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ILAC 110N: Brazil: Musical Culture and Films

An audiovisual introduction to Brazilian cultural and regional diversities. Films and Music from Samba to Bossa Nova to Tropicália to Hip-Hop. Rhythms and Spirituals of Capoeira and Candomblé. Amerindian songs. Dances and Rituals. Final visual-sonorous exhibition and performance by students. Taught in English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Librandi Rocha, M. (PI)

ILAC 117Q: The Short Story in Latin America

What is a short story? How is it different from a nouvelle or a short novel? What represents the greatest achievement in its practice? How is the social function and literary standing of cuentos different in the region from elsewhere in the world? Read and think about short stories while cultivating core critical skills: close-reading, aesthetic appreciation, and good Spanish expository prose. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hoyos, H. (PI)

ILAC 127E: Junipero Serra (HISTORY 263D)

Why is Junipero Serra considered a representative figure of California? How have assessments of Serra evolved over the last 200 years? Why does his name appear so often on our campus? In this course we will consider these and other questions in terms of Spanish empire, Native American history, California politics of memory and commemoration, among other approachs. Requirements include weekly reading, class discussion, a field trip to Carmel Mission, short writing assignments, and a formal debate on the ethics naming university or public buildings after historical figures with contested pasts. Taught in English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Surwillo, L. (PI)

ILAC 130: Introduction to Iberia: Cultural Perspectives

The purpose of this course is to study major figures and historical trends in modern Iberia against the background of the linguistic plurality and social and cultural complexity of the Iberian world. We will study the fundamental issues of empire, the Napoleonic occupation of Spain, Latin American independence, recurring civil wars, federal republicanism, and the historic nationalisms (Galician, Basque, and Catalan), all leading up to the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), which is a defining moment in modern Spanish and European history, with ongoing consequences still felt and debated painfully today in contemporary Spain. This course is designed to help prepare students for their participation in the Stanford overseas study programs in Barcelona and Madrid. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Resina, J. (PI)

ILAC 131: Introduction to Latin America: Cultural Perspectives

Part of the Gateways to the World program, this is an introductory course for all things Latin American: culture, history, literature, and current events. By combining lecture and seminar formats, the class prepares you for all subsequent research on, and learning about, the region. Comparative discussion of independence movements in Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, the Andean Region, Brazil, and the Southern Cone. Other topics vary yearly, including: representations of ethnicity and class, the Cold War, popular culture, as well as major thinkers and writers. Open to all. Recommended for students who want to study abroad in Santiago, Chile. Required for majors in Spanish or Iberian and Latin American Cultures (ILAC). In Spanish.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hoyos, H. (PI)

ILAC 133: The Animal Within: Animals in Modern and Contemporary Latin American Narrative

How does the criterion for the division between the human and the animal take part on contemporary Latin American narrative? To what extent is this divide challenged or contested? How do animals behave in literary spaces? The course combines a discussion of the literary works of authors like Jorge Luis Borges, Horacio Quiroga, Julio Cortázar, Mario Bellatin, Graciliano Ramos, Clarice Lispector, and José María Arguedas with a reflection on the animal and animality in the writings of Derrida, Deleuze, and Haraway. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Briceno, X. (PI)

ILAC 134: In the First Person: Women's Self Writing in Latin America

Why is self-narrative a particularly daring form for the feminine voice? How can a woman writer affect notions of identity in her narrative? The course examines different expressions of feminine self-portrayal in Latin America from the 1920s to the present. We study women's self-writing across different formats: diaries, memoirs, fiction, and comics. Authors include: Rosario Castellanos, Victoria Ocampo, Norah Lange, Frida Kahlo, Tununa Mercado, Marcela Trujillo, Power Paola, and Gabriela Wiener. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Briceno, X. (PI)

ILAC 136: Modern Iberian Literatures

1800 to the mid 20th century. Topics include: romanticism; realism and its variants; the turn of the century; modernism and the avant garde; the Civil War; and the first half of the 20th century. Authors may include Mariano Jose de Larra, Gustavo Adolfo Becquer, Rosalia de Castro, Benito Perez Galdos, Jacint Verdaguer, Eca de Queiros, Miguel de Unamuno, Ramon de Valle-Inclan, Antonio Machado, and Federico García Lorca. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPANLANG 13 or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Surwillo, L. (PI)

ILAC 157: Medieval and Early Modern Iberian Literatures

Survey of Iberian literature from the medieval and early modern periods. When covering texts in languages other than Spanish, translations into English or Spanish will be made available. Taught in Spanish; prerequisite: SPANLANG 13 or equivalen
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 159: Don Quijote

Focus is on a close reading of Miguel de Cervantes¿s prose masterpiece. The rise of the novel, the problems of authorship and signification, modes of reading, the status of Muslim and Jewish converts in early modern Spain, the rise of capitalism, masochistic desire. This course will be conducted in English, and no prior knowledge of Spanish is necessary.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Barletta, V. (PI)

ILAC 161: Modern Latin American Literature

From independence to the present. A survey of significant authors and works of Hispanic and Brazilian Portuguese literatures, focusing on fictional prose and poetry. Topics include romantic allegories of the nation; modernism and postmodernism; avant-garde poetry; regionalism versus cosmopolitanism; indigenous and indigenist literature; magical realism and the literature of the boom; Afro-Hispanic literature; and testimonial narrative. Authors may include: Bolívar, Bello, Gómez de Avellaneda, Isaacs, Sarmiento, Machado de Assis, Darío, Martí­, Agustini, Vallejo, Huidobro, Borges, Cortázar, Neruda, Guillon, Rulfo, Ramos, Garcí­a Marquez, Lispector, and Bolaño. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 175: CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People (COMPLIT 100, DLCL 100, FRENCH 175, GERMAN 175, HISTORY 206E, ITALIAN 175, URBANST 153)

This course takes students on a trip to eight capital cities, at different moments in time: Renaissance Florence, Golden Age Madrid, Colonial Mexico City, Enlightenment and Romantic Paris, Existential and Revolutionary St. Petersburg, Roaring Berlin, Modernist Vienna, and bustling Buenos Aires. While exploring each place in a particular historical moment, we will also consider the relations between culture, power, and social life. How does the cultural life of a country intersect with the political activity of a capital? How do large cities shape our everyday experience, our aesthetic preferences, , and our sense of history? Why do some cities become cultural capitals? Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents (in translation); authors we will read include Boccaccio, Lope de Vega, Sor Juana, Montesquieu, Baudelaire, Dostoyevsky, Irmgard Keun, Freud, and Borges.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 193: The Cinema of Pedro Almodovar

Pedro Almodóvar is one of the most recognizable auteur directors in the world today. His films express a hybrid and eclectic visual style and the blurring of frontiers between mass and high culture. Special attention is paid to questions of sexuality and the centering of usually marginalized characters. This course studies Pedro Almodóvar's development from his directorial debut to the present, from the "shocking" value of the early films to the award-winning mastery of the later ones. Prerequisite: ability to understand spoken Spanish. Readings in English. Midterm and final paper can be in English. Majors should write in Spanish.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 199: Individual Work

Open only to students in the department, or by consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 202: Identity is a Skin: Identity Debates in Europe and Latin America from Essence to Appearance (CSRE 202A, SOC 288)

Traditionally, collective identity the identity of countries, peoples, and other human groups has been studied from the viewpoint of the question who or what are they, the question about the specific traits or contents that define identity. This seminar will undertake a radical epistemological turn, understanding identity as a negotiation of external recognition and internal cohesion. The focus switches from contents to container, from essence to form, from the guts to the skin. The seminar will study examples from Latin America and Europe, with their diverse strategies of identity affirmation or invention. It will also take into consideration the current conflict between Catalonia and Spain as an original case of identity consolidation in a developed society. The instructor will provide the readings. Most of them will be available in English and Spanish. Taught in Spanish. INSTRUCTOR: Salvador Cardús
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cardus Ros, S. (PI)

ILAC 206: Medieval Iberian Lyric

Selected major works of Iberian lyric poetry produced from the eleventh through the fifteenth centuries; also current critical approaches to medieval lyric, including issues of performance, orality, gender, and manuscript culture. Prerequisite: SPANLANG 13 or equivalent. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Barletta, V. (PI)

ILAC 220E: Renaissance Africa (AFRICAST 220E, COMPLIT 220, ILAC 320E)

Literature and Portuguese expansion into Africa during the sixteenth century. Emphasis on forms of exchange between Portuguese and Africans in Morocco, Angola/Congo, South Africa, the Swahili Coast, and Ethiopia. Readings in Portuguese and English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Barletta, V. (PI)

ILAC 230: Freedom and Unfreedom in Colonial Spanish America

Even as human "freedom" emerged as a dominant value in European political thought, European global expansion created numerous "unfreedoms" from direct enslavement to more indirect forms of coercion, debt peonage or social disenfranchisement according to race and gender. This course will inquire into the specific forms that "freedom" and its opposite took in writings from colonial Spanish America. While its silver and sugar production fueled the global economy, Spanish imperialism also stood out for its corporate structure, division of powers between Church and State, and emphasis on Christian conversion of non-European subjects. These competing interests and contradictions created room for debate on the justification of empire and the social structures of colonialism. The course will read important texts in these debates to determine whether it is possible to trace a specifically Iberian genealogy of freedom, conscious of and in dialogue with forms of unfreedom. Simultaneously, it will reflect on whether this mediated notion of freedom, many times emitted from unfree subjects, may provide a corrective to the idealist and Enlightened freedom that continues to be the basis for political thought today. nnCourse will be conducted in Spanish. Primary readings will include works by Colón; Cortés; Vitoria; Sepúlveda; Las Casas; Ercilla, Acosta; Guaman Poma de Ayala; Inca Garcilaso de la Vega; Sandoval; Sigüenza y Góngora; Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz. INSTRUCTOR: Anna More.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; More, A. (PI)

ILAC 235: Critique of Technology (STS 200L)

Informed citizens living in today'¬ôs world, and especially in Silicon Valley, should be able to formulate their own articulate positions about the role of technology in culture. The course gives students the tools to do so. Against the trend towards the thoughtless celebration of all things technological, we will engage in critique in the two senses of the term: as careful study of the cultural implications of technology and as balanced, argumentative criticism. Can technology make life more meaningful, society more fair, people smarter, and the world smaller? We will pay special attention to the insights that literature, and other arts, can offer for reframing digital culture. Selections by Latin American fiction writers (Cortázar, Zambra), philosophers and thinkers (Heidegger and Beller), as well as recent popular works of social commentary, such as You are not a Gadget, The Shallows, 24/7, and Present Shock. Taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hoyos, H. (PI)

ILAC 240E: Borges and Philosophy

Analysis of the Argentine author's literary renditions of philosophical ideas. Topics may include: time, free will, infinitude, authorship and self, nominalism vs. realism, empiricism vs. idealism, skepticism, peripheral modernities, postmodernism, and Eastern thought. Close reading of short stories, poems, and essays from Labyrinths paired with selections by authors such as Augustine, Berkeley, James, and Lao Tzu. The course will be conducted in English; Spanish originals will be available. Satisfies the capstone seminar requirement for the major in Philosophy and Literature.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 246: Critical Issues of Human Rights through Literature

This course seeks to explain some of the most relevant contemporary problems of contemporary human rights through the eyes of literature. Through novels, the course problematizes some issues of human rights that, from a legal perspective, are simplified or captured merely through legal forms i.e. rules. These novels highlight the social and political tensions involved in the rise of human rights and in some of its most urgent problems during their short history. Human rights legal forms generally simplify a wider array of tensions that this course brings to the foreground. Taught in Spanish. INSTRUCTOR: Jorge González-Jacome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 270: Afro-Brazil: Oral Culture, Literature and Digital Media (ILAC 370)

The African-Brazilian population in the state of Minas Gerais and the ritual of the coronation of the kings and the queens of the Congo in the Devotion to Our Lady of Rosario. Texts by Antonio Vieira, Guimarães Rosa and others. Multimedia digital experiments with videos and the production of sonic textures. Taught in Portuguese.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Librandi Rocha, M. (PI)

ILAC 277: Spanish and Society: Cultures of Salsa

Salsa is the soundscape of 20th century Latin America. How is it possible that salsa stands for Latin American music? How can we understand its origin and its musical expansion? We learn how salsa voices transformation and self-exploration of different places and moments in all of Latin America and the US and we analyze how it travels across the world. We discuss musical examples in relation to colonialism, globalization, migration, nationalism, gender and ethnicity. As a core course of the Spanish major, Cultures of Salsa emphasizes the analysis of Spanish in real-world contexts.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Briceno, X. (PI)

ILAC 278: Senior Seminar: Spanish Poetry

Open to seniors in ILAC and Spanish: others by permission of instructor. nnThis course will study the poetry of Lorca and his generation, the so-called Generation of 1927. We will concentrate on the rediscovery of the poetry of Luis de Góngora and its impact in revolutionizing poetic language in modern Spain. Special attention will be given to close stylistic analysis and to the historical and social conditions out of which arose the progressive intellectual and educational movement that gave rise to this renaissance of brilliant poetry. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ILAC 278A: Senior Seminar: Literatura y Antropología

Literature and Anthropology in Latin America (including Brazil. Amerindian perspectivism and the poetics of translation.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Librandi Rocha, M. (PI)

ILAC 280: Latin@ Literature (CHILATST 200, CSRE 200, ILAC 382)

Examines a diverse set of narratives by U.S. Latin@s of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Guatemalan, and Dominican heritage through the lens of latinidad. All share the historical experience of Spanish colonization and U.S. imperialism, yet their im/migration patterns differ, affecting social, cultural, and political trajectories in the US and relationships to "home" and "homeland," nation, diaspora, history, and memory. Explores how racialization informs genders as well as sexualities. Emphasis on textual analysis. Taught in English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 282: Queer Film (FEMGEN 282)

Analysis of representations of queer lives in films from the Spanish-speaking world (including the U.S.). We will be looking at the meaning each film produces about a wide variety of queer experience, in relation to a specific national, historical and cultural context. We will also practice doing close readings of how each film produces meaning about queer experience, focusing on the formal features mise-en-scene, cinematography, sound, editing , narrative and style.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 299: Individual Work

Open to department advanced undergraduates or graduate students by consent of professor. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 320E: Renaissance Africa (AFRICAST 220E, COMPLIT 220, ILAC 220E)

Literature and Portuguese expansion into Africa during the sixteenth century. Emphasis on forms of exchange between Portuguese and Africans in Morocco, Angola/Congo, South Africa, the Swahili Coast, and Ethiopia. Readings in Portuguese and English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Barletta, V. (PI)

ILAC 333: Spain and the Transatlantic

Course will address a variety of literary works from the 19th century to today, current debates on transatlantic studies, review of recent scholarship, and history. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Surwillo, L. (PI)

ILAC 346: Fernando Vallejo: Grammar, Dogs, and Lust for Life

Vallejo, the most fascinating Colombian author since Garcia Marquez is, like that author, a longtime exile in Mexico. What does his idiosyncratic, transnational oeuvre reveal about contemporary Latin America? Systematic study of major works. Topics include: cursileria, malditismo, glotopolitics, queer writing, vitalism vs. materialism, and animal rights. Students are encouraged to incorporate Vallejo's works into their own research projects. In Spanish, with selections from longer works and up-to-date critical bibliography.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hoyos, H. (PI)

ILAC 348: US-Mexico Border Fictions: Writing La Frontera, Tearing Down the Wall (COMPLIT 348)

A border is a force of containment that inspires dreams of being overcome, crossed, and cursed; motivates bodies to climb over walls; and threatens physical harm. This graduate seminar places into comparative dialogue a variety of perspectives from Chicana/o and Mexican/Latin American literary studies. Our seminar will examine fiction and cultural productions that range widely, from celebrated Mexican and Chicano/a authors such as Carlos Fuentes (La frontera de cristal), Yuri Herrera (Señales que precederan al fin del mundo), Willivaldo Delgaldillo (La Virgen del Barrio Árabe), Américo Paredes (George Washington Gómez: A Mexico-Texan Novel), Gloria Anzaldúa (Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza), and Sandra Cisneros (Carmelo: Puro Cuento), among others, to musicians whose contributions to border thinking and culture have not yet been fully appreciated such as Herb Albert, Ely Guerra, Los Tigres del Norte, and Café Tacvba. Last but not least, we will screen and analyze Orson Welles' iconic border films Touch of Evil and Rodrigo Dorfman's Los Sueños de Angélica.nnProposing a diverse and geographically expansive view of the US-Mexico border literary and cultural studies, this seminar links the work of these authors and musicians to struggles for land and border-crossing rights, anti-imperialist forms of trans-nationalism, and to the decolonial turn in border thinking or pensamineto fronterizo. It forces us to take into account the ways in which shifts in the nature of global relations affect literary production and negative aesthetics especially in our age of (late) post-industrial capitalism.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Saldivar, J. (PI)

ILAC 370: Afro-Brazil: Oral Culture, Literature and Digital Media (ILAC 270)

The African-Brazilian population in the state of Minas Gerais and the ritual of the coronation of the kings and the queens of the Congo in the Devotion to Our Lady of Rosario. Texts by Antonio Vieira, Guimarães Rosa and others. Multimedia digital experiments with videos and the production of sonic textures. Taught in Portuguese.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Librandi Rocha, M. (PI)

ILAC 382: Latin@ Literature (CHILATST 200, CSRE 200, ILAC 280)

Examines a diverse set of narratives by U.S. Latin@s of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Guatemalan, and Dominican heritage through the lens of latinidad. All share the historical experience of Spanish colonization and U.S. imperialism, yet their im/migration patterns differ, affecting social, cultural, and political trajectories in the US and relationships to "home" and "homeland," nation, diaspora, history, and memory. Explores how racialization informs genders as well as sexualities. Emphasis on textual analysis. Taught in English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 399: Individual Work

For Spanish and Portuguese department graduate students only. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 801: TGR Project

Terms: Aut | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
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