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JEWISHST 5: Biblical Greek (CLASSGRK 5, RELIGST 5)

This is a one term intensive class in Biblical Greek. After quickly learning the basics of the language, we will then dive right into readings from the New Testament and the Septuagint, which is the ancient Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible. By the end of the term everyone will be able to read the Greek Bible with ease. No previous knowledge of Greek required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Porta, F. (PI)

JEWISHST 5B: Biblical Greek II (CLASSGRK 5B, RELIGST 5B)

This is a continuation of the Winter Quarter Biblical Greek Course. We will be reading selections primarily from the New Testament (both Gospels and Epistles) as well as focusing on knowledge of key vocabulary and grammar needed to read the Greek Bible with ease. Readings will be supplemented with sections from the Septuagint and Early Christian texts (Apostolic Fathers and Early Creeds). Pre-requisite: ClassGrk 5 or a similar introductory course in Ancient Greek.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sheppard, A. (PI)

JEWISHST 101A: Beginning Hebrew, First Quarter (AMELANG 128A)

Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JEWISHST 101B: Beginning Hebrew, Second Quarter (AMELANG 128B)

Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Greif, E. (PI); Porat, G. (PI)

JEWISHST 101C: Beginning Hebrew, Third Quarter (AMELANG 128C)

Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Greif, E. (PI); Porat, G. (PI)

JEWISHST 102B: Intermediate Hebrew, Second Quarter (AMELANG 129B)

Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Shemtov, V. (PI)

JEWISHST 102C: Intermediate Hebrew, Third Quarter (AMELANG 129C)

Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Language | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Porat, G. (PI)

JEWISHST 104: Hebrew Forum (AMELANG 131)

Intermediate and advanced level. Bi-weekly Hebrew discussion on contemporary issues with Israeli guest speakers. Vocabulary enhancement. Focus on exposure to academic Hebrew.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Shemtov, V. (PI)

JEWISHST 104A: Beginning Yiddish, First Quarter (AMELANG 140A)

Reading, writing, and speaking.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Levitow, J. (PI)

JEWISHST 104B: Beginning Yiddish, Second Quarter (AMELANG 140B)

Reading, writing, and speaking.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Levitow, J. (PI)

JEWISHST 104C: Beginning Yiddish, Third Quarter (AMELANG 140C)

Reading, writing, and speaking.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Language | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Levitow, J. (PI)

JEWISHST 106: Reflection on the Other: The Jew in Arabic Literature, the Arab in Hebrew Literature (AMELANG 126)

How literary works outside the realm of western culture struggle with questions such as identity, minority, and the issue of the other. How the Arab is viewed in Hebrew literature and how the Jew is viewed in Arabic literature. Historical, political, and sociological forces that have contributed to the shaping of the writer's views. Arab and Jewish (Israeli) culture.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Shemtov, V. (PI)

JEWISHST 107A: Biblical Hebrew, First Quarter (AMELANG 170A, RELIGST 170A)

Establish a basic familiarity with the grammar and vocabulary of Biblical Hebrew and will begin developing a facility with the language. This course requires no prior knowledge of Hebrew and will begin with learning the alphabet. By the end of the quarter, students will be able to translate basic biblical texts, will be familiar with common lexica and reference grammars, and will have sufficient foundational knowledge to enable them to continue expanding their knowledge either in a subsequent course or own their own.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JEWISHST 148: Writing Between Languages: The Case of Eastern European Jewish Literature (JEWISHST 248, SLAVLIT 198, SLAVLIT 298)

Eastern European Jews spoke and read Hebrew, Yiddish, and their co-territorial languages (Russian, Polish, etc.). In the modern period they developed secular literatures in all of them, and their writing reflected their own multilinguality and evolving language ideologies. We focus on major literary and sociolinguistic texts. Reading and discussion in English; students should have some reading knowledge of at least one relevant language as well.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Safran, G. (PI)

JEWISHST 15A: The Bible and Archaeology (CLASSGEN 15, RELIGST 15A)

An introduction to how archaeology has been used to illumine the Bible and biblical history. Did Abraham exist? Was there an Exodus? Did Joshua really conquer Canaan? What does archaeology reveal about ancient Israel beyond what is recorded in the Bible? This course will address such questions as it seeks to introduce biblical archaeology to students with no prior introduction to either the Bible or to archaeology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Shectman, S. (PI)

JEWISHST 15N: Travels through the Afterlife (RELIGST 15N)

Since the beginning of civilization, humans have refused to believe that physical death is the end of life and have sought in various ways to travel into the afterlife. We cannot know what lies beyond death, but there are other kinds of insights to be learned from these otherworldly journeys. The first part of the course will explore the origins and history of the afterlife, going back in time to ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Israel, Greece, and medieval Europe to survey these cultures' view of death and what lies beyond it. The second part of the course will investigate what has happened to belief in the afterlife in modern American culture. Our ultimate goal is to confront one of the most difficult aspects of life--our fear of death and oblivion--and also to explore the power of thought and imagination to move beyond the confines of mortality.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Weitzman, S. (PI)

JEWISHST 183: The Holocaust (HISTORY 237, HISTORY 337, JEWISHST 383)

The emergence of modern racism and radical anti-Semitism. The Nazi rise to power and the Jews. Anti-Semitic legislation in the 30s. WW II and the beginning of mass killings in the East. Deportations and ghettos. The mass extermination of European Jewry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Zipperstein, S. (PI)

JEWISHST 185B: Jews in the Modern World (HISTORY 185B, HISTORY 385C)

(Same as HISTORY 85B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 185B.) Topics include the restructuring of Jewish existence during the Enlightenment and legal emancipation at the end of the 18th century in W. Europe; the transformation of Jewish life in E. Europe under the authoritarian Russian regime; colonialism in the Sephardic world; new ideologies (Reform Judaism and Jewish nationalisms); the persistence and renewal of antisemitism; the destruction of European Jewry under the Nazis; new Jewish centers in the U.S.; and the State of Israel.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Zipperstein, S. (PI)

JEWISHST 248: Writing Between Languages: The Case of Eastern European Jewish Literature (JEWISHST 148, SLAVLIT 198, SLAVLIT 298)

Eastern European Jews spoke and read Hebrew, Yiddish, and their co-territorial languages (Russian, Polish, etc.). In the modern period they developed secular literatures in all of them, and their writing reflected their own multilinguality and evolving language ideologies. We focus on major literary and sociolinguistic texts. Reading and discussion in English; students should have some reading knowledge of at least one relevant language as well.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Safran, G. (PI)

JEWISHST 289: Poles and Jews (HISTORY 229, HISTORY 329, JEWISHST 389)

Focus is on the period since WW I. The place of the Jews in interwar Poland, WW II, surviving Jews after the war, Polish memorialization of the Holocaust, the reality and mythology of Jews in the communist apparatus, the manipulation of anti-Semitism by the communist government, and post-communist movement toward reconciliation. Memory and national mythology emphasizing Polish wartime behavior and the relationship of Jews to communism. The sources and uses of stereotypes, and the state of Polish-Jewish relations today.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jolluck, K. (PI)

JEWISHST 383: The Holocaust (HISTORY 237, HISTORY 337, JEWISHST 183)

The emergence of modern racism and radical anti-Semitism. The Nazi rise to power and the Jews. Anti-Semitic legislation in the 30s. WW II and the beginning of mass killings in the East. Deportations and ghettos. The mass extermination of European Jewry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Zipperstein, S. (PI)

JEWISHST 385B: Core in Jewish History, 20th Century (HISTORY 285B, HISTORY 385B)

Instructor consent required.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Zipperstein, S. (PI)

JEWISHST 389: Poles and Jews (HISTORY 229, HISTORY 329, JEWISHST 289)

Focus is on the period since WW I. The place of the Jews in interwar Poland, WW II, surviving Jews after the war, Polish memorialization of the Holocaust, the reality and mythology of Jews in the communist apparatus, the manipulation of anti-Semitism by the communist government, and post-communist movement toward reconciliation. Memory and national mythology emphasizing Polish wartime behavior and the relationship of Jews to communism. The sources and uses of stereotypes, and the state of Polish-Jewish relations today.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jolluck, K. (PI)

JEWISHST 102A: Intermediate Hebrew, First Quarter (AMELANG 129A)

Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Language | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JEWISHST 122B: Early Christianity, Early Judaism, and Gender (CLASSGEN 134, RELIGST 132B)

An exploration of gender in Early Christianity and Early Judaism. Possible topics include: an examination of Pre-Christian writings which are indicative of the foundational social contexts in which early Christian and Jewish writers operated; how women¿s preaching was portrayed in Paul¿s letters and the implications for what was actually going on in the community in Corinth; later interpretations of Paul¿s attitudes towards women and marriage, which diverge between a pro-marriage and further restrictive understanding of women¿s involvement in the Church in the pastorals (1 and 2 Timothy and Titus) and a pro-ascetic, cross-dressing, understanding of greater women¿s freedom in the Acts of Paul and Thecla; female Christian martyrs who had visions of themselves as men entering battle and male Rabbis who understood themselves as female virgins and who hid in whorehouses to avoid martyrdom; and a survey of early Rabbinic laws pertaining to men and women and what they reveal about early Jewish conceptions of gender.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JEWISHST 153C: Feminism and American Literature (AMSTUD 183C, ENGLISH 183C)

Exploration of the ways in which an eclectic group of American writers from the 19th century to the 20th have endeavored to enlarge the canvas on which women can paint their lives. Readings include stories, novels, journalism, poetry and drama that engage the social cultural, and political forces that can shape the kinds of futures students can imagine for themselves--forces that are further inflected by issues of race, ethnicity and class.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fishkin, S. (PI)

JEWISHST 199B: Directed Reading in Yiddish, Second Quarter

For intermediate or advanced students. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Baker, Z. (PI)

JEWISHST 241: Memory, History, and the Contemporary Novel (COMPLIT 221, GERLIT 246)

How the watershed events of the 20th century, the philosophic linguistic turn, and the debate regarding the end of history left their mark on the novel. How does the contemporary novel engage with the past? How does its interest in memory and history relate to late- or postmodern culture of time or to political and ethical concerns? Novels by Toni Morrison, W. G. Sebald, J. M. Coetzee, Kazuo Ishiguro, and A. B. Yehoshua; theoretical works by Nietzsche, Freud, Heidegger, Hannah Arendt, Walter Benjamin, Fredric Jameson, Paul Ricoeur Awishai Margalit, and Walter Benn Michaels.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JEWISHST 287D: Tel Aviv: Site, Symbol, City (HISTORY 287D, HISTORY 387D, JEWISHST 387D)

Tel Aviv, the first Israeli/Hebrew city, from a cultural history perspective combining high and low cultural artifacts, examining the symbolic constructions of the city as a site of Hebrew modernisn and postmodernism. Topics include: the utopian origins behind the establishment of Tel Aviv in Zionist texts; artists, poets, and writers in Tel Aviv's coffee houses; as the capital of Bauhaus architecture; the emergence of Israeli pop culture in Tel Aviv of the late 60s and 70s; the effects of contemporary globalization and the reconstruction of Tel Aviv as the symbolic site of Israeli post-nationalism . Sources include art, cinema, and literature, pop music and archival materials from Green Library's Eliasaf Robinson Collection. Hebrew reading knowledge, although helpful, is not required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dubnov, A. (PI)

JEWISHST 287E: Jewish Intellectuals and the Crisis of Modernity (HISTORY 287E, HISTORY 387E, JEWISHST 387E)

Intellectual responses of Jewish political thinkers, historians and authors to the age of extremes. Readings include Theodor Adorno, Herbert Marcuse, Eric Fromm, Hannah Arendt, Leo Strauss, Karl Popper, Isaiah Berlin, Tony Judt, and George Steiner. Analyses of enlightenment, nationalism, socialism and totalitarianism; their life stories, and their direct and indirect role in creating a transatlantic political discourse in postwar years. Contextualizes historically the fundamental features of Jewish intellectual activity after 1945. No prior knowledge of political science, philosophy and/or Jewish studies is required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dubnov, A. (PI)

JEWISHST 385A: Core in Jewish History, 17th-19th Centuries (HISTORY 385A)

Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rodrigue, A. (PI)

JEWISHST 387D: Tel Aviv: Site, Symbol, City (HISTORY 287D, HISTORY 387D, JEWISHST 287D)

Tel Aviv, the first Israeli/Hebrew city, from a cultural history perspective combining high and low cultural artifacts, examining the symbolic constructions of the city as a site of Hebrew modernisn and postmodernism. Topics include: the utopian origins behind the establishment of Tel Aviv in Zionist texts; artists, poets, and writers in Tel Aviv's coffee houses; as the capital of Bauhaus architecture; the emergence of Israeli pop culture in Tel Aviv of the late 60s and 70s; the effects of contemporary globalization and the reconstruction of Tel Aviv as the symbolic site of Israeli post-nationalism . Sources include art, cinema, and literature, pop music and archival materials from Green Library's Eliasaf Robinson Collection. Hebrew reading knowledge, although helpful, is not required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dubnov, A. (PI)

JEWISHST 387E: Jewish Intellectuals and the Crisis of Modernity (HISTORY 287E, HISTORY 387E, JEWISHST 287E)

Intellectual responses of Jewish political thinkers, historians and authors to the age of extremes. Readings include Theodor Adorno, Herbert Marcuse, Eric Fromm, Hannah Arendt, Leo Strauss, Karl Popper, Isaiah Berlin, Tony Judt, and George Steiner. Analyses of enlightenment, nationalism, socialism and totalitarianism; their life stories, and their direct and indirect role in creating a transatlantic political discourse in postwar years. Contextualizes historically the fundamental features of Jewish intellectual activity after 1945. No prior knowledge of political science, philosophy and/or Jewish studies is required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dubnov, A. (PI)

JEWISHST 486A: Graduate Research Seminar in Jewish History (HISTORY 486A)

Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Zipperstein, S. (PI)

JEWISHST 486B: Graduate Research Seminar in Jewish History (HISTORY 486B)

Prerequisite: HISTORY 486A.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Zipperstein, S. (PI)
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