survey research and experimental results. Analysts interested in using such data need to understand how they were collected, in order to decide what data can appropriately be used to answer different kinds of questions. Often to answer the questions of interest, a researcher needs to collect new data, which poses challenging questions about how to design an empirical research study. Answering these questions appropriately is important to ensure publication in a peer-reviewed journal, which is becoming increasingly important to legal academia. This seminar will introduce students to the wide range of research methods that can be used to answer empirical questions, provide a framework for choosing among methods, and explain how to use the methods. The project for the quarter is to design an empirical research study on a topic of your choice. Special Instructions: JD students can take the class for 3-4 units. SPILS students must take this class for 4 units. Students taking the course for 4 units must attend the additional session on Thursday, which is optional for others. After the term begins, JD students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which can potentially satisfy the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Consent Application for JD students: To apply for this course, JD students must e-mail the instructors for permission to enroll. This course is REQUIRED for all SPILS fellows and BY CONSENT for all other students. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, class presentation, written assignments and final paper.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 7807: Facilitation for Attorneys

Most lawyers and other professionals spend a significant amount of time in meetings and working in teams or groups for a variety of purposes, and many report that this can be a frustrating experience. As the practice of law becomes more complex, it includes more and more situations where groups of people need to work together planning complex legal strategies, developing firm policies, working with corporations or other multi-person clients, or participating in shareholder meetings, public commissions and councils, corporate and non-profit Board of Directors meetings. Group functionality and outcomes can be significantly improved by any group member who has the awareness and skills of a facilitator, whether or not that person is formally designated as the facilitator. The interactive class methodology will combine discussion with many exercises and roleplays, putting facilitation tools into practice every step of the way. We will examine group dynamics and learn skills used by professional facilitators to prevent common problems and elicit the best work of a group. We will explore how to prepare effectively with clear goals, collaborative problem definition, inclusive process design and a well-structured agenda. We will also discuss and practice core meeting management skills such as how to balance voice and participation, build consensus, inspire creativity and promote principled evaluation and decision-making. Finally, we will identify and apply communication skills that keep group sessions productive and tools to manage difficult moments and problem behaviors. Class Schedule dates: Oct. 18th. (4:00 -- 9p.m.), Oct 19th. (9 -- 5:00) and Oct. 27th. (9 -- 5:00). Elements used in grading: Class attendance, participation and final paper.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Notini, J. (PI)

LAW 7815: Advanced Legal Writing: Business Transactions

This course offers comprehensive preparation for practice of the transactional lawyer. Students will learn the foundational tools necessary to write clear, effective, plain language business contracts and analyze other transactional writings used to manage and document complex business transactions. The course provides interactive lectures and a wide range of realistic drafting and research exercises, completed both inside and outside of class, both individually and collaboratively. These exercises help students improve their research, analysis, drafting, and editing skills and develop sensitivity to the expectations of attorneys and clients with whom they will be working. Students will learn the research and analytical tools necessary to interpret provisions in a variety of business agreements. Issues related to ethics in a transactional practice will also be addressed. The course should appeal especially to students interested in working for a law firm and practicing transactional law (be it corporate, venture, debt, intellectual property, mergers and acquisitions, entertainment, real estate, etc.). It will also appeal to those interested in business litigation, or those curious about the work of transactional lawyers. SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS: Students on the waitlist for the course will be admitted if spots are available on the basis of priority and degree program. Early drop deadline: Students may not drop this course after first week of class. Corporations (Law 1013) is a prerequisite for all but LLM (CGP) students. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, written assignments, and final paper. Please consult the syllabus for paper and assignment deadlines.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Bautista, M. (PI)

LAW 7820: Moot Court

The major moot court activity at Stanford Law School is the Marion Rice Kirkwood Memorial Competition, which takes place each year during Autumn and Winter terms. Autumn term will be dedicated to brief writing and completion of the written portion of the Competition; the oral argument portion of the Competition will be conducted during the first four to five weeks of Winter term. Students on externship and in clinics may enroll, if permitted by their respective programs. In Autumn term there are only a few class meetings, including a guest lecture on ethics, which can be recorded. In addition, there are individually scheduled conferences. In Winter term, there are optional class meetings and practice arguments. Participation in the oral argument competition is mandatory, which includes attendance at the semifinal and final arguments. The preliminary rounds are held in the evening; the semifinal and final rounds are in the late afternoon. Prior to the Competition itself, materials and lectures are provided on research, brief writing, and oral advocacy techniques. Registration for the Kirkwood Competition is by team. Each team is required to submit an appellate brief of substantial length and quality and to complete at least two oral arguments, one on each side of an actual case. The first draft of the brief is reviewed and critiqued by the course instructors. The course instructors and the Moot Court Board Presidents score the final draft of the brief. The course also offers digital recording and critiques of practice oral arguments. Panels of judges and local attorneys serve as judges who score the oral argument portion of the Competition. Teams are selected for the quarterfinal, semifinal, and final round of the Competition based on their brief and oral advocacy scores. The final round of the Competition is held before a panel of distinguished judges, and the entire Law School community is invited to attend. Special Instructions: In order to maintain academic standards, enrollment in the Kirkwood Competition is limited to 20 two-person teams. This limit will be strictly enforced. Registration forms will be distributed Spring term. If the program is oversubscribed, a lottery will be held to determine participating teams and to establish a waiting list. The final drop deadline for the course will be on Thursday of the first week of classes. Enrollment in both Autumn (2 units) and Winter (1 unit) terms is required. The final grade for both Autumn and Winter terms and the Professional Skills credit will be awarded upon the completion of the course requirements. Registration and Consent Instructions: Instructions on how to register for the Moot Court competition are sent out to students each year in Spring term for the coming academic year. The registration process is separate from the regular class registration process. Early application and drop deadlines. Elements used in grading: Satisfactory completion of appellate brief and oral arguments.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F

LAW 7821: Negotiation

As a lawyer, you will probably negotiate more than you do anything else. You will negotiate not just over cases, but any time that you need something that you cannot get alone. You will negotiate with your boss, your clients, your paralegal, and all of their counterparts (plus the lawyers) on the other side. You will negotiate with "the system" whether it is the court, the government, the structure of society, or the law. You will also continue to negotiate with your family, your friends, and yourself. This course is designed to: (1) develop your understanding of negotiation, and your awareness of yourself as a negotiator; (2) give you some tools and concepts for analyzing and preparing for negotiations; (3) enhance your negotiating skills through frequent role plays, reflection, and feedback; and (4) teach you how to keep learning from your own negotiation experience. In addition to negotiation skills and theory (including interviewing, counseling, negotiation, fact analysis, legal analysis, and collaboration), you will be introduced to issues of representation, ethics, and the place of negotiation in our legal system. The Negotiation Seminar is an intense, interactive course. We will require weekly preparation of readings, simulations, and written assignments. Basically, you will learn by reading about specific research and doing simulated negotiations -- figuring out with the rest of the class what works and what does not, writing about what you're learning, and trying again. Because participation in the simulations is central to the course, attendance at all classes is required. Since we will begin our simulation exercises on the first day of class, all students who are interested in taking the course (whether enrolled or on the wait-list) need to be present for the first class. (Students who are not present will be dropped from the class or waiting list unless they have made previous arrangements with the instructor.) Add-drop decisions need to be resolved at the first class. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance and written assignments.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F

LAW 7828: Trial Advocacy Workshop

This lawyering skills course gives students an orientation to and constant practice in most basic pretrial and trial advocacy skills areas. Topics include: taking and defending depositions, trial evidence, including admission of trial exhibits in evidence and use of prior witness statements to refresh and impeach a witness, jury selection and voir dire, opening statements, direct and cross-examination of witnesses, expert witnesses, and closing arguments. Students will try a full jury case through to verdict with use of jurors and usually before a real judge in the courthouse in Palo Alto at the end of the course. Students will also have a chance to watch the jurors deliberate and talk with them after their verdict. The course takes place during seven weeks of the Autumn Quarter with two classes (one lecture and one workshop) per week on most weeks from 4:15-9:00 PM (these usually occur on M, W, or Th), plus the final weekend of jury trials, Saturday and Sunday November 16 and 17. Each day's ending time will vary; most sessions will end before 9:00 PM. For details, please refer to the 2019 Trial Advocacy Workshop Schedule at https://tinyurl.com/TrialAd2019. The format for each topic begins with a lecture/discussion featuring video vignettes of various techniques and a live demonstration by an expert trial lawyer. Following the discussion portion of each topic are small group sessions during which each student practices the skills involved. Constructive feedback is given after each exercise by two of our faculty of very experienced Bay Area litigators and judges. Most exercises are also videoed for further one-on-one critique by another faculty member. The central philosophy of the workshop is that skills are best acquired in an experiential manner by seeing and doing. Frequent short, well-defined exercises followed by immediate constructive feedback in a non-competitive, non-threatening atmosphere provide the core of the program. The workshop directors are Tim Hallahan, Judge Sallie Kim and Sara Peters. Tim has taught similar programs at Harvard Law School, the University of San Francisco School of Law, Berkeley Law, the California Continuing Education of the Bar, and in private and public interest law firms around the country. Sallie is a United States Magistrate Judge in San Francisco and was a partner in a civil litigation firm and also previously taught a class at SLS and served as Associate Dean for Student Affairs. Sara is a trial attorney for a personal injury law firm in San Francisco. She graduated from Stanford Law School in 2008 and coaches the Stanford Law School mock trial team. Special Instructions: If you haven't taken Evidence you must contact Tim Hallahan before the course begins for some brief pre-course reading assignments. There are no papers or tests, but attendance at every session is required. Since we will begin our trial advocacy exercises on the first day of class, all students who are interested in taking the course (whether enrolled or on the wait-list) need to be present for the first class. (Students who are not present will be dropped from the class or waiting list unless they have made previous arrangements with the professor.) Add-drop decisions need to be resolved at the first class; no drops will be permitted thereafter. Exceptions to this rule will be made by petition only. Mandatory attendance. Elements used in grading: Attendance and in-class assignments. In addition, the Trial Advocacy Workshop is approved to offer Experiential Learning (EL) Credit. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F

LAW 7830: Topics in American Legal Practice

(Formerly Law 733) This course is designed to introduce international students to American legal practice. To do this, the course begins in the spring quarter by working with students to look ahead to their summer experience and begin to identify ways in which the culture or norms of the practice setting might be distinctive, or otherwise differ from the legal, political, or workplace culture of their home country. Then in the fall quarter, students are asked to write a 10-page paper, situated in the relevant literature(s), that uses the summer experience to examine one such set of issues. Elements used in grading: Final Paper.
Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Fleischmann, S. (PI)

LAW 7836: Advanced Legal Writing: Appellate Litigation

This course will bring the Instructor's decades of experience in high-stakes legal writing to bear on the drafting of appellate briefs: what's good, what's bad; what works, what doesn't; and how to get from here (your frustratingly blank computer screen) to there (a finished brief that assists, persuades, and impresses appellate judges). Through a combination of lectures, discussion, selected readings, and writing exercises (both individual and collaborative), we will cover most of the key topics in appellate writing, including: The differences between appellate and trial-court writing; How appellate judges think, and how to give them what they need; Basic appellate procedure; The pervasive influence that the standard of review has on everything in the brief; Identifying and articulating winning issues and themes (and the difference between the two); Framing appellate issues to advantage your client and neutralize your opponent's best arguments; Getting your arms around the trial-court record; The components of an appellate brief, their purposes, and what it takes to make each component successful; Crafting a narrative that grips the imagination; Structuring appellate arguments; Constructing great headings and subheadings; Writing clear, graceful, properly constructed sentences devoid of brain-killing ambiguities; Linking the entire brief together--using headings, paragraphs, sentences, and individual words--so that it seems to flow effortlessly from point to point to reach the seemingly ineluctable conclusion that your client should win; Lessons from scientific studies of cognition and reading; Cultivating the critical distance you need to edit your own writing; Editing other lawyers' writing effectively; Obtaining discretionary appellate review; and Typography and layout. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Hirsch, S. (PI)

LAW 7846: Elements of Policy Analysis

This one-credit course is designed to support students undertaking public policy analysis projects in the Policy Lab and in other policy-based courses. The course will help students gain facility with basic policy methods and approaches common to public policy research and Policy Lab projects. The core session of the course consists of three hours of classroom instruction on a Saturday morning (the Saturday at the end of the first week of classes) with emphasis on thinking like a policy analyst (as distinguished from an advocate or lawyer), scoping policy problems, promoting and assessing evidence quality, and making valid (and avoiding invalid) inferences. The afternoon session offers three hours of instruction focused on designing and evaluating programs to improve individuals' lives (for example programs aimed at reducing homelessness or opioid addiction). Then, during the early part of the term, students may choose at least two topics from among a series of short workshops including (1) interviewing clients and other stakeholders (especially where ethnic and cultural differences may be salient), (2) policy research tools and strategies, (3) design thinking for law and policy, (4) charting, graphing, and visualizing data, and (5) policy writing. With guidance from their faculty instructors, students may then draw on the skills developed in this introductory seminar to analyze a public policy problem, develop potential strategies to address it, weigh the pros and cons of strategy options, and produce a final product that may offer options or recommendations to a policy client, suggestions for implementing such recommendations, and techniques to assess the effectiveness of implementation. Attention Non-Law Students: See Non-Law Student Add Request Form at https://law.stanford.edu/education/courses/non-law-students/ to enroll in this class. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F

LAW 8001: Corporate Governance and Practice Seminar

The seminar on corporate governance meets in the Autumn and Winter quarters and forms the core of the LL.M. Program in Corporate Governance & Practice. The course, designed to be taken in conjunction with Corporations in Autumn, takes an economic approach to the analysis of corporate law. In particular, we ask why American corporate law has its particular structure. We will seek to understand how the separation of ownership and control produces agency costs, and the ways in which corporate law seeks to remedy these through techniques like disclosure, fiduciary duties and shareholder litigation, voting, and hostile takeovers. We will read and discuss ongoing debates among scholars and practitioners about the agency cost framework, the merits and limits of current legal policies, and the role of institutional arrangements like activist shareholders. We will also consider the relevance of these disputes, and the effectiveness of corporate law and governance more generally, in the context of a variety of real-life incidents. No knowledge of economics is presupposed, so the course will also introduce basic economics and finance concepts necessary to understand these concepts. Some course sessions, largely in the Winter, will feature outside speakers who will complement the discussions with real-world examples drawn from practice. Attendance and active participation are important to the success of the seminar and an important factor in the overall grade. Students are expected to have carefully read and reviewed assigned materials in advance of each session. Students will be required to submit short reflection papers that evaluate, critique, and discuss some or all of the key topics reviewed in the previous week's session. Students may also be asked to prepare presentations to help guide discussions. The class will be graded H/P/R/F in Autumn Quarter and Winter Quarter. This course is required for and limited to students in the Corporate Governance and Practice LL.M. Program. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance and assignments.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Jennings, A. (PI)

LAW 8002: Environmental Law and Policy Colloquium

The Environmental Law & Policy Colloquium offers students the opportunity to learn about cutting-edge legal topics related to environmental law, broadly defined to include, among other areas, pollution control, natural resources management, and energy development. The colloquium meets in two quarters. During the autumn quarter, students will learn about core concepts that underlie the administration of environmental law, exploring ideas from economics, philosophy, natural science, and law. In the autumn quarter, students will begin to develop a capstone research paper on a contemporary environmental law issue. During the spring quarter, the students will write and present their research papers. Elements used in grading include attendance and participation, problem sets, small writing assignments, and a final paper. This course is required for students in the Environmental Law & Policy LL.M. Program. All other students are welcome but will need instructor permission to enroll.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Polk, A. (PI)

LAW 8003: International Economic Law, Business & Policy (IELBP) Colloquium

This course enables IELBP advanced degree students to explore selected issues, case studies and policy debates in international economic law and business, global political economy, and international economic dispute resolution in a highly interactive seminar. The course is a complement to the other core degree requirements of the LLM in IELBP and is discussion-oriented. The course offers students the opportunity to engage in dialogue with experts in the field (including Stanford Law faculty and interdisciplinary scholars from other schools, departments or programs at Stanford University). The course takes on a wide-ranging approach: we will examine legal issues confronting international business while also focusing on cutting-edge debates arising out of economic globalization; we will explore the complex architecture of international economic law, unpacking how international institutions and public international law sources (formal and informal) regulate: i) cross-border business transactions between private parties, ii) international economic relations between and among states, and iii) cross-border economic conduct by states, international organizations, and private actors. Students are expected to have carefully read assigned materials in advance of each session, and to actively participate during class. Grades for the colloquium are based on students' papers and their classroom performance (e.g., preparation, participation, attendance, etc.). The course extends over two quarters (autumn and spring), and students are required to complete both quarters in order to satisfy the program requirement. Topics in the Fall quarter will focus on developments in world trade law, international monetary cooperation, international investment law, economic integration and development, international taxation, international arbitration, and international antitrust law. Topics in the Spring quarter will be selected based on students' interests, as well as pressing policy concerns in international commerce, such as climate change and national security.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Pinchis-Paulsen, M. (PI)

LAW 8004: Law, Science, and Technology Colloquium

The Law, Science & Technology Colloquium offers students in the Law, Science & Technology LLM Program the opportunity to discuss cutting-edge legal issues at the intersection of law and technology with leading experts in the field, including Stanford faculty, visiting scholars, technology and IP lawyers, entrepreneurs, and executives from Silicon Valley technology companies. For organizational purposes, the course is divided into units reflecting different areas of law and technology. Each begins with a keystone lecture that introduces students to the unit's doctrinal and theoretical themes. After the keystone lecture, each unit includes one or more topical lectures taught by experts representing a diverse cross-section of viewpoints from academia, legal practice, and business. Students are expected to have carefully read the assigned materials in advance of each session, and to actively participate during class. Students will also write papers dealing with the units' themes. Grades for the colloquium are based on students' papers and their classroom performance (e.g., preparation, participation, attendance, etc.). This course is restricted to students in the Law, Science, and Technology LLM program, and satisfies their "colloquium requirement" for the fall quarter.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: ; Du Mont, J. (PI)

LAW 8011: SPILS Law and Society Seminar

This seminar is restricted to students who are in the SPILS program. The seminar deals with the relationship between legal systems and the societies in which they are embedded. The materials are drawn from studies of many different societies. Among the issues dealt with are: What influence does culture have on the operation of legal systems? What are the social forces which produce particular forms of law? What impact do legal interventions have on society and on human behavior? Elements used in grading: Exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 8021: Introduction to American Law

This course is designed to introduce international students in the Exchange and Advanced Degree Programs (LL.M. and SPILS) to the key principles of American law. The course provides an overview of distinctive features of the U.S. legal system, including its history and institutions. Topics include the role of precedent in the common law, distinctive elements of civil procedure and legal actions, the branches of the U.S. government and the separation of powers, federalism, due process, and equal protection. The course is offered before the start of the regular Law School quarter. Special Instructions: Required for LL.M. but optional for the SPILS and Exchange Program students. Open to LL.M., SPILS and SLS Exchange Program students only. The class starts on August 27 and runs through September 18. Final exam will be scheduled on Friday, September 20. Elements used in grading: class attendance, participation, short written assignment, and final exam.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Greely, H. (PI)

LAW 8022: Professional Responsibility

This course introduces students to the goals, rules and responsibilities of the American legal profession and its members. The course is designed around the premise that the subject of professional responsibility is the single most relevant to students' future careers as members of the bar. These issues come up on a constant basis and it is critical that lawyers be alert to spotting them when they arise and be educated in the methods of resolving them. As such, the course will address many of the most commonly recurring issues that arise, such as confidentiality, conflicts of interest, candor to the courts and others, the role of the attorney as counselor, the structure of the attorney-client relationship, issues around billing, the tension between "cause lawyering" and individual representation, and lawyers' duty to serve the underrepresented. In addition, we will delve into some more personal ethical issues that reflect on why students have chosen law as a profession and how lawyers compose careers that promote or frustrate those goals. At the start of each session (starting with the second session) there will be a brief quiz on the material that was covered in the readings and discussion of the prior session. During the period of the course, students will also be responsible for submitting one reflection paper (three-to-five pages) based on a prompt that will be circulated after each of the first six sessions (one paper for the entire course). These papers will be due by 11:59 on the last day the class meets. Grades will be based on the quizzes and the paper submitted, with the instructor retaining the right to take class participation into account. Attendance is mandatory and students must seek instructor approval for any absences not due to illness. This course is offered to international graduate students only. It is taught on an accelerated basis over the course of three weeks between orientation and the beginning of the Fall Quarter classes. Thus, the course meets on average nine hours per week. The exact meeting times will be set once the graduate students' schedules are set. Elements used in grading: Attendance, class participation, quizzes and written memo. Limited to LLMs, JSMs and exchange students. Required for LLMs.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Marshall, L. (PI)

LAW 8031: JSD Research Colloquium

Required for and limited to JSD candidates. The objective of the colloquium is to assist students in designing, conducting, analyzing and reporting their doctoral dissertation research. Weekly colloquium sessions are devoted to work in progress presentations by JSD candidates, supplemented by occasional guest lectures and discussions of cross-cutting issues of interest to doctoral students.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: ; Kessler, A. (PI)
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