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JAPAN 20: Humanities Core: Dao, Virtue, and Nature -- Foundations of East Asian Thought (CHINA 20, HUMCORE 20, KOREA 20)

This course explores the values and questions posed in the formative period of East Asian civilizations. Notions of a Dao ("Way") are common to Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism, but those systems of thought have radically different ideas about what that Dao is and how it might be realized in society and an individual's life. These systems of thought appeared first in China, and eventually spread to Korea and Japan. Each culture developed its own ways of reconciling the competing systems, but in each case the comprehensive structure of values and human ideals differs significantly from those that appeared elsewhere in the ancient world. The course examines East Asian ideas about self-cultivation, harmonious society, rulership, and the relation between human and nature with a view toward expanding our understanding of these issues in human history, and highlighting their legacies in Asian civilizations today. The course features selective readings in classics of Confucian, Daoist, and Buddhist texts that present the foundational tenets of Asian thought. N. B. This is the first of three courses in the Humanities Core, East Asian track. These courses show how history and ideas shape our world and future. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to the life of the mind.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Egan, R. (PI); Yang, L. (TA)

JAPAN 21: Humanities Core: Love and Betrayal in Asia (CHINA 21, HUMCORE 21, KOREA 21)

Why are lovers in storybooks East and West always star-crossed? Why do love and death seem to go together? For every Romeo and Juliet, there are dozens of doomed lovers in the Asian literary repertoires, from Genji's string of embittered mistresses, to the Butterfly lovers in early modern China, to the voices of desire in Koryo love songs, to the devoted adolescent cousins in Dream of the Red Chamber, to the media stars of Korean romantic drama, now wildly popular throughout Asia. In this course, we explore how the love story has evolved over centuries of East Asian history, asking along the way what we can learn about Chinese, Japanese, and Korean views of family and community, gender and sexuality, truth and deception, trust and betrayal, ritual and emotion, and freedom and solidarity from canonical and non-canonical works in East Asian literatures. N.B. This is the second of three courses in the East Asian track. These courses offer an unparalleled opportunity to study East Asian history and culture, past and present. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to exploring how ideas have shaped our world and future.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 21Q: Humanities Core: Love and Betrayal in Asia (CHINA 21Q, HUMCORE 21Q, KOREA 21Q)

Why are lovers in storybooks East and West always star-crossed? Why do love and death seem to go together? For every Romeo and Juliet, there are dozens of doomed lovers in the Asian literary repertoires, from Genji's string of embittered mistresses, to the Butterfly lovers in early modern China, to the voices of desire in Koryo love songs, to the devoted adolescent cousins in Dream of the Red Chamber, to the media stars of Korean romantic drama, now wildly popular throughout Asia. In this course, we explore how the love story has evolved over centuries of East Asian history, asking along the way what we can learn about Chinese, Japanese, and Korean views of family and community, gender and sexuality, truth and deception, trust and betrayal, ritual and emotion, and freedom and solidarity from canonical and non-canonical works in East Asian literatures. N.B. This is the second of three courses in the East Asian track. These courses offer an unparalleled opportunity to study East Asian history and culture, past and present. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to exploring how ideas have shaped our world and future.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 22Q: Humanities Core: How to be Modern in East Asia (CHINA 22Q, COMPLIT 22Q, HUMCORE 22Q)

Modern East Asia was almost continuously convulsed by war and revolution in the 19th and 20th centuries. But the everyday experience of modernity was structured more profoundly by the widening gulf between the country and the city, economically, politically, and culturally. This course examines literary and cinematic works from China and Japan that respond to and reflect on the city/country divide, framing it against issues of class, gender, national identity, and ethnicity. It also explores changing ideas about home/hometown, native soil, the folk, roots, migration, enlightenment, civilization, progress, modernization, nationalism, cosmopolitanism, and sustainability. All materials are in English. N.B. This is the third of three courses in the East Asian track. These courses offer an unparalleled opportunity to study East Asian history and culture, past and present. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to exploring how ideas have shaped our world and future.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 52: Global Humanities: The Grand Millennium, 800-1800 (DLCL 52, HISTORY 206D, HUMCORE 52)

How should we live? This course explores ethical pathways in European, Islamic, and East Asian traditions: mysticism and rationality, passion and duty, this and other worldly, ambition and peace of mind. They all seem to be pairs of opposites, but as we'll see, some important historical figures managed to follow two or more of them at once. We will read works by successful thinkers, travelers, poets, lovers, and bureaucrats written between 800 and 1900 C.E. We will ask ourselves whether we agree with their choices and judgments about what is a life well lived.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 60: Asian Arts and Cultures (ARTHIST 2)

An exploration of the visual arts of East and South Asia from ancient to modern times, in their social, religious, literary and political contexts. Analysis of major monuments of painting, sculpture and architecture will be organized around themes that include ritual and funerary arts, Buddhist art and architecture across Asia, landscape and narrative painting, culture and authority in court arts, and urban arts in the early modern world.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 82N: Joys and Pains of Growing Up and Older in Japan

What do old and young people share in common? With a focus on Japan, a country with a large long-living population, this seminar spotlights older people's lives as a reflectiion of culture and society, history, and current social and personal changes. Through discussion of multidisciplinary studies on age, analysis of narratives, and films, we will gain a closer understanding of Japanese society and the multiple meanings of growing up and older. Students will also create a short video/audio profile of an older individual, and we will explore cross-cultural comparisons. Held in Knight Bldg. Rm. 201.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 95A: Japanese Alternative Spring Break

An Alternative Spring Break (ASB) course through Haas Center. Directed reading course, designed by the students. http://viaprograms.org/expand-your-boundaries/social-innovation-design-thinking/design-thinking-for-social-innovation/
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

JAPAN 110: Romance, Desire, and Sexuality in Modern Japanese Literature (FEMGEN 110J, FEMGEN 210J, JAPAN 210)

This class is structured around three motifs: love suicide (as a romantic ideal), female desire, and same-sex sexuality. Over the course of the quarter we will look at how these motifs are treated in the art and entertainment from three different moments of Japanese history: the Edo period (1615-1868), the modern period (1920-65), and the contemporary period (1965-present). We will start by focusing on the most traditional representations of these topics. Subsequently, we will consider how later artists and entertainers revisited the conventional treatments of these motifs, informing them with new meanings and social significance. We will devote particular attention to how this material comments upon issues of gender, sexuality, and human relationships in the context of Japan. Informing our perspective will be feminist and queer theories of reading and interpretation.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 118: Humanities Core: Everybody Eats: The Language, Culture, and Ethics of Food in East Asia (CHINA 118, HUMCORE 22, KOREA 118)

Many of us have grown up eating "Asian" at home, with friends, on special occasions, or even without full awareness that Asian is what we were eating. This course situates the three major culinary traditions of East Asia--China, Japan, and Korea--in the histories and civilizations of the region, using food as an introduction to their rich repertoires of literature, art, language, philosophy, religion, and culture. It also situates these seemingly timeless gastronomies within local and global flows, social change, and ethical frameworks. Specifically, we will explore the traditional elements of Korean court food, and the transformation of this cuisine as a consequence of the Korean War and South Korea¿s subsequent globalizing economy; the intersection of traditional Japanese food with past and contemporary identities; and the evolution of Chinese cuisine that accompanies shifting attitudes about the environment, health, and well-being. Questions we will ask ourselves during the quarter include, what is "Asian" about Asian cuisine? How has the language of food changed? Is eating, and talking about eating, a gendered experience? How have changing views of the self and community shifted the conversation around the ethics and ecology of meat consumption?
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 121: Translating Japan, Translating the West (COMPLIT 142B, JAPAN 221)

Translation lies at the heart of all intercultural exchange. This course introduces students to the specific ways in which translation has shaped the image of Japan in the West, the image of the West in Japan, and Japan's self-image in the modern period. What texts and concepts were translated by each side, how, and to what effect? No prior knowledge of Japanese language necessary.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 122: Translating Cool: Globalized Popular Culture in Asia (JAPAN 222, KOREA 122, KOREA 222)

Did you grow up watching Pokémon and Power Rangers? Have you danced along to "Gangnam Style"? As we become increasingly exposed to Asian popular culture and the Internet facilitates instant access to new media, previous localized forms of entertainment--animated cartoons, comics, video games, music videos, film, and soap operas--have become part of a global staple. However, these cultural forms have emerged not only in their original form with mediation of subtitles. Many have undergone various processes of adaptation and translation so that we no longer recognize that these products had ever originated elsewhere. This course will immerse students in a range of Japanese and Korean cultural phenomena to reveal the spectrum of translation practices across national boundaries. We will inquire into why these cultural forms have such compelling and powerful staying power, contextualize them within their frames of production, and explore the strategies, limitations, and potential of translational practices.nnContact instructor for place. dafnazur@stanford.edunKnight 201.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 123: Critical Translation Studies (COMPLIT 228, JAPAN 223)

Seminal works of translation theory and scholarship from a wide array of disciplinary, regional, linguistic, and historical perspectives. Readings are in English, but students must have at least two years of training or the equivalent in another language, or permission from the instructor. (Important note: Students who wish to count this course toward requirements in the department of East Asian Languages and Cultures must have permission from their EALC advisor.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Levy, I. (PI)

JAPAN 124: Manga as Literature (JAPAN 224)

Analysis of representative manga as narratives that combine verbal and visual elements, with attention to historical and cultural background. Representative manga by Tezuka Osamu, Tatsumi Yoshihiro, Koike Kazuo, Taniguchi Jiro, Natsume Ono, Kono Fumiyo, and others. All readings in English.nnnClass meets in Knight Bldg, Rm 018. Contact instructor (sdcarter@stanford.edu) for place
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 125: Tokyo, Kyoto, Osaka and beyond: place in modern Japan

From the culturally distinct urban centers of Tokyo, Kyoto, and Osaka to the sharp contrasts between the southernmost and northernmost parts of Japan, modern Japanese literature and film present rich characterizations of place that have shaped Japanese identities at the national, regional, and local levels. This course focuses attention on how these settings operate in key works of literature and film, with an eye toward developing students' understanding of diversity within modern Japan.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 133: Japanese Media Culture (JAPAN 233)

Focuses on the intertwined histories of the postwar Japanese television, anime, music, and video game industries, and how their development intersects with wider trends in Japanese society. We will pay particular attention to questions of affect, labor, and environment in media production, consumption, and style.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 138: Introduction to Modern Japanese Literature and Culture (JAPAN 238)

This class introduces key literary texts from Japan's modern era (1868-present), locating these works in the larger political, social, and cultural trends of the period. Primary texts include: Futabatei Shimei's Floating Clouds, Higuchi Ichiyô's Child's Play, Natsume Sôseki's Kokoro, Kobayashi Takiji's Cannery Boat, Ôe Kenzaburô's The Catch, and Yoshimoto Banana's Kitchen. Examination of these literary works will be contextualized within larger political trends (e.g., the modernization program of the Meiji regime, the policies of Japan's wartime government, and postwar Japanese responses to the cold war), social developments (e.g., changing notions of social class, the women's rights movement, and the social effects of the postwar economic expansion), and cultural movements (e.g., literary reform movement of the 1890s, modernism of the 1920s and 30s, and postmodernism of the 1980s). The goal of the class is to use literary texts as a point of entry to understand the grand narrative of Japan's journey from its tentative re-entry into the international community in the 1850s, through the cataclysm of the Pacific War, to the remarkable prosperity of the bubble years in the 1980s.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 144: Inventing Japan: Traditional Culture in the Modern World (JAPAN 244)

Features of traditional Japanese culture such as temples and shrines, kimono, and cultural practices like the tea ceremony, have played an important role in both domestic and international representations of Japan since the late nineteenth century. In this course students will be introduced to these elements of traditional Japanese culture, while learning to cast a critical eye on the concept of tradition. Themes will include discussion of the gendered nature of tradition in modern Japan and the role played by such traditions in constructing national identity, both in Japan and overseas. We will explore these topics using the theoretical frameworks of invention of tradition and reformatting of tradition. Contact instructor for room. rcorbett@stanford.edu
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 148: Modern Japanese Narratives: Literature and Film (JAPAN 248)

Central issues in modern Japanese visual and written narrative. Focus is on competing views of modernity, war, and crises of individual and collective identity and responsibility. Directors and authors include Kurosawa, Mizoguchi, Ozu, Ogai, Akutagawa, Tanizaki, Abe, and Oe.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 151: Japanese Business Culture and Systems (JAPAN 251)

Japanese sociocultural dynamics in industrial and corporate structures, negotiating styles, decision making, and crisis management. Practicum on Japan market strategies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dasher, R. (PI)

JAPAN 151B: The Nature of Knowledge: Science and Literature in East Asia (CHINA 151B, CHINA 251B, JAPAN 251B, KOREA 151, KOREA 251)

"The Nature of Knowledge" explores the intersections of science and humanities East Asia. It covers a broad geographic area (China, Japan, and Korea) along a long temporal space (14th century - present) to investigate how historical notions about the natural world, the human body, and social order defied, informed, and constructed our current categories of science and humanities. The course will make use of medical, geographic, and cosmological treatises from premodern East Asia, portrayals and uses of science in modern literature, film, and media, as well as theoretical and historical essays on the relationships between literature, science, and society.nnAs part of its exploration of science and the humanities in conjunction, the course addresses how understandings of nature are mediated through techniques of narrative, rhetoric, visualization, and demonstration. In the meantime, it also examines how the emergence of modern disciplinary "science" influenced the development of literary language, tropes, and techniques of subject development. This class will expose the ways that science has been mobilized for various ideological projects and to serve different interests, and will produce insights into contemporary debates about the sciences and humanities.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Zur, D. (PI)

JAPAN 152: Art Animation (FILMSTUD 146, JAPAN 252)

While anime has spread around the world, Japanese art animators have been busy developing a parallel tradition, built from a more personal, experimental, and idiosyncratic approach to the medium. Looking closely at key works from major artists in the field, this course explores art animation from a variety of perspectives: animation scene; philosophical attempts to account for animated movement; and art animation's unique perspective on Japanese culture.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 155: The Vampire in Anime (JAPAN 255)

Analysis of anime where vampires play central roles as characters and/or in plot development. Comparison of character and plot development within anime series and Western vampire literature will be the main focus; attention will also be paid to the development of the vampire as a literary and film character in the West, the conception of the supernatural in Japanese culture, and the points of similarity and difference between the two.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 157: Science, Power, and Knowledge: East Asia to 1900 (CHINA 157, CHINA 257, HISTORY 294J, JAPAN 257, KOREA 157, KOREA 257)

In the early modern period, East Asian societies featured long-established institutions of learning and traditions of knowledge. This course examines the relationship between knowledge and power in East Asia societies prior to 1900. It explores how knowledge production operated in late imperial China (1550-1900), Chos'n Korea (1392-1910), and Tokugawa Japan (1600-1868). Among the themes addressed are: the state's role in patronizing science and knowledge; major intellectual movements; engagement with Western science and religion; East Asian statecraft; and East Asian understandings of space and geography. nTaking a holistic perspective, it places science and technology in 1) a social and cultural context 2) in relation to other bodies and fields of knowledge 3) in comparison to other societies in a similar historical time period. A socially embedded perspective on knowledge and science seeks to appreciate how politics, society, and knowledge are integrated, and in particular how science and knowledge can be both instruments and sites of political power. By exploring these links, the course will also illustrate how our modern disciplinary categories of natural science,social science and the humanities cannot be taken for granted and the areas of knowledge they cover can be deeply intertwined. nnThe course will also address these issues historically and across geographic regions in East Asia and beyond. The comparative lens and frameworks these perspectives can offer will bring an awareness of the diverse traditions of knowledge production in East Asia. Its examination of East Asian encounters with Western paradigms of knowledge throughout the early modern period will also illustrate how communication occurs across cultural, social, and linguistic barriers and how diverse world-views were managed in these encounters. These encounters of knowledge-exchange between Jesuit missionaries, Ming literati, Korean aristocrats, and Japanese doctors also show how cultural identities were constructed, reinforced, and challenged. These identities, expressed through the mastery of knowledge, are essential for understanding how East Asian reckoned with growing pressures to adopt Western industrial technology and military science in the late nineteenth century.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 157S: Tyranny and Resistance: East Asia's Political Culture and Tradition (CHINA 157S, KOREA 157S)

What is tyranny? When does political power cease to be legitimate and government become tyrannical? And what can individuals do in the face of tyranny? This course will explore East Asia's long political tradition through the problem of tyranny and its resistance. We will cover a wide range of material. We begin with how seminal political thinkers in East Asia, including Warring States philosophers such as Mencius and Han Feizi, understood the boundary between legitimate and illegitimate authority. We will also look at the strategies used by various political actors, including government officials, cultural or social elites, and common people, when they confronted what they perceived to be the unjust exercise political power, whether in the form of despotic monarchs, corrupt authorities, or general misrule. Our discussions will be wide-ranging. We will pay particular attention to how these historical examples from China, Korea, and Japan¿s past have resonated with modern and contemporary political discussions in contemporary East Asian societies.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 158: A Critical and Historical Survey of Classical Japanese Literature (JAPAN 258)

This course presents a broad survey of classical Japanese literature in English translation, with particular emphasis on prose fiction and poetry. We will make use of multiple, complementary modes of literary criticism, beginning with historicism and formalism, which reflect different assumptions and interpretive priorities. The approach is integrative, with attention paid throughout to the intersections between literature, social and institutional history, and religion. Key questions to be explored include the following: How were the major works of classical Japanese literature understood by readers during the medieval and early-modern periods? How did the current canon of classical Japanese literature arise, and what historical forces shaped its development? How might modern modes of literary criticism help us better approach premodern Japanese literature, and what are their limitations?
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Reichert, J. (PI)

JAPAN 159: The Paranormal in Premodern Japan (JAPAN 259)

This course will explore the various stories of gods, ghosts, demons, and monsters that appear throughout the Premodern period in Japan. The course will use the concept of the paranormal to explore the ways these beings are depicted as living alongside humanity and that humanity can easily and unknowingly enter into the realm of these beings.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 160: Classical Japanese Literature in Translation (JAPAN 260)

Prose, poetry, and drama from the 10th-19th centuries. Historical, intellectual, and cultural context. Works vary each year. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 161: Japanese Ghosts: The Supernatural in Japanese Art and Entertainment (JAPAN 261)

The complex meanings of ghosts in Japanese culture. Representations of the supernatural in images, drama, oral narratives, prose, film, comics and animation at different moments in Japanese history.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 162: Japanese Poetry and Poetics (JAPAN 262)

Heian through Meiji periods with emphasis on relationships between the social and aesthetic. Works vary each year. This year's genre is the diary. Prerequisites: 246, 247, or equivalent.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 163: Japanese Performance Traditions (JAPAN 263)

Major paradigms of gender in Japanese performance traditions from ancient to modern times, covering Noh, Kabuki, Bunraku, and Takarazuka.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 164: Introduction to Premodern Japanese (JAPAN 264)

Readings from Heian, Kamakura, Muromachi, and early Edo periods with focus on grammar and reading comprehension. Prerequisite: JAPANLNG 129B or 103, or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Stilerman, A. (PI)

JAPAN 166: Introduction to Sino-Japanese (JAPAN 266)

Readings in Sino-Japanese (kambun) texts of the Heian, Kamakura, and Muromachi periods, with focus on grammar and reading comprehension. Prerequisite: 246 or equivalent.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 170: The Tale of Genji and Its Historical Reception (JAPAN 270)

Approaches to the tale including 12th-century allegorical and modern feminist readings. Influence upon other works including poetry, Noh plays, short stories, modern novels, and comic book ( manga) retellings. Prerequisite for graduate students: JAPANLNG 129B or 103, or equivalent.nnThis course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 184: Aristocrats, Warriors, Sex Workers, and Barbarians: Lived Life in Early Modern Japanese Painting (ARTHIST 184, ARTHIST 384, JAPAN 284)

Changes marking the transition from medieval to early modern Japanese society that generated a revolution in visual culture, as exemplified in subjects deemed fit for representation; how commoners joined elites in pictorializing their world, catalyzed by interactions with the Dutch.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 185: Arts of War and Peace: Late Medieval and Early Modern Japan, 1500-1868 (ARTHIST 187, ARTHIST 387, JAPAN 285)

Narratives of conflict, pacification, orthodoxy, nostalgia, and novelty through visual culture during the change of episteme from late medieval to early modern, 16th through early 19th centuries. The rhetorical messages of castles, teahouses, gardens, ceramics, paintings, and prints; the influence of Dutch and Chinese visuality; transformation in the roles of art and artist; tensions between the old and the new leading to the modernization of Japan.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 186: Theme and Style in Japanese Art (ARTHIST 186, ARTHIST 386, JAPAN 286)

A mixture of lecture and discussion, this course presents a chronological introduction to some of the defining monuments in the history of Japanese visual culture from prehistory to the mid-19th century. This introductory class presumes no prior knowledge of art history or of Japan. We will emphasize certain overarching themes like religious life; notions of decorum appropriate to various classes (court, warrior, and commoner); the relationship between and among the arts, such as the visual and the verbal, or the symphonic assemblage arts as seen in the tea ceremony; pervasive cultural tropes like nostalgia, seasonality, or the sense of place; and broader issues such as censorship, patronage, gender issues, and the encounters between Japanese and foreign cultures.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Takeuchi, M. (PI)

JAPAN 188: The Japanese Tea Ceremony: The History, Aesthetics, and Politics Behind a National Pastime (ARTHIST 287A, JAPAN 288)

The Japanese tea ceremony, the ultimate premodern multimedia phenomenon, integrates architecture, garden design, ceramics, painting, calligraphy, and other treasured objects into a choreographed ritual wherein host, objects, and guests perform designated roles on a tiny stage sometimes only six feet square.. In addition to its much-touted aesthetic and philosophical aspects, the practice of tea includes inevitable political and rhetorical dimensions. This course traces the evolution of tea practice from its inception within the milieu of courtier diversions, Zen monasteries, and warrior villas, through its various permutations into the 20th century, where it was manipulated by the emerging industrialist class for different-but ultimately similar-ends.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Takeuchi, M. (PI)

JAPAN 189B: Honors Research

Open to senior honors students to write thesis.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 191: Japanese Pragmatics (JAPAN 291)

The choice of linguistic expressions and our understanding of what is said involve multiple sociocultural, cognitive and discourse factors. Can such pragmatic factors and processes be considered universal to all languages, or are there variations among languages? The course will investigate an array of phenomena observed in Japanese. Through readings and projects, students will deepen their knowledge of Japanese and consider theoretical implications. Prerequisites: one year of Japanese and a course in linguistics, or two years of Japanese, or consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 192: Analyzing Japanese Text and Talk (JAPAN 292)

Are there reasons why certain words, phrases, sentences and prosody are chosen by language speakers and writers in specific contexts? What linguistic and extra-linguistic elements give the hearers and readers the impression that certain utterances and passages are friendly, accusatory, officious, humorous, personal, formal, colloquial, etc.? This seminar provides an introduction to different theoretical and analytical approaches to studying language use in context (e.g. pragmatics, sociolinguistics, usage-based grammar, conversational analysis, critical discourse analysis) and an opportunity to critically analyze text and talk. Using the analytical tools acquired through readings and discussions, students will be able to analyze Japanese materials of their selection. The course is designed for graduate students and advanced undergraduate students with interests either (or both) in Japanese linguistics and literature.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 193: Acquisition of Japanese as a Second Language (JAPAN 293)

This course provides students with a broad overview of second language acquisition (SLA) research and introduces recent SLA studies on Japanese as a second language (L2). It covers six topics: (1) the evolution of the field, (2) approaches to understanding learner language, (3) current state of knowledge of L2 developmental patterns, (4) theories of L2 learning, (5) factors that affect SLA, and (6) instructed SLA. By reading and discussing exemplary SLA studies on L2 Japanese as well as seminal papers on these topics, students will develop abilities to analyze learner language from multiple perspectives, critically read research reports, and consider implications for L2 teaching.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ishida, M. (PI)

JAPAN 197: Points in Japanese Grammar (JAPAN 297)

(Formerly JAPANLIT157/257) The course provides practical but in-depth analyses of selected points in Japanese grammar that are often difficult to acquire within the limited hours of language courses. We consider findings from linguistic research, focusing on differences between similar expressions and distinctions that may not be salient in English, with the aim to provide systematic analytical background for more advanced understanding of the language. May be repeat for credit. Prerequisite: JAPANLNG23 or equivalent for JAPAN197; JAPANLNG103 or equivalent for JAPAN297.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 198C: Senior Research (Capstone Essay)

EALC students writing a Senior Capstone Essay who wish to conduct research with their adviser may enroll in this course for 1 unit, for 1 quarter.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

JAPAN 198H: Senior Research (Honors Thesis)

EALC juniors or seniors pursuing honors research should sign up for this course under their faculty adviser for research credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 199: Individual Reading in Japanese

Asian Languages majors only. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: JAPANLNG 129B or 103, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 200: Directed Reading in Japanese

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 201: Proseminar: Introduction to Graduate Study in Japanese

Bibliographical and research methods. Major trends in literary and cultural theory and critical practice. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: JAPANLNG 103 or 129B, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Levy, I. (PI)

JAPAN 202: Bibliographic and Research Methods in Japanese

The use of library and online resources for the study of Japanese literature, language, and culture. Prerequisite: JAPANLNG 103 or 129B, or consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 203: Teaching Japanese Humanities

Prepares graduate students to teach humanities at the undergraduate level. Topics include syllabus development and course design, techniques for generating discussion, effective grading practices, and issues particular to the subject matter.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

JAPAN 210: Romance, Desire, and Sexuality in Modern Japanese Literature (FEMGEN 110J, FEMGEN 210J, JAPAN 110)

This class is structured around three motifs: love suicide (as a romantic ideal), female desire, and same-sex sexuality. Over the course of the quarter we will look at how these motifs are treated in the art and entertainment from three different moments of Japanese history: the Edo period (1615-1868), the modern period (1920-65), and the contemporary period (1965-present). We will start by focusing on the most traditional representations of these topics. Subsequently, we will consider how later artists and entertainers revisited the conventional treatments of these motifs, informing them with new meanings and social significance. We will devote particular attention to how this material comments upon issues of gender, sexuality, and human relationships in the context of Japan. Informing our perspective will be feminist and queer theories of reading and interpretation.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 221: Translating Japan, Translating the West (COMPLIT 142B, JAPAN 121)

Translation lies at the heart of all intercultural exchange. This course introduces students to the specific ways in which translation has shaped the image of Japan in the West, the image of the West in Japan, and Japan's self-image in the modern period. What texts and concepts were translated by each side, how, and to what effect? No prior knowledge of Japanese language necessary.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 222: Translating Cool: Globalized Popular Culture in Asia (JAPAN 122, KOREA 122, KOREA 222)

Did you grow up watching Pokémon and Power Rangers? Have you danced along to "Gangnam Style"? As we become increasingly exposed to Asian popular culture and the Internet facilitates instant access to new media, previous localized forms of entertainment--animated cartoons, comics, video games, music videos, film, and soap operas--have become part of a global staple. However, these cultural forms have emerged not only in their original form with mediation of subtitles. Many have undergone various processes of adaptation and translation so that we no longer recognize that these products had ever originated elsewhere. This course will immerse students in a range of Japanese and Korean cultural phenomena to reveal the spectrum of translation practices across national boundaries. We will inquire into why these cultural forms have such compelling and powerful staying power, contextualize them within their frames of production, and explore the strategies, limitations, and potential of translational practices.nnContact instructor for place. dafnazur@stanford.edunKnight 201.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 223: Critical Translation Studies (COMPLIT 228, JAPAN 123)

Seminal works of translation theory and scholarship from a wide array of disciplinary, regional, linguistic, and historical perspectives. Readings are in English, but students must have at least two years of training or the equivalent in another language, or permission from the instructor. (Important note: Students who wish to count this course toward requirements in the department of East Asian Languages and Cultures must have permission from their EALC advisor.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Levy, I. (PI)

JAPAN 224: Manga as Literature (JAPAN 124)

Analysis of representative manga as narratives that combine verbal and visual elements, with attention to historical and cultural background. Representative manga by Tezuka Osamu, Tatsumi Yoshihiro, Koike Kazuo, Taniguchi Jiro, Natsume Ono, Kono Fumiyo, and others. All readings in English.nnnClass meets in Knight Bldg, Rm 018. Contact instructor (sdcarter@stanford.edu) for place
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 233: Japanese Media Culture (JAPAN 133)

Focuses on the intertwined histories of the postwar Japanese television, anime, music, and video game industries, and how their development intersects with wider trends in Japanese society. We will pay particular attention to questions of affect, labor, and environment in media production, consumption, and style.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 235: Academic Readings in Japanese I

Strategies for reading academic writings in Japanese. Readings of scholarly papers and advanced materials in Japanese in students' research areas in the humanities and social sciences. Prerequisites: JAPANLNG 103, 129B, or equivalent; and consent of instructor. May be repeat for credit.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 238: Introduction to Modern Japanese Literature and Culture (JAPAN 138)

This class introduces key literary texts from Japan's modern era (1868-present), locating these works in the larger political, social, and cultural trends of the period. Primary texts include: Futabatei Shimei's Floating Clouds, Higuchi Ichiyô's Child's Play, Natsume Sôseki's Kokoro, Kobayashi Takiji's Cannery Boat, Ôe Kenzaburô's The Catch, and Yoshimoto Banana's Kitchen. Examination of these literary works will be contextualized within larger political trends (e.g., the modernization program of the Meiji regime, the policies of Japan's wartime government, and postwar Japanese responses to the cold war), social developments (e.g., changing notions of social class, the women's rights movement, and the social effects of the postwar economic expansion), and cultural movements (e.g., literary reform movement of the 1890s, modernism of the 1920s and 30s, and postmodernism of the 1980s). The goal of the class is to use literary texts as a point of entry to understand the grand narrative of Japan's journey from its tentative re-entry into the international community in the 1850s, through the cataclysm of the Pacific War, to the remarkable prosperity of the bubble years in the 1980s.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 239: Modern Japanese Short Stories

This course explores the postwar Japanese short story. We will read representative works by major authors, such as Ishikawa Jun, Hayashi Fumiko, Abe Kobe and Murakami Haruki. Attention will be devoted to both accurate reading of the Japanese prose and more general discussion of the literary features of the texts.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 244: Inventing Japan: Traditional Culture in the Modern World (JAPAN 144)

Features of traditional Japanese culture such as temples and shrines, kimono, and cultural practices like the tea ceremony, have played an important role in both domestic and international representations of Japan since the late nineteenth century. In this course students will be introduced to these elements of traditional Japanese culture, while learning to cast a critical eye on the concept of tradition. Themes will include discussion of the gendered nature of tradition in modern Japan and the role played by such traditions in constructing national identity, both in Japan and overseas. We will explore these topics using the theoretical frameworks of invention of tradition and reformatting of tradition. Contact instructor for room. rcorbett@stanford.edu
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 248: Modern Japanese Narratives: Literature and Film (JAPAN 148)

Central issues in modern Japanese visual and written narrative. Focus is on competing views of modernity, war, and crises of individual and collective identity and responsibility. Directors and authors include Kurosawa, Mizoguchi, Ozu, Ogai, Akutagawa, Tanizaki, Abe, and Oe.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 251: Japanese Business Culture and Systems (JAPAN 151)

Japanese sociocultural dynamics in industrial and corporate structures, negotiating styles, decision making, and crisis management. Practicum on Japan market strategies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dasher, R. (PI)

JAPAN 251B: The Nature of Knowledge: Science and Literature in East Asia (CHINA 151B, CHINA 251B, JAPAN 151B, KOREA 151, KOREA 251)

"The Nature of Knowledge" explores the intersections of science and humanities East Asia. It covers a broad geographic area (China, Japan, and Korea) along a long temporal space (14th century - present) to investigate how historical notions about the natural world, the human body, and social order defied, informed, and constructed our current categories of science and humanities. The course will make use of medical, geographic, and cosmological treatises from premodern East Asia, portrayals and uses of science in modern literature, film, and media, as well as theoretical and historical essays on the relationships between literature, science, and society.nnAs part of its exploration of science and the humanities in conjunction, the course addresses how understandings of nature are mediated through techniques of narrative, rhetoric, visualization, and demonstration. In the meantime, it also examines how the emergence of modern disciplinary "science" influenced the development of literary language, tropes, and techniques of subject development. This class will expose the ways that science has been mobilized for various ideological projects and to serve different interests, and will produce insights into contemporary debates about the sciences and humanities.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Zur, D. (PI)

JAPAN 252: Art Animation (FILMSTUD 146, JAPAN 152)

While anime has spread around the world, Japanese art animators have been busy developing a parallel tradition, built from a more personal, experimental, and idiosyncratic approach to the medium. Looking closely at key works from major artists in the field, this course explores art animation from a variety of perspectives: animation scene; philosophical attempts to account for animated movement; and art animation's unique perspective on Japanese culture.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 252A: Special Topics in Japanese Literature

For graduate students working with Japanese literature. This course covers a selection of core texts in modern Japanese fiction and current scholarly approaches to literature in relation to 1) censorship, and 2) film. During the second half of the quarter, students will conduct guided research on these topics, to culminate in a final research paper 20-25 pages in length. For the first half of the quarter, class will be conducted entirely in Japanese. Prerequisite: fourth-year Japanese or the equivalent, and permission of the instructors.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 253: Japanese Graduate Seminar: Translation Theory & Premodern Literature

Translation Theory & Premodern Literature course
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 255: The Vampire in Anime (JAPAN 155)

Analysis of anime where vampires play central roles as characters and/or in plot development. Comparison of character and plot development within anime series and Western vampire literature will be the main focus; attention will also be paid to the development of the vampire as a literary and film character in the West, the conception of the supernatural in Japanese culture, and the points of similarity and difference between the two.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 257: Science, Power, and Knowledge: East Asia to 1900 (CHINA 157, CHINA 257, HISTORY 294J, JAPAN 157, KOREA 157, KOREA 257)

In the early modern period, East Asian societies featured long-established institutions of learning and traditions of knowledge. This course examines the relationship between knowledge and power in East Asia societies prior to 1900. It explores how knowledge production operated in late imperial China (1550-1900), Chos'n Korea (1392-1910), and Tokugawa Japan (1600-1868). Among the themes addressed are: the state's role in patronizing science and knowledge; major intellectual movements; engagement with Western science and religion; East Asian statecraft; and East Asian understandings of space and geography. nTaking a holistic perspective, it places science and technology in 1) a social and cultural context 2) in relation to other bodies and fields of knowledge 3) in comparison to other societies in a similar historical time period. A socially embedded perspective on knowledge and science seeks to appreciate how politics, society, and knowledge are integrated, and in particular how science and knowledge can be both instruments and sites of political power. By exploring these links, the course will also illustrate how our modern disciplinary categories of natural science,social science and the humanities cannot be taken for granted and the areas of knowledge they cover can be deeply intertwined. nnThe course will also address these issues historically and across geographic regions in East Asia and beyond. The comparative lens and frameworks these perspectives can offer will bring an awareness of the diverse traditions of knowledge production in East Asia. Its examination of East Asian encounters with Western paradigms of knowledge throughout the early modern period will also illustrate how communication occurs across cultural, social, and linguistic barriers and how diverse world-views were managed in these encounters. These encounters of knowledge-exchange between Jesuit missionaries, Ming literati, Korean aristocrats, and Japanese doctors also show how cultural identities were constructed, reinforced, and challenged. These identities, expressed through the mastery of knowledge, are essential for understanding how East Asian reckoned with growing pressures to adopt Western industrial technology and military science in the late nineteenth century.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 258: A Critical and Historical Survey of Classical Japanese Literature (JAPAN 158)

This course presents a broad survey of classical Japanese literature in English translation, with particular emphasis on prose fiction and poetry. We will make use of multiple, complementary modes of literary criticism, beginning with historicism and formalism, which reflect different assumptions and interpretive priorities. The approach is integrative, with attention paid throughout to the intersections between literature, social and institutional history, and religion. Key questions to be explored include the following: How were the major works of classical Japanese literature understood by readers during the medieval and early-modern periods? How did the current canon of classical Japanese literature arise, and what historical forces shaped its development? How might modern modes of literary criticism help us better approach premodern Japanese literature, and what are their limitations?
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Reichert, J. (PI)

JAPAN 259: The Paranormal in Premodern Japan (JAPAN 159)

This course will explore the various stories of gods, ghosts, demons, and monsters that appear throughout the Premodern period in Japan. The course will use the concept of the paranormal to explore the ways these beings are depicted as living alongside humanity and that humanity can easily and unknowingly enter into the realm of these beings.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 260: Classical Japanese Literature in Translation (JAPAN 160)

Prose, poetry, and drama from the 10th-19th centuries. Historical, intellectual, and cultural context. Works vary each year. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 261: Japanese Ghosts: The Supernatural in Japanese Art and Entertainment (JAPAN 161)

The complex meanings of ghosts in Japanese culture. Representations of the supernatural in images, drama, oral narratives, prose, film, comics and animation at different moments in Japanese history.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 262: Japanese Poetry and Poetics (JAPAN 162)

Heian through Meiji periods with emphasis on relationships between the social and aesthetic. Works vary each year. This year's genre is the diary. Prerequisites: 246, 247, or equivalent.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 263: Japanese Performance Traditions (JAPAN 163)

Major paradigms of gender in Japanese performance traditions from ancient to modern times, covering Noh, Kabuki, Bunraku, and Takarazuka.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 264: Introduction to Premodern Japanese (JAPAN 164)

Readings from Heian, Kamakura, Muromachi, and early Edo periods with focus on grammar and reading comprehension. Prerequisite: JAPANLNG 129B or 103, or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Stilerman, A. (PI)

JAPAN 265: Readings in Premodern Japanese

Edo and Meiji periods with focus on grammar and reading comprehension. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 246 or equivalent.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 266: Introduction to Sino-Japanese (JAPAN 166)

Readings in Sino-Japanese (kambun) texts of the Heian, Kamakura, and Muromachi periods, with focus on grammar and reading comprehension. Prerequisite: 246 or equivalent.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 270: The Tale of Genji and Its Historical Reception (JAPAN 170)

Approaches to the tale including 12th-century allegorical and modern feminist readings. Influence upon other works including poetry, Noh plays, short stories, modern novels, and comic book ( manga) retellings. Prerequisite for graduate students: JAPANLNG 129B or 103, or equivalent.nnThis course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 279: Research in Japanese Linguistics

This proseminar introduces Japanese linguistics research to graduate students and advanced undergraduate students. Through readings and discussions, students will familiarize themselves with materials and references in both English and Japanese in preparation for conducting research effectively in their own areas of interest in Japanese linguistics. They learn the organization and presentation of research projects and conduct a pilot project in their selected area of interest. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: JAPANLNG 103 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Matsumoto, Y. (PI)

JAPAN 284: Aristocrats, Warriors, Sex Workers, and Barbarians: Lived Life in Early Modern Japanese Painting (ARTHIST 184, ARTHIST 384, JAPAN 184)

Changes marking the transition from medieval to early modern Japanese society that generated a revolution in visual culture, as exemplified in subjects deemed fit for representation; how commoners joined elites in pictorializing their world, catalyzed by interactions with the Dutch.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 285: Arts of War and Peace: Late Medieval and Early Modern Japan, 1500-1868 (ARTHIST 187, ARTHIST 387, JAPAN 185)

Narratives of conflict, pacification, orthodoxy, nostalgia, and novelty through visual culture during the change of episteme from late medieval to early modern, 16th through early 19th centuries. The rhetorical messages of castles, teahouses, gardens, ceramics, paintings, and prints; the influence of Dutch and Chinese visuality; transformation in the roles of art and artist; tensions between the old and the new leading to the modernization of Japan.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 286: Theme and Style in Japanese Art (ARTHIST 186, ARTHIST 386, JAPAN 186)

A mixture of lecture and discussion, this course presents a chronological introduction to some of the defining monuments in the history of Japanese visual culture from prehistory to the mid-19th century. This introductory class presumes no prior knowledge of art history or of Japan. We will emphasize certain overarching themes like religious life; notions of decorum appropriate to various classes (court, warrior, and commoner); the relationship between and among the arts, such as the visual and the verbal, or the symphonic assemblage arts as seen in the tea ceremony; pervasive cultural tropes like nostalgia, seasonality, or the sense of place; and broader issues such as censorship, patronage, gender issues, and the encounters between Japanese and foreign cultures.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Takeuchi, M. (PI)

JAPAN 287: Pictures of the Floating World: Images from Japanese Popular Culture (ARTHIST 287, ARTHIST 487X)

Printed objects produced during the Edo period (1600-1868), including the Ukiyo-e (pictures of the floating world) and lesser-studied genres such as printed books (ehon) and popular broadsheets (kawaraban). How a society constructs itself through images. The borders of the acceptable and censorship; theatricality, spectacle, and slippage; the construction of play, set in conflict against the dominant neo-Confucian ideology of fixed social roles.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 288: The Japanese Tea Ceremony: The History, Aesthetics, and Politics Behind a National Pastime (ARTHIST 287A, JAPAN 188)

The Japanese tea ceremony, the ultimate premodern multimedia phenomenon, integrates architecture, garden design, ceramics, painting, calligraphy, and other treasured objects into a choreographed ritual wherein host, objects, and guests perform designated roles on a tiny stage sometimes only six feet square.. In addition to its much-touted aesthetic and philosophical aspects, the practice of tea includes inevitable political and rhetorical dimensions. This course traces the evolution of tea practice from its inception within the milieu of courtier diversions, Zen monasteries, and warrior villas, through its various permutations into the 20th century, where it was manipulated by the emerging industrialist class for different-but ultimately similar-ends.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Takeuchi, M. (PI)

JAPAN 291: Japanese Pragmatics (JAPAN 191)

The choice of linguistic expressions and our understanding of what is said involve multiple sociocultural, cognitive and discourse factors. Can such pragmatic factors and processes be considered universal to all languages, or are there variations among languages? The course will investigate an array of phenomena observed in Japanese. Through readings and projects, students will deepen their knowledge of Japanese and consider theoretical implications. Prerequisites: one year of Japanese and a course in linguistics, or two years of Japanese, or consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 292: Analyzing Japanese Text and Talk (JAPAN 192)

Are there reasons why certain words, phrases, sentences and prosody are chosen by language speakers and writers in specific contexts? What linguistic and extra-linguistic elements give the hearers and readers the impression that certain utterances and passages are friendly, accusatory, officious, humorous, personal, formal, colloquial, etc.? This seminar provides an introduction to different theoretical and analytical approaches to studying language use in context (e.g. pragmatics, sociolinguistics, usage-based grammar, conversational analysis, critical discourse analysis) and an opportunity to critically analyze text and talk. Using the analytical tools acquired through readings and discussions, students will be able to analyze Japanese materials of their selection. The course is designed for graduate students and advanced undergraduate students with interests either (or both) in Japanese linguistics and literature.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 293: Acquisition of Japanese as a Second Language (JAPAN 193)

This course provides students with a broad overview of second language acquisition (SLA) research and introduces recent SLA studies on Japanese as a second language (L2). It covers six topics: (1) the evolution of the field, (2) approaches to understanding learner language, (3) current state of knowledge of L2 developmental patterns, (4) theories of L2 learning, (5) factors that affect SLA, and (6) instructed SLA. By reading and discussing exemplary SLA studies on L2 Japanese as well as seminal papers on these topics, students will develop abilities to analyze learner language from multiple perspectives, critically read research reports, and consider implications for L2 teaching.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ishida, M. (PI)

JAPAN 296: Modern Japanese Literature

Advanced readings. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: JAPANLNG 213. Formerly JAPANLIT 396.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 297: Points in Japanese Grammar (JAPAN 197)

(Formerly JAPANLIT157/257) The course provides practical but in-depth analyses of selected points in Japanese grammar that are often difficult to acquire within the limited hours of language courses. We consider findings from linguistic research, focusing on differences between similar expressions and distinctions that may not be salient in English, with the aim to provide systematic analytical background for more advanced understanding of the language. May be repeat for credit. Prerequisite: JAPANLNG23 or equivalent for JAPAN197; JAPANLNG103 or equivalent for JAPAN297.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 298: The Theory and Practice of Japanese Literary Translation

Theory and cultural status of translation in modern Japanese and English. Comparative analysis of practical translation strategies. Final project is a literary translation of publishable quality. Prerequisite: fourth-year Japanese or consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 299: Master's Thesis or Translation

A total of 5 units, taken in one or more quarters.nn (Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 350: Japanese Historical Fiction

Authors include Mori Ogai, Akutagawa Ryunosuke, Tanizaki Jun'ichiro, Enchi Fumiko, Shiba Ryotaro, Fujisawa Shuhei, and Hiraiwa Yumie. Genre theory, and historical and cultural context. Works vary each year. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 377: Seminar: Structure of Japanese

Linguistic constructions in Japanese. Topics vary annually. In 2009-10, focus is on noun-modifying constructions in Japanese from multiple perspectives including syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and acquisition. Contrasts with similar constructions in other languages. Typological implications. Prerequisites: courses in Japanese linguistics, consent of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 381: Topics in Pragmatics and Discourse Analysis

Naturally occurring discourse (conversational, narrative, or written) and theoretical implications. Discourse of different age groups, expressions of identity and persona, and individual styles. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 382: Research Projects in Japanese Linguistics

For advanced graduate students with specific research projects in Japanese linguistics. Consent of instructor required.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

JAPAN 395: Early Modern Japanese Literature

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 247.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 396: Seminar in Modern Japanese Literature

Works and topics vary each year. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: fourth-year Japanese or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 399: Dissertation Research

For doctoral students in Japanese working on dissertations.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

JAPAN 801: TGR Project

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR

JAPAN 802: TGR Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
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