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HISTORY 1B: Global History: The Early Modern World, 1300 to 1800

Topics include early globalization and cross-cultural exchanges; varying and diverse cultural formations in different parts of the world; the growth and interaction of empires and states; the rise of capitalism and the economic divergence of "the west"; changes in the nature of technology, including military and information technologies; migration of ideas and people (including the slave-trade); disease, climate, and environmental change over time. Designed to accommodate beginning students, non-majors, and more advanced history students
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lewis, M. (PI); Wigen, K. (PI)

HISTORY 2N: Food and Global History

What was Indian cuisine like before the Portuguese introduced chili peppers in the 16th century? Why was the tomato incorporated into Italian cuisine in the seventeenth century? How did the industrialization of food production in the modern period change taste? This course will explore global history through the lens of food staples and cuisines. By analyzing the role of food in major global historical developments such as colonization, slavery, and industrialization, students will explore novel ways of historical thinking, gain insight into the many consequences of historical events, and will uncover the deeper histories and contexts of everyday foods. Through presentations, outings to restaurants and analyses of menus, students will begin to view even the most humble everyday foods as springboards to the past.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rodrigue, A. (PI)

HISTORY 7W: Service-Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking Part II (FEMGEN 7W, HUMRTS 7W)

Prerequisite: HISTORY6W (FEMGEN 6W). Continuation of HISTORY 6W (FEMGEN 6W). Students will continue working on their projects with their community partners. Several class meetings and small group consultations throughout the quarter. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 10N: Thinking About War

This course examines classic approaches to war as an intellectual problem, looking at how a matter of such great physical violence and passions can be subjected to understanding and used in philosophy, political theory, and art. Questions to be examined include the definition of war, its causes, its moral value, the nature of its participants, its use in the self-definition of individuals and societies, its relation to political authority, warfare and gender, and the problem of civil war.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lewis, M. (PI)

HISTORY 20A: The Russian Empire, 1450-1800

(Same as HISTORY 120A. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 120A.) Explores rise of Russian state and expanse of empire; patterns of governance of a Eurasian empire; strategies and institutions of governance; survey of various ethnic and religious groups in empire and their varied cultures and political economies; gender and family; serfdom; Russian Orthodox religion and culture; reforms and Europeanization of 18th century.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kollmann, N. (PI)

HISTORY 23N: The Soviet Union and the World: View from the Hoover Archives

This course seeks to explore the Soviet Union's influence on the world from 1917 to its end in 1991 from a variety of perspectives. Hoover Institution archival holdings will be the basic sources for the course.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Naimark, N. (PI)

HISTORY 31S: Resistance, Rebellion, and Revolution in Early Modern Europe: Theory and Practice

Europe in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries was characterized by constant and profound political and religious conflict. Laity and lower clergy challenged church hierarchy, subjects challenged rulers, common people challenged governing classes. What constituted legitimate resistance to established authorities? Early modern thinkers developed robust political philosophies to answer this question. This course examines the early modern tradition of resistance theory alongside contemporaneous events and movements of resistance. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lilje, N. (PI)

HISTORY 37D: Germany's Wars and the World, 1848-2010 (HISTORY 137D)

This course examines a series of explosive encounters between Germans, Europe, and the world. Starting with the overlooked revolutions of 1848 and ending with the reunification of West Germany and East Germany after the Cold War, the course will explore a range of topics: capitalism, communism, imperialism, nationalism, diplomacy, antisemitism, gender, race, and the Holocaust, among others. We will also consider competing visions of Germany its borders, its members, its enemies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Press, S. (PI)

HISTORY 38G: Europe and Its Great Migrations: The Modern Period (HISTORY 138G)

From the "Germanic" people's migrations of antiquity to the global refugee crises of today, migration has left an indelible mark on European society. What are the causes and consequences of periods of "mass" migration? Surveying major episodes in recent European migration history, we will explore how human mobility has historically shaped culture, politics, economics, and society on this continent. Special attention will be given to the 19th century, an exceptional chapter in global migration history that saw some 55 million Europeans departing for the Americas.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hein, B. (PI)

HISTORY 40: World History of Science

(Same as HISTORY 140. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 140.) The earliest developments in science, the prehistoric roots of technology, the scientific revolution, and global voyaging. Theories of human origins and the oldest known tools and symbols. Achievements of the Mayans, Aztecs, and native N. Americans. Science and medicine in ancient Greece, Egypt, China, Africa, and India. Science in medieval and Renaissance Europe and the Islamic world including changing cosmologies and natural histories. Theories of scientific growth and decay; how science engages other factors such as material culture and religions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Proctor, R. (PI)

HISTORY 42N: The Missing Link

This course explores the history of evolutionary science, focusing upon debates surrounding the evolutionary place of human beings in the natural world, by examining the history of the idea of a "missing link," an intermediate form between humans and apes. We will consider famous hoaxes such as the Piltdown Man, and films and stories such as King Kong and Planet of the Apes, as well as serious scientific work such as that of Eugène Dubois, the paleoanthropologist and geologist who discovered Homo erectus (first called Java Man and then Pithecanthropus erectus) and first developed the notion of a missing link. We will take an interest not only in scientific aspects of missing-link theories but in their accompanying political, social and cultural implications. And we'll watch some classic monster films.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Riskin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 43S: Science and Medicine in Islam: Perceptions of Cosmos and the Body, 700-1700

What makes a certain kind of knowledge "Islamic"? Is Islam inherently against science and progress? What role did Islamic science play between ancient Greek science and the "Scientific Revolution"? Starting with the emergence of Islam throughout the "Classical period" and later Ottoman and Safavid Empires, this course explores the relationship between religion and science, and the circulation of knowledge. It concludes by analyzing contemporary Muslims' discussions of evolutionary theories and the role of Western civilization in the Islamic world. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Yildirim, D. (PI)

HISTORY 44: Women and Gender in Science, Medicine and Engineering

(Same as HISTORY 144. Majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in HISTORY 144.) Men's and women's roles in science, medicine, and engineering over the past 200 years with a focus on the present. What efforts are underway globally to transform research institutions so that both men's and women's careers can flourish? How have science and medicine studied and defined males and females? How can we harness the creative power of gender analysis to enhance knowledge and spark innovation?
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Schiebinger, L. (PI)

HISTORY 44Q: Gendered Innovations in Science, Medicine, Engineering, and Environment (FEMGEN 44Q)

Section 1 focuses on the history of women in science, medicine, and engineering. Section 2 looks at transforming research institutions so that both men and women can flourish. Section 3 explores how sex and gender analysis can enhance creativity. We discuss concrete examples of how taking gender into account has yielded new research results. Stanford University currently has a multiple year collaboration with the European Commission for Gendered Innovations, and this class will be part of that project. This course fulfills the second level Writing and Rhetoric Requirement (WRITE 2) and will emphasize oral and multimedia presentation.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Schiebinger, L. (PI)

HISTORY 48Q: South Africa: Contested Transitions (AFRICAAM 48Q)

Preference to sophomores. The inauguration of Nelson Mandela as president in May 1994 marked the end of an era and a way of life for South Africa. The changes have been dramatic, yet the legacies of racism and inequality persist. Focus: overlapping and sharply contested transitions. Who advocates and opposes change? Why? What are their historical and social roots and strategies? How do people reconstruct their society? Historical and current sources, including films, novels, and the Internet.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Samoff, J. (PI)

HISTORY 50B: Nineteenth Century America (AFRICAAM 50B, CSRE 50S)

(Same as HISTORY 150B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register in 150B.) Territorial expansion, social change, and economic transformation. The causes and consequences of the Civil War. Topics include: urbanization and the market revolution; slavery and the Old South; sectional conflict; successes and failures of Reconstruction; and late 19th-century society and culture.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; White, R. (PI)

HISTORY 52Q: Democracy in Crisis: Learning from the Past (EDUC 122Q, POLISCI 20Q)

This Sophomore Seminar will focus on U.S. democracy and will use a series of case studies of major events in our national history to explore what happened and why to American democracy at key pressure points. This historical exploration should shed light on how the current challenges facing American democracy might best be handled. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ehrlich, T. (PI)

HISTORY 55F: The Civil War and Reconstruction Era, 1830 to 1877 (HISTORY 155F)

This course explores the causes, course, and consequences of the American Civil War. The Civil War profoundly impacted American life at national, sectional, and constitutional levels, and radically challenged categories of race and citizenship. Topics covered include: the crisis of union and disunion in an expanding republic; slavery, race, and emancipation as national problems and personal experiences; the horrors of total war for individuals and society; and the challenges--social and political--of Reconstruction.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Olivarius, K. (PI)

HISTORY 55S: The Great Depression

Vanishing fortunes. Starving families. Fascism on the rise. More than any event in modern history, the Great Depression recast the relationship between governments and markets, citizenship and society, politics and culture. This course takes an in-depth look at the Great Depression in the United States, delving into its causes, consequences, and legacies. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Su, A. (PI)

HISTORY 73: Mexican Migration to the United States (AMSTUD 73, CHILATST 173, HISTORY 173)

This class examines the history of Mexican migration to the United States. In the United States we constantly hear about Obama's immigration plan, the anti-immigrant laws in Arizona, and the courage of DREAM Activists; in Mexico news sources speak about the role of remittances, the effect of deportations, and the loss of life at the border. Unfortunately, few people truly understand the historical trends in these migratory processes, or the multifaceted role played by the United States in encouraging individuals to head there. Moreover, few people have actually heard the opinions and voices of migrants themselves. This course seeks to provide students with the opportunity to place migrants' experiences in dialogue with migratory laws as well as the knowledge to embed current understandings of Latin American migration in their meaningful historical context.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Minian Andjel, A. (PI)

HISTORY 79C: The Ethical Challenges of Climate Change (HISTORY 179C)

This course explores the ethical challenges of climate change from historical, social, economic, political, cultural and scientific perspectives. These include the discovery of global warming over two centuries, the rise of secular and religious denialism and skepticism toward the scientific consensus on it, the dispute between developed and developing countries over how to forge a binding global agreement to mitigate it, and the "role morality" of various actors (scientists, politicians, fossil fuel companies, the media and ordinary individuals) in the US in assessing ethical responsibility for the problem and its solutions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wolfe, M. (PI)

HISTORY 85Q: Humanities Core: Middle East II -- Classic (COMPLIT 32Q, DLCL 32Q, HUMCORE 32Q)

How should we live? This course explores two ethical pathways: mysticism and rationality. They seem to be opposites, but as we'll see, some important historical figures managed to follow both at once. We will read works by successful judges, bureaucrats, academics, and lovers written between 700 and 1900 C.E. We will ask ourselves whether we agree with their choices and judgments about professional success and politics. What would we do differently today? We certainly organize knowledge differently, but do we think about ethics the same way? N.B. This is the second of three courses in the Middle Eastern track. These courses offer an unparalleled opportunity to study Middle Eastern history and culture, past and present. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to exploring how ideas have shaped our world and future.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 101: The Greeks (CLASSICS 83)

250 years ago, for almost the first time in history, a few societies rejected kings who claimed to know what the gods wanted and began moving toward democracy. Only once before had this happened--in ancient Greece. This course asks how the Greeks did this, and what they can teach us today. It uses texts and archaeology to trace the material and military sides of the story as well as cultural developments, and looks at Greek slavery and misogyny as well as their achievements. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 104D: International Security in a Changing World (INTLPOL 241, POLISCI 114S)

(Formerly IPS 241) This class examines the most pressing international security problems facing the world today: nuclear crises, nuclear non-proliferation, digital security, terrorism, and climate change. Alternative perspectives--from political science, history, and STS (Science, Technology, and Society) studies--are used to analyze these problems. The class includes an award-winning two-day international negotiation simulation.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 106B: Global Human Geography: Europe and Americas

Patterns of demography, economic and social development, geopolitics, and cultural differentiation. Use of maps to depict geographical patterns and processes.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lewis, M. (PI)

HISTORY 107: Introduction to Urban Studies (URBANST 110)

Today, for the first time in history, a majority of people live in cities. By 2050, cities will hold two-thirds of the world¿s population. This transformation touches everyone, and raises critical questions. What draws people to live in cities? How will urban growth affect the world¿s environment? Why are cities so divided by race and by class, and what can be done about it? How do cities change who we are, and how can we change cities? In this class, you will learn to see cities in new ways, from the smallest everyday interactions on a city sidewalk to the largest patterns of global migration and trade. We will use specific examples from cities around the world to illustrate the concepts that we learn in class. The course is intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 120A: The Russian Empire, 1450-1800

(Same as HISTORY 20A. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 120A.) Explores rise of Russian state and expanse of empire; patterns of governance of a Eurasian empire; strategies and institutions of governance; survey of various ethnic and religious groups in empire and their varied cultures and political economies; gender and family; serfdom; Russian Orthodox religion and culture; reforms and Europeanization of 18th century.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kollmann, N. (PI)

HISTORY 137D: Germany's Wars and the World, 1848-2010 (HISTORY 37D)

This course examines a series of explosive encounters between Germans, Europe, and the world. Starting with the overlooked revolutions of 1848 and ending with the reunification of West Germany and East Germany after the Cold War, the course will explore a range of topics: capitalism, communism, imperialism, nationalism, diplomacy, antisemitism, gender, race, and the Holocaust, among others. We will also consider competing visions of Germany its borders, its members, its enemies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Press, S. (PI)

HISTORY 138G: Europe and Its Great Migrations: The Modern Period (HISTORY 38G)

From the "Germanic" people's migrations of antiquity to the global refugee crises of today, migration has left an indelible mark on European society. What are the causes and consequences of periods of "mass" migration? Surveying major episodes in recent European migration history, we will explore how human mobility has historically shaped culture, politics, economics, and society on this continent. Special attention will be given to the 19th century, an exceptional chapter in global migration history that saw some 55 million Europeans departing for the Americas.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hein, B. (PI)

HISTORY 140: World History of Science

(Same as HISTORY 40. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 140.) The earliest developments in science, the prehistoric roots of technology, the scientific revolution, and global voyaging. Theories of human origins and the oldest known tools and symbols. Achievements of the Mayans, Aztecs, and native N. Americans. Science and medicine in ancient Greece, Egypt, China, Africa, and India. Science in medieval and Renaissance Europe and the Islamic world including changing cosmologies and natural histories. Theories of scientific growth and decay; how science engages other factors such as material culture and religions.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Proctor, R. (PI)

HISTORY 144: Women and Gender in Science, Medicine and Engineering (FEMGEN 144)

(Same as HISTORY 44. Majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in HISTORY 144.) Men's and women's roles in science, medicine, and engineering over the past 200 years with a focus on the present. What efforts are underway globally to transform research institutions so that both men's and women's careers can flourish? How have science and medicine studied and defined males and females? How can we harness the creative power of gender analysis to enhance knowledge and spark innovation?
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Schiebinger, L. (PI)

HISTORY 150B: Nineteenth Century America (AFRICAAM 150B, AMSTUD 150B, CSRE 150S)

(Same as HISTORY 50B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 150B.) Territorial expansion, social change, and economic transformation. The causes and consequences of the Civil War. Topics include: urbanization and the market revolution; slavery and the Old South; sectional conflict; successes and failures of Reconstruction; and late 19th-century society and culture.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; White, R. (PI)

HISTORY 152: History of American Law (HISTORY 352B)

(Formerly Law 318. Now Law 3504.) This course examines the growth and development of American legal institutions with particular attention to crime and punishment, slavery and race relations, the role of law in developing the economy, and the place of lawyers in American society, from colonial times to the present. Special Instructions: Any student may write a paper in lieu of the final exam with consent of instructor. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Final exam or paper. Automatic grading penalty waived for writers. Cross-listed with History (HISTORY 152 Consent of instructor required) & (HISTORY 352B).
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Friedman, L. (PI)

HISTORY 155F: The Civil War and Reconstruction Era, 1830 to 1877 (HISTORY 55F)

This course explores the causes, course, and consequences of the American Civil War. The Civil War profoundly impacted American life at national, sectional, and constitutional levels, and radically challenged categories of race and citizenship. Topics covered include: the crisis of union and disunion in an expanding republic; slavery, race, and emancipation as national problems and personal experiences; the horrors of total war for individuals and society; and the challenges--social and political--of Reconstruction.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Olivarius, K. (PI)

HISTORY 173: Mexican Migration to the United States (AMSTUD 73, CHILATST 173, HISTORY 73)

This class examines the history of Mexican migration to the United States. In the United States we constantly hear about Obama's immigration plan, the anti-immigrant laws in Arizona, and the courage of DREAM Activists; in Mexico news sources speak about the role of remittances, the effect of deportations, and the loss of life at the border. Unfortunately, few people truly understand the historical trends in these migratory processes, or the multifaceted role played by the United States in encouraging individuals to head there. Moreover, few people have actually heard the opinions and voices of migrants themselves. This course seeks to provide students with the opportunity to place migrants' experiences in dialogue with migratory laws as well as the knowledge to embed current understandings of Latin American migration in their meaningful historical context.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Minian Andjel, A. (PI)

HISTORY 179C: The Ethical Challenges of Climate Change (HISTORY 79C)

This course explores the ethical challenges of climate change from historical, social, economic, political, cultural and scientific perspectives. These include the discovery of global warming over two centuries, the rise of secular and religious denialism and skepticism toward the scientific consensus on it, the dispute between developed and developing countries over how to forge a binding global agreement to mitigate it, and the "role morality" of various actors (scientists, politicians, fossil fuel companies, the media and ordinary individuals) in the US in assessing ethical responsibility for the problem and its solutions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wolfe, M. (PI)

HISTORY 200A: Doing Legal History

What is law, and how do we write its history? Drawing on case studies from a broad range of periods and places, this course will explore how law is made, interpreted, enforced, experienced, and resisted. It will also explore how historians use both legal and non-legal sources to study the ways in which law and society have shaped each other. This course forms part of the "Doing History" series: rigorous undergraduate colloquia that introduce the practice of history within a particular field or thematic area.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 200D: Doing the History of Science and Technology

The history of science has often been at the crux of key debates in the larger field of history, including debates over objectivity and bias, relativism and the problem of "present-ism." This course explores key questions, methods and debates in the history of science and examines how historians of science have addressed these organizing problems of the historical discipline. This course forms part of the "Doing History" series: rigorous undergraduate colloquia that introduce the practice of history within a particular field or thematic area.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Riskin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 200F: Doing Microhistory

Explores the emergence of microhistory as a genre in the 1960s and the controversies it stimulated. We will read examples of microhistory from various times and places; if possible, students will conduct their own microhistory in the course of the quarter. This course forms part of the "Doing History" series: rigorous undergraduate colloquia that introduce the practice of history within a particular field or thematic area.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kollmann, N. (PI)

HISTORY 204G: War and Society (HISTORY 304G, REES 304G)

How Western societies and cultures have responded to modern warfare. The relationship between its destructive capacity and effects on those who produce, are subject to, and must come to terms with its aftermath. Literary representations of WW I; destructive psychological effects of modern warfare including those who take pleasure in killing; changes in relations between the genders; consequences of genocidal ideology and racial prejudice; the theory of just war and its practical implementation; and how wars are commemorated.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Weiner, A. (PI)

HISTORY 205J: Wonder, Curiosity & Collecting: Building a Stanford Cabinet of Curiosities (ARTHIST 225, HISTORY 305J)

Inside every museum lies a cabinet of curiosities. Explores the history of wonder, curiosity, and collecting, with special attention to the Renaissance origins of the cabinet of curiosities and their modern afterlives. Hands-on experience working with the Stanford collection in the Cantor to create a contemporary cabinet in collaboration with artist Mark Dion. This will be a unique opportunity to create a Stanford cabinet of curiosities for the twenty-first century. All seminar participants will contribute to the published exhibit catalogue.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 205K: The Age of Revolution: America, France, and Haiti (AFRICAAM 205K, HISTORY 305K)

This course examines the "Age of Revolution," spanning the 18th and 19th centuries. Primarily, this course will focus on the American, French, and Haitian Revolutions (which overthrew both French and white planter rule). Taken together, these events reshaped definitions of citizenship, property, and government. But could republican principles-- color-blind in rhetoric-- be so in fact? Could nations be both republican and pro-slavery? Studying a wide range of primary materials, this course will explore the problem of revolution in an age of empires, globalization, and slavery.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Olivarius, K. (PI)

HISTORY 206C: The Modern Battle (INTNLREL 183)

The purpose of this seminar is to examine the evolution of modern warfare by closely following four modern battles/campaigns. For this purpose the seminar offers four mock staff rides, facilitating highly engaged, well-researched experience for participants. In a mock staff ride, students are assigned roles; each student is playing a general or staff officer who was involved in the battle/campaign. Students will research their roles and, during the staff ride, will be required to explain "their" decisions and actions. Staff rides will not deviate from historical records, but closely examine how decisions were made, what pressures and forces were in action, battle outcomes, etc. This in-depth examination will allow students to gain a deeper understanding of how modern tactics, technology, means of communications, and the scale of warfare can decide, and indeed decided, campaigns. We will will spend two weeks preparing for and playing each staff ride. One meeting will be dedicated to discussing the forces shaping the chosen battle/campaign: the identity and goals ofnthe belligerents, the economic, technological, cultural and other factors involved, as well as the initial general plan. The second meeting will be dedicated to the battle itself. The four battles will illustrate major developments in modern warfare.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Vardi, G. (PI)

HISTORY 206E: CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People (COMPLIT 100, DLCL 100, FRENCH 175, GERMAN 175, ILAC 175, ITALIAN 175, URBANST 153)

This course takes students on a trip to major capital cities, at different moments in time: Renaissance Florence, Golden Age Madrid, Colonial Mexico City, Enlightenment and Romantic Paris, Existential and Revolutionary St. Petersburg, Roaring Berlin, Modernist Vienna, and bustling Buenos Aires. While exploring each place in a particular historical moment, we will also consider the relations between culture, power, and social life. How does the cultural life of a country intersect with the political activity of a capital? How do large cities shape our everyday experience, our aesthetic preferences, and our sense of history? Why do some cities become cultural capitals? Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents (in translation); authors we will read include Boccaccio, Dante, Sor Juana, Montesquieu, Baudelaire, Gogol, Irmgard Keun, Freud, and Borges. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a Letter Grade.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 207J: Visual Technologies and Environmental Thinking (HISTORY 307J)

This course follows the historical development of environmental thinking from the birth of the earth sciences in the early 19th-century to the rise of green activism. We will explore how conceptions of nature (and society) changed throughout the development of technical modes of representing space and observing the earth from a distance. Particular attention will be paid to the political, military, intellectual and cultural factors that shape the way visual technologies define, visualize, and represent the natural world in the Middle East and North Africa.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Zakar, A. (PI)

HISTORY 207K: Writing History: Celebrity Deathmatch (HISTORY 307K)

What makes a book of history "popular" and what makes it "academic"? Is it possible to write rigorous scholarship that also attracts a broad readership? This class answers yes, and then sets out to consider how this might be done, comparing pairs of books written on similar topics. With its emphasis on the craft of writing and the art of public engagement, this colloquia is meant to encourage both Ph.D students and undergraduates interested in writing serious nonfiction.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Burns, J. (PI)

HISTORY 208J: Where Do Highways Come From? The History of Infrastructure

Roads, walls, and server farms are often taken for granted in our daily lives. In fact, a common statement about infrastructure is that it goes unnoticed until it fails. So what role does it play in shaping human behavior? What can we learn from understanding its origins and demise? From roadside taverns to biometric identification, this introduction to infrastructure studies explores early modern examples side-by-side with twenty-first century global ones.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; McDonough, K. (PI)

HISTORY 209S: Research Seminar for Majors

Required of History majors. How to conduct original, historical research and analysis, including methods such as using the libraries and archives at Stanford and elsewhere, and working collaboratively to frame topics, identify sources, and develop analyses. Autumn quarter focuses on American Political History and Comparative Colonialism; Winter quarter on Europe before 1500; Spring quarter on Gender/Race/Sexuality in U.S. History, Early Modern Travel Accounts, and Law, Society, and the Supernatural in Early Modern Europe.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 210: The History of Occupation, 1914-2010 (HISTORY 310)

Examines the major cases of occupation in the twentieth century, from the first World War until the present, and issues of similarities, differences, and implications for contemporary policy making. Topics include European and Asian cases emerging from World War I and World War II, the Israeli occupation of the West Bank; the Soviet and American occupations of Afghanistan; and the American occupation of Iraq. Discussions will revolve around the problems, efficacy, and effects of occupation in historical perspective.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Naimark, N. (PI)

HISTORY 213F: Medieval Germany, 900-1250 (GERMAN 213, GERMAN 313, HISTORY 313F)

This course will provide a survey of the most important political, historical, and cultural events and trends that took place in the German-speaking lands between 900 and 1250. Important themes include the evolution of imperial ideology and relations with Rome, expansion along the eastern frontier, the crusades, the investiture controversy, the rise of powerful cities and civic identities, monastic reform and intellectual renewal, and the flowering of vernacular literature.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 221B: The 'Woman Question' in Modern Russia (FEMGEN 221B, HISTORY 321B)

Russian radicals believed that the status of women provided the measure of freedom in a society and argued for the extension of rights to women as a basic principle of social progress. The social status and cultural representations of Russian women from the mid-19th century to the present. The arguments and actions of those who fought for women's emancipation in the 19th century, theories and policies of the Bolsheviks, and the reality of women's lives under them. How the status of women today reflects on the measure of freedom in post-Communist Russia.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 224A: The Soviet Civilization (HISTORY 424A, REES 224A)

Socialist visions and practices of the organization of society and messianic politics; the Soviet understanding of mass violence, political and ethnic; and living space. Primary and secondary sources. Research paper or historiographical essay.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Weiner, A. (PI)

HISTORY 224C: Genocide and Humanitarian Intervention (HISTORY 324C, JEWISHST 284C, JEWISHST 384C, PEDS 224)

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Traces the history of genocide in the 20th century and the question of humanitarian intervention to stop it, a topic that has been especially controversial since the end of the Cold War. The pre-1990s discussion begins with the Armenian genocide during the First World War and includes the Holocaust and Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. Coverage of genocide and humanitarian intervention since the 1990s includes the wars in Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, the Congo and Sudan.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Patenaude, B. (PI)

HISTORY 226E: Famine in the Modern World (HISTORY 326E, PEDS 226)

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Examines the major famines of modern history, the controversies surrounding them, and the reasons that famine persists in our increasingly globalized world. Focus is on the relative importance of natural, economic, and political factors as causes of famine in the modern world. Case studies include the Great Irish Famine of the 1840s; the Bengal famine of 1943-44; the Soviet famines of 1921-22 and 1932-33; China's Great Famine of 1959-61; the Ethiopian famines of the 1970s and 80s, and the Somalia famines of the 1990s and of 2011.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Patenaude, B. (PI)

HISTORY 230C: Paris: Capital of the Modern World (FRENCH 140, FRENCH 340, URBANST 184)

This course explores how Paris, between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries, became the political, cultural, and artistic capital of the modern world. It considers how the city has both shaped and been shaped by the tumultuous events of modern history- class conflict, industrialization, imperialism, war, and occupation. It will also explore why Paris became the major world destination for intellectuals, artists and writers. Sources will include films, paintings, architecture, novels, travel journals, and memoirs. Course taught in English with an optional French section.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 230G: How to Build an Empire: Race and Religion in Imperial France (FRENCH 207, FRENCH 307)

This class will explore the French Empire through race and religion, and examine its specificity vis-a-vis the history of other European empires. How do we think historically about the relationships between nation, Republic and empire? This course will draw from literary, political, philosophical and anthropological texts to introduce students to key notions and concepts debated in France and the francophone world. Readings bear on the nature of nation and citizenship, the tension between republic and empire, the dynamics of universalism and particularism, changing discourses of race, and the role of religion in the nation-state.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Marcus, E. (PI)

HISTORY 232A: Power, Art, and Knowledge in Renaissance Italy (HISTORY 332A)

Provides a fundamental understanding of the cultural and political imagination of the Italian Renaissance, with particular emphasis on Florence between 1300 and 1600 CE. Topics include political and social upheavals, radical shifts in religious practice and devotion, the commercial revolution in trade and banking, the rediscovery of classical philosophy and style, and the flowering of the literary and visual arts.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Findlen, P. (PI)

HISTORY 233D: Borders and Migration in the British Empire, 1750-2000 (HISTORY 333D)

This course traces the history of borders, migration, and belonging in Britain's colonies and imperial spaces, from the late-18th through late-20th centuries. From colonial North America to Sydney to Cape Town, from the British Caribbean to Britain itself, we will explore the concept of "border imperialism" in which borders, movement, and regimes of belonging are both constituted through and integral to capital and empire. Readings will be drawn from primary sources as well as secondary texts.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 234B: Grad Research Seminar: The Enlightenment, Pt. II (HISTORY 432B)

Prerequisite: Completion of HISTORY 234, 334 or 432A.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Riskin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 248S: Colonial States and African Societies, Part I (HISTORY 448A)

Colonialism set in motion profound transformations of African societies. These transformations did not occur immediately following military conquest, nor did they occur uniformly throughout the continent. This research seminar will focus directly on the encounter between the colonial state and African societies. The seminar will examine problems of social transformation, the role of the colonial state, and the actions of Africans. Following four weeks of collloquim style discussion, students then embark on independent research on the encounter between one colonial state and its constituent African societies.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Roberts, R. (PI)

HISTORY 254E: The Rise of American Democracy (HISTORY 354E)

Where did American democracy come from? Prior to and during the American Revolution, few who lived in what became the United States claimed to live in a democracy. Half a century later, most took this reality as an article of faith. Accordingly, the period stretching from c. 1750 to c. 1840 is often considered the period when American democracy was ascendant, a time marked by the explosion of new forms of political thinking, practices, and culture, new political institutions and forms of political organization, and new kinds of political struggles. This advanced undergraduate/graduate colloquium will explore how American political life changed during this formative period to understand the character of early American democracy, how different groups gained or suffered as a result of these transformations, and, in light of these investigations, in what ways it is historically appropriate to think of this period as in fact the rise of American democracy.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Gienapp, J. (PI)

HISTORY 260D: The Asian American Movement: A History of Activism

The "Asian American Movement" was born in the late 1960s inspired by other movements for social change and justice in the era. Activism among Asians in America has a longer history and a continuity to today. We will examine past, present, and future and consider issues of racial/ethnic identity, of inequality, and of injustice. We will explore avenues that sought remedy and progress. Political, social, cultural, gender and sexuality, and international dimensions will be considered. Note: Students who have taken History/AMSTUD/ASNAMST 55D/155D should not enroll in this course.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chang, G. (PI)

HISTORY 261G: Presidents and Foreign Policy in Modern History (INTNLREL 173)

Nothing better illustrates the evolution of the modern presidency than the arena of foreign policy. This class will examine the changing role and choices of successive presidential administrations over the past century, examining such factors as geopolitics, domestic politics, the bureaucracy, ideology, psychology, and culture. Students will be encouraged to think historically about the institution of the presidency, while examining specific case studies, from the First World War to the conflicts of the 21st century.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rakove, R. (PI)

HISTORY 269F: Modern American History: From Civil Rights to Human Rights (HISTORY 369F)

This focuses on American social justice movements during the years since the passage of landmark civil rights legislation during the 1960s, with particular emphasis on efforts to extend rights to all people.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Carson, C. (PI)

HISTORY 275B: History of Modern Mexico (AMSTUD 275B, CHILATST 275B, CSRE 275B, HISTORY 375C)

Surveys the history of governance, resistance, and identity formation in Mexico from the nineteenth century to the present. Explores Mexico's historical struggles to achieve political stability, economic prosperity, and social justice and examines how regional, class, ethnic, and gender differences have figured prominently in the shaping of Mexican affairs. Topics include Mexico's wars and their legacies, the power of the state, violence and protest, debates over the meaning of "Mexicanness," youth culture, and the politics of indigenismo.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Minian Andjel, A. (PI)

HISTORY 283D: Capitalism and the Middle East

This course investigates the logics of capital in the context of the Arab world, Turkey, and Iran from the sixteenth century to the present. It brings in related theoretical readings from fields and disciplines to push the boundaries of what we know about capitalism, racial capitalism, and changing property regimes. Students will explore historical moments of corporate capitalism, agrarian capitalism, globalization, financialization, and neo-liberalism in the Middle East in order to expand their knowledge of global capitalism in non-Western contexts.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Alff, K. (PI)

HISTORY 284: The Ottoman Empire, 1300-1923 (HISTORY 384)

This is a course on the Middle East and Southeast Europe under the Ottoman Empire. Topics include how the Ottoman enterprise was constructed in the frontier region of the Christian and Islamic worlds; the conquests and consolidation of the imperial institutions; how diverse peoples, cultures, and regions were integrated into the imperial system; the Ottoman Empire and the broader world; merchants and their markets; elite, urban, rural and nomadic lives; women, family sexuality; art, literature, and architecture; the transformation of the empire on the eve of modernity; the rise of nationalism and the Ottoman response; Ottoman disintegration and the making of the Middle East and Southeast Europe.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Yaycioglu, A. (PI)

HISTORY 287D: A Survey of Jews in the Contemporary World (HISTORY 387D, JEWISHST 287D, JEWISHST 387D)

This course will explore the notion of "traditional" vs "modern"¿ the different ways in which Jewish communities have encountered "modernity," and what the modern era has meant has meant for different Jewish communities, whether in the Middle East, Europe, or North America.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Meyers, J. (PI)

HISTORY 292D: Japan in Asia, Asia in Japan (HISTORY 392D)

How Japan and Asia mutually shaped each other in the late 19th and 20th centuries. Focus is on Japanese imperialism in Asia and its postwar legacies. Topics include: pan-Asianism and orientalism; colonial modernization in Korea and Taiwan; collaboration and resistance; popular imperialism in Manchuria; total war and empire; comfort women and the politics of apology; the issue of resident Koreans; and economic and cultural integration of postwar Asia.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Uchida, J. (PI)

HISTORY 292J: Sino-Korean Relations, Past and Present (CHINA 156, CHINA 256, KOREA 156, KOREA 256)

Korea and China have long been intertwined in their political, economic, and cultural histories. The depth of this historical relationship has enormous ramifications for East Asia today. This course will investigate the history of Korea-China relations from its deep roots in the ancient past, through its formative periods in the early modern period and the age of imperialism, to the contemporary era. Topics to be covered include formation of Chinese and Korean national identity, Sino-Korean cultural exchange, premodern Chinese empire in East Asia, China and Korea in the wake of Western and Japanese imperialism, communist revolutions in East Asia, the Korean War, and China's relations with a divided Korea in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Particular attention will be paid to how the modern and contemporary ramifications of past historical relations and how contemporary Chinese and Koreans interpret their own and each others' pasts.nThis course will ask students to engage with diverse interpretations of the past and to consider how a common history is interpreted by different audiences and for different purposes. What are the implications of divergent memories of a single historical event for Chinese and Korean political, cultural, and ethnic identities? How are political, cultural, and ethnic identities constructed through engagement with difference? And what is at stake in different constructions of identity?In addressing these issues, students will also engage in social inquiry. They will be asked to understand how political ideology, economic organization, and social forces have shaped the character of Sino-Korean relations. What are the economic and political institutions that influence these relations in each time period? How do ideologies like Confucianism, Communism, or free-market liberalism interface with Chinese and Korean societies and impact their relations?
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Wang, S. (PI)

HISTORY 298C: Race, Gender, & Sexuality in Chinese History (ASNAMST 298, CSRE 298G, FEMGEN 298C)

This course examines the diverse ways in which identities--particularly race, ethnicity, gender and sexuality have been understood and experienced in Chinese societies, broadly defined, from the imperial period to the present day. Topics include changes in women's lives and status, racial and ethnic categorizations, homosexuality, prostitution, masculinity, and gender-crossing.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Elmore, A. (PI)

HISTORY 299H: Junior Honors Colloquium

Required of junior History majors planning to write a History honors thesis during senior year. Meets four times during the quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Burns, J. (PI)

HISTORY 299M: Undergraduate Directed Research: Martin Luther King, Jr., Research and Education Institute

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Carson, C. (PI)

HISTORY 303E: Infrastructure & Power in the Global South (AFRICAST 303E)

In the last decade, the field of infrastructure studies has entered into conversation with area studies, post/colonial studies, and other scholarship on the "Global South." These intersections have produced dramatic new understandings of what "infrastructures" are, and how to analyze them as conduits of social and political power. This course offers a graduate-level introduction to this recent scholarship, drawing primarily on works from history, anthropology, geography, and architecture.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hecht, G. (PI)

HISTORY 303F: Words and Things in the History of Classical Scholarship (CLASSICS 331)

How have scholars used ancient texts and objects since the revival of the classical tradition? How did antiquarians study and depict objects and relate them to texts and reconstructions of the past? What changed and what stayed the same as humanist scholarship gave way to professional archaeologists, historians, and philologists? Focus is on key works in the history of classics, such as Erasmus and Winckelmann, in their scholarly, cultural, and political contexts, and recent critical trends in intellectual history and the history of disciplines.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Ceserani, G. (PI)

HISTORY 304G: War and Society (HISTORY 204G, REES 304G)

How Western societies and cultures have responded to modern warfare. The relationship between its destructive capacity and effects on those who produce, are subject to, and must come to terms with its aftermath. Literary representations of WW I; destructive psychological effects of modern warfare including those who take pleasure in killing; changes in relations between the genders; consequences of genocidal ideology and racial prejudice; the theory of just war and its practical implementation; and how wars are commemorated.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Weiner, A. (PI)

HISTORY 305: Graduate Pedagogy Workshop

Required of first-year History Ph.D. students. Perspectives on pedagogy for historians: course design, lecturing, leading discussion, evaluation of student learning, use of technology in teaching lectures and seminars. Addressing today's classroom: sexual harassment issues, integrating diversity, designing syllabi to include students with disabilities.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Frank, Z. (PI)

HISTORY 305J: Wonder, Curiosity & Collecting: Building a Stanford Cabinet of Curiosities (ARTHIST 225, HISTORY 205J)

Inside every museum lies a cabinet of curiosities. Explores the history of wonder, curiosity, and collecting, with special attention to the Renaissance origins of the cabinet of curiosities and their modern afterlives. Hands-on experience working with the Stanford collection in the Cantor to create a contemporary cabinet in collaboration with artist Mark Dion. This will be a unique opportunity to create a Stanford cabinet of curiosities for the twenty-first century. All seminar participants will contribute to the published exhibit catalogue.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 305K: The Age of Revolution: America, France, and Haiti (AFRICAAM 205K, HISTORY 205K)

This course examines the "Age of Revolution," spanning the 18th and 19th centuries. Primarily, this course will focus on the American, French, and Haitian Revolutions (which overthrew both French and white planter rule). Taken together, these events reshaped definitions of citizenship, property, and government. But could republican principles-- color-blind in rhetoric-- be so in fact? Could nations be both republican and pro-slavery? Studying a wide range of primary materials, this course will explore the problem of revolution in an age of empires, globalization, and slavery.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Olivarius, K. (PI)

HISTORY 307J: Visual Technologies and Environmental Thinking (HISTORY 207J)

This course follows the historical development of environmental thinking from the birth of the earth sciences in the early 19th-century to the rise of green activism. We will explore how conceptions of nature (and society) changed throughout the development of technical modes of representing space and observing the earth from a distance. Particular attention will be paid to the political, military, intellectual and cultural factors that shape the way visual technologies define, visualize, and represent the natural world in the Middle East and North Africa.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Zakar, A. (PI)

HISTORY 307K: Writing History: Celebrity Deathmatch (HISTORY 207K)

What makes a book of history "popular" and what makes it "academic"? Is it possible to write rigorous scholarship that also attracts a broad readership? This class answers yes, and then sets out to consider how this might be done, comparing pairs of books written on similar topics. With its emphasis on the craft of writing and the art of public engagement, this colloquia is meant to encourage both Ph.D students and undergraduates interested in writing serious nonfiction.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Burns, J. (PI)

HISTORY 308F: Law and Humanities Workshop: History, Literature, and Philosophy

(Formerly LAW 516, now LAW 3515.) The Law and Humanities Workshop: History, Literature, and Philosophy is designed as a forum in which faculty and students from the Law School and from various humanities departments can discuss some of the best work now being done in law and humanities. Every other week, an invited speaker will present his or her current research for discussion. In the week prior to a given speaker's presentation, the class will meet as a group to discuss secondary literature relevant to understanding and critiquing the speaker's research. Students will then read the speaker's paper in advance of the following week's workshop presentation. Enrollment will be limited to 30 students-- 20 from SLS who will be selected by lottery and 10 from H&S. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, and writing assignments.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 310: The History of Occupation, 1914-2010 (HISTORY 210)

Examines the major cases of occupation in the twentieth century, from the first World War until the present, and issues of similarities, differences, and implications for contemporary policy making. Topics include European and Asian cases emerging from World War I and World War II, the Israeli occupation of the West Bank; the Soviet and American occupations of Afghanistan; and the American occupation of Iraq. Discussions will revolve around the problems, efficacy, and effects of occupation in historical perspective.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Naimark, N. (PI)

HISTORY 313F: Medieval Germany, 900-1250 (GERMAN 213, GERMAN 313, HISTORY 213F)

This course will provide a survey of the most important political, historical, and cultural events and trends that took place in the German-speaking lands between 900 and 1250. Important themes include the evolution of imperial ideology and relations with Rome, expansion along the eastern frontier, the crusades, the investiture controversy, the rise of powerful cities and civic identities, monastic reform and intellectual renewal, and the flowering of vernacular literature.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 321B: The 'Woman Question' in Modern Russia (FEMGEN 221B, HISTORY 221B)

Russian radicals believed that the status of women provided the measure of freedom in a society and argued for the extension of rights to women as a basic principle of social progress. The social status and cultural representations of Russian women from the mid-19th century to the present. The arguments and actions of those who fought for women's emancipation in the 19th century, theories and policies of the Bolsheviks, and the reality of women's lives under them. How the status of women today reflects on the measure of freedom in post-Communist Russia.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 324C: Genocide and Humanitarian Intervention (HISTORY 224C, JEWISHST 284C, JEWISHST 384C, PEDS 224)

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Traces the history of genocide in the 20th century and the question of humanitarian intervention to stop it, a topic that has been especially controversial since the end of the Cold War. The pre-1990s discussion begins with the Armenian genocide during the First World War and includes the Holocaust and Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. Coverage of genocide and humanitarian intervention since the 1990s includes the wars in Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, the Congo and Sudan.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Patenaude, B. (PI)

HISTORY 326E: Famine in the Modern World (HISTORY 226E, PEDS 226)

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Examines the major famines of modern history, the controversies surrounding them, and the reasons that famine persists in our increasingly globalized world. Focus is on the relative importance of natural, economic, and political factors as causes of famine in the modern world. Case studies include the Great Irish Famine of the 1840s; the Bengal famine of 1943-44; the Soviet famines of 1921-22 and 1932-33; China's Great Famine of 1959-61; the Ethiopian famines of the 1970s and 80s, and the Somalia famines of the 1990s and of 2011.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Patenaude, B. (PI)

HISTORY 331B: Core Colloquium on Modern Europe: The 19th Century

The major historical events and historiographical debates of the long 19th century from the French Revolution to WW I.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Press, S. (PI)

HISTORY 332A: Power, Art, and Knowledge in Renaissance Italy (HISTORY 232A)

Provides a fundamental understanding of the cultural and political imagination of the Italian Renaissance, with particular emphasis on Florence between 1300 and 1600 CE. Topics include political and social upheavals, radical shifts in religious practice and devotion, the commercial revolution in trade and banking, the rediscovery of classical philosophy and style, and the flowering of the literary and visual arts.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Findlen, P. (PI)

HISTORY 333D: Borders and Migration in the British Empire, 1750-2000 (HISTORY 233D)

This course traces the history of borders, migration, and belonging in Britain's colonies and imperial spaces, from the late-18th through late-20th centuries. From colonial North America to Sydney to Cape Town, from the British Caribbean to Britain itself, we will explore the concept of "border imperialism" in which borders, movement, and regimes of belonging are both constituted through and integral to capital and empire. Readings will be drawn from primary sources as well as secondary texts.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 345B: African Encounters with Colonialism

This colloquium is a broad sweep of some of the main themes in the history of the colonial period for Africa. A course of this nature can not help but be a selective sample of the field. For example, topics on the end of slavery in Africa, on the social history of law in colonial Africa, Islam and religious conversion, nationalism and decolonization are not included here because they are covered by more specialized courses. This course is designed to let students sample different approaches to the history of the colonial period.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Roberts, R. (PI)

HISTORY 351D: Core in American History, Part IV

May be repeated once for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; White, R. (PI)

HISTORY 352B: History of American Law (HISTORY 152)

(Formerly Law 318. Now Law 3504.) This course examines the growth and development of American legal institutions with particular attention to crime and punishment, slavery and race relations, the role of law in developing the economy, and the place of lawyers in American society, from colonial times to the present. Special Instructions: Any student may write a paper in lieu of the final exam with consent of instructor. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Final exam or paper. Automatic grading penalty waived for writers. Cross-listed with History (HISTORY 152 Consent of instructor required) & (HISTORY 352B).
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Friedman, L. (PI)

HISTORY 354E: The Rise of American Democracy (HISTORY 254E)

Where did American democracy come from? Prior to and during the American Revolution, few who lived in what became the United States claimed to live in a democracy. Half a century later, most took this reality as an article of faith. Accordingly, the period stretching from c. 1750 to c. 1840 is often considered the period when American democracy was ascendant, a time marked by the explosion of new forms of political thinking, practices, and culture, new political institutions and forms of political organization, and new kinds of political struggles. This advanced undergraduate/graduate colloquium will explore how American political life changed during this formative period to understand the character of early American democracy, how different groups gained or suffered as a result of these transformations, and, in light of these investigations, in what ways it is historically appropriate to think of this period as in fact the rise of American democracy.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Gienapp, J. (PI)

HISTORY 369F: Modern American History: From Civil Rights to Human Rights (HISTORY 269F)

This focuses on American social justice movements during the years since the passage of landmark civil rights legislation during the 1960s, with particular emphasis on efforts to extend rights to all people.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Carson, C. (PI)

HISTORY 371: Graduate Colloquium: Explorations in Latin American History and Historiography (ILAC 371)

Introduction to modern Latin American history and historiography, including how to read and use primary sources for independent research.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Wolfe, M. (PI)

HISTORY 375C: History of Modern Mexico (AMSTUD 275B, CHILATST 275B, CSRE 275B, HISTORY 275B)

Surveys the history of governance, resistance, and identity formation in Mexico from the nineteenth century to the present. Explores Mexico's historical struggles to achieve political stability, economic prosperity, and social justice and examines how regional, class, ethnic, and gender differences have figured prominently in the shaping of Mexican affairs. Topics include Mexico's wars and their legacies, the power of the state, violence and protest, debates over the meaning of "Mexicanness," youth culture, and the politics of indigenismo.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Minian Andjel, A. (PI)

HISTORY 384: The Ottoman Empire, 1300-1923 (HISTORY 284)

This is a course on the Middle East and Southeast Europe under the Ottoman Empire. Topics include how the Ottoman enterprise was constructed in the frontier region of the Christian and Islamic worlds; the conquests and consolidation of the imperial institutions; how diverse peoples, cultures, and regions were integrated into the imperial system; the Ottoman Empire and the broader world; merchants and their markets; elite, urban, rural and nomadic lives; women, family sexuality; art, literature, and architecture; the transformation of the empire on the eve of modernity; the rise of nationalism and the Ottoman response; Ottoman disintegration and the making of the Middle East and Southeast Europe.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Yaycioglu, A. (PI)

HISTORY 387D: A Survey of Jews in the Contemporary World (HISTORY 287D, JEWISHST 287D, JEWISHST 387D)

This course will explore the notion of "traditional" vs "modern"¿ the different ways in which Jewish communities have encountered "modernity," and what the modern era has meant has meant for different Jewish communities, whether in the Middle East, Europe, or North America.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Meyers, J. (PI)

HISTORY 392D: Japan in Asia, Asia in Japan (HISTORY 292D)

How Japan and Asia mutually shaped each other in the late 19th and 20th centuries. Focus is on Japanese imperialism in Asia and its postwar legacies. Topics include: pan-Asianism and orientalism; colonial modernization in Korea and Taiwan; collaboration and resistance; popular imperialism in Manchuria; total war and empire; comfort women and the politics of apology; the issue of resident Koreans; and economic and cultural integration of postwar Asia.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Uchida, J. (PI)

HISTORY 399P: Archives-Based Teaching Practicum

Through hands-on exercises and key readings, students will learn about basic archival handling techniques, usage guidelines, security issues, principles of archival organization, and bibliographic literacy around archival and Special Collections materials, along with an insiders tour of Stanford University Special Collections. During the second, students will partake in a hands-on session using Special Collections materials, with a class session enactment that demonstrates the program¿s concepts. Note: Enrollment only open to PhD students (ANY department) with instructor permission required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mullaney, T. (PI)

HISTORY 414A: Research Seminar in Medieval History

This graduate-level research seminar explores major themes, problems, methods, and historiographical traditions in medieval European history. For 2018-19, the theme is "Law, Religion, and Society in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe." Interested students should contact the instructor in advance.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dorin, R. (PI)

HISTORY 424A: The Soviet Civilization (HISTORY 224A, REES 224A)

Socialist visions and practices of the organization of society and messianic politics; the Soviet understanding of mass violence, political and ethnic; and living space. Primary and secondary sources. Research paper or historiographical essay.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Weiner, A. (PI)

HISTORY 432B: Grad Research Seminar: The Enlightenment, Pt. II (HISTORY 234B)

Prerequisite: Completion of HISTORY 234, 334 or 432A.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Riskin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 448A: Colonial States and African Societies, Part I (HISTORY 248S)

Colonialism set in motion profound transformations of African societies. These transformations did not occur immediately following military conquest, nor did they occur uniformly throughout the continent. This research seminar will focus directly on the encounter between the colonial state and African societies. The seminar will examine problems of social transformation, the role of the colonial state, and the actions of Africans. Following four weeks of collloquim style discussion, students then embark on independent research on the encounter between one colonial state and its constituent African societies.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Roberts, R. (PI)

HISTORY 460: Research Seminar in America in the World

Ways to place American history in an international context. Comparative, transnational, diplomatic, and world systems are approaches to complete a research paper based on research into primary materials. Historical methodologies, research strategies, and essay projects. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Chang, G. (PI)

HISTORY 490A: Law in Early China

This course studies the role of law in early China. It examines both evidence transmitted in received sources and newly excavated legal materials. It will consider law from several approaches, including the role of language, the background in emotions and group sentiments, the links to honor and shame, its role in establishing a public realm and forms of group membership, and its links to defining the nature of both the ruler and the philosophical sage.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lewis, M. (PI)

HISTORY 495A: Qing Legal Documents (CHINA 495A)

(Same as LAW 5037.) How to use Qing legal documents for research. Winter: sample documents that introduce the main genres including: the Qing code and commentaries; magistrates' handbooks and published case collections; and case records from Chinese archives. Spring: class meets occasionally; students complete research papers. Prerequisite: advanced reading ability in Chinese.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sommer, M. (PI)
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