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HISTORY 1C: Global History: The Modern Age

Explores the making of our modern world. Investigates the interconnected histories of revolution, war, imperialism, migration, race, slavery, democracy, rebellion, nationalism, feminism, socialism, fascism, genocide, anti-colonialism, neoliberalism, and populist authoritarianism. Analyzing memoirs, novels, films, and other sources, we will investigate how key political ideas have transformed societies, cultures, and economies across the globe from the late eighteenth century through to the present.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 2S: The Stardust of Empires: History of National Self-Determination

The global map is carved along ethnonational lines. But how did we get here? Why did the centuries' old empires vanish, to be replaced by nation-states? How have populations evolved into nations, gained identity and acquired political sovereignty? What are the competing political forms of nationhood? Will nation-states themselves endure? This Sources and Methods course tackles these questions and more by focusing on the national self-determination phenomenon in the 19th and 20th century Europe and beyond. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Spr, offered once only | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Nurmis, K. (PI)

HISTORY 3D: Dangerous Ideas (ARTHIST 36, COMPLIT 36A, EALC 36, ENGLISH 71, ETHICSOC 36X, FRENCH 36, MUSIC 36H, PHIL 36, POLISCI 70, SLAVIC 36)

Ideas matter. Concepts such as race, progress, and equality have inspired social movements, shaped political systems, and dramatically influenced the lives of individuals. Others, like gender identity, universal basic income, and historical memory play an important role in contemporary debates in the United States. All of these ideas are contested, and they have a real power to change lives, for better and for worse. In this one-unit class we will examine these dangerous ideas. Each week, a faculty member from a different department in the humanities and arts will explore a concept that has shaped human experience across time and space. Some weeks will have short reading assignments, but you are not required to purchase any materials.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Anderson, R. (PI)

HISTORY 9R: Humanities Research Intensive (ENGLISH 9R)

Everyone knows that scientists do research, but how do you do research in the humanities? This five-day course, taught over spring break, will introduce you to the excitement of humanities research, while preparing you to develop an independent summer project or to work as a research assistant for a Stanford professor. Through hands-on experience with archival materials in Special Collections, you will learn how to formulate a solid research question; how to gather the evidence that will help you to answer that question; how to write up research results; how to critique the research of your fellow students; how to deliver your results in a public setting; and how to write an effective grant proposal. Students who complete this course become Humanities Research Intensive Fellows and receive post-program mentorship during spring quarter, ongoing opportunities to engage with faculty and advanced undergraduates, a small stipend for research materials, and eligibility to apply for additional funding to support follow-up research. Freshmen and sophomores only. All majors and undeclared students welcome. No prior research experience necessary. Enrollment limited: apply by 11/12/18 at undergrad.stanford.edu/hri.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

HISTORY 10B: Renaissance to Revolution: Early Modern Europe

(Same as HISTORY 110B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 110B.) Few historical settings offer a more illuminating perspective on our world today than old-regime Europe. Few cast a darker shadow. Science and the enlightened ambition to master nature and society, the emergence of statehood and its grasp for human mobility, bloodshed and coexistence in the face of religious fragmentation, as well as capitalism and the birth of modern finance: this course surveys some of the most consequential developments in European societies between the late fifteenth and the early nineteenth century.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stokes, L. (PI)

HISTORY 14N: Making the Middle Ages

Through hands-on engagement with Stanford's diverse collections of medieval artifacts-- from grungy coins to lavish manuscripts-- this course offers an introduction to the cultures of Europe and the Mediterranean world from 400-1400 CE. In addition, the course will explore competing contemporary understandings of the "Middle Ages" and the role of the "medieval" in shaping what it means to be "modern".
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dorin, R. (PI)

HISTORY 22: St. Petersburg BOSP Seminar

Lectures and readings on Russian history as background for the Overseas Seminar to St. Petersburg. Students prepare a research project to complete during the seminar and submit a written report on topic, bibliography and theme.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

HISTORY 30S: Séances & Spirits: Science and the Occult during the Long 19th Century

The 19th century was an age of secularism, rationality, industrialization, urbanization, and scientific and technological innovation. But it was also marked by obsession with the paranormal, as people held séances, summoned ghosts, and performed magic rituals. Exploring this paradox, this course will focus on Britain, with occasional forays to America. Using sources like spirit photographs, séance transcripts, and occult objects in the Stanford archives, we will examine the origins, spread, and significance of our modern fascination with the "other world." Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Temple, M. (PI)

HISTORY 31Q: Resistance and Collaboration in Hitler's Europe

What is resistance and what did it entail in Nazi-occupied Europe? What prompted some to resist, while others accommodated or actively collaborated with the occupiers? How have postwar societies remembered their resistance movements and collaborationists? This seminar examines how Europeans responded to the Nazi order during World War II. We will explore experiences under occupation; dilemmas the subject peoples faced; the range of resistance motivations, goals, activities, and strategies; and postwar memorialization. Select cases from Western, Eastern, and Mediterranean Europe.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Batinic, J. (PI)

HISTORY 36N: Gay Autobiography (FEMGEN 36N)

Preference to freshmen. Gender, identity, and solidarity as represented in nine autobiographies: Isherwood, Ackerley, Duberman, Monette, Louganis, Barbin, Cammermeyer, Gingrich, and Lorde. To what degree do these writers view sexual orientation as a defining feature of their selves? Is there a difference between the way men and women view identity? What politics follow from these writers' experiences?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Robinson, P. (PI)

HISTORY 36S: Martin Luther's World: Rebellion, Heresy, and Dissent in Sixteenth-Century Europe

Until recently the Protestant Reformation has occupied a privileged position in the history of Western Civilization, and Martin Luther has played the leading role in that story. The Reformation, no less than the Renaissance, encompassed a confluence of ideas, methods, and mentalities. This course uses Luther as a lens to study the history of the sixteenth-century Reformation in its late-medieval context as well as the writing of that history in contemporaneous and later centuries. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Amato, J. (PI)

HISTORY 45B: Africa in the Twentieth Century

(Same as HISTORY 145B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 145B.) The challenges facing Africans from when the continent fell under colonial rule until independence. Case studies of colonialism and its impact on African men and women drawn from West, Central, and Southern Africa. Novels, plays, polemics, and autobiographies written by Africans.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 50C: The United States in the Twentieth Century (AFRICAAM 50C)

(Same as HISTORY 150C. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 150C.) 100 years ago, women and most African-Americans couldn't vote; automobiles were rare and computers didn't exist; and the U.S. was a minor power in a world dominated by European empires. This course surveys politics, culture, and social movements to answer the question: How did we get from there to here? Two historical research "labs" or archival sessions focus on the Great Depression in the 1930s and radical and conservative students movements of the 1960s. Suitable for non-majors and majors alike.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 57: The Constitution: A Short History (POLISCI 128F)

(Same as HISTORY 157. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 157.) A broad survey of the Constitution, from its Revolutionary origins to the contemporary disputes over interpretation. Topics include the invention of the written constitution and interpretative canons; the origins of judicial review; the Civil War and Reconstruction as constitutional crises; the era of substantive due process; the rights revolution; and the Constitution in wartime.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 78: Film and History of Latin American Revolutions and Counterrevolutions (HISTORY 178)

Note: Students who have completed HISTORY 78N or 78Q should not enroll in this course. In this course we will watch and critique films made about Latin America's 20th century revolutions focusing on the Cuban, Chilean and Nicaraguan revolutions. We will analyze the films as both social and political commentaries and as aesthetic and cultural works, alongside archivally-based histories of these revolutions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Wolfe, M. (PI); Poh, G. (TA)

HISTORY 95: Modern Korean History

(Same as HISTORY 195. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 195.) This lecture course provides a general introduction to the history of modern Korea. Themes include the characteristics of the Chosôn dynasty, reforms and rebellions in the nineteenth century, Korean nationalism; Japan's colonial rule and Korean identities; decolonization and the Korean War; and the different state-building processes in North and South, South Korea's democratization in 1980s, and the current North Korean crisis.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Moon, Y. (PI); Kim, C. (TA)

HISTORY 97: Southeast Asia: From Antiquity to the Modern Era (HISTORY 197)

The history of S.E. Asia, comprising Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam, Burma, Cambodia, and Laos, from antiquity to the present. The spread of Indian cultural influences, the rise of indigenous states, and the emergence of globally linked trade networks. European colonization, economic transformation, the rise of nationalism, the development of the modern state, and the impact of globalization.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 98: The History of Modern China

(Same as HISTORY 198. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 198.) Lecture course tracking the emergence of modern China from the Manchu conquest of 1644 to the US-China trade war of 2018. Draws on historical essays, fiction, art, and film to broaden your perspectives. Helps you understand China's historical transformations from empire to nation-state, and from midcentury Maoism to today's "socialism with Chinese characteristics." Provides students with background to intelligently discuss Chinese social, political, cultural, and economic changes, as well as an understanding of nationalism, gender, ethnicity, and sexuality.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Elmore, A. (PI)

HISTORY 102: History of the International System (INTNLREL 102)

After defining the characteristics of the international system at the beginning of the twentieth century, this course reviews the primary developments in its functioning in the century that followed. Topics include the major wars and peace settlements; the emergence of Nazism and Communism; the development of the Cold War and nuclear weapons; the rise of China, India, and the EU; and the impact of Islamic terrorism. The role of international institutions and international society will also be a focus as will the challenge of environment, health, poverty, and climate issues to the functioning of the system.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 102A: The Romans (CLASSICS 84)

How did a tiny village create a huge empire and shape the world, and why did it fail? Roman history, imperialism, politics, social life, economic growth, and religious change. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required; enroll in sections on Coursework.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 106A: Global Human Geography: Asia and Africa

Global patterns of demography, economic and social development, geopolitics, and cultural differentiation, covering E. Asia, S. Asia, S.E. Asia, Central Asia, N. Africa, and sub-Saharan Africa. Use of maps to depict geographical patterns and processes.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lewis, M. (PI); Zola, C. (TA)

HISTORY 110B: Renaissance to Revolution: Early Modern Europe

(Same as HISTORY 10B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 110B.) Few historical settings offer a more illuminating perspective on our world today than old-regime Europe. Few cast a darker shadow. Science and the enlightened ambition to master nature and society, the emergence of statehood and its grasp for human mobility, bloodshed and coexistence in the face of religious fragmentation, as well as capitalism and the birth of modern finance: this course surveys some of the most consequential developments in European societies between the late fifteenth and the early nineteenth century.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stokes, L. (PI)

HISTORY 114: Origins of History in Greece and Rome (CLASSICS 88)

What¿s the history of `History¿? The first ancient historians wrote about commoners and kings, conquest and power¿those who had it, those who wanted it, those without it. Their powerful ways of recounting the past still resonate today and can be harnessed to tell new stories. We will look at how ancients like Herodotus, Thucydides, Tacitus, and Livy turned stories about the past into compelling narratives of loss, growth and decline¿inventing ¿History¿ as we know it. All readings in English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ceserani, G. (PI)

HISTORY 145B: Africa in the 20th Century (AFRICAAM 145B)

(Same as HISTORY 45B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 145B.) The challenges facing Africans from when the continent fell under colonial rule until independence. Case studies of colonialism and its impact on African men and women drawn from West, Central, and Southern Africa. Novels, plays, polemics, and autobiographies written by Africans.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 150C: The United States in the Twentieth Century (AFRICAAM 150C, AMSTUD 150C)

(Same as HISTORY 50C. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 150C.) 100 years ago, women and most African-Americans couldn't vote; automobiles were rare and computers didn't exist; and the U.S. was a minor power in a world dominated by European empires. This course surveys politics, culture, and social movements to answer the question: How did we get from there to here? Two historical research "labs" or archival sessions focus on the Great Depression in the 1930s and radical and conservative students movements of the 1960s. Suitable for non-majors and majors alike.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 151: The American West (AMSTUD 124A, ARTHIST 152, ENGLISH 124, POLISCI 124A)

The American West is characterized by frontier mythology, vast distances, marked aridity, and unique political and economic characteristics. This course integrates several disciplinary perspectives into a comprehensive examination of Western North America: its history, physical geography, climate, literature, art, film, institutions, politics, demography, economy, and continuing policy challenges. Students examine themes fundamental to understanding the region: time, space, water, peoples, and boom and bust cycles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 153: Creation of the Constitution

(Same as LAW 230.) The course begins with readings setting forth the intellectual and experiential background of the framing, including common law and natural rights theory, republicanism, economic & political scientific ideas, and colonial and post-Independence experience. We then study large parts of the debates at the Constitutional Convention, primarily using Madison's Notes. Next come the ratification debates, including readings from antifederalist writers, about half of The Federalist, and overviews of the Virginia and New York ratification conventions. We conclude with the addition of the Bill of Rights. Classes consist of a combination of lecture and extensive participation by students. Elements used in grading: Exam.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; McConnell, M. (PI)

HISTORY 157: The Constitution: A Brief History (AMSTUD 157, POLISCI 128S)

A broad survey of the Constitution, from its Revolutionary origins to the contemporary disputes over interpretation. Topics include the invention of the written constitution and interpretative canons; the origins of judicial review; the Civil War and Reconstruction as constitutional crises; the era of substantive due process; the rights revolution; and the Constitution in wartime.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 178: Film and History of Latin American Revolutions and Counterrevolutions (HISTORY 78)

Note: Students who have completed HISTORY 78N or 78Q should not enroll in this course. In this course we will watch and critique films made about Latin America's 20th century revolutions focusing on the Cuban, Chilean and Nicaraguan revolutions. We will analyze the films as both social and political commentaries and as aesthetic and cultural works, alongside archivally-based histories of these revolutions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Wolfe, M. (PI); Poh, G. (TA)

HISTORY 195: Modern Korean History (HISTORY 395)

(Same as HISTORY 95. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 195.) This lecture course provides a general introduction to the history of modern Korea. Themes include the characteristics of the Chosôn dynasty, reforms and rebellions in the nineteenth century, Korean nationalism; Japan's colonial rule and Korean identities; decolonization and the Korean War; and the different state-building processes in North and South, South Korea's democratization in 1980s, and the current North Korean crisis.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Moon, Y. (PI); Kim, C. (TA)

HISTORY 197: Southeast Asia: From Antiquity to the Modern Era (HISTORY 97)

The history of S.E. Asia, comprising Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam, Burma, Cambodia, and Laos, from antiquity to the present. The spread of Indian cultural influences, the rise of indigenous states, and the emergence of globally linked trade networks. European colonization, economic transformation, the rise of nationalism, the development of the modern state, and the impact of globalization.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 198: The History of Modern China

(Same as HISTORY 98. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 198.) Lecture course tracking the emergence of modern China from the Manchu conquest of 1644 to the US-China trade war of 2018. Draws on historical essays, fiction, art, and film to broaden your perspectives. Helps you understand China's historical transformations from empire to nation-state, and from midcentury Maoism to today's "socialism with Chinese characteristics." Provides students with background to intelligently discuss Chinese social, political, cultural, and economic changes, as well as an understanding of nationalism, gender, ethnicity, and sexuality.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Elmore, A. (PI)

HISTORY 200B: Doing Environmental History: Climate Change... the podcast

This will be a hands-on course that will emphasize how to do environmental history. Students will reflect on what it means to think historically about a pressing contemporary problem--climate change. We will ask historical questions, produce historical knowledge, and as a critical part of the course, present that knowledge to a general audience in the form of a podcast. This course forms part of the "Doing History" series: rigorous undergraduate colloquia that introduce the practice of history within a particular field or thematic area.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Warga, J. (PI); White, R. (PI)

HISTORY 200E: Doing Economic History

The course introduces major approaches to economic history such as the classical school, Malthusianism, Marxism and Dependency theories, moral economic critique, institutionalism, technological determinism, environmentalism, and the Anthropocene thesis. Using these approaches, students will explore themes including pre-modern agrarian orders; the emergence of fiscal-military state; financial and commercial expansion; diverse property regimes; the industrial revolution; growth and poverty; markets and networks; labor and capital; the rise of capitalism and imperialisms; immigration; formal and informal economies; development and underdevelopment; globalization and environmental crisis. Special emphasis will be given to the theories of the Great Divergence, namely why the West became the dominant economic power over the rest of the world and how different economic cultures responded to that. This course forms part of the "Doing History" series: rigorous undergraduate colloquia that introduce the practice of history within a particular field or thematic area.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Yaycioglu, A. (PI)

HISTORY 200G: Doing Intellectual History

A consideration of the claims made by twentieth century historians regarding the nature and methods of intellectual history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Baker, K. (PI)

HISTORY 202G: Peoples, Armies and Governments of the Second World War (HISTORY 302G)

Clausewitz conceptualized war as always consisting of a trinity of passion, chance, and reason, mirrored, respectively, in the people, army and government. Following Clausewitz, this course examines the peoples, armies, and governments that shaped World War II. Analyzes the ideological, political, diplomatic and economic motivations and constraints of the belligerents and their resulting strategies, military planning and fighting. Explores the new realities of everyday life on the home fronts and the experiences of non-combatants during the war, the final destruction of National Socialist Germany and Imperial Japan, and the emerging conflict between the victors. How the peoples, armies and governments involved perceived their possibilities and choices as a means to understand the origins, events, dynamics and implications of the greatest war in history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Vardi, G. (PI)

HISTORY 202S: The History of Genocide (HISTORY 402D, JEWISHST 282S, JEWISHST 482D)

This course will explore the history, politics, and character of genocide from the beginning of world history to the present. It will also consider the ways that the international system has developed to prevent and punish genocide.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Naimark, N. (PI)

HISTORY 204D: Advanced Topics in Agnotology (HISTORY 304D)

Advanced research into the history of ignorance. Our goal will be to explore how ignorance is created, maintained and destroyed, using case studies from topics such as tobacco denialism, global climate denialism, and other forms of resistance to knowledge making. Course culminates in a research paper on the theory and practice of agnotology, the science of ignorance.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Proctor, R. (PI)

HISTORY 204J: Religion, Violence, and Empire (HISTORY 304J)

Explores the interplay of religion and violence in the making and breaking of empires around the world from the Aztecs to al Qaida.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Crews, R. (PI)

HISTORY 205B: History of Fear (HISTORY 305B)

Whether directed at immigrants, infected airs, or the stock market, fear has often been a driving historical force. This class explores old and new approaches to the history of fear, with a focus on the early modern period. Themes include: epidemic prevention, xenophobia, dietary fears, weather phobias, concepts of anxiety, the place of fear in political theory, and political and economic uses of fear. A final project will require students to identify and explore the history of a particular fear.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Scholz, L. (PI)

HISTORY 205D: Freedom in Chains: Black Slavery in the Atlantic, 1400s-1800s (AFRICAAM 113V, AFRICAST 113V, CSRE 113V)

This course will focus on the history of slavery in the British, French, Spanish, Portuguese and Dutch Atlantic world(s), from the late 1400s to the 1800s. Its main focus will be on the experiences of enslaved Africans and their descendants. Between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries, the Europeans forcibly embarked over 10 million Africans to the Americas. Drawing on methodologies used by historians, archaeologists and anthropologists, the course will reconstruct the daily lives and the socio-economic, cultural and political histories of these captives. We will seek to hear their voices by investigating a variety of historical testimonies and recent scholarship. The course will examine slavery in the context of broader trends in Atlantic World studies, a field that has grown considerably in recent years, providing new ways of understanding historical developments across national boundaries. We will seek to identify commonalities and differences across time periods and regions and the reasons for those differences. Covered topics will include slave ship voyages, labor, agency, the creation of new identities (creolization), religion, race, gender, resistance, legacies, and memory.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lamotte, M. (PI)

HISTORY 208B: Women's Activist Response to War (FEMGEN 208B, HISTORY 308B, HUMRTS 113)

Theoretical issues, historical origins, changing forms of women's activism in response to war throughout the 20th century, and contemporary cases, such as the Russian Committee of Soldiers Mothers, Bosnian Mothers of Srebrenica, Serbian Women in Black, and the American Cindy Sheehan. Focus is on the U.S. and Eastern Europe, with attention to Israel, England, and Argentina.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 209S: Research Seminar for Majors

Required of History majors. How to conduct original, historical research and analysis, including methods such as using the libraries and archives at Stanford and elsewhere, and working collaboratively to frame topics, identify sources, and develop analyses. Autumn quarter focuses on American Political History and Comparative Colonialism; Winter quarter on Europe before 1500; Spring quarter on Gender/Race/Sexuality in U.S. History, Early Modern Travel Accounts, and Law, Society, and the Supernatural in Early Modern Europe.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 223E: Cities of Empire: An Urban Journey through Eastern Europe and the Mediterranean (HISTORY 323E, REES 204, REES 304)

This course explores the cities of the Habsburg, Ottoman and Russian empires in the dynamic and turbulent period of their greatest transformation from the 19th century through the Two World Wars. Through the reading of urban biographies of Venice and Trieste, Vienna, Budapest, Cracow, Lviv, Sarajevo, Belgrade, Salonica, and Odessa, we consider broad historical trends of political, economic, and social modernization, urbanization, identity formation, imperialism, cosmopolitanism, and orientalism. As vibrant centers of coexistence and economic exchange, social and cultural borderlands, and sites of transgression, these cities provide an ideal lens through which to examine these themes in the context of transition from imperial to post-imperial space.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Knezevic, J. (PI)

HISTORY 224D: The Soviet Civilization, Part 2 (HISTORY 424B)

Prerequisite: HISTORY 224A/424A
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Weiner, A. (PI)

HISTORY 233J: Early British Empire: Themes and Approaches (HISTORY 333J)

This course explores the history of the early British empire, beginning with the question, "What is empire?" From plantations in Ireland, through the American Revolution, a turn to the east, and into Britain's imperial century, we will investigate how the empire began and evolved, with special attention to governance, ideology, technologies of rule, domestic effects, periodization, and historiography. Readings include primary sources and secondary texts specifically chosen to illustrate a variety of approaches to writing about empire.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Williams, J. (PI)

HISTORY 235F: Camus (COMPLIT 229B, CSRE 129, FRENCH 129)

"The Don Draper of Existentialism" for Adam Gopnik, "the ideal husband of contemporary letters" for Susan Sontag, and "the admirable conjunction of a man, of an action, and of a work" for Sartre, Camus embodies the very French figure of the "intellectuel engagé," or public intellectual. From his birth in 1913 into a poor family in Algeria to the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1957, from Saint Germain-des-Prés to his predilection for the mediterranean culture, Camus captured the quest for universalism, for the politics of justice, and engaged in the great ethical battles of his time, from the fight against nazism and communism, from questioning colonial rules to the haunting Algerian War, and his complex "silence" over the war. Camus the Algerian, Camus the moralist, Camus the Resistant: through readings and films, we will explore his multiple, long-lasting legacies. Readings from Albert Camus, Kamel Daoud, Mouloud Feraoun, Alice Kaplan, Orhan Pamuk, A.B. Yehoshua, Assia Djebar, Jean-Paul Sartre, Yasmina Khadra. Movies include "The Stranger," and "Far from Men." This course is a gateway for French Studies, with special emphasis on oral proficiency. Taught in French.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ulloa, M. (PI)

HISTORY 236G: Fascism and Populism in Europe since WWI (HISTORY 336G)

Examines the continuities and discontinuities between "classic" fascism of the interwar period, its ideological variations and contexts, and the "neo-fascisms," and radical right movements in Western Europe between 1945 and 1989. Uses these contexts to analyze the dramatic growth in right-wing populism in Western and Eastern Europe since 2008.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Specter, M. (PI)

HISTORY 237J: Nationhood and Nationalism in France: Modern French history through film and fiction (FRENCH 237A, FRENCH 337, HISTORY 337J)

Europe is seeing a rise in nationalist politics, fueled by fear of economic instability and immigration. In France, Marine Le Pen's far-right populist party Rassemblement National (until June 2018 - the Front National) has dominated political debates, insisting on preserving French national sovereignty. But what is a nation? What does it mean to be French? Who is included and who is excluded? In this course we will explore the construction of the idea of France in the face of revolution, the world wars and the Holocaust, and the violent end of colonialism. By looking at these critical historical moments, we will also gain a firmer grasp of contemporary problems surrounding nationhood in France and around the world. Sources will include films, novels, pamphlets, and political speeches. Course taught in English, with an optional French section.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kassabova, B. (PI)

HISTORY 239E: Nationalism in European and World History, 18th Century until the Present (HISTORY 339E)

This course focuses on nationalism as a political and cultural phenomenon in the modern era. Through secondary and primary source readings, we study nationalist ideas, activists, movements, and state policies as well as their constructive and destructive effects across Europe and other parts of the world. Where did nationalism come from, under which conditions has it thrived, how has it shaped politics, societies, mentalities, and cultures? What did it mean to be a nationalist in different places and times?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ertz, S. (PI)

HISTORY 243C: People, Plants, and Medicine: Colonial Science and Medicine (HISTORY 343C)

Explores the global exchange of knowledge, technologies, plants, peoples, disease, and medicines. Considers primarily Africans, Amerindians, and Europeans in the eighteenth-century West but also takes examples from other knowledge traditions. Readings treat science and medicine in relation to voyaging, colonialism, slavery, racism, plants, and environmental exchange. Colonial sciences and medicines were important militarily and strategically for positioning emerging nation states in global struggles for land and resources.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Schiebinger, L. (PI)

HISTORY 244F: Beyond Pink and Blue: Gender in Tech (FEMGEN 344F, HISTORY 344F)

This d-school seminar prototypes concepts and methods for "inclusive" design. From the moment we arrive on the planet, gender shapes our perception of the world. Examples of products (including objects, services, and systems) gone awry will serve as prompts for design activities, challenges, and discussions on gender issues to illustrate the different needs of women, men, and gender-fluid people. Class sessions mix use case explorations with design methodology, design thinking abilities, and guest speakers from technology, design, and academia. Students will be asked to work in interdisciplinary teams on several design challenges, culminating in the development of a toolkit for inclusive design. Methods will interact in crucial ways to create "intersectional thinking" (i.e., to consider how gender, ethnicity, sexuality, socio-economic status, etc. work together to require new solutions in design). Topics include: algorithms, media, seat belts for pregnant women, robotics, assistive technologies, tech for developing worlds, video games, urban/rural design, software development, and many more. Admission by application only. Visit d.school.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 248: Religion, Radicalization and Media in Africa since 1945 (AFRICAST 248, AFRICAST 348, HISTORY 348, RELIGST 230X, RELIGST 330X)

What are the paths to religious radicalization, and what role have media- new and old- played in these conversion journeys? We examine how Pentecostal Christians and Reformist Muslims in countries such as South Africa, Nigeria, Sudan, and Ethiopia have used multiple media forms- newspapers, cell phones, TV, radio, and the internet- to gain new converts, contest the authority of colonial and post-colonial states, construct transnational communities, and position themselves as key political players.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Cabrita, J. (PI)

HISTORY 249S: Colonial States and African Societies, Part II (HISTORY 448B)

Second part of the research seminar offered in the Winter. Students continue their research and present their penultimate drafts in week 8.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Roberts, R. (PI)

HISTORY 251G: Topics in Constitutional History (AMSTUD 251, POLISCI 222S)

Ideas of rights in American history emphasizing the problem of defining constitutional rights, the free exercise of religion, freedom of expression, and the contemporary debate over rights talk and the idiom of human rights.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rakove, J. (PI)

HISTORY 252B: Diplomacy on the Ground: Case Studies in the Challenges of Representing Your Country (INTNLREL 174)

The tragic death of Ambassador Chris Stevens has recently highlighted the dangers of diplomacy in the modern era. This class will look at how Americans in embassies have historically confronted questions such as authoritarian rule, human rights abuses, violent changes of government, and covert action. Case studies will include the Berlin embassy in the 1930s, Tehran in 1979, and George Kennan's experiences in Moscow, among others. Recommended for students contemplating careers in diplomatic service. *Course satisfies the WiM requirement for International Relations majors. As space is limited, first-year students must obtain the instructor's prior consent before enrolling.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rakove, R. (PI)

HISTORY 252E: From Gold Rush to Google Bus: History of San Francisco (AMSTUD 150X, URBANST 150)

This class will examine the history of San Francisco from Native American and colonial settlement through the present. Focus is on social, environmental, and political history, with the theme of power in the city. Topics include Native Americans, the Gold Rush, immigration and nativism, railroads and robber barons, earthquake and fire, progressive reform and unionism, gender, race and civil rights, sexuality and politics, counterculture, redevelopment and gentrification. Students write final project in collaboration with ShapingSF, a participatory community history project documenting and archiving overlooked stories and memories of San Francisco. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kahan, M. (PI)

HISTORY 255D: Racial Identity in the American Imagination (AFRICAAM 255, AMSTUD 255D, CSRE 255D, HISTORY 355D)

From Sally Hemings to Barack Obama, this course explores the ways that racial identity has been experienced, represented, and contested throughout American history. Engaging historical, legal, and literary texts and films, this course examines major historical transformations that have shaped our understanding of racial identity. This course also draws on other imaginative modes including autobiography, memoir, photography, and music to consider the ways that racial identity has been represented in American society. Most broadly, this course interrogates the problem of American identity and examines the interplay between racial identity and American identity.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hobbs, A. (PI)

HISTORY 257C: LGBT/Queer Life in the United States (FEMGEN 140D, FEMGEN 240D)

An introductory course that explores LGBT/Queer social, cultural, and political history in the United States. By analyzing primary documents that range from personal accounts (private letters, autobiography, early LGBT magazines, and oral history interviews) to popular culture (postcards, art, political posters, lesbian pulp fiction, and film) to medical, military, and legal papers, students will understand how the categories of gender and sexuality have changed over the past 150 years. This class investigates the relationship among queer, straight and transgender identities. Seminar discussions will question how the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality influenced the construction of these categories.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Davies, A. (PI)

HISTORY 258: Sexual Violence in America (AFRICAAM 192, AMSTUD 258, CSRE 192E, FEMGEN 258, FEMGEN 358, HISTORY 358)

This undergraduate/graduate colloquium explores the history of sexual violence in America, with particular attention to the intersections of gender and race in the construction of rape. We discuss the changing definitions of sexual violence in law and in cultural representations from early settlement through the late-twentieth century, including slavery, wartime and prison rape, the history of lynching and anti-lynching movements, and feminist responses to sexual violence. In addition to introducing students to the literature on sexual violence, the course attempts to teach critical skills in the analysis of secondary and primary historical texts. Students write short weekly reading responses and a final paper; no final exam; fifth unit research or CEL options.nnLimited enrollment, permission of instructor required. Submit application form and indicate interest in CEL option. Priority admission to History, FGSS, CSRE, AFRICAAM, and AMSTUD declared majors and minors. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Freedman, E. (PI)

HISTORY 259E: American Interventions, 1898-Present (HISTORY 359E, INTNLREL 168A)

This class seeks to examine the modern American experience with limited wars, beginning with distant and yet pertinent cases, and culminating in the war in Iraq. Although this class will examine war as a consequence of foreign policy, it will not focus primarily on presidential decision making. Rather, it will place wartime policy in a broader frame, considering it alongside popular and media perceptions of the war, the efforts of antiwar movements, civil-military relations, civil reconstruction efforts, and conditions on the battlefield. We will also examine, when possible, the postwar experience.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rakove, R. (PI)

HISTORY 281G: The Middle East and the World

This course examines recent works about the Middle East and the world in periods of globalization from the nineteenth century to the present. The aim of the course is to situate transformations that have swept over the region in the past two centuries in a global frame. In addition to exploring how global developments shaped the Middle East, we will also examine how different local practices shaped aspects of the modern world that we often associate with Western Europe.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Alff, K. (PI)

HISTORY 282D: Knowledge and Violence in the Middle East (ANTHRO 182D, ANTHRO 282D, CSRE 182C, HISTORY 382D, SOC 182H)

In this colloquium, we will think about the various ways in which knowledge shapes violence and violence shapes knowledge in the modern Middle East. Recent works in various subfield of Middle Eastern studies, including history, anthropology, sociology and science and technology studies address this topic from different disciplinary perspectives. We will investigate how violence has been harnessed, theorized and narrated in influential works in these subfields. The course focuses on a set of key themes and questions that have been central to such writings: the nature of violence and the question of accountability and responsibility, shifting technologies of warfare, including technologies of representation, and the aftermath of violence. The questions that drive this colloquium, include, how do we define violence? What is its role in shaping the history and historiography of the modern Middle East? What is the relationship between war and the production of knowledge about war?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Zakar, A. (PI)

HISTORY 282F: History of Modern Turkey

Social, political and cultural history of Modern Turkey from the last decades of the Ottoman Empire in the late 19th century until Today. Themes include transformation from a multi-national empire to a national republic; Islam, secularism and radical modernism; military, bureaucracy and democratic experience; economic development, underdevelopment and class; Istanbul, Ankara and provincial Turkey; socialism, conservatism(s), and Kurdish challenge; Turkey in Europe, the Middle East and Central Asia; gender, sexuality and family; recent political crises.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Yaycioglu, A. (PI)

HISTORY 297D: Oral History and the Partition of India (HISTORY 397D)

The 1947 Partition of the Indian subcontinent into the independent nations of Hindu-majority India and Muslim-majority Pakistan was accompanied by one of the largest forced migrations in human history and mass violence where more than one million people lost their lives. How could neighboring communities, accustomed to centuries of relative peace have suddenly turned so violently upon one another? With an archive of thousands of survivor interviews this course will use oral histories to explore the Partition and its legacy.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Perkins, C. (PI)

HISTORY 299M: Undergraduate Directed Research: Martin Luther King, Jr., Research and Education Institute

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Carson, C. (PI)

HISTORY 299X: Preparing for International Field Work: Public Service or Research (HISTORY 399A)

Open to students in all classes, those planning internships abroad and those planning research, from juniors with honors theses and sophomores with Chappell Lougee grants to freshmen thinking ahead. Introduces resources on campus for planning international research and service. Raises issues that need to be considered in advance of going abroad: ethical concerns, Human Subjects Protocol, networking, personal safety and gender issues, confronting cultural differences. Exposes students to research methods: case studies, interviewing, working in foreign libraries and archives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

HISTORY 302G: Peoples, Armies and Governments of the Second World War (HISTORY 202G)

Clausewitz conceptualized war as always consisting of a trinity of passion, chance, and reason, mirrored, respectively, in the people, army and government. Following Clausewitz, this course examines the peoples, armies, and governments that shaped World War II. Analyzes the ideological, political, diplomatic and economic motivations and constraints of the belligerents and their resulting strategies, military planning and fighting. Explores the new realities of everyday life on the home fronts and the experiences of non-combatants during the war, the final destruction of National Socialist Germany and Imperial Japan, and the emerging conflict between the victors. How the peoples, armies and governments involved perceived their possibilities and choices as a means to understand the origins, events, dynamics and implications of the greatest war in history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Vardi, G. (PI)

HISTORY 304D: Advanced Topics in Agnotology (HISTORY 204D)

Advanced research into the history of ignorance. Our goal will be to explore how ignorance is created, maintained and destroyed, using case studies from topics such as tobacco denialism, global climate denialism, and other forms of resistance to knowledge making. Course culminates in a research paper on the theory and practice of agnotology, the science of ignorance.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Proctor, R. (PI)

HISTORY 304J: Religion, Violence, and Empire (HISTORY 204J)

Explores the interplay of religion and violence in the making and breaking of empires around the world from the Aztecs to al Qaida.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Crews, R. (PI)

HISTORY 305B: History of Fear (HISTORY 205B)

Whether directed at immigrants, infected airs, or the stock market, fear has often been a driving historical force. This class explores old and new approaches to the history of fear, with a focus on the early modern period. Themes include: epidemic prevention, xenophobia, dietary fears, weather phobias, concepts of anxiety, the place of fear in political theory, and political and economic uses of fear. A final project will require students to identify and explore the history of a particular fear.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Scholz, L. (PI)

HISTORY 308B: Women's Activist Response to War (FEMGEN 208B, HISTORY 208B, HUMRTS 113)

Theoretical issues, historical origins, changing forms of women's activism in response to war throughout the 20th century, and contemporary cases, such as the Russian Committee of Soldiers Mothers, Bosnian Mothers of Srebrenica, Serbian Women in Black, and the American Cindy Sheehan. Focus is on the U.S. and Eastern Europe, with attention to Israel, England, and Argentina.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 323E: Cities of Empire: An Urban Journey through Eastern Europe and the Mediterranean (HISTORY 223E, REES 204, REES 304)

This course explores the cities of the Habsburg, Ottoman and Russian empires in the dynamic and turbulent period of their greatest transformation from the 19th century through the Two World Wars. Through the reading of urban biographies of Venice and Trieste, Vienna, Budapest, Cracow, Lviv, Sarajevo, Belgrade, Salonica, and Odessa, we consider broad historical trends of political, economic, and social modernization, urbanization, identity formation, imperialism, cosmopolitanism, and orientalism. As vibrant centers of coexistence and economic exchange, social and cultural borderlands, and sites of transgression, these cities provide an ideal lens through which to examine these themes in the context of transition from imperial to post-imperial space.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Knezevic, J. (PI)

HISTORY 332D: Rome: From Pilgrimage to the Grand Tour

What lies beyond the ruins of an ancient city? How did Rome revive? The history of Rome from the late Middle Ages and Renaissance to the age of the Grand Tour. Topics include: the history of the papacy; the everyday world of Roman citizens; the relationship between the city and the surrounding countryside; the material transformation of Rome and projects to map the city; and its meaning for foreigners.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Findlen, P. (PI)

HISTORY 333J: Early British Empire: Themes and Approaches (HISTORY 233J)

This course explores the history of the early British empire, beginning with the question, "What is empire?" From plantations in Ireland, through the American Revolution, a turn to the east, and into Britain's imperial century, we will investigate how the empire began and evolved, with special attention to governance, ideology, technologies of rule, domestic effects, periodization, and historiography. Readings include primary sources and secondary texts specifically chosen to illustrate a variety of approaches to writing about empire.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Williams, J. (PI)

HISTORY 336G: Fascism and Populism in Europe since WWI (HISTORY 236G)

Examines the continuities and discontinuities between "classic" fascism of the interwar period, its ideological variations and contexts, and the "neo-fascisms," and radical right movements in Western Europe between 1945 and 1989. Uses these contexts to analyze the dramatic growth in right-wing populism in Western and Eastern Europe since 2008.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Specter, M. (PI)

HISTORY 337J: Nationhood and Nationalism in France: Modern French history through film and fiction (FRENCH 237A, FRENCH 337, HISTORY 237J)

Europe is seeing a rise in nationalist politics, fueled by fear of economic instability and immigration. In France, Marine Le Pen's far-right populist party Rassemblement National (until June 2018 - the Front National) has dominated political debates, insisting on preserving French national sovereignty. But what is a nation? What does it mean to be French? Who is included and who is excluded? In this course we will explore the construction of the idea of France in the face of revolution, the world wars and the Holocaust, and the violent end of colonialism. By looking at these critical historical moments, we will also gain a firmer grasp of contemporary problems surrounding nationhood in France and around the world. Sources will include films, novels, pamphlets, and political speeches. Course taught in English, with an optional French section.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kassabova, B. (PI)

HISTORY 339E: Nationalism in European and World History, 18th Century until the Present (HISTORY 239E)

This course focuses on nationalism as a political and cultural phenomenon in the modern era. Through secondary and primary source readings, we study nationalist ideas, activists, movements, and state policies as well as their constructive and destructive effects across Europe and other parts of the world. Where did nationalism come from, under which conditions has it thrived, how has it shaped politics, societies, mentalities, and cultures? What did it mean to be a nationalist in different places and times?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ertz, S. (PI)

HISTORY 343C: People, Plants, and Medicine: Colonial Science and Medicine (HISTORY 243C)

Explores the global exchange of knowledge, technologies, plants, peoples, disease, and medicines. Considers primarily Africans, Amerindians, and Europeans in the eighteenth-century West but also takes examples from other knowledge traditions. Readings treat science and medicine in relation to voyaging, colonialism, slavery, racism, plants, and environmental exchange. Colonial sciences and medicines were important militarily and strategically for positioning emerging nation states in global struggles for land and resources.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Schiebinger, L. (PI)

HISTORY 344F: Beyond Pink and Blue: Gender in Tech (FEMGEN 344F, HISTORY 244F)

This d-school seminar prototypes concepts and methods for "inclusive" design. From the moment we arrive on the planet, gender shapes our perception of the world. Examples of products (including objects, services, and systems) gone awry will serve as prompts for design activities, challenges, and discussions on gender issues to illustrate the different needs of women, men, and gender-fluid people. Class sessions mix use case explorations with design methodology, design thinking abilities, and guest speakers from technology, design, and academia. Students will be asked to work in interdisciplinary teams on several design challenges, culminating in the development of a toolkit for inclusive design. Methods will interact in crucial ways to create "intersectional thinking" (i.e., to consider how gender, ethnicity, sexuality, socio-economic status, etc. work together to require new solutions in design). Topics include: algorithms, media, seat belts for pregnant women, robotics, assistive technologies, tech for developing worlds, video games, urban/rural design, software development, and many more. Admission by application only. Visit d.school.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 345C: Africa in the 20th Century

The challenges facing Africans from when the continent fell under colonial rule until independence. Case studies of colonialism and its impact on African men and women drawn from West, Central, and Southern Africa. Novels, plays, polemics, and autobiographies written by Africans. Instructor permission is required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

HISTORY 348: Religion, Radicalization and Media in Africa since 1945 (AFRICAST 248, AFRICAST 348, HISTORY 248, RELIGST 230X, RELIGST 330X)

What are the paths to religious radicalization, and what role have media- new and old- played in these conversion journeys? We examine how Pentecostal Christians and Reformist Muslims in countries such as South Africa, Nigeria, Sudan, and Ethiopia have used multiple media forms- newspapers, cell phones, TV, radio, and the internet- to gain new converts, contest the authority of colonial and post-colonial states, construct transnational communities, and position themselves as key political players.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Cabrita, J. (PI)

HISTORY 351E: Core in American History, Part V

Required of all first-year United States History Ph.D. students. Topics in Twentieth Century United States History.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Burns, J. (PI)

HISTORY 354F: Law and Empire in U.S. History

(Same as LAW 3506. Instructor consent required for History 354F.) This course will examine the interrelationship between legal norms and empire in the history of the United States. Topics in this part will include the Constitution as an imperial document; law and the expansion of the United States in western North America, Puerto Rico, and Hawaii; the Insular Cases; and current debates over extraterritoriality and the War on Terror. Substantial readings will consist of scholarly articles, historical cases, and primary sources, and will be provided online. Requirements for the course include regular class participation and, at the students' election, either response papers or a historiographical essay. Students may also elect to complete a research paper, in which case they will receive 3 units and "R" credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Ablavsky, G. (PI)

HISTORY 355D: Racial Identity in the American Imagination (AFRICAAM 255, AMSTUD 255D, CSRE 255D, HISTORY 255D)

From Sally Hemings to Barack Obama, this course explores the ways that racial identity has been experienced, represented, and contested throughout American history. Engaging historical, legal, and literary texts and films, this course examines major historical transformations that have shaped our understanding of racial identity. This course also draws on other imaginative modes including autobiography, memoir, photography, and music to consider the ways that racial identity has been represented in American society. Most broadly, this course interrogates the problem of American identity and examines the interplay between racial identity and American identity.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hobbs, A. (PI)

HISTORY 358: Sexual Violence in America (AFRICAAM 192, AMSTUD 258, CSRE 192E, FEMGEN 258, FEMGEN 358, HISTORY 258)

This undergraduate/graduate colloquium explores the history of sexual violence in America, with particular attention to the intersections of gender and race in the construction of rape. We discuss the changing definitions of sexual violence in law and in cultural representations from early settlement through the late-twentieth century, including slavery, wartime and prison rape, the history of lynching and anti-lynching movements, and feminist responses to sexual violence. In addition to introducing students to the literature on sexual violence, the course attempts to teach critical skills in the analysis of secondary and primary historical texts. Students write short weekly reading responses and a final paper; no final exam; fifth unit research or CEL options.nnLimited enrollment, permission of instructor required. Submit application form and indicate interest in CEL option. Priority admission to History, FGSS, CSRE, AFRICAAM, and AMSTUD declared majors and minors. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Freedman, E. (PI)

HISTORY 359E: American Interventions, 1898-Present (HISTORY 259E, INTNLREL 168A)

This class seeks to examine the modern American experience with limited wars, beginning with distant and yet pertinent cases, and culminating in the war in Iraq. Although this class will examine war as a consequence of foreign policy, it will not focus primarily on presidential decision making. Rather, it will place wartime policy in a broader frame, considering it alongside popular and media perceptions of the war, the efforts of antiwar movements, civil-military relations, civil reconstruction efforts, and conditions on the battlefield. We will also examine, when possible, the postwar experience.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rakove, R. (PI)

HISTORY 361D: History of Civil Rights Law

(Same as LAW 7838.) This is a seminar that will examine canonical civil rights law using history. We will investigate the historical context behind the enactment of particular laws and judicial decisions. We will also discuss the meaning and implications of the term "civil rights law." Readings will include cases, law review articles, primary sources, and history articles. Topics will include segregation, abortion, workers' rights, and disability. 14th Amendment is not a prerequisite for the seminar. Requirements for the course include regular class participation and, at the students' election, either response papers or a historiographical essay. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Belt, R. (PI)

HISTORY 378: The Historical Ecology of Latin America

What role did the natural environment play in the emergence of Latin America as a distinct geographical and socio-cultural world region? How do we analyze the historical relationship between the regions rich and seemingly abundant natural resources and its status as "underdeveloped"? What historical consequences did this relationship have and what alternative, more sustainable developmental paths can we envision for the future in light of the past that we will study? In this course, students will become familiar with the historiography on Latin America (with emphasis on Mexico) that has explored these questions through a variety of approaches, methodologies and points of view.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Wolfe, M. (PI)

HISTORY 382D: Knowledge and Violence in the Middle East (ANTHRO 182D, ANTHRO 282D, CSRE 182C, HISTORY 282D, SOC 182H)

In this colloquium, we will think about the various ways in which knowledge shapes violence and violence shapes knowledge in the modern Middle East. Recent works in various subfield of Middle Eastern studies, including history, anthropology, sociology and science and technology studies address this topic from different disciplinary perspectives. We will investigate how violence has been harnessed, theorized and narrated in influential works in these subfields. The course focuses on a set of key themes and questions that have been central to such writings: the nature of violence and the question of accountability and responsibility, shifting technologies of warfare, including technologies of representation, and the aftermath of violence. The questions that drive this colloquium, include, how do we define violence? What is its role in shaping the history and historiography of the modern Middle East? What is the relationship between war and the production of knowledge about war?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Zakar, A. (PI)

HISTORY 382F: History of Modern Turkey

Social, political and cultural history of Modern Turkey from the last decades of the Ottoman Empire in the late 19th century until Today. Themes include transformation from a multi-national empire to a national republic; Islam, secularism and radical modernism; military, bureaucracy and democratic experience; economic development, underdevelopment and class; Istanbul, Ankara and provincial Turkey; socialism, conservatism(s), and Kurdish challenge; Turkey in Europe, the Middle East and Central Asia; gender, sexuality and family; popular culture, soccer, and film industry; Post-Modernism, Neo-Ottomanism, and the New-Turkey; The class also include reading works of Turkish literature and watching movies by Turkish directors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Yaycioglu, A. (PI)

HISTORY 395: Modern Korean History (HISTORY 195)

(Same as HISTORY 95. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 195.) This lecture course provides a general introduction to the history of modern Korea. Themes include the characteristics of the Chosôn dynasty, reforms and rebellions in the nineteenth century, Korean nationalism; Japan's colonial rule and Korean identities; decolonization and the Korean War; and the different state-building processes in North and South, South Korea's democratization in 1980s, and the current North Korean crisis.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Moon, Y. (PI); Kim, C. (TA)

HISTORY 396D: Historiography of Modern Japan

Introduces students to the major historical problems and historiographic trends in the study of modern Japan from the Meiji period to the present. Themes include approaches to late Meiji culture and politics, the formation of imperial subjects and citizens, agrarian society and politics, gender in modern Japan, empire and modernity, total war and transwar state and society, U.S. occupation, and postwar Japan.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Uchida, J. (PI)

HISTORY 397D: Oral History and the Partition of India (HISTORY 297D)

The 1947 Partition of the Indian subcontinent into the independent nations of Hindu-majority India and Muslim-majority Pakistan was accompanied by one of the largest forced migrations in human history and mass violence where more than one million people lost their lives. How could neighboring communities, accustomed to centuries of relative peace have suddenly turned so violently upon one another? With an archive of thousands of survivor interviews this course will use oral histories to explore the Partition and its legacy.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Perkins, C. (PI)

HISTORY 399A: Preparing for International Field Work: Public Service or Research (HISTORY 299X)

Open to students in all classes, those planning internships abroad and those planning research, from juniors with honors theses and sophomores with Chappell Lougee grants to freshmen thinking ahead. Introduces resources on campus for planning international research and service. Raises issues that need to be considered in advance of going abroad: ethical concerns, Human Subjects Protocol, networking, personal safety and gender issues, confronting cultural differences. Exposes students to research methods: case studies, interviewing, working in foreign libraries and archives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

HISTORY 399P: Archives-Based Teaching Practicum

Through hands-on exercises and key readings, students will learn about basic archival handling techniques, usage guidelines, security issues, principles of archival organization, and bibliographic literacy around archival and Special Collections materials, along with an insiders tour of Stanford University Special Collections. During the second, students will partake in a hands-on session using Special Collections materials, with a class session enactment that demonstrates the program¿s concepts. Note: Enrollment only open to PhD students (ANY department) with instructor permission required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mullaney, T. (PI)

HISTORY 402D: The History of Genocide (HISTORY 202S, JEWISHST 282S, JEWISHST 482D)

This course will explore the history, politics, and character of genocide from the beginning of world history to the present. It will also consider the ways that the international system has developed to prevent and punish genocide.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Naimark, N. (PI)

HISTORY 414B: Research Seminar in Medieval History

Prerequisite: History 414A.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dorin, R. (PI)

HISTORY 424B: The Soviet Civilization, Part 2 (HISTORY 224D)

Prerequisite: HISTORY 224A/424A
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Weiner, A. (PI)

HISTORY 438: European History Workshop

All European history graduate students in residence register for this weekly workshop, at which dissertation chapters and prospectuses, papers, and grant proposals by students and faculty are read and discussed.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Robinson, P. (PI)

HISTORY 448B: Colonial States and African Societies, Part II (HISTORY 249S)

Second part of the research seminar offered in the Winter. Students continue their research and present their penultimate drafts in week 8.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Roberts, R. (PI)

HISTORY 460: Research Seminar in America in the World

Ways to place American history in an international context. Comparative, transnational, diplomatic, and world systems are approaches to complete a research paper based on research into primary materials. Historical methodologies, research strategies, and essay projects. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Chang, G. (PI)

HISTORY 481: Research Seminar in Middle East History (JEWISHST 287S, JEWISHST 481)

Student-selected research topics. May be repeated for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Yaycioglu, A. (PI)

HISTORY 486A: Graduate Research Seminar in Jewish History (JEWISHST 486A)

Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rodrigue, A. (PI)

HISTORY 490B: Law in Early China

This course studies the role of law in early China. It examines both evidence transmitted in received sources and newly excavated legal materials. It will consider law from several approaches, including the role of language, the background in emotions and group sentiments, the links to honor and shame, its role in establishing a public realm and forms of group membership, and its links to defining the nature of both the ruler and the philosophical sage.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lewis, M. (PI)

HISTORY 491A: Modern Korea Research Seminar

This graduate seminar prepares students to undertake research using Korean-language sources on a variety of themes in modern Korea. Students will identify characteristics of major online and offline archives in Korean studies, learn essential skills in investigating primary sources, and analyze selected sample documents in class.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Moon, Y. (PI)

HISTORY 495B: Qing Legal Documents (CHINA 495B)

How to use Qing legal documents for research. Winter: sample documents that introduce the main genres including: the Qing code and commentaries; magistrates' handbooks and published case collections; and case records from Chinese archives. Spring: class meets occasionally; students complete research papers. Prerequisite: advanced reading ability in Chinese.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Sommer, M. (PI)
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