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HUMBIO 2A: Genetics, Evolution, and Ecology

Introduction to the principles of classical and modern genetics, evolutionary theory, and ecology. Topics: micro- and macro-evolution, population and molecular genetics including personal genomics and CRISPR, biodiversity and ecology, emphasizing the genetics and ecology of the evolutionary process and applications to human populations. HUMBIO 2A and HUMBIO 2B are designed to be taken concurrently and exams for both sides may include material from joint module lectures. Concurrent enrollment is strongly encouraged and is necessary for majors in order to meet declaration deadlines. Please note Human Biology majors are required to take the Human Biology Core Courses for a letter grade.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 2B: Culture, Evolution, and Society

Introduction to the evolutionary study of human diversity. Hominid evolution, the origins of social complexity, social theory, population dynamics, the impact of disease on societies and the emergence of the modern world system, emphasizing the concept of culture and its influence on human differences. HUMBIO 2B, with HUMBIO 3B and HUMBIO 4B, satisfies the Writing in the Major (WIM) requirement for students in Human Biology. HUMBIO 2A and HUMBIO 2B are designed to be taken concurrently and exams for both sides may include material from joint module lectures. Concurrent enrollment is strongly encouraged and is necessary for majors in order to meet declaration deadlines. Please note Human Biology majors are required to take the Human Biology Core Courses for a letter grade.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 14: Understanding Connections between Food and the Environment

Globally, food systems, what we eat, where and how we grow it, play a major role in determining our impact on the environment. By considering our food choices, we can find "low hanging vegetables" for reducing our "foodprint". In this course, we will begin to explore the complex connections between food and the environment. We will begin with a discussion of "Planetary Boundaries" as a guide for understanding the limits for human alterations of the biosphere, beyond which abrupt changes could occur. We will then introduce nine topics which will be discussed in the nine weeks to follow, and how they relate to food.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gardner, C. (PI)

HUMBIO 29A: Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course (CHILATST 177A, CSRE 177E, EDUC 177A)

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Schell, E. (PI)

HUMBIO 44: Diagnostic Odysseys In Medicine (MED 244)

Medicine is rapidly evolving, with increasing emphasis on genetic testing, immunophenotyping and integration of technology to guide diagnosis. In this course, experts from Stanford and Silicon Valley will highlight exciting developments. Topics include the latest developments in genetics and genomics (including genome testing in clinical practice, direct to consumer testing, and frontiers in neurogenetics), immunophenotyping, utilization of databases to research diseases and the emerging field of machine learning and clinical decision support in optimizing diagnostic strategies. Students who wish to engage in a mentored multi-disciplinary team-based research project related to advanced diagnostic techniques can additionally enroll in MED 239.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hom, J. (PI)

HUMBIO 51: Big Data for Biologists - Decoding Genomic Function

Biology and medicine are becoming increasingly data-intensive fields. This course is designed to introduce students interested in human biology and related fields to methods for working with large biological datasets. There will be in-class activities analyzing real data that have revealed insights about the role of the genome and epigenome in health and disease. For example, we will explore data from large-scale gene expression and chromatin state studies. The course will provide an introduction to the relevant topics in biology and to fundamental computational skills such as editing text files, formatting and storing data, visualizing data and writing data analysis scripts. Students will become familiar with both UNIX and Python. This course is designed at the introductory level. Previous university-level courses in biology and programming experience are not required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 82B: Advanced Data Analysis in Qualitative Research

For students writing up their own qualitative research. Students prepare a complete draft presenting their own qualitative research study including results, with reports drafted section by section, week by week. Class provides feedback, guidance, support.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wolf, J. (PI)

HUMBIO 89: Introduction to Health Sciences Statistics

This course aims to provide a firm grounding in the foundations of probability and statistics, with a focus on analyzing data from the health sciences. Students will learn how to read, interpret, and critically evaluate the statistics in medical and biological studies. The course also prepares students to be able to analyze their own data, guiding them on how to choose the correct statistical test, avoid common statistical pitfalls, and perform basic functions in R deducer. Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 116: Climate Perspectives: Climate Science, Impacts, Policy, Negotiations, and Advocacy (PUBLPOL 116)

The course contains four main parts:Climate Science, Climate Impacts, Climate Policy, Climate Advocacy. Part I begins with a detailed introduction to climate science, including an assessment of arguments by climate science skeptics, and an examination of climate change models. Part II describes the impacts of climate change on the planet, human health, species and biodiversity, and it adds an economic perspective on the costs and benefits of responding now¿or later¿to climate change. Part II also include a discussion on climate change ethics, i.e., fairness and responsibility among individuals, nations, and generations. Part III focuses on climate policy, from the Kyoto Protocol to the Paris Accord. Part III also includes an introduction to how the public and officials have viewed climate change over time, and it explores factors that make widespread formal agreement difficult. Part IV looks forward to climate advocacy and what to expect from future of climate negotiations. Prerequisite: Human Biology Core or Biology Foundations or consent of instructor (i.e. background in earth systems, economics, policy).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Nation, J. (PI)

HUMBIO 122: Beyond Health Care: the effects of social policies on health (PEDS 222)

Available evidence at the national and cross-country level linking social welfare interventions and health outcomes. If and how non-health programs and policies could have an impact on positive health outcomes. Evaluation of social programs and policies that buffer the negative health impact of economic instability and unemployment among adult workers and their children. Examination of safety nets, including public health insurance, income maintenance programs, and disability insurance. Prerequisites: HumBio 4B or equivalent, and some background in research methods and statistics, or Instructor permission.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Rodriguez, E. (PI)

HUMBIO 122A: Health Care Policy and Reform (PUBLPOL 156)

Focuses on healthcare policy at the national, state, and local levels. Includes sessions on international models, health insurance, the evolution of healthcare policy in the U.S., key U.S. healthcare topics (Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Medicare, Medicaid, public employee retiree health care), the role of technology, reform proposals (single payer, national health care, consumer-based systems, regulated markets, state and local reform efforts), efficiency/cost drivers and prospects for future policy. The course includes sessions on effective memo writing and presentation of policy proposals.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 124C: Global Child Health (MED 124, PEDS 124)

This course introduces students to key challenges to the health and well being of children worldwide. We explicitly focus on child and public health problems in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) to reflect the global burden of disease among children. We will review the scope and magnitude of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality, as well as examine regional variations. We will then identify both medical and non-medical causes, effects of, as well as interventions to address, some of the biggest child health problems. The course will also prevent an overview of the role of culture, gender, and non-state actors (NGOs, foundations, etc.) on health and health policy. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

HUMBIO 126: Promoting Health Over the Life Course: the Science of Healthy Living (CHPR 226)

(HUMBIO students must enroll in HumBio 126. CHPR students must enroll in CHPR 226 for a letter grade.) Disease prevention and health promotion topics pertinent at different stages of the life span emphasizing healthy lifestyle and reducing risk factors in both individuals and communities. Focus is on the application of behavioral science to risk reduction strategies, and the importance of health promotion as a social and economic imperative. Public and community health are emphasized. Topics include: epidemiology of chronic diseases; social determinants of health, behavior change; physical activity, nutrition, obesity and stress reduction; children, young adult, mid-life and aging health issues; health care delivery and public health system; workplace wellness; and other additional issues. Undergraduate prerequisite: Human Biology Core or equivalent or consent of instructor. Students enrolled in CHPR 226 must complete additional assignments appropriate for its Masters level listing. Undergraduate prerequisite: Human Biology Core or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 135: Exercise Physiology

Explore the amazing capacity of your body to move and adapt within your everyday world. You will learn: how your body systems respond to the stress of acute exercise and adapt to chronic exercise training, how your cardiovascular system adapts to optimize oxygen delivery and utilization, how your muscles generate force and hypertrophy in response to training, and how your metabolic/biochemical pathways are regulated to support the increased energy demand of exercise. We will discuss theories on the causes of fatigue and muscle soreness, and on what limits human performance. Applied topics such as the effects of aging, gender, and environmental conditions (high altitude, heat, cold, microgravity) on your body will be emphasized in the second half of the course. Portions of the class will be taught through videos that use online lectures and engaging stories to illustrate physiology concepts. Prerequisite: Human Biology core or Biology Foundations or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Friedlander, A. (PI)

HUMBIO 142M: Special Topics in Adolescent Mental Health (PSYCH 142A)

Includes the study of aspects of common disorders seen in adolescent populations, such as prevalence, developmental course, gender differences, theoretical explanations, and therapeutic interventions. Topics will include mood/anxiety disorders, eating disorders, learning disabilities and ADHD, sexual risk behaviors, developmental disorders, substance abuse, and self-harm. Goals of this course include getting students to think critically about the unique mental health needs of adolescents, collaborating on devising ways to improve the way our society meets those needs, and strengthening writing and communication skills applicable to this area of inquiry. Prerequisite: Human Biology Core or Biology Foundations or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, not given next year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Medoff, L. (PI)

HUMBIO 154B: Principles of Epidemiology

Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of health and disease in human populations. In this course, students will learn about design, measures of disease occurrence and measures of association between exposures - be they environmental, behavioral or genetic - and health outcomes of interest. Students will also learn about how error, confounding and bias can impact epidemiological results. The course draws on both classic and contemporary research articles, which students will learn to critically appraise. Through lectures, problem sets, written responses to original articles and in-class discussions, students will gain a solid foundation in epidemiology. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kurina, L. (PI)

HUMBIO 155H: Humans and Viruses I (MI 155A)

Introduction to human virology integrating epidemiology, molecular biology, clinical sciences, social sciences, history, and the arts. Emphasis is on host pathogen interactions and policy issues. Topics: polio and vaccination, smallpox and eradication, yellow fever and history, influenza and genomic diversity, rubella and childhood infections, adenovirus and viral morphology, ebola and emerging infection, lassa fever and immune response.
Terms: Aut | Units: 6 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Siegel, R. (PI)

HUMBIO 164: Autism Spectrum Disorder

Enrollment by application only. Deficits in social communication and interaction and repetitive behaviors are the core symptoms of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects about 1% of all children and costs society an estimated $268B annually. This interactive seminar course will provide an overview of our understanding of ASD, from genetics through epidemiology, biology and treatment, and the many implications for society, including the principles and problems of diagnosis, its impact upon family and across the lifespan, and controversies regarding its etiology, perception and care. Course enrollment is limited to 18 students. Applications due by 5:00pm on August 15th but will be considered in the order received. Preference will be given to upperclassmen, especially in the HumBio program. Attendance at first class is mandatory. Prerequisite: Human Biology core or BIO 82 and BIO 84 or instructor consent. Application is now closed.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HUMBIO 176A: Medical Anthropology (ANTHRO 82, ANTHRO 282)

Emphasis is on how health, illness, and healing are understood, experienced, and constructed in social, cultural, and historical contexts. Topics: biopower and body politics, gender and reproductive technologies, illness experiences, medical diversity and social suffering, and the interface between medicine and science.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Garcia, A. (PI)

HUMBIO 178A: Intro to Disability Studies: Disability and Technology (ENGLISH 108A)

For a long time, disability studies has focused on the past, early representations of people with disabilities and histories of the movement for disability rights. This course turns toward the future, looking at activism and speculative fiction as critical vehicles for change. Drawing on fiction by Samuel Beckett, Muriel Rukeyser, and Octavia Butler, this course will address the question of the future through an interrogation of the relationship between disability and technology, including assistive technology, genetic testing, organ transplantation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kantor, R. (PI)

HUMBIO 191: Human Biology Practicum

Restricted to Human Biology majors. For students who have undertaken supervised community-engaged service, research (e.g. HB-REX, Bio-X) or pre-professional experiences related to their Area of Concentration topic. Includes a series of five required workshops, written reflection and presentation. Satisfies the Capstone Requirement of the major.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HUMBIO 192A: Human Biology Synthesis

Co-Requisite HUMBIO 191. Restricted to Human Biology majors. Expands the work of the Human Biology Practicum; (can also focus on a different aspect of the Area of Concentration). Allows students the opportunity to craft a culminating, creative work of scholarship based on a synthesis of personal and academic interests, including service projects. Exhibited during senior year. Students should enroll in either 3 units for two quarters or 2 units for three quarters.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMBIO 193: Research in Human Biology

Independent research conducted under faculty supervision, in junior or senior year, normally but not necessarily in pursuit of an honors project. May be taken for a maximum 3 quarters of credit. Prerequisite: Faculty approval; application available in student services office.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

HUMBIO 194: Honors

Restricted to Human Biology majors. Completion of the honors project, normally taken in the student's final quarter. First component: the honors thesis, a final paper providing evidence of rigorous research, fully referenced, and written in an accepted scientific style. Second component: participation in the honors symposium, including a 10-minute oral presentation followed by a brief question and answer session. Prerequisites: 193 or 199, and acceptance into the honors program.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HUMBIO 197: Human Biology Internship

Limited to and required of Human Biology majors. A supervised field, community, or lab experience of student's choosing, pre-approved by Human Biology faculty and student advisers, and initiated at least three quarters prior to graduation. Participation in a poster session on the internship experience is required during the first quarter that the student is in residence at Stanford after completion of the internship. May be repeated for credit and a total of 4 units accumulatively. Prerequisite: Human Biology core.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kurina, L. (PI)

HUMBIO 198: Senior Tutorial in Human Biology

Reading for Human Biology majors in exceptional circumstances and under sponsorship of Human Biology associated faculty. Students must apply through Human Biology student services before registering. Reading list, paper, and evaluation required. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HUMBIO 199: Directed Reading/Special Projects

Human Biology majors must obtain a sponsor from the Human Biology associated faculty or the Academic Council. Non-majors and students who have not declared must obtain a sponsor only from the Human Biology associated faculty. Students must complete application in student services office.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

HUMBIO 200: Teaching of Human Biology

For upper division undergraduates and graduate students. Practical experience in teaching Human Biology or serving as an assistant in a lecture course. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kurina, L. (PI)
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