Print Settings
 

ILAC 12Q: Humanities Core: Great Books, Big Ideas -- Europe, Middle Ages and Renaissance (DLCL 12Q, FRENCH 12Q, HUMCORE 12Q)

This three-quarter sequence asks big questions of major texts in the European and American tradition. What is a good life? How should society be organized? Who belongs? How should honor, love, sin, and similar abstractions govern our actions? What duty do we owe to the past and future? The second quarter focuses on the transition from the Middle Ages to Modernity, Europe's re-acquaintance with classical antiquity and its first contacts with the New World. Authors include Dante, Shakespeare, Machiavelli, Cervantes, and Milton. N.B. This is the second of three courses in the European track. These courses offer an unparalleled opportunity to study European history and culture, past and present. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to exploring how ideas have shaped our world and future. Students who take HUMCORE 11 and HUMCORE 12Q will have preferential admission to HUMCORE 13Q (a WR2 seminar).
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 111Q: Texts and Contexts: Spanish/English Literary Translation Workshop (DLCL 111Q)

This course introduces students to the theoretical knowledge and practical skills necessary to translate literary texts from Spanish to English and English to Spanish. Students will workshop and revise a translation project throughout the quarter. Topics may include comparative syntaxes, morphologies, and semantic systems; register and tone; audience; the role of translation in the development of languages and cultures; and the ideological and socio-cultural forces that shape translations.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Santana, C. (PI)

ILAC 112Q: 2666

The novel 2666 has been regarded as the first classic of world literature in the 21st century. At the end of this course, you will have read and studied this work in its entirety. Close to 1000 pages long, Roberto Bolaño's opus is both daunting and eminently readable¿a feast for serious readers and aspiring writers. It is a dark thriller that spans several continents, with memorable characters and unsuspected plot twists throughout. Similar to Anna Karenina or One Hundred Years of Solitude in ambition, it explores the limits of the sayable, and of the novel form. Its protagonists include vivacious young people, a lost German author, an African-American journalist in Mexico, gallivanting academics, and bodily remains. Some of its topics include literary fame and influence, exile, Cartel violence, and the legacies of World War II. Take this course if you would like to gain solid training in the art of close reading, take your Spanish to the next level, immerse yourself in deep learning, familiarize yourself with current events in Latin America, and participate in a dedicated book salon. The reading pace is very moderate (20 pages every weekday), which allows for careful consideration and readerly enjoyment. The analytical skills you gain in this seminar are also highly portable: they will serve you well in all of your future scholarly pursuits. The course combines small seminar discussion¿a staple of humanities education¿with an approximation to a fresh, contemporary text. You will present on a small section of the book, write short response papers, and engage in various creative activities. Guest speakers and archival work will complement our regular activities.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hoyos, H. (PI)

ILAC 113Q: Borges and Translation (DLCL 113Q)

Borges's creative process and practice as seen through the lens of translation. How do Borges's texts articulate the relationships between reading, writing, and translation? Topics include authorship, fidelity, irreverence, and innovation. Readings will draw on Borges's short stories, translations, and essays. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 115Q: From Rubber to Cocaine: Commodities in Colombian Literature

Do you like "Narcos" on Netflix and want to learn more about the Drug Wars and its representation? Are you curious about Colombia? The present sophomore seminar serves the double purpose of introducing you to Colombian culture and of training you in sophisticated rhetorical analysis. At the end of the course you will be a better reader and writer (in Spanish, no less!). You will also have familiarity with a country that in some ways is a "meta-Latin American country," for it includes the regional cultures of the Caribbean, Pacific, Andes, plains, and Amazon jungle. We will read fascinating novels that deal with the sugar plantation economy in the 19th century, the exploitation of rubber at the onset of the 20th, and the coffee and cocaine booms leading to the present. Some things to expect: gripping, tragic love stories among the landed elites of the Pacific Coast, and among their slaves, set against the backdrop of a landscape forever transformed by agriculture (La María); dangerous adventures of city-dwellers turned jungle explorers (La Vorágine), a strike among banana workers turned supernatural catastrophe (Cien años de soledad); the criminal legacy of Pablo Escobar, a man who built an empire of coca leaf, as a symptom of broader societal problems (La parábola de Pablo). This rare course offering will allow you to gain granular knowledge about a fascinating body of literature. You will also become acquainted with an exciting method of cultural analysis called "new materialism." Taught in Spanish.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 116: Approaches to Spanish and Spanish American Literature

Short stories, poetry, and theater. What analytical tools do the "grammars" of different genres call for? What contact zones exist between these genres? How have ideologies, the power of patronage, and shifting poetics shaped their production over time? Authors may include Arrabal, Borges, Cortázar, Cernuda, García Márquez, Lorca, Neruda, Rivas. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 123: Reading the Environment in Brazil

Focus is on cultural representations of natural and built environments in Brazil, from the turn of the twentieth century to the present. How do these representations shape attitudes and policies that affect the socially marginalized populations (human and otherwise) that live in those places? How do representations of space interrelate with otherness in Brazil? Through the analysis of texts, films, visual art and social media related to the Amazon, the Northeast, and urban spaces, these questions will take on greater clarity. Authors/artists/directors include: Euclides da Cunha; Raul Bopp; Tarsila do Amaral; Graciliano Ramos; Glauber Rocha; Clarice Lispector; Fernando Meirelles; and Luiz Ruffato. Taught in English, with readings in Portuguese and English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Schiess, A. (PI)

ILAC 130: Introduction to Iberia: Cultural Perspectives

The purpose of this course is to study major figures and historical trends in modern Iberia against the background of the linguistic plurality and cultural complexity of the Iberian world. We will cover the period from the loss of the Spanish empire, through the civil wars and dictatorships to the end of the Portuguese Estado Novo and the monarchic restoration in Spain. Particular attention will be given to the Peninsula's difficult negotiation of its cultural and national diversity, with an emphasis on current events. This course is designed to help prepare students for their participation in the Stanford overseas study program in Spain. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 131: Introduction to Latin America: Cultural Perspectives

Part of the Gateways to the World program, this is an introductory course for all things Latin American: culture, history, literature, and current events. By combining lecture and seminar formats, the class prepares you for all subsequent research on, and learning about, the region. Comparative discussion of independence movements in Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, the Andean Region, Brazil, and the Southern Cone. Other topics vary yearly, including: representations of ethnicity and class, the Cold War, popular culture, as well as major thinkers and writers. Open to all. Recommended for students who want to study abroad in Santiago, Chile. Required for majors in Spanish or Iberian and Latin American Cultures (ILAC). In Spanish.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hughes, N. (PI)

ILAC 132: Drug Wars: from Pablo Escobar to the Mara Salvatrucha to Iguala Mass Student Kidnapping

This course will study the ways in which Latin American Narcos are represented in feature films, documentaries, essays, and novels. We will choose two regions and times: Pablo Escobar's Colombia (1949-1993) and current Mexico (1990-2015), including the mass students kidnappings in Iguala, México, 2014. Films: Sins of my Father (Entel, 2009); Pablo's Hippos (Lawrence Elman, 2010); True Story of Killing Pablo, David Keane (2002), Sumas y restas (Víctor Gaviria, 2003); La vida loca (Poveda, 2009), Sin nombre (Cary Fukunaga, 2009), El velador (Almada, 2011); La jaula de oro (Quemada-Díez, 2013); La bestia (Pedro Ultreras, 2010); Cartel Land (Heineman, 2015); The Missing 43 (Vice, 2015). Books: Alejandra Inzunza, José Luis Pardo, Pablo Ferri: Narco America, de los Andes a Manhattan (2015); Sergio González Rodríguez: El hombre sin cabeza (2010); Rafael Ramírez Heredia: La Mara (2004).
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hoyos, H. (PI)

ILAC 132E: Introduction to Global Portuguese: Cultural Perspectives

Portuguese is the sixth most-spoken language in the world (roughly 250 million speakers now, with expected growth to 400 million by 2050) and the most-spoken language south of the Equator. It is the official language of nation-states on four continents, making it truly global in scope. Beyond Brazil, there are tens of millions of Portuguese speakers in Africa and Europe as well as smaller communities in Asia and North America. In this course, students will learn about the cultures and communities that make up the Portuguese-speaking world, even as they learn to critique the idea of linking these communities by means of a language that became global (like Spanish and English) through violent colonial expansion. Topics include art and music, film, poetry, short story, post-colonialism, indigeneity, crioulismo, empire, diaspora, semi-peripherality, modernism. Course taught in English with optional Portuguese section.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Barletta, V. (PI)

ILAC 136: Modern Iberian Literatures

1800 to the mid 20th century. Topics include: romanticism; realism and its variants; the turn of the century; modernism and the avant garde; the Civil War; and the first half of the 20th century. Authors may include Mariano Jose de Larra, Gustavo Adolfo Becquer, Rosalia de Castro, Benito Perez Galdos, Jacint Verdaguer, Eca de Queiros, Miguel de Unamuno, Ramon de Valle-Inclan, Antonio Machado, and Federico García Lorca. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPANLANG 13 or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Surwillo, L. (PI)

ILAC 140: Migration in 21st Century Latin American Film (CHILATST 140)

Focus on how images and narratives of migration are depicted in recent Latin American film. It compares migration as it takes place within Latin America to migration from Latin America to Europe and to the U.S. We will analyze these films, and their making, in the global context of an ever-growing tension between "inside" and "outside"; we consider how these films represent or explore precariousness and exclusion; visibility and invisibility; racial and gender dynamics; national and social boundaries; new subjectivities and cultural practices. Films include: Bolivia, Copacabana, La teta asustada, Norteado, Sin nombre, Migración, Ulises, among others. Films in Spanish, with English subtitles. Discussions and assignments in Spanish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 145: Poets, Journalists and Collectors: Latin American Modernismo

Discusses the different artistic avatars exercised by Latin American modernistas at the turn of the 19th Century in the context of growing capitalism, technological innovation and social transformation. We focus on how modernistas as poets, journalists and collectors explored and transgressed the limits of the individual and his/her situation. We consider topics like cosmopolitanism, dandysm, autonomy of art, and the aesthetic cultivation of the self. Authors include: Delmira Agustini, Rubén Darío, Julián del Casal, Leopoldo Lugones, José Martí, Manuel Gutierrez Nájera, José Enrique Rodó, José Asunción Silva, and Abraham Valdelomar. Spanish proficiency required.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 149: The Laboring of Diaspora & Border Literary Cultures (COMPLIT 149, CSRE 149)

Focus is given to emergent theories of culture and on comparative literary and cultural studies. How do we treat culture as a social force? How do we go about reading the presence of social contexts within cultural texts? How do ethno-racial writers re-imagine the nation as a site with many "cognitive maps" in which the nation-state is not congruent with cultural identity? How do diaspora and border narratives/texts strive for comparative theoretical scope while remaining rooted in specific local histories. Note: This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 156: Brevity as an Art Form

In both literature and film, brevity has been recognize as a superior artistic form. Augusto Monterroso's "El Dinosaurio" (only one line) has been celebrated as a perfect short story, and "Bagdah Messi" (18 minutes) by Sahim Omar Kalifa) could also be considered a work of art. This course will choose no less than 20 short stories and shorts, to analyze and comment, besides a couple of books on the theory of the short literature.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 157: Medieval and Early Modern Iberian Literatures

From roughly 1000 to 1700 CE. A survey of significant authors and works of early Iberian literatures, focusing on fictional/historical prose and poetry. Topics include lyric poetry and performance, the rise of European empire, Islam in the West, the rise of the novel, early European accounts of Africa and the Americas. Authors may include: Andalusi lyric poets, Llull, the Archpriest of Hita, Zurara, March, Rojas, Vaz de Caminha, Cabeza de Vaca, Sá de Miranda, Monte(ay)or, Teresa of Ávila, Camões, Mendes Pinto, Góngora, Sóror Violante do Céu, Sor Juana, Calderón, and Cervantes. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hughes, N. (SI)

ILAC 159: Don Quijote

Focus is on a close reading of Miguel de Cervantes's prose masterpiece. Topics include: the rise of the novel, problems of authorship and meaning, modes of reading, the status of Muslim and Jewish converts in early modern Spain, the rise of capitalism, masochistic desire. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPANLANG 13 or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Barletta, V. (PI)

ILAC 161: Modern Latin American Literature

From independence to the present. A survey of significant authors and works of Hispanic and Brazilian Portuguese literatures, focusing on fictional prose and poetry. Topics include romantic allegories of the nation; modernism and postmodernism; avant-garde poetry; regionalism versus cosmopolitanism; indigenous and indigenist literature; magical realism and the literature of the boom; Afro-Hispanic literature; and testimonial narrative. Authors may include: Bolívar, Bello, Gómez de Avellaneda, Isaacs, Sarmiento, Machado de Assis, Darío, Martí­, Agustini, Vallejo, Huidobro, Borges, Cortázar, Neruda, Guillon, Rulfo, Ramos, Garcí­a Marquez, Lispector, and Bolaño. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 175: CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People (COMPLIT 100, DLCL 100, FRENCH 175, GERMAN 175, HISTORY 206E, ITALIAN 175, URBANST 153)

This course takes students on a trip to major capital cities, at different moments in time: Renaissance Florence, Golden Age Madrid, Colonial Mexico City, Enlightenment and Romantic Paris, Existential and Revolutionary St. Petersburg, Roaring Berlin, Modernist Vienna, and bustling Buenos Aires. While exploring each place in a particular historical moment, we will also consider the relations between culture, power, and social life. How does the cultural life of a country intersect with the political activity of a capital? How do large cities shape our everyday experience, our aesthetic preferences, and our sense of history? Why do some cities become cultural capitals? Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents (in translation); authors we will read include Boccaccio, Dante, Sor Juana, Montesquieu, Baudelaire, Gogol, Irmgard Keun, Freud, and Borges. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a Letter Grade.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 181: Philosophy and Literature (CLASSICS 42, COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, GERMAN 181, ITALIAN 181, PHIL 81, SLAVIC 181)

What, if anything, does reading literature do for our lives? What can literature offer that other forms of writing cannot? Can fictions teach us anything? Can they make people more moral? Why do we take pleasure in tragic stories? This course introduces students to major problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature. It addresses key questions about the value of literature, philosophical puzzles about the nature of fiction and literary language, and ways that philosophy and literature interact. Readings span literature, film, and philosophical theories of art. Authors may include Sophocles, Dickinson, Toni Morrison, Proust, Woolf, Walton, Nietzsche, and Sartre. Students master close reading techniques and philosophical analysis, and write papers combining the two. This is the required gateway course for the Philosophy and Literature major tracks. Majors should register in their home department.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 193: The Cinema of Pedro Almodovar

Pedro Almodóvar is one of the most recognizable auteur directors in the world today. His films express a hybrid and eclectic visual style and the blurring of frontiers between mass and high culture. Special attention is paid to questions of sexuality and the centering of usually marginalized characters. This course studies Pedro Almodóvar's development from his directorial debut to the present, from the "shocking" value of the early films to the award-winning mastery of the later ones. Prerequisite: ability to understand spoken Spanish. Readings in English. Midterm and final paper can be in English. Majors should write in Spanish.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 199: Individual Work

Open only to students in the department, or by consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 200E: War and the Modern Novel

From the turn of the 19th century to well into the 20th century, novelists developed the theme of alienation and the decline of civilization. Along with the fall of centuries-old empires, World War I brought about the collapse of traditional European values and the dissociation of the subject. The aestheticizing of violence and the ensuing insecurity inaugurated the society of totally administered life, based on universal suspicion and pervasive guilt. The seminar will study narrative responses to these developments in some of the foremost authors of the 20th century from several European literatures: Knut Hamsun, Joseph Roth, Ernst Jünger, Virginia Woolf, Franz Kafka, Curzio Malaparte, Thomas Mann, Mercè Rodoreda, Antonio Lobo Antunes, and Jaume Cabré. Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 209: Desaparecidos

The course will go through many manifestations of the figure of "desaparecidos" in the last 40 years both in Latin America and Spain. Two coordinates will allow us to map this vast terrain: first, a rigorous discussion of categories to think about suffering (disappearance, victim, humanitarianism, among others); second, close analytical reading of key cultural products, especially films, that seek to convey experiences of intense suffering. We will consider different cases of disappearance, from its coinage in the 1970s to more recent ones ¿especially in Mexico, but also Colombia, Brazil, and/or Uruguay. Students will be introduced to years of personal and collective research on the subject (http://identidadcolectiva.es/victimas). In Spanish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gatti, G. (PI)

ILAC 211: Existentialism, from Moral Quest to Novelistic Form (COMPLIT 258A)

This seminar intends to follow the development of Existentialism from its genesis to its literary expressions in the European postwar. The notions of defining commitment, of moral ambiguity, the project of the self, and the critique of humanism will be studied in selected texts by Kierkegaard, Heidegger, Unamuno, Albert Camus, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, and Joan Sales.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Resina, J. (PI)

ILAC 213: The Memory of the Eye: Iberian Cinema from Buñuel to Almodóvar

An introduction to Spanish, Portuguese, Basque, and Catalan cinema through films from the 1920s and 30s to the present. How film uses a visual grammar of the image to tackle social questions and construct a collective memory. This course will consider the problems of individual recollection under conditions of collective trauma and distortion of the past, exploring the relation between film and history. The course will also focus on how images can be used to explore subjectivity and the passions. We will be watching outstanding films by Luis Buñuel, Carlos Saura, Víctor Erice, Bigas Luna, Pedro Almodóvar, Miguel Gomes, Julio Medem, Ventura Pons, Iciar Bollaín, and Isabel Coixet. Students will be responsible for watching all the films, engaging in lively discussion, in preparation for which, they will be asked to consider certain issues in writing before each class. Each student will present on one of the films for about fifteen minutes. There will be one short midterm essay and one final paper "on a different film."
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Resina, J. (PI)

ILAC 217: Fernando Pessoa: Aesthetics as Ontology

The poetry and prose of Fernando Pessoa (1888-1935), Portugal's greatest modern poet. As famous for his written work as for his complex understanding of selfhood, Pessoa remains a towering and largely perplexing figure even today. Class discussions will focus on close readings of Pessoa's work along with the implications of his theory of subjectivity for our understanding of modernity, aesthetics, and the self. Taught in English. Readings in Portuguese and English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 227: The Making of Modern Brazil

This course explores vital moments in Brazil after its republican revolution of 1889 until the present. Through a cultural lens, we will study moments in Brazil's various impulses for "progress" and "modernity." Through various authors, films, artworks, and manifestos from Brazil's biggest cities to the backlands and to the Amazon, we seek to imagine contemporary Brazil from a deep understanding of its cultural and historical context. Specific areas of focus include the Modern Art Week of 1922 in Sao Paulo, the construction of Brasilia, and the rise (and fall) of Brazil in the 2010s. Taught in English, with readings available in English and Portuguese and an option for students to complete assignments in Portuguese if desired.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 236: Gender and Feminist Debates in Latin America

This interdisciplinary, 10 hour, 1-unit course, explores gender politics and representation in contemporary Latin American film, theory, and social movements. Seminar format, open to undergraduate and graduate students. Works may include: film: Señorita María (2017) by Rubén Mendoza (Colombia); studies by Marta Lamas (Mexico), Ana Amado (Argentina), and Sonia Corrêa (Brazil), among others. The course will be taught in Spanish at Bolivar House, 582 Alvarado Row. Schedule: The course dates are Monday, April 23 to Wednesday April, 25, 6:00-9:00pm. Instructor: Professor Moira Fradinger (Yale University), hosted by Professor Héctor Hoyos. NOTE: Professor Fradinger will also give a talk on "Antígonas: A Latin American Tradition," on Friday, April 27th, in the CLAS noon lecture series.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 238: Latin American Poetry as Witness to Self and World.

Can lyric poetry engage with the political? How have political contexts shaped poetic form? In this course we will study the ways in which Latin American poetry has modified, dismissed, and drawn inspiration from the traditions of the avant-garde and politicized poetry. Authors may include Darío, Huidobro, Vallejo, Guillén, Storni, Neruda, Paz, Pizarnik, Parra, Dalton, Zurita, and Morejón.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Santana, C. (PI)

ILAC 241: Fiction Workshop in Spanish

Spanish and Spanish American short stories approached through narrative theory and craft. Assignments are creative in nature and focus on the formal elements of fiction (e.g. character and plot development, point of view, creating a scene, etc.). Students will write, workshop, and revise an original short story throughout the term. No previous experience with creative writing is required. Readings may include works by Ayala, Bolaño, Borges, Clarín, Cortázar, García Márquez, Piglia, Rodoreda, and others. Enrollment limited.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 242: Poetry Workshop in Spanish

Latin American and Spanish poetry approached through elements of craft. Assignments are creative in nature and focus on the formal elements of poetry (meter, rhythm, lineation, rhetorical figures and tropes) and the exploration of lyric subgenres (e.g. ode, elegy, prose poem). Students write original poems throughout the quarter. No previous experience with creative writing is required. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor. Enrollment limited.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Santana, C. (PI)

ILAC 243: Latin American Aesthetics

As the branch of philosophy that deals with the principles of beauty and artistic taste, aesthetics is, purportedly, universal. The course interrogates its conspicuous omission of Latin American theorization and cultural production. Three thematic axes are vanguardia, colonialidad, and populismo; a central concern is aesthetic responses to precariousness. Argentine, Brazilian, Chilean, Colombian, and Cuban essayism and visual arts from the mid 20th century to the present, notably origenismo, neo-baroque, and indigenismo. In collaboration with a cognate course at UC Berkeley. Taught in Spanish.nNOTE: This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for WAYS credit.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 254: On the Road w/o GPS: Fiction, Journalism & Art of Survival - Tijuana, Havana, Mexico & Buenos Aires

A travelogue through four major Latin American cities. Border town Tijuana; Havana's fading socialism and cultural dissent; carnival and apocalypse in Mexico City; and cosmopolitan and marginal Buenos Aires will be the main stops on this journey. We will use works of fiction and journalism to cross the uncharted fields of identities, mythologies, traditions, popular icons, urban challenges and survival experiences. The readings will involve Guillermo Cabrera Infante, Carlos Fuentes, Antonio José Ponte, Jorge Luis Borges, Martín Caparrós, Leila Guerriero, María Moreno and Juan Villoro, among others.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 255: Climate Change and Latin American Naturecultures

In this course, we will explore fundamental concepts of the environmental humanities as they relate to the inseparable natural and cultural phenomena that constitute climate change in Latin America. The course will be structured around different ecological themes¿such as, energy and extractive industries, the Amazon, the desert, the Andes, the Caribbean, urban habitats¿that will be examined through twentieth- and twenty-first-century Latin American novels, film, short story, and song. Possible authors include Gloria Anzaldúa, Macarena Gómez-Barris, Gabriel García Márquez, and José Eustasio Rivera. We will consider the ethics and politics of climate change in the Americas, how the methodologies of literary and decolonial studies can generate insights into contemporary climate change impacts in Latin America, and what role culture has in a period defined by chronic and slow-moving environmental crisis and recovery. Taught in English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Valderrama, P. (PI)

ILAC 256A: Landscapes in Latin American Cinema

From Patagonia to the US/Mexico border, this course examines diverse cinematic visions of the Latin American continent through documentaries, fiction films, stories, and essays. We will consider different regions and time periods, including representations of dictatorship/violence, the drug trade, and cities to explore how land, nature, and humanity interact in film and to what effect. Areas of focus are the Southern Cone, Brazil, and the US/Mexico/Central America borderlands, and students will gain a solid critical understanding of how to read film.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 258: Narratives at the Edge of Life

The limits of language in the face of violence and the exhaustion of representation are, by now, familiar topics in the humanities and social sciences. And yet the question persists: how to write about dire realities? How to find the right pitch? Building upon the premise that the only way to even attempt to do this is by being self-reflective about writing itself, thinking about our resources to give an account about what is impossible to be put into stories, the course deals with the limits and possibilities of these sciences when confronted with suffering. Discussions draw on life experience of the professor as well as on work in progress about the figure of the disappeared in the contemporary world. In Spanish
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gatti, G. (PI)

ILAC 262: Fiction and History in the Mexican Novel

In Mexico, government discourse and "explanations" have cast history under a shroud of misunderstanding. Meanwhile, novels have rescued from oblivion and censorship historical facts of the highest importance. In the process, such novels have demonstrated that the imagination is a key resource to understanding reality. A literary interpretation of themes that went unexamined for political reasons is thus highly productive. The course, which opposes historical and novelistic accounts of social reality, considers work by Martín Luis Guzmán, Nellie Campobello, Elena Garro, Juan Rulfo, Jorge Ibargüengoitia and Sergio Pitol.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 263: Visions of the Andes

Themes like "people," "revolt," "community," "utopia" and "landscape" are central to 20th century Andean narrative and its accompanying critical apparatus. The course reviews major works of Andean literature to reconsider the aesthetic and intellectual legacy of modernity and modernization in the region. We discuss changes in recent literature and film. Special attention is payed to post-conflict Peru and Evo Morales' Bolivia.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 268: INDIGENISMOS REVISITED

TBD
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Briceno, X. (PI)

ILAC 269: Realismo Mágico vs. Real Maravilloso

Two important concepts and theories realismo mágico and lo Real maravilloso have given sense and substance to Latin American literature during the last three decades. This course will focus on those concepts and on the works of Garcia Marquez and Alejo Carpentier, two key authors of modern Latin America. NOTE: Taught by professor Tom Winterbottom.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 272: New Brazilian Cinema

This course studies cinema from Brazil with a focus on films from the last decade. We will consider how to effectively talk and write about film, particularly according to Brazil's specific historical and cultural context and from a perspective of social realism. Numerous readings and discussions will bolster our viewings of fiction films and documentaries. Directors include Kleber Mendonça Filho, Anna Muylaert, Gabriel Mascaro, Karim Aïnouz, Aly Muritiba, and Petra Costa. Taught in English; films shown with English subtitles.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Winterbottom, T. (PI)

ILAC 277: Senior Seminar: Spanish and Society - From Novel to Film

Open to seniors in ILAC and Spanish; juniors by permission of instructor. All students must contact instructor to obtain an enrollment code. How are film and novels alike? How are they different? Can the study of cinematographic adaptation of novels help us understand better the specific nature of literature and that of film? What does it mean to be 'faithful' to a work of literature in a new medium? To address these questions, the course combines a selection of major Latin American novels and plays, as well as a panorama of Latin American cinematography, from 1960s's films to contemporary productions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Briceno, X. (PI)

ILAC 278A: Senior Seminar: Shepherds and Butchers, or The Iberian Pastoral

Open to seniors in ILAC and Spanish; juniors by permission of instructor. What does pastoral literature -- with its lovesick shepherds, acts of self-immolation, and aquatic nymphs -- have to do with imperial expansion? For early modern Portugal and Spain, it formed a surprisingly indispensable (if somewhat perverse) foundation for their respective colonial projects. From the earliest African slave markets to the rise of the modern novel, the pastoral is everywhere, a true companion of empire. Through a close analysis and discussion of early modern texts in Spanish and Portuguese (translations of Portuguese texts will be made available), as well as some theoretical/philosophical texts in English, we will explore the bizarre place of the pastoral in early modern Iberian Empire and reckon with its impact on our own sense of the colonial past. Authors include: Joanot Martorell, Francisco de Sá de Miranda, Garcilaso de la Vega, Joan Boscà, Jorge Montemor, Luisa Sigea, Luís de Camões, and Miguel de Cervantes. NOTE: This course must be taken for a minimum of 5 units and a letter grade to be eligible for WIM credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 281E: Peripheral Dreams: The Art and Literature of Miró, Dalí, and other Surrealists in Catalonia (ARTHIST 221E)

Why was Salvador Dalí fascinated with the architecture of Gaudí? Why did André Breton, Paul Éluard and Federico García Lorca visit Barcelona? Moreover, why did Catalonia become such an important cradle for Surrealism? Why is the (Catalan) landscape such a relevant presence in the work of Miró and Dalí? Through a critical analysis and discussion of selected works of art and literature, this seminar focuses and follows the trajectories of Miró and Dalí, from Barcelona to Paris to New York, and explores the role of their Catalan background as a potentially essential factor in their own contributions to Surrealism and the reception of their work. The course will provide the materials and guide the student to conduct research on a specific work(s) of art, architecture, literature or cinema either by Miró, Dalí or one of his peers in relation to their cultural, social and political context. The course is intended for graduate students in Iberian and Comparative Literature, Art History, Cultural Studies, and related fields. Taught in English by Jordi Falgàs i Casanovas.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 283E: Visuality, Memory and Citizenship: Archive and Activism in Catalan Photography (ARTHIST 283E)

An examination of the ethics, poetics and politics of visual representation in a selection of photographers and artists from Catalonia: images of the Spanish Civil War by Agustí Centelles, snapshots of urban life by Joan Colom, the use of photography as memorial or critical tool by Francesc Torres and Joan Fontcuberta¿s creative and theoretical contributions to post-photography in the digital age, among others. The wide range of practices discussed encompass documentary photography, photojournalism and the relation between photography and contemporary art. These Catalan photographers and artists will be studied in an international context, in connection with the work of Robert Capa, Gerda Taro, Gilles Peress, Gervasio Sánchez, Susan Meiselas, Marcelo Brodsky, Sophie Ristelhueber, Alfredo Jaar, Gustavo Germano and Martin Parr. The main focus will be on how photography serves both as a repository of memory and as an instrument of political intervention. Offered in English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Monegal, A. (PI)

ILAC 299: Individual Work

Open to department advanced undergraduates or graduate students by consent of professor. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 303: Topics of: Early Modern Theories of History

From the 15th to the 17th centuries, European expansion projects, especially the Iberian ones, prompted new constructions of the past, present, and future. This proliferation of history writing was complicated by the fact that the various populations of the global Iberian monarchies, particularly those of New Spain, Peru, and Brazil, did not share the same concepts of historicity or temporality. In this course, students will explore a great diversity of primary sources (chronicles, reports, annals, pictographic codices, theater, paintings, feather mosaics, murals, etc.) and discover the unexpected social memories and theories of history that they created.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 305: Rhythm: Ethics and Poetics of the Premodern

Focus is on the notion of rhythm as a theoretical frame for the analysis of medieval and early modern Iberian poetry. Topics include Ancient Greek and modern conceptions of rhythm and the links between poetics and ethics in the medieval period and beyond. Authors include: Aeschylus, Plato, Aristoxenus, Maurice Blanchot, Paul Celan, EmmanuelnnLevinas, Arcipreste de Hita, Ausiås March, Garcilaso de la Vega, and Luís de Camões. Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 321: Aljamiado Literature: Crypto-Muslim Culture in Early Modern Iberia

The history, culture, and literature of minority Muslim communities in Spain and Portugal from 1492 to the Morisco expulsions of 1609-14. Topics include: Islam and the West; Religious minorities in Europe; Inquisition and resistance; Gender and Islam; Law and Culture. Class discussions will revolve around selected works of Aljamiado literature (students will learn to read Arabic script), and the final project will involve the partial transcription and study of a sixteenth-century Aljamiado manuscript.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Barletta, V. (PI)

ILAC 334A: Concepts of Modernity I: Philosophical Foundations (COMPLIT 334A, MTL 334A)

In the late eighteenth century, Immanuel Kant proclaimed his epoch to be "the genuine age of criticism." He went on to develop the critique of reason, which set the stage for many of the themes and problems that have preoccupied Western thinkers for the last two centuries. This fall quarter survey is intended as an introduction to these themes and problems. The general course layout draws equal parts on Koselleck's practice of "conceptual history" (Begriffsgeschichte) and on Jameson's of "cognitive mapping." After consideration of an important, if often under-appreciated precedent (the baroque), we turn our attention to the conceptual triad of subject, reason and critique, followed by that of revolution, utopia and sovereignty. Authors may include Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Weber, Freud, Lukács, and others. This course is the first of a two-course sequence. Priority to graduate students in MTL, ILAC, and English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hoyos, H. (PI)

ILAC 336: One World or Many? Representing Distance, Time, and Place in Iberian Expansion

The travelers, missionaries, and historians that reflected on Iberian overseas expansion during the early modern period often asked themselves a crucial question: was there only one world or many? Could the New World, unknown to the ancients, be entirely detached from the rest of human history? Many of these chroniclers continued to think that the world was divided into three parts: Europe, Asia, and Africa. In their descriptions of the Americas, they drew heavily on histories and travel reports pertaining to other epochs and locales, especially contemporary Asia and ancient Rome. Local authors and artists in the New World in this period used world history and news of distant conflicts to reflect on the immediacy of their historical experience. In this course, we will consider the ways in which historians, conquistadors, missionaries, and indigenous authors in New Spain (Mexico), Brazil, and Peru contemplated themselves in the looking glass of remote times and places: from Greco-Roman Antiquity to Lutheran Germany, from the Ottoman Mediterranean to the Apocalyptic End of Times. Students will reassess the importance of this archive to early modern studies writ large and challenge the scholarly tendency to frame the Iberian Peninsula as the center and the Americas as the periphery. Primary sources will include sixteenth and seventeenth-century chronicles, reports, poetry, theater, pictographic codices, feather mosaics, and maps. Reading knowledge of Spanish and a willingness to work with Portuguese required. Course to be taught by Nicole T. Hughes.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 342: Meat

"Carne" mistranslates as "meat," "Körper," or "chair." Does the word codify into language a certain culturally specific experience of the body and its mediation with nature? In which ways does "flesh" subordinate nonhumans? How does the theme of meat articulate natural and political histories? This advanced research seminar tackles these questions across Latin American corpora: Piñera, Eltit, Echeverría, Bolaño, Bombal, and Lispector. Theorists include: Singer, Santner, and Ortiz. Culturalist, new materialist debates on cattle and corpses. This course will be taught in Spanish.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 347: Topics of: Early Modern Iberian Lyric Poetry

Focused analysis of lyric poetry in Catalan, Portuguese, and Spanish from the fifteenth through the seventeenth centuries. Readings include poems by Ausiàs March, el marqués de Santillana, Bernardim Ribeiro, Francisco de Sá de Miranda, Garcilaso de la Vega, Luís de Camões, Diogo Bernardes, Vicent Garcia, Luis de Góngora, and Soror Violante do Céu. Ways of thinking about and thinking through poetry. Focus on poetic form, voice, figural language, performativity, empire, and the interaction of sensory registers. Taught in English with readings in Catalan, Portuguese, and Spanish.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 350: Roberto Bolaño's 2666

Roberto Bolaño's 2666 raises questions about the representability of sovereignty, neoliberalism, gender violence, and globalization. An unlikely global classic, it has become a de rigueur referent in contemporary literary studies. Graduate students taking this class will not only engage in a narratological examination of novel, but also survey the existing secondary bibliography, including forthcoming manuscripts with special permission from the authors. The goal of the seminar is to prepare graduate students to formulate their own contributions to the state of the discipline.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hoyos, H. (PI)

ILAC 366: Topics of: The Yellow-Brick Road to the Spanish Nation-State

Nation states arise historically with the transfer of rule from the king to the people, which becomes depository of the general interest. But the old patrimonial state included different peoples, some of which continued to have their own constitutions, representative chambers, and codes of law. Unifying them was a pre-requisite for the emergence of the nation state. This was achieved through a process of nation building which, for most European states, culminated in the 19th century. Not so in Spain. The recurring crises of the Spanish state through the 19th and 20th centuries, and renewed territorial problems in the 21st, reveal an unachieved national project. The seminar will discuss theories of nationalism and sovereignty, and will consider the historical attempts of the Spanish state to manage its intractable nationalities problem, with particular reference to Catalonia. In addition to the state¿s political fractures, the significance of culture for the insolubility of national identities in a single national project will be considered in some detail, as will the role of academic disciplines in furthering a cultural mandate in the sense of political power or in challenge to it.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 371: Graduate Colloquium: Explorations in Latin American History and Historiography (HISTORY 371)

Introduction to modern Latin American history and historiography, including how to read and use primary sources for independent research.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Wolfe, M. (PI)

ILAC 373: Baroque Brazil

In this course we will read texts from and about seventeenth- andneighteenth-century Brazil, with special emphasis on the baroquenaesthetic in literature, art, and music. Authors include AntónionVieira; Gregório de Matos; Bento Teixeira; Sebastião da Rocha Pita;nNuno Marques Pereira; Manuel Botelho de Oliveira; and Frei Itaparica.nReadings in English and Portuguese. Taught in English.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 399: Individual Work

For Spanish and Portuguese department graduate students only. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ILAC 801: TGR Project

Terms: Aut | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR

ILAC 802: TGR Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints