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HISTORY 1A: Global History: The Ancient World (CLASSICS 76)

This course examines the emergence of "world empires"-- the first way of constituting a world-- in four regions of the eastern hemisphere from the first millennium BCE to the year 900 CE. It will study the pivotal role of cities, the importance of rulers, the incorporation of diverse peoples, and how the states that followed their collapse constituted new world orders through combining imitation of the vanished empire with the elaboration of the new "world religions."
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lewis, M. (PI); Nunez, A. (TA)

HISTORY 3F: The Changing Face of War: Introduction to Military History (HISTORY 103F, INTNLREL 103F)

Introduces students to the rich history of military affairs and, at the same time, examines the ways in which we think of change and continuity in military history. How did war evolve from ancient times, both in styles of warfare and perceptions of war? What is the nature of the relationship between war and society? Is there such a thing as a Western way of war? What role does technology play in transforming military affairs? What is a military revolution and can it be manufactured or induced? Chronologically following the evolution of warfare from Ancient Greece to present day so-called new wars, we will continuously investigate how the interdependencies between technological advances, social change, philosophical debates and economic pressures both shaped and were influenced by war. Students satisfying the WiM requirement for the major in International Relations, must enroll in INTNLREL 103F course listing.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Vardi, G. (PI); Kim, C. (TA)

HISTORY 3N: Terrorism

Why do we categorize some acts of violence as terrorism? How do the practitioners of such violence legitimize their actions? What are the effects of terror on culture, society, and politics? This course explores these questions around the globe from the nineteenth century to the present. Topics include the Russian populists, Ku Klux Klan, IRA, al Qaida, state terror, and the representation of terrorism in law, journalism, literature, film, and TV.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Crews, R. (PI)

HISTORY 5Q: The History of Information: From Movable Type to Machine Learning

Information has a history-- and it's not the one you've been told by Silicon Valley. In a series of propulsive, empirically rich, and provocative lectures and discussions, this course deep-dives into the history of information and IT, including moveable type, telegraphy, typewriting, personal computing, gaming, social media, algorithms, machine learning, Digital Humanities, and more. You will leave the course with entirely new perspectives on information, including how IT shapes-- and is shaped by-- culture, nationality, gender, ethnicity, economy, and environment.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Mullaney, T. (PI)

HISTORY 12N: Income and wealth inequality from the Stone Age to the present (CLASSICS 12N)

Rising inequality is a defining feature of our time. How long has economic inequality existed, and when, how and why has the gap between haves and have-nots widened or narrowed over the course of history? This seminar takes a very long-term view of these questions. It is designed to help you appreciate dynamics and complexities that are often obscured by partisan controversies and short-term perspectives, and to provide solid historical background for a better understanding of a growing societal concern.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Scheidel, W. (PI)

HISTORY 33A: Blood and Roses: The Age of the Tudors

(Same as HISTORY 133A. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 133A.) English society and state from the Wars of the Roses to the death of Elizabeth. Political, social, and cultural upheavals of the Tudor period and the changes wrought by the Reformation. The establishment of the Tudor monarchy; destruction of the Catholic church; rise of Puritanism; and 16th-century social and economic changes.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 49S: African Futures: Nationalism, Pan-Africanism, and Beyond (AFRICAAM 49S)

This course examines decolonization and its aftermath in sub-Saharan Africa. With a "wind of change" sweeping the continent, how did Africans imagine their futures together? From W.E.B. Du Bois to Black Panther, this course will engage in historical readings of political essays, speeches, film, and literature to consider how Africans envisioned their communities beyond empire. Topics will include a variety of projects for African unity, from experiments with Pan-Africanism, to religious revivalism, to Afrofuturist art and aesthetics.
Terms: Aut, offered once only | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jacob, E. (PI)

HISTORY 50A: Colonial and Revolutionary America

(Same as HISTORY 150A. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 150A.) Survey of the origins of American society and polity in the 17th and 18th centuries. Topics: the migration of Europeans and Africans and the impact on native populations; the emergence of racial slavery and of regional, provincial, Protestant cultures; and the political origins and constitutional consequences of the American Revolution.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 62S: From Runaway Wives to Dancing Girls: Urban Women in the Long Nineteenth Century (FEMGEN 62S)

This course explores the ways in which women - white and black, immigrant and native born, free and enslaved - lived and labored in American cities during the long nineteenth century. Together we will examine a variety of primary sources including diaries, municipal and institutional records, newspapers, memoirs, oral histories, and visual culture. We will also consider whose stories are told and explore how historians make sense of times very different from our own. Priority given to History majors and minors.
Terms: Aut, offered once only | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Zola, C. (PI)

HISTORY 68D: American Prophet: The Inner Life and Global Vision of Martin Luther King, Jr. (AFRICAAM 68D, AMSTUD 168D, CSRE 68, HISTORY 168D)

Martin Luther King, Jr., was the 20th-century's best-known African-American leader, but the religious roots of his charismatic leadership are far less widely known. The documents assembled and published by Stanford's King Research and Education Institute provide the source materials for this exploration of King's swift rise to international prominence as an articulate advocate of global peace and justice.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 73: Mexican Migration to the United States (AMSTUD 73, CHILATST 173, HISTORY 173)

(History 73 is 3 units; History 173 is 5 units.) This class examines the history of Mexican migration to the United States. In the United States we constantly hear about Obama's immigration plan, the anti-immigrant laws in Arizona, and the courage of DREAM Activists; in Mexico news sources speak about the role of remittances, the effect of deportations, and the loss of life at the border. Unfortunately, few people truly understand the historical trends in these migratory processes, or the multifaceted role played by the United States in encouraging individuals to head there. Moreover, few people have actually heard the opinions and voices of migrants themselves. This course seeks to provide students with the opportunity to place migrants' experiences in dialogue with migratory laws as well as the knowledge to embed current understandings of Latin American migration in their meaningful historical context.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 86Q: Blood and Money: The Origins of Antisemitism (JEWISHST 86Q)

For over two millennia, Jews and Judaism have been the object of sustained anxieties, fears, and fantasies, which have in turn underpinned repeated outbreaks of violence and persecution. This course will explore the development and impact of antisemitism from Late Antiquity to the Enlightenment, including the emergence of the Blood libel, the association between Jews and moneylending, and the place of Judaism in Christian and Islamic theology. No prior background in history or Jewish studies is necessary. Prerequisite: PWR 1.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dorin, R. (PI)

HISTORY 87: The Islamic Republics: Politics and Society in Iran, Afghanistan and Pakistan

(Same as HISTORY 187. History majors and other taking 5 units, register for 187.) Explores the contested politics of these societies in modern times. Topics include controversies surrounding the meaning of revolution, state building, war, geopolitics, Islamic law, clerical authority, gender, an Islamic economy, culture, and ethnic, national and religious identities from the 1940s to the present. Assignments will focus on primary sources (especially legal documents, poetry, novels, and memoirs) and films.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 91B: The City in Imperial China

The evolution of cities in the early imperial, medieval, and early modern periods. Topics include physical structure, social order, cultural forms, economic roles, relations to rural hinterlands, and the contrast between imperial capitals and other cities. Comparative cases from European history. Readings include primary and secondary sources, and visual materials.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 94B: Japan in the Age of the Samurai

(Same as HISTORY 194B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 194B.) From the Warring States Period to the Meiji Restoration. Topics include the three great unifiers, Tokugawa hegemony, the samurai class, Neoconfucian ideologies, suppression of Christianity, structures of social and economic control, frontiers, the other and otherness, castle-town culture, peasant rebellion, black marketing, print culture, the floating world, National Studies, food culture, samurai activism, black ships, unequal treaties, anti-foreign terrorism, restorationism, millenarianism, modernization as westernization, Japan as imagined community.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Sakakibara, S. (PI)

HISTORY 95N: Maps in the Modern World

Preference to freshmen. Focus is on cutting-edge research. Topics: the challenge of grasping the globe as a whole; geography's roots in empire; maps as propaganda and as commodities; the cultural production of scale; and the cartography of imaginery worlds.Sources include resources in the Green Library Special Collections and in the Stanford Spatial History Lab.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wigen, K. (PI)

HISTORY 96S: The World the Mongols Made: Nomads, Empire, Legacy

The Mongols created global history. Their enterprise was the largest land-based empire in world history, and it lasted longer than most of the competition. This course will examine the world that the Mongols left behind, a world whose ways the Mongols affected and still continue to affect. In particular we will look first at the Mongol Empire in its entirety and its interactions with the Christian, Muslim, and the Chinese worlds. We will then examine the legacies left by the Mongols in the aftermath of its fracture and reorganization to form various successors.
Terms: Aut, offered once only | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Poh, G. (PI)

HISTORY 98: The History of Modern China

(Same as HISTORY 198. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 198.) This course charts major historical transformations in modern China, and will be of interest to those concerned with Chinese politics, culture, society, ethnicity, economy, gender, international relations, and the future of the world.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 103D: Human Society and Environmental Change (EARTHSYS 112, EARTHSYS 212, ESS 112)

Interdisciplinary approaches to understanding human-environment interactions with a focus on economics, policy, culture, history, and the role of the state. Prerequisite: ECON 1.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 103F: The Changing Face of War: Introduction to Military History (HISTORY 3F, INTNLREL 103F)

Introduces students to the rich history of military affairs and, at the same time, examines the ways in which we think of change and continuity in military history. How did war evolve from ancient times, both in styles of warfare and perceptions of war? What is the nature of the relationship between war and society? Is there such a thing as a Western way of war? What role does technology play in transforming military affairs? What is a military revolution and can it be manufactured or induced? Chronologically following the evolution of warfare from Ancient Greece to present day so-called new wars, we will continuously investigate how the interdependencies between technological advances, social change, philosophical debates and economic pressures both shaped and were influenced by war. Students satisfying the WiM requirement for the major in International Relations, must enroll in INTNLREL 103F course listing.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Vardi, G. (PI); Kim, C. (TA)

HISTORY 116N: Howard Zinn and the Quest for Historical Truth (EDUC 116N)

With more than two million copies in print, Howard Zinn's A People's History is a cultural icon. We will use Zinn's book to probe how we determine what was true in the past. A People's History will be our point of departure, but our journey will visit a variety of historical trouble spots: debates about whether the US was founded as a Christian nation, Holocaust denial, and the "Birther" controversy of President Obama.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wineburg, S. (PI)

HISTORY 117: Ancient Empires: Near East (CLASSICS 81)

Why do imperialists conquer people? Why do some people resist while others collaborate? This course tries to answer these questions by looking at some of the world's earliest empires. The main focus is on the expansion of the Assyrian and Persian Empires between 900 and 300 BC and the consequences for the ancient Jews, Egyptians, and Greeks. The main readings come from the Bible, Herodotus, and Assyrian and Persian royal inscriptions, and the course combines historical and archaeological data with social scientific approaches. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 133A: Blood and Roses: The Age of the Tudors

English society and state from the Wars of the Roses to the death of Elizabeth. Political, social, and cultural upheavals of the Tudor period and the changes wrought by the Reformation. The establishment of the Tudor monarchy; destruction of the Catholic church; rise of Puritanism; and 16th-century social and economic changes.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 150A: Colonial and Revolutionary America (AMSTUD 150A)

(Same as HISTORY 50A. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for HISTORY 150A.) Survey of the origins of American society and polity in the 17th and 18th centuries. Topics: the migration of Europeans and Africans and the impact on native populations; the emergence of racial slavery and of regional, provincial, Protestant cultures; and the political origins and constitutional consequences of the American Revolution.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 155: American Constitutional History from the Civil War to the War on Poverty (AMSTUD 155)

This course addresses U.S. constitutional history from the post-Civil War Reconstruction period through the mid-20th century. Because of the breadth of the subject matter, the view will necessarily be partial. In particular we will take as our focus the way the Constitution has provided a point of political mobilization for social movements challenging economic and social inequality. Topics covered include: Civil War Reconstruction and restoration; the rise of corporate capitalism and efforts to constrain it; Progressive Era regulation; the New Deal challenge to federalism and the anti-New Deal backlash; government spending; WWII and the Japanese Internment; the Civil Rights Era, and the War on Poverty. Readings will include both legal and historical materials with a focus on the relationship between law and society. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments, Final Paper. Paper extensions will be granted with instructor permission. No automatic grading penalty for late papers. Cross-listed with the Law School (LAW 7008),
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dauber, M. (PI)

HISTORY 166C: The Cold War: An International History (INTNLREL 154)

Though it ended twenty years ago, we still live in a world shaped by the Cold War. Beginning with its origins in the mid-1940s, this course will trace the evolution of the global struggle, until its culmination at the end of the 1980s. Students will be asked to ponder the fundamental nature of the Cold War, what kept it alive for nearly fifty years, how it ended, and its long term legacy for the world. As distinguished from the lecture taught in previous quarters, this class will closely investigate ten major Cold War battlegrounds over the quarter. Selected case studies will include: the division of Germany, Iran in the 1950s, Cuba, Vietnam, the Six Day War, the Chilean coup, sub-Saharan Africa, Afghanistan, Central America, and the Eastern European revolutions of 1989. Students will be asked to consult a combination of original documents and recent histories.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rakove, R. (PI)

HISTORY 168D: American Prophet: The Inner Life and Global Vision of Martin Luther King, Jr. (AFRICAAM 68D, AMSTUD 168D, CSRE 68, HISTORY 68D)

Martin Luther King, Jr., was the 20th-century's best-known African-American leader, but the religious roots of his charismatic leadership are far less widely known. The documents assembled and published by Stanford's King Research and Education Institute provide the source materials for this exploration of King's swift rise to international prominence as an articulate advocate of global peace and justice.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 173: Mexican Migration to the United States (AMSTUD 73, CHILATST 173, HISTORY 73)

(History 73 is 3 units; History 173 is 5 units.) This class examines the history of Mexican migration to the United States. In the United States we constantly hear about Obama's immigration plan, the anti-immigrant laws in Arizona, and the courage of DREAM Activists; in Mexico news sources speak about the role of remittances, the effect of deportations, and the loss of life at the border. Unfortunately, few people truly understand the historical trends in these migratory processes, or the multifaceted role played by the United States in encouraging individuals to head there. Moreover, few people have actually heard the opinions and voices of migrants themselves. This course seeks to provide students with the opportunity to place migrants' experiences in dialogue with migratory laws as well as the knowledge to embed current understandings of Latin American migration in their meaningful historical context.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 187: The Islamic Republics: Politics and Society in Iran, Afghanistan and Pakistan

(Same as HISTORY 87. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 187.) Explores the contested politics of these societies in modern times. Topics include controversies surrounding the meaning of revolution, state building, war, geopolitics, Islamic law, clerical authority, gender, an Islamic economy, culture and ethnic, national and religious identities from the 1940s to the present. Assignments will focus on primary sources (especially legal documents, poetry, novels, and memoirs) and films.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 191B: The City in Imperial China

The evolution of cities in the early imperial, medieval, and early modern periods. Topics include physical structure, social order, cultural forms, economic roles, relations to rural hinterlands, and the contrast between imperial capitals and other cities. Comparative cases from European history. Readings include primary and secondary sources, and visual materials.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 194B: Japan in the Age of the Samurai

(Same as HISTORY 94B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 194B.) From the Warring States Period to the Meiji Restoration. Topics include the three great unifiers, Tokugawa hegemony, the samurai class, Neoconfucian ideologies, suppression of Christianity, structures of social and economic control, frontiers, the other and otherness, castle-town culture, peasant rebellion, black marketing, print culture, the floating world, National Studies, food culture, samurai activism, black ships, unequal treaties, anti-foreign terrorism, restorationism, millenarianism, modernization as westernization, Japan as imagined community.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Sakakibara, S. (PI)

HISTORY 198: The History of Modern China

(Same as HISTORY 98. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 198.) This course charts major historical transformations in modern China, and will be of interest to those concerned with Chinese politics, culture, society, ethnicity, economy, gender, international relations, and the future of the world.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 200F: Doing Microhistory

The genre of microhistory was expressly invented in the 1970s to recover the voices of people usually neglected in the past, often based on scanty sources. It's an exciting and risky endeavor, as the historian often has to fill in details lacking in the sources, a historical tightrope act. Class includes three sessions with authors of microhistory who share how they met these challenges:Profs. Zipperstein and Stokes (Stanford) and Getz (San Francisco State).
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kollmann, N. (PI)

HISTORY 200J: Doing Oral History (AMSTUD 200J)

Students explore exemplary historical works based on oral histories and develop a range of practical skills while completing their own interviews. Topics include oral history and narrative theory, interview techniques, transcript preparation, and digital archiving. Students also learn how to analyze interviews using both qualitative and quantitative methods, practice writing history using oral evidence, and experiment with digital humanities approaches for disseminating oral history, including the Stanford Oral History Text Analysis Project. This course forms part of the "Doing History" series: rigorous undergraduate colloquia that introduce the practice of history within a particular field or thematic area.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 201B: Spatial History: Concepts, Methods, Problems (HISTORY 401A)

What can digital mapping and spatial analysis bring to history? How have historians written spatial history in the past? How do scholars in other disciplines deal with space and what can we learn from them? The course provides students with conceptual and technical skills in spatial history. As part of the exercise to think spatially about the past, students will receive training in Geographic Informational Science (GIS) and develop their own spatial history projects. No prior technical skills are needed for this course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Frank, Z. (PI); Zakar, A. (SI)

HISTORY 201C: The U.S., U.N. Peacekeeping, and Humanitarian War (INTNLREL 140C, INTNLREL 140X)

The involvement of U.S. and the UN in major wars and international interventions since the 1991 Gulf War. The UN Charter's provisions on the use of force, the origins and evolution of peacekeeping, the reasons for the breakthrough to peacemaking and peace enforcement in the 90s, and the ongoing debates over the legality and wisdom of humanitarian intervention. Case studies include Croatia and Bosnia, Somalia, Rwanda, Kosovo, East Timor, and Afghanistan. *International Relations majors taking this course to fulfill the WiM requirement should enroll in INTNLREL 140C for 5 units.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Patenaude, B. (PI)

HISTORY 203C: History of Ignorance

Scholars pay a lot of attention to knowledge--how it arises and impacts society--but much less attention has been given to ignorance, even though its impacts are equally profound. Here we explore the political history of ignorance, through case studies including: corporate denials of harms from particular products (tobacco, asbestos), climate change denialism, and creationist rejections of Darwinian evolution. Students will be expected to produce a research paper tracing the origins and impact of a particular form of ignorance.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Proctor, R. (PI)

HISTORY 209J: History of Surveillance (GERMAN 112, GERMAN 312, HISTORY 309J)

The question of surveillance (and its limits) is increasingly becoming a concern for individuals, organizations, and states around the globe. Indeed, from NSA databases to Alexa recordings, surveillance seems to be an unavoidable aspect of modern life. But how did surveillance become an everyday experience? This course explores the technological advancements, political aims, ideological commitments, and military goals that have fueled the rise of surveillance, especially throughout the past century. We will examine the ways in which states and organizations have developed surveillance programs and the consequences that these programs have had on both the watchers and the watched.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Anderson, C. (PI)

HISTORY 209S: Research Seminar for Majors

Required of History majors. How to conduct original, historical research and analysis, including methods such as using the libraries and archives at Stanford and elsewhere, and working collaboratively to frame topics, identify sources, and develop analyses. Autumn quarter focuses on American Political History and Race, Gender, Sexuality in U.S.; Winter quarter on Early Modern Travel Accounts and The Americas; Spring quarter on Modern Times and Open Topic.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 225E: From Vladimir to Putin: Key Themes in Russian History (HISTORY 325E, REES 225E)

Formative issues in Russian history from Muscovy to the present: autocracy and totalitarianism; tsars, emperors, and party secretaries; multi-ethnicity and nationalism; serfdom, peasantry; rebellions and revolutions, dissent and opposition; law and legality; public and private spheres; religion and atheism; patterns of collapse. Class format will be discussion of one to two assigned books or major articles per class.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 231G: European Reformations (HISTORY 331G, RELIGST 231, RELIGST 331)

Readings in and discussion of theological and social aspects of sixteenth century reformations: Luther, Radical Reform, Calvin, and Council of Trent, missionary expansion, religious conflict, creative and artistic expressions. Texts include primary sources and secondary scholarly essays and monographs.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 232G: Early Modern Cities (HISTORY 332G)

Colloquium on the history of early modern European cities, covering urbanization, street life, neighborhoods, fortifications, guilds and confraternities, charity, vagrancy, and begging, public health, city-countryside relationship, urban constitutions, and confederations. Assignments include annotated bibliography, book review, and a final paper. Second-quarter continuation of research seminar available (HIST299S or HIST402).
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stokes, L. (PI)

HISTORY 233C: Two British Revolutions (HISTORY 333C)

Current scholarship on Britain,1640-1700, focusing on political and religious history. Topics include: causes and consequences of the English civil war and revolution; rise and fall of revolutionary Puritanism; the Restoration; popular politics in the late 17th century; changing contours of religious life; the crisis leading to the Glorious Revolution; and the new order that emerged after the deposing of James II.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Como, D. (PI)

HISTORY 235D: When Worlds Collide: The Trial of Galileo (HISTORY 335D)

In 1633, the Italian mathematician Galileo was tried and condemned for advocating that the sun, not the earth, was the center of the cosmos. The Catholic Church did not formally admit that Galileo was right until 1992. Examines the many factors that led to the trial of Galileo and looks at multiple perspectives on this signal event in the history of science and religion. Considers the nature and definition of intellectual heresy in the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, and examines the writings of Galileo's infamous predecessor Giordano Bruno (burned at the stake in 1600). Looks closely at documents surrounding the trial and related literature on Renaissance and Reformation Italy in order to understand the perspectives of various participants in this famous event. Focal point of seminar involves the examination of the many different histories that can be produced from Galileo's trial. What, in the end, were the crimes of Galileo?
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Findlen, P. (PI)

HISTORY 236J: A Tour of Dangerous Ideas: Radical Thinkers in Modern Europe (HISTORY 336J)

In this course we will examine ideas radical to their context in modern European thought, paying close attention to what it has meant to explain features of society, government, and politics in terms of power. What is power? What is human nature, and do all humans possess natural rights? How is human identity interwoven with the practice of power? What makes an idea radical? We will examine these and other questions through close readings of seven thinkers whose ideas shaped the modern period: John Locke, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Mary Wollstonecraft, John Stuart Mill, Karl Marx, C.L.R. James, and Michel Foucault.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pegg, J. (PI)

HISTORY 237D: The French Revolution and the Birth of Modern Politics (HISTORY 337D)

(Students who have taken HISTORY 134 should not enroll in this course.) This course will focus on the birth of modern politics in the French Revolution. The goal will be to understand the structural contradictions of the French monarchy in the pre-revolutionary period, the reasons for the monarchy's failure to resolve those contradictions, and the political dynamic unleashed as they were solved by the revolutionary action of 1789. Sovereignty, democracy, rights, representation, and terror will be principal themes. Lectures will be combined with close reading and discussions of political and philosophical writings of the period.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Baker, K. (PI)

HISTORY 242G: Spaces and Practices of Natural History (HISTORY 342G)

Gentleman scientists once practiced natural history by studying specimens collected from around the world, stored in cabinets of curiosity. From the 17th to 19th centuries, natural history moved out of the cabinet and into the field; these environments required new ways of thinking and different types of scientific workers. This course will track how new spaces, practices, and people became associated with natural history and explore how they shaped the content of the field and the social contours of science.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Williams, J. (PI)

HISTORY 243G: Tobacco and Health in World History (HISTORY 343G)

Cigarettes are the world's leading cause of death--but how did we come into this world, where 6 trillion cigarettes are smoked every year? Here we explore the political, cultural, and technological origins of the cigarette and cigarette epidemic, using the tobacco industry's 80 million pages of secret documents. Topics include the history of cigarette advertising and cigarette design, the role of the tobacco industry in fomenting climate change denial, and questions raised by the testimony of experts in court.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Proctor, R. (PI)

HISTORY 246F: The African State: An Inconvenient History

This course offers a history of the formation of postcolonial African states and how they came to be the way they are now. It will explore what exactly is meant by a "state", as well as examine the forms of governments that existed within Africa prior to, and during colonial rule. The course looks at structures and institutions the colonial state erected and what effects they had on their succeeding African states.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Boakye, O. (PI)

HISTORY 252B: Diplomacy on the Ground: Case Studies in the Challenges of Representing Your Country (INTNLREL 174)

The tragic death of Ambassador Chris Stevens has recently highlighted the dangers of diplomacy in the modern era. This class will look at how Americans in embassies have historically confronted questions such as authoritarian rule, human rights abuses, violent changes of government, and covert action. Case studies will include the Berlin embassy in the 1930s, Tehran in 1979, and George Kennan's experiences in Moscow, among others. Recommended for students contemplating careers in diplomatic service. *Course satisfies the WiM requirement for International Relations majors. As space is limited, first-year students must obtain the instructor's prior consent before enrolling.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rakove, R. (PI)

HISTORY 254: Popular Culture and American Nature

Despite John Muir, Aldo Leopold, and Rachel Carson, it is arguable that the Disney studios have more to do with molding popular attitudes toward the natural world than politicians, ecologists, and activists. Disney as the central figure in the 20th-century American creation of nature. How Disney, the products of his studio, and other primary and secondary texts see environmentalism, science, popular culture, and their interrelationships.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; White, R. (PI)

HISTORY 261G: Presidents and Foreign Policy in Modern History (INTNLREL 173)

Nothing better illustrates the evolution of the modern presidency than the arena of foreign policy. This class will examine the changing role and choices of successive presidential administrations over the past century, examining such factors as geopolitics, domestic politics, the bureaucracy, ideology, psychology, and culture. Students will be encouraged to think historically about the institution of the presidency, while examining specific case studies, from the First World War to the conflicts of the 21st century.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rakove, R. (PI)

HISTORY 264: History of Prisons and Immigration Detention (AMSTUD 264, CSRE 264, HISTORY 364)

This course will explore the history of the growing prison and immigration detention systems in the United States. They will pay particular attention to how they developed and how they affect different populations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Minian Andjel, A. (PI)

HISTORY 269F: Modern American History: From Civil Rights to Human Rights (HISTORY 369F)

(History 269F is an undergraduate course offered for 5 units; History 369F is a graduate course offered for 4-5 units.) This focuses on American social justice movements during the years since the passage of landmark civil rights legislation during the 1960s, with particular emphasis on efforts to extend rights to all people.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Carson, C. (PI)

HISTORY 280B: The Birth of Islam: Authority, Community, and Resistance (GLOBAL 134, GLOBAL 234, HISTORY 380B)

This course explores the historical problem of how authority and community (in both the political and religious sense) were defined and challenged in the early Islamic period. Chronological topics covered include: the political, cultural, and religious world of Late Antiquity into which Muhammad was born; the crystallization of a small community of believers who supported Muhammad's message of radical monotheism and aided him in the conquest and conversion of the Arabian Peninsula; the problems of legacy and leadership in the community of the faithful after Muhammad's death; the Arabo-Islamic conquests beyond Arabia during the 7th and early 8th centuries and the establishment of the first Islamic empire under the rule of the Umayyad clan; the Sunni/Shi'a split (and further splits in Shi'ism); the revolution of 750 A.D. and overthrow of the Umayyads by the 'Abbasids; the flourishing of a sophisticated world of learning and culture under the 'Abbasids; and the waning of the 'Abbasids empire in the tenth century and political reconfiguration of the Islamic lands.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Izzo, J. (PI)

HISTORY 284E: Contemporary Muslim Political Thought (HISTORY 384E)

This course aims to provide an intellectual history of contemporary Muslim political thought. It presents post-nineteenth century Muslim contributions to political thought. It is designed as a survey of some major thinkers from the Arab world to Iran and Southeast Asia, from Turkey to North America, who sought to interpret Islam's basic sources and Islamic intellectual legacy. Our readings include primary texts by Tahtawi, Tunisi, Afghani, Rida, Huda Sharawi, Qutb, Shariati, and Mernissi among other prominent figures. We will analyze recurring ideas in this body of thought such as decline, civilization, rationality, ijtihad (Islamic independent reasoning), shura (deliberative decision-making), democracy, secularism, Muslim unity, khilafah (caliphate and vicegerency), freedom, equality, and justice. We will discuss their current significance for the ongoing theoretical debates in Muslim political thought, Muslim intellectual history, and comparative political theory.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Yenigun, H. (PI)

HISTORY 286D: Yours in Struggle: African Americans and Jews in the 20th Century U.S. (JEWISHST 286D)

This colloquium explores the history of African Americans and Jews in 20th century US beginning with Jewish immigration from Eastern Europe and the Great Migration to America's urban centers. It considers the geographical and economic tensions that developed between two minority groups living in close proximity; the appropriation of black culture; Jewish claims to whiteness and performance of blackness; intercommunal relations during the Civil Rights movement; the breakdown of the black-Jewish alliance in the late 1960s; and the lingering ramifications of this shift today.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Walters, A. (PI)

HISTORY 297G: Rulers, Reformers, Radicals: History of India in Two Centuries

This course traces the cultural, religious, literary, and political lineages of India during the last two centuries. It investigates the conditions and impact of colonialism in the formation of the contemporary subcontinent. In doing so, the course examines the ways in which Indians changed their society, culture, and identities as they became entwined with colonial, imperial, and global forces. Over the course of the quarter, we will address the following questions: What was the nature of colonial rule in India? How did the process of colonization shape questions of gender and class, race and caste in India? In societies as diverse as India, is anticolonialism synonymous with nationalism?
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Anushree, A. (PI)

HISTORY 299M: Undergraduate Directed Research: Martin Luther King, Jr., Research and Education Institute

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Carson, C. (PI)

HISTORY 299P: Mastering Uncertainty: The Power of Archival Thinking (HISTORY 399P)

When confronted with chaos and uncertainty, do you know how to stay calm, ask the right questions, and find the answers? Archival researchers do. Do you realize that less than 1 percent of primary sources have been digitized, and that 99 percent still exist in their original formats in collections, small and large, scattered all across the world? Do you know how to find them and use them? Archival researchers do. Through hands-on exercises in Stanford¿s archives, students learn the fundamentals of archival research. Pursuing their own research interests, students will learn to become self-sufficient, independent researchers capable of navigating uncertainty and producing knowledge--a skill set in demand no matter what their major or post-graduate plans. Instructor permission required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mullaney, T. (PI)

HISTORY 302: Technopolitics: Materiality, Power, Theory (ANTHRO 302A)

This graduate readings seminar provides a lively introduction to some of the major themes and issues in the field of Science and Technology Studies (STS). How do technologies and material assemblages perform power? How are their designs and uses shaped by social, cultural, and political dynamics? How do they shape those dynamics? The course draws on an interdisciplinary body of literature in humanities and social science, mixing theoretical material with more empirically oriented studies, and classics with new scholarship.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hecht, G. (PI)

HISTORY 303C: History of Ignorance

Scholars pay a lot of attention to knowledge--how it arises and impacts society--but much less attention has been given to ignorance, even though its impacts are equally profound. Here we explore the political history of ignorance, through case studies including: corporate denials of harms from particular products (tobacco, asbestos), climate change denialism, and creationist rejections of Darwinian evolution. Students will be expected to produce a research paper tracing the origins and impact of a particular form of ignorance.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Proctor, R. (PI)

HISTORY 304: Approaches to History

For first-year History and Classics Ph.D. students. This course explores ideas and debates that have animated historical discourse and shaped historiographical practice over the past half-century or so. The works we will be discussing raise fundamental questions about how historians imagine the past as they try to write about it, how they constitute it as a domain of study, how they can claim to know it, and how (and why) they argue about it.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Wigen, K. (PI)

HISTORY 309J: History of Surveillance (GERMAN 112, GERMAN 312, HISTORY 209J)

The question of surveillance (and its limits) is increasingly becoming a concern for individuals, organizations, and states around the globe. Indeed, from NSA databases to Alexa recordings, surveillance seems to be an unavoidable aspect of modern life. But how did surveillance become an everyday experience? This course explores the technological advancements, political aims, ideological commitments, and military goals that have fueled the rise of surveillance, especially throughout the past century. We will examine the ways in which states and organizations have developed surveillance programs and the consequences that these programs have had on both the watchers and the watched.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Anderson, C. (PI)

HISTORY 313: Core Colloquium: Graduate Readings in Medieval History

This course serves as a graduate-level introduction to major themes, problems, methods, and historiographical traditions in medieval European history.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dorin, R. (PI)

HISTORY 325E: From Vladimir to Putin: Key Themes in Russian History (HISTORY 225E, REES 225E)

Formative issues in Russian history from Muscovy to the present: autocracy and totalitarianism; tsars, emperors, and party secretaries; multi-ethnicity and nationalism; serfdom, peasantry; rebellions and revolutions, dissent and opposition; law and legality; public and private spheres; religion and atheism; patterns of collapse. Class format will be discussion of one to two assigned books or major articles per class.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 331G: European Reformations (HISTORY 231G, RELIGST 231, RELIGST 331)

Readings in and discussion of theological and social aspects of sixteenth century reformations: Luther, Radical Reform, Calvin, and Council of Trent, missionary expansion, religious conflict, creative and artistic expressions. Texts include primary sources and secondary scholarly essays and monographs.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 332G: Early Modern Cities (HISTORY 232G)

Colloquium on the history of early modern European cities, covering urbanization, street life, neighborhoods, fortifications, guilds and confraternities, charity, vagrancy, and begging, public health, city-countryside relationship, urban constitutions, and confederations. Assignments include annotated bibliography, book review, and a final paper. Second-quarter continuation of research seminar available (HIST299S or HIST402).
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stokes, L. (PI)

HISTORY 333C: Two British Revolutions (HISTORY 233C)

Current scholarship on Britain,1640-1700, focusing on political and religious history. Topics include: causes and consequences of the English civil war and revolution; rise and fall of revolutionary Puritanism; the Restoration; popular politics in the late 17th century; changing contours of religious life; the crisis leading to the Glorious Revolution; and the new order that emerged after the deposing of James II.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Como, D. (PI)

HISTORY 335D: When Worlds Collide: The Trial of Galileo (HISTORY 235D)

In 1633, the Italian mathematician Galileo was tried and condemned for advocating that the sun, not the earth, was the center of the cosmos. The Catholic Church did not formally admit that Galileo was right until 1992. Examines the many factors that led to the trial of Galileo and looks at multiple perspectives on this signal event in the history of science and religion. Considers the nature and definition of intellectual heresy in the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, and examines the writings of Galileo's infamous predecessor Giordano Bruno (burned at the stake in 1600). Looks closely at documents surrounding the trial and related literature on Renaissance and Reformation Italy in order to understand the perspectives of various participants in this famous event. Focal point of seminar involves the examination of the many different histories that can be produced from Galileo's trial. What, in the end, were the crimes of Galileo?
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Findlen, P. (PI)

HISTORY 336J: A Tour of Dangerous Ideas: Radical Thinkers in Modern Europe (HISTORY 236J)

In this course we will examine ideas radical to their context in modern European thought, paying close attention to what it has meant to explain features of society, government, and politics in terms of power. What is power? What is human nature, and do all humans possess natural rights? How is human identity interwoven with the practice of power? What makes an idea radical? We will examine these and other questions through close readings of seven thinkers whose ideas shaped the modern period: John Locke, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Mary Wollstonecraft, John Stuart Mill, Karl Marx, C.L.R. James, and Michel Foucault.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pegg, J. (PI)

HISTORY 337D: The French Revolution and the Birth of Modern Politics (HISTORY 237D)

(Students who have taken HISTORY 134 should not enroll in this course.) This course will focus on the birth of modern politics in the French Revolution. The goal will be to understand the structural contradictions of the French monarchy in the pre-revolutionary period, the reasons for the monarchy's failure to resolve those contradictions, and the political dynamic unleashed as they were solved by the revolutionary action of 1789. Sovereignty, democracy, rights, representation, and terror will be principal themes. Lectures will be combined with close reading and discussions of political and philosophical writings of the period.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Baker, K. (PI)

HISTORY 342G: Spaces and Practices of Natural History (HISTORY 242G)

Gentleman scientists once practiced natural history by studying specimens collected from around the world, stored in cabinets of curiosity. From the 17th to 19th centuries, natural history moved out of the cabinet and into the field; these environments required new ways of thinking and different types of scientific workers. This course will track how new spaces, practices, and people became associated with natural history and explore how they shaped the content of the field and the social contours of science.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Williams, J. (PI)

HISTORY 343G: Tobacco and Health in World History (HISTORY 243G)

Cigarettes are the world's leading cause of death--but how did we come into this world, where 6 trillion cigarettes are smoked every year? Here we explore the political, cultural, and technological origins of the cigarette and cigarette epidemic, using the tobacco industry's 80 million pages of secret documents. Topics include the history of cigarette advertising and cigarette design, the role of the tobacco industry in fomenting climate change denial, and questions raised by the testimony of experts in court.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Proctor, R. (PI)

HISTORY 345A: Africa in the Era of the Slave Trade

The slave trade, including the trans-Saharan, Indian Ocean, and trans-Atlantic trades, constituted nearly a millennium of interaction with the wider world and set in motion transformations in African societies, polities, and cultures. Topics include the debates about slavery in Africa, the impact of the slave trade on African societies, state formation, economic change, religious change, and household change in the period before the scramble for Africa in the late 19th century.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Roberts, R. (PI)

HISTORY 351A: Core in American History, Part I

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rakove, J. (PI)

HISTORY 364: History of Prisons and Immigration Detention (AMSTUD 264, CSRE 264, HISTORY 264)

This course will explore the history of the growing prison and immigration detention systems in the United States. They will pay particular attention to how they developed and how they affect different populations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Minian Andjel, A. (PI)

HISTORY 369F: Modern American History: From Civil Rights to Human Rights (HISTORY 269F)

(History 269F is an undergraduate course offered for 5 units; History 369F is a graduate course offered for 4-5 units.) This focuses on American social justice movements during the years since the passage of landmark civil rights legislation during the 1960s, with particular emphasis on efforts to extend rights to all people.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Carson, C. (PI)

HISTORY 371: Graduate Colloquium: Explorations in Latin American History and Historiography (ILAC 371)

Introduction to modern Latin American history and historiography, including how to read and use primary sources for independent research.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Wolfe, M. (PI)

HISTORY 380B: The Birth of Islam: Authority, Community, and Resistance (GLOBAL 134, GLOBAL 234, HISTORY 280B)

This course explores the historical problem of how authority and community (in both the political and religious sense) were defined and challenged in the early Islamic period. Chronological topics covered include: the political, cultural, and religious world of Late Antiquity into which Muhammad was born; the crystallization of a small community of believers who supported Muhammad's message of radical monotheism and aided him in the conquest and conversion of the Arabian Peninsula; the problems of legacy and leadership in the community of the faithful after Muhammad's death; the Arabo-Islamic conquests beyond Arabia during the 7th and early 8th centuries and the establishment of the first Islamic empire under the rule of the Umayyad clan; the Sunni/Shi'a split (and further splits in Shi'ism); the revolution of 750 A.D. and overthrow of the Umayyads by the 'Abbasids; the flourishing of a sophisticated world of learning and culture under the 'Abbasids; and the waning of the 'Abbasids empire in the tenth century and political reconfiguration of the Islamic lands.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Izzo, J. (PI)

HISTORY 384E: Contemporary Muslim Political Thought (HISTORY 284E)

This course aims to provide an intellectual history of contemporary Muslim political thought. It presents post-nineteenth century Muslim contributions to political thought. It is designed as a survey of some major thinkers from the Arab world to Iran and Southeast Asia, from Turkey to North America, who sought to interpret Islam's basic sources and Islamic intellectual legacy. Our readings include primary texts by Tahtawi, Tunisi, Afghani, Rida, Huda Sharawi, Qutb, Shariati, and Mernissi among other prominent figures. We will analyze recurring ideas in this body of thought such as decline, civilization, rationality, ijtihad (Islamic independent reasoning), shura (deliberative decision-making), democracy, secularism, Muslim unity, khilafah (caliphate and vicegerency), freedom, equality, and justice. We will discuss their current significance for the ongoing theoretical debates in Muslim political thought, Muslim intellectual history, and comparative political theory.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Yenigun, H. (PI)

HISTORY 391B: The City in Imperial China

The evolution of cities in the early imperial, medieval, and early modern periods. Topics include physical structure, social order, cultural forms, economic roles, relations to rural hinterlands, and the contrast between imperial capitals and other cities. Comparative cases from European history. Readings include primary and secondary sources, and visual materials.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 393: Frontier Expansion and Ethnic Statecraft in the Qing Empire (CHINA 393)

The legacy of the Qing dynasty in the territorial boundaries claimed by the People's Republic of China including the frontier zones that lie outside China proper. How the Qing acquired and ruled its frontier territories. Growth and migration of the Han Chinese population. How the dynasty's Manchu rulers managed ethnic difference. Consequences of Qing expansionism and ethnic statecraft for subject peoples and for the dynasty itself. At what point and by what processes did the Qing become China.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sommer, M. (PI)

HISTORY 399P: Mastering Uncertainty: The Power of Archival Thinking (HISTORY 299P)

When confronted with chaos and uncertainty, do you know how to stay calm, ask the right questions, and find the answers? Archival researchers do. Do you realize that less than 1 percent of primary sources have been digitized, and that 99 percent still exist in their original formats in collections, small and large, scattered all across the world? Do you know how to find them and use them? Archival researchers do. Through hands-on exercises in Stanford¿s archives, students learn the fundamentals of archival research. Pursuing their own research interests, students will learn to become self-sufficient, independent researchers capable of navigating uncertainty and producing knowledge--a skill set in demand no matter what their major or post-graduate plans. Instructor permission required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mullaney, T. (PI)

HISTORY 401A: Spatial History: Concepts, Methods, Problems (HISTORY 201B)

What can digital mapping and spatial analysis bring to history? How have historians written spatial history in the past? How do scholars in other disciplines deal with space and what can we learn from them? The course provides students with conceptual and technical skills in spatial history. As part of the exercise to think spatially about the past, students will receive training in Geographic Informational Science (GIS) and develop their own spatial history projects. No prior technical skills are needed for this course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Frank, Z. (PI); Zakar, A. (SI)

HISTORY 433A: Research Seminar in Modern Europe

Students will complete an article-length research paper based on primary sources.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Daughton, J. (PI)

HISTORY 448A: Colonial States and African Societies, Part I

(History 248S is an undergraduate course offered for 5 units; History 448A is a graduate course offered for 4-5 units.) Colonialism set in motion profound transformations of African societies. These transformations did not occur immediately following military conquest, nor did they occur uniformly throughout the continent. This research seminar will focus directly on the encounter between the colonial state and African societies. The seminar will examine problems of social transformation, the role of the colonial state, and the actions of Africans. Following four weeks of collloquim style discussion, students then embark on independent research on the encounter between one colonial state and its constituent African societies.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Roberts, R. (PI)
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