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HISTORY 1C: Global History through Graphic Novels: The Modern Age

How did empires and nation-states evolve around the globe during the modern period? How did they shape global experiences of modernity? And how can one write a history of the entire world, so as to cover the necessary ground, but also preserve nuance and complexity? In this course we will use graphic novels (paired with archival sources and historical essays) to examine modern world history from the 18th to the 21st century, from the age of empires and revolutions, through the World Wars, the Cold War, and the War on Terror. The class is appropriate for beginning students, non-majors, and more advanced history students, and may be taken for different levels of credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Mullaney, T. (PI)

HISTORY 3D: Dangerous Ideas (ARTHIST 36, COMPLIT 36A, EALC 36, ENGLISH 71, ETHICSOC 36X, FRENCH 36, MUSIC 36H, PHIL 36, POLISCI 70, SLAVIC 36)

Ideas matter. Concepts such as race, progress, and equality have inspired social movements, shaped political systems, and dramatically influenced the lives of individuals. Others, like gender identity, universal basic income, and historical memory play an important role in contemporary debates in the United States. All of these ideas are contested, and they have a real power to change lives, for better and for worse. In this one-unit class we will examine these dangerous ideas. Each week, a faculty member from a different department in the humanities and arts will explore a concept that has shaped human experience across time and space. Some weeks will have short reading assignments, but you are not required to purchase any materials.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Anderson, R. (PI)

HISTORY 3S: A Global History of the Apocalypse: Millenarian Movements in the Modern World

This course will examine the rise, fall, and legacy of modern millenarian movements-- movements that claim that our corrupt world is about to be swept away, to be replaced with a particular version of paradise-- in a global perspective. Drawing on an array of sources ranging from proclamations, diaries, criminal confessions, newspaper accounts, cartoons, songs, photographs, and films, we will explore what, if anything, these movements had in common, and their connections to and influences on one another.
Terms: Spr, offered once only | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hick, P. (PI)

HISTORY 7W: Service-Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking Part II (FEMGEN 7W, HUMRTS 7W)

Prerequisite: HISTORY6W (FEMGEN 6W). Continuation of HISTORY 6W (FEMGEN 6W). Students will continue working on their projects with their community partners. Several class meetings and small group consultations throughout the quarter. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 9R: Humanities Research Intensive (ARTHIST 9R, EALC 9R, ENGLISH 9R)

Everyone knows that scientists do research, but how do you do research in the humanities? This five-day course, taught over spring break, will introduce you to the excitement of humanities research, while preparing you to develop an independent summer project or to work as a research assistant for a Stanford professor. Through hands-on experience with archival materials in Special Collections and the East Asia Library, you will learn how to formulate a solid research question; how to gather the evidence that will help you to answer that question; how to write up research results; how to critique the research of your fellow students; how to deliver your results in a public setting; and how to write an effective grant proposal. Students who complete this course become Humanities Research Intensive Fellows and receive post-program mentorship during spring quarter, ongoing opportunities to engage with faculty and advanced undergraduates, and eligibility to apply for additional funding to support follow-up research. Freshmen and sophomores only. All majors and undeclared students welcome. No prior research experience necessary. Enrollment limited: apply by 11/4/19 at hri-fellows.stanford.edu.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

HISTORY 16: Traders and Crusaders in the Medieval Mediterranean (HISTORY 116)

Trade and crusade were inextricably interconnected in the high Middle Ages. As merchant ships ferried knights and pilgrims across the Mediterranean, rulers borrowed heavily to finance their expeditions, while military expansion opened new economic opportunities. Course themes include the origins of the Crusading movement; the rise of Venice and other maritime powers; the pivotal roles of the Byzantine and Mongol Empires; relations between Christians, Muslims, and Jews; new military, maritime, and commercial technologies; and the modern legacy of the Crusades.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dorin, R. (PI)

HISTORY 36N: Gay Autobiography (FEMGEN 36N)

Preference to freshmen. Gender, identity, and solidarity as represented in nine autobiographies: Isherwood, Ackerley, Duberman, Monette, Louganis, Barbin, Cammermeyer, Gingrich, and Lorde. To what degree do these writers view sexual orientation as a defining feature of their selves? Is there a difference between the way men and women view identity? What politics follow from these writers' experiences?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Robinson, P. (PI)

HISTORY 37D: Germany's Wars and the World, 1848-2010 (HISTORY 137D)

(History 37D is 3 units; History 137D is 5 units.)This course examines a series of explosive encounters between Germans, Europe, and the world. Starting with the overlooked revolutions of 1848 and ending with the reunification of West Germany and East Germany after the Cold War, the course will explore a range of topics: capitalism, communism, imperialism, nationalism, diplomacy, antisemitism, gender, race, and the Holocaust, among others. We will also consider competing visions of Germany its borders, its members, its enemies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Press, S. (PI)

HISTORY 45B: Africa in the Twentieth Century

(Same as HISTORY 145B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 145B.) The challenges facing Africans from when the continent fell under colonial rule until independence. Case studies of colonialism and its impact on African men and women drawn from West, Central, and Southern Africa. Novels, plays, polemics, and autobiographies written by Africans.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cabrita, J. (PI)

HISTORY 50C: The United States in the Twentieth Century (AFRICAAM 50C)

(Same as HISTORY 150C. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 150C.) 100 years ago, women and most African-Americans couldn't vote; automobiles were rare and computers didn't exist; and the U.S. was a minor power in a world dominated by European empires. This course surveys politics, culture, and social movements to answer the question: How did we get from there to here? Two historical research "labs" or archival sessions focus on the Great Depression in the 1930s and radical and conservative students movements of the 1960s. Suitable for non-majors and majors alike.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Burns, J. (PI)

HISTORY 55F: The Civil War and Reconstruction Era, 1830 to 1877 (AFRICAAM 55F, AMSTUD 55F, AMSTUD 155F, HISTORY 155F)

(History 55F is 3 units; History 155F is 5 units.)This course explores the causes, course, and consequences of the American Civil War. The Civil War profoundly impacted American life at national, sectional, and constitutional levels, and radically challenged categories of race and citizenship. Topics covered include: the crisis of union and disunion in an expanding republic; slavery, race, and emancipation as national problems and personal experiences; the horrors of total war for individuals and society; and the challenges--social and political--of Reconstruction.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Olivarius, K. (PI)

HISTORY 61: The Politics of Sex: Work, Family, and Citizenship in Modern American Women's History (AMSTUD 161, CSRE 162, FEMGEN 161, HISTORY 161)

This course explores the transition from Victorian to modern American womanhood by asking how Native, European, African, Mexican, and Asian American women navigated the changing sexual, economic, and political landscapes of the twentieth century. Through secondary readings, primary sources, films, music, and literature we explore the opportunities and boundaries on groups of women in the context of historical events that included immigration, urbanization, wartime, depression, the Cold War, as well as recurrent feminist and conservative political movements.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Freedman, E. (PI)

HISTORY 70S: The Mexican-American War

Frequently overshadowed by the Louisiana Purchase and the Civil War, the Mexican-American War was central to antebellum conflicts over territorial expansion, the expansion of slavery, and debates about race, ethnicity, and citizenship. This course examines the long and deep history of the war by situating it within its colonial, national, and borderlands contexts. The course will draw on methods from a range of historical subfields including, diplomatic, political, social, cultural, and spatial history. Priority given to History majors and minors.
Terms: Spr, offered once only | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hull, C. (PI)

HISTORY 82S: Enemies Within: Hostile Minorities in Israel and Iraq in the 20th Century

This course explores the nation state in the Middle East through the perspectives of minority groups in Israel and Iraq. The class examines the origins of these two states since WWI, and considers the integral role that minority groups have played in their formation. Using an array of primary sources and methods of analysis, we will examine significant political, economic, social, and discursive trends in these states, while keeping in mind the broader regional and global contexts.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fahoum, B. (PI)

HISTORY 95: Modern Korean History

(Same as HISTORY 195. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 195.) This lecture course provides a general introduction to the history of modern Korea. Themes include the characteristics of the Chosôn dynasty, reforms and rebellions in the nineteenth century, Korean nationalism; Japan's colonial rule and Korean identities; decolonization and the Korean War; and the different state-building processes in North and South, South Korea's democratization in 1980s, and the current North Korean crisis.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 102: History of the International System since 1914 (INTNLREL 102)

After defining the characteristics of the international system at the beginning of the twentieth century, this course reviews the primary developments in its functioning in the century that followed. Topics include the major wars and peace settlements; the emergence of Nazism and Communism; the Cold War; decolonization; and globalization. The role of international institutions and international society will also be a focus as will the challenges of climate change, inequality, migration, and terrorism.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dovern, L. (PI)

HISTORY 102A: The Romans (CLASSICS 84)

How did a tiny village create a huge empire and shape the world, and why did it fail? Roman history, imperialism, politics, social life, economic growth, and religious change. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required; enroll in sections on Coursework.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 106A: Global Human Geography: Asia and Africa

Global patterns of demography, economic and social development, geopolitics, and cultural differentiation, covering E. Asia, S. Asia, S.E. Asia, Central Asia, N. Africa, and sub-Saharan Africa. Use of maps to depict geographical patterns and processes.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lewis, M. (PI)

HISTORY 116: Traders and Crusaders in the Medieval Mediterranean (HISTORY 16)

Trade and crusade were inextricably interconnected in the high Middle Ages. As merchant ships ferried knights and pilgrims across the Mediterranean, rulers borrowed heavily to finance their expeditions, while military expansion opened new economic opportunities. Course themes include the origins of the Crusading movement; the rise of Venice and other maritime powers; the pivotal roles of the Byzantine and Mongol Empires; relations between Christians, Muslims, and Jews; new military, maritime, and commercial technologies; and the modern legacy of the Crusades.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dorin, R. (PI)

HISTORY 137D: Germany's Wars and the World, 1848-2010 (HISTORY 37D)

(History 37D is 3 units; History 137D is 5 units.)This course examines a series of explosive encounters between Germans, Europe, and the world. Starting with the overlooked revolutions of 1848 and ending with the reunification of West Germany and East Germany after the Cold War, the course will explore a range of topics: capitalism, communism, imperialism, nationalism, diplomacy, antisemitism, gender, race, and the Holocaust, among others. We will also consider competing visions of Germany its borders, its members, its enemies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Press, S. (PI)

HISTORY 145B: Africa in the 20th Century (AFRICAAM 145B)

(Same as HISTORY 45B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 145B.) The challenges facing Africans from when the continent fell under colonial rule until independence. Case studies of colonialism and its impact on African men and women drawn from West, Central, and Southern Africa. Novels, plays, polemics, and autobiographies written by Africans.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cabrita, J. (PI)

HISTORY 150C: The United States in the Twentieth Century (AFRICAAM 150C, AMSTUD 150C)

(Same as HISTORY 50C. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 150C.) 100 years ago, women and most African-Americans couldn't vote; automobiles were rare and computers didn't exist; and the U.S. was a minor power in a world dominated by European empires. This course surveys politics, culture, and social movements to answer the question: How did we get from there to here? Two historical research "labs" or archival sessions focus on the Great Depression in the 1930s and radical and conservative students movements of the 1960s. Suitable for non-majors and majors alike.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Burns, J. (PI)

HISTORY 151: The American West (AMSTUD 124A, ARTHIST 152, ENGLISH 124, POLISCI 124A)

The American West is characterized by frontier mythology, vast distances, marked aridity, and unique political and economic characteristics. This course integrates several disciplinary perspectives into a comprehensive examination of Western North America: its history, physical geography, climate, literature, art, film, institutions, politics, demography, economy, and continuing policy challenges. Students examine themes fundamental to understanding the region: time, space, water, peoples, and boom and bust cycles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 153: Creation of the Constitution

(Same as LAW 230.) The course begins with readings setting forth the intellectual and experiential background of the framing, including common law and natural rights theory, republicanism, economic & political scientific ideas, and colonial and post-Independence experience. We then study large parts of the debates at the Constitutional Convention, primarily using Madison's Notes. Next come the ratification debates, including readings from antifederalist writers, about half of The Federalist, and overviews of the Virginia and New York ratification conventions. We conclude with the addition of the Bill of Rights. Classes consist of a combination of lecture and extensive participation by students. Elements used in grading: Exam.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; McConnell, M. (PI)

HISTORY 155F: The Civil War and Reconstruction Era, 1830 to 1877 (AFRICAAM 55F, AMSTUD 55F, AMSTUD 155F, HISTORY 55F)

(History 55F is 3 units; History 155F is 5 units.)This course explores the causes, course, and consequences of the American Civil War. The Civil War profoundly impacted American life at national, sectional, and constitutional levels, and radically challenged categories of race and citizenship. Topics covered include: the crisis of union and disunion in an expanding republic; slavery, race, and emancipation as national problems and personal experiences; the horrors of total war for individuals and society; and the challenges--social and political--of Reconstruction.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Olivarius, K. (PI)

HISTORY 161: The Politics of Sex: Work, Family, and Citizenship in Modern American Women's History (AMSTUD 161, CSRE 162, FEMGEN 161, HISTORY 61)

This course explores the transition from Victorian to modern American womanhood by asking how Native, European, African, Mexican, and Asian American women navigated the changing sexual, economic, and political landscapes of the twentieth century. Through secondary readings, primary sources, films, music, and literature we explore the opportunities and boundaries on groups of women in the context of historical events that included immigration, urbanization, wartime, depression, the Cold War, as well as recurrent feminist and conservative political movements.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Freedman, E. (PI)

HISTORY 195: Modern Korean History

(Same as HISTORY 95. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 195.) This lecture course provides a general introduction to the history of modern Korea. Themes include the characteristics of the Chosôn dynasty, reforms and rebellions in the nineteenth century, Korean nationalism; Japan's colonial rule and Korean identities; decolonization and the Korean War; and the different state-building processes in North and South, South Korea's democratization in 1980s, and the current North Korean crisis.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 200D: Doing the History of Science and Technology

The history of science has often been at the crux of key debates in the larger field of history, including debates over objectivity and bias, relativism and the problem of "present-ism." This course explores key questions, methods and debates in the history of science and examines how historians of science have addressed these organizing problems of the historical discipline. This course forms part of the "Doing History" series: rigorous undergraduate colloquia that introduce the practice of history within a particular field or thematic area.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 200K: Doing Literary History: Orwell in the World

This course will bring together the disciplines of history and literary studies by looking closely at the work of one major twentieth-century author: the British writer and political polemicist George Orwell. In 1946, Orwell writes, "What I have most wanted to do throughout the past ten years is to make political writing into an art." In these years, Orwell writes about-- and often participates in or witnesses first-hand--a series of major events and crises. These include British imperialism in Burma, urban poverty in Europe, class inequality in England, the conflict between Socialism and Fascism in Spain, and the rise of totalitarianism in the Soviet Union. In engaging all of these events, Orwell experiments with different literary forms, moving between fiction and non-fiction, novel and autobiography, essay and memoir, manifesto and fable, literature and journalism. Few writers demand such sustained and equal attention to text and context: in this course we will move back-and-forth between Orwell¿s varied writing and the urgent social and political contexts it addresses.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 200L: Doing Public History

Examines history outside the classroom; its role in political/cultural debates in U.S. and abroad. Considers functions, practices, and reception of history in public arena, including museums, memorials, naming of buildings, courtrooms, websites, op-eds. Analyzes controversies arising when historians' work outside the academy challenges the status quo; role funders, interest groups, and the public play in promoting, shaping, or suppressing historical interpretation. Who gets to tell a group's story? What changes can public history enable? Students will engage in public history projects.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 201A: The Global Drug Wars (HISTORY 301A)

Explores the global story of the struggle over drugs from the nineteenth century to the present. Topics include the history of the opium wars in China, controversies over wine and tobacco in Iran, narco-trafficking and civil war in Lebanon, the Afghan 'narco-state,' Andean cocaine as a global commodity, the politics of U.S.- Mexico drug trafficking, incarceration, drugs, and race in the U.S., and the globalization of the American 'war on drugs.'
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Crews, R. (PI)

HISTORY 201D: History Goes Pop! Songwriting the Past (HISTORY 301D)

Historical research doesn't always take the form of a thesis, an article, or a book. Sometimes, research leads to film, museum exhibits, works of art, or... music. In this class, students will collaborate to write, record, and produce original pop music (perhaps even an entire album) based on original research in Stanford's wealth of archives and Special Collections. The thematic focus of the class will be on the global history of civil rights and social justice movements during the modern period. Archives include, but are not limited to, rare materials on the 2017 Women's March, Solidarity (Solidarno¿¿), Tiananmen Square, the NAACP, the United Farm Workers of America, the Black Panthers, the Gay Activists Alliance, Martin Luther King Jr., and more.nnA background in music is NOT required, but openness, supportiveness, and (a little bit of) bravery ARE. nnSpace Limited. Requires permission by instructor (apply at https://forms.gle/1MaYLjugN1bwvB6GA )
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mullaney, T. (PI)

HISTORY 202F: Surveillance States: Policing and Information Gathering in the Modern Era (HISTORY 302F)

The course analyzes the evolution, functions, structures and consequences of surveillance in the modern era. Among issues discussed are the rise of the modern state and population politics, information gathering and its uses in domestic and national security arenas, institutions of surveillance in various regimes, the challenge of privacy and ethical dilemmas.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Weiner, A. (PI)

HISTORY 202G: Peoples, Armies and Governments of the Second World War (HISTORY 302G)

Clausewitz conceptualized war as always consisting of a trinity of passion, chance, and reason, mirrored, respectively, in the people, army and government. Following Clausewitz, this course examines the peoples, armies, and governments that shaped World War II. Analyzes the ideological, political, diplomatic and economic motivations and constraints of the belligerents and their resulting strategies, military planning and fighting. Explores the new realities of everyday life on the home fronts and the experiences of non-combatants during the war, the final destruction of National Socialist Germany and Imperial Japan, and the emerging conflict between the victors. How the peoples, armies and governments involved perceived their possibilities and choices as a means to understand the origins, events, dynamics and implications of the greatest war in history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Vardi, G. (PI)

HISTORY 204D: Advanced Topics in Agnotology (HISTORY 304D)

Advanced research into the history of ignorance. Our goal will be to explore how ignorance is created, maintained and destroyed, using case studies from topics such as tobacco denialism, global climate denialism, and other forms of resistance to knowledge making. Course culminates in a research paper on the theory and practice of agnotology, the science of ignorance.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Proctor, R. (PI)

HISTORY 205D: Freedom in Chains: Black Slavery in the Atlantic, 1400s-1800s (AFRICAAM 113V, AFRICAST 113V, CSRE 113V)

This course will focus on the history of slavery in the British, French, Spanish, Portuguese and Dutch Atlantic world(s), from the late 1400s to the 1800s. Its main focus will be on the experiences of enslaved Africans and their descendants. Between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries, the Europeans forcibly embarked over 10 million Africans to the Americas. Drawing on methodologies used by historians, archaeologists and anthropologists, the course will reconstruct the daily lives and the socio-economic, cultural and political histories of these captives. We will seek to hear their voices by investigating a variety of historical testimonies and recent scholarship. The course will examine slavery in the context of broader trends in Atlantic World studies, a field that has grown considerably in recent years, providing new ways of understanding historical developments across national boundaries. We will seek to identify commonalities and differences across time periods and regions and the reasons for those differences. Covered topics will include slave ship voyages, labor, agency, the creation of new identities (creolization), religion, race, gender, resistance, legacies, and memory.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lamotte, M. (PI)

HISTORY 207D: Transhistory Colloquium (HISTORY 307D)

Colloquium on the history of transgender practices and identities. Readings will include scholarly texts from the emerging historical field of transhistory as well as adjacent fields within gender history. Colloquium will investigate avenues for deepening transhistory through further historical inquiry.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stokes, L. (PI)

HISTORY 209S: Research Seminar for Majors

Required of History majors. How to conduct original, historical research and analysis, including methods such as using the libraries and archives at Stanford and elsewhere, and working collaboratively to frame topics, identify sources, and develop analyses. Autumn quarter focuses on American Political History and Race, Gender, Sexuality in U.S.; Winter quarter on Early Modern Travel Accounts and The Americas; Spring quarter on Modern Times and Open Topic.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 210: The History of Occupation, 1914-2010 (HISTORY 310)

(History 210 is an undergraduate course offered for 5 units; History 310 is a graduate course offered for 4-5 units.) Examines the major cases of occupation in the twentieth century, from the first World War until the present, and issues of similarities, differences, and implications for contemporary policy making. Topics include European and Asian cases emerging from World War I and World War II, the Israeli occupation of the West Bank; the Soviet and American occupations of Afghanistan; and the American occupation of Iraq. Discussions will revolve around the problems, efficacy, and effects of occupation in historical perspective.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Naimark, N. (PI)

HISTORY 211: Out of Eden: Deportation, Exile, and Expulsion from Antiquity to the Renaissance (HISTORY 311)

This course examines the long pedigree of modern deportations and mass expulsions, from the forced resettlements of the ancient world to the expulsion of Jews from Spain in 1492, and from the outlawry of Saga-era Iceland to the culture of civic exile in Renaissance Italy. The course focuses on Europe and the Mediterranean from antiquity to the early modern period, but students are welcome to venture beyond these geographical and chronological boundaries for their final papers.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dorin, R. (PI)

HISTORY 226D: The Holocaust: Causes, Consequences, Memory (HISTORY 326D)

Overview of the history of the Holocaust, the genocide of European Jews. Explores its causes, course, consequences, and memory. Addresses the events themselves, as well as the roles of perpetrators and bystanders, dilemmas faced by victims, collaboration of local populations, and the issue of rescue. Considers how the Holocaust was and is remembered and commemorated by victims and participants alike. Uses different kinds of sources: scholarly work, memoirs, diaries, film, and primary documents.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 230C: Paris: Capital of the Modern World (FRENCH 140, FRENCH 340, URBANST 184)

This course explores how Paris, between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries, became the political, cultural, and artistic capital of the modern world. It considers how the city has both shaped and been shaped by the tumultuous events of modern history- class conflict, industrialization, imperialism, war, and occupation. It will also explore why Paris became the major world destination for intellectuals, artists and writers. Sources will include films, paintings, architecture, novels, travel journals, and memoirs. Course taught in English with an optional French section.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Daughton, J. (PI)

HISTORY 235F: Camus (COMPLIT 229B, CSRE 129, FRENCH 129)

"The Don Draper of Existentialism" for Adam Gopnik, "the ideal husband of contemporary letters" for Susan Sontag, and "the admirable conjunction of a man, of an action, and of a work" for Sartre, Camus embodies the very French figure of the "intellectuel engagé," or public intellectual. From his birth in 1913 into a poor family in Algeria to the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1957, from Paris to the Mediterranean world, Camus engaged in the great ethical battles of his time, from the fight against nazism and communism, from questioning colonial rules to the Algerian War of Independence. Through readings and films, we will explore his multiple, long-lasting legacies. Readings from Albert Camus, Jean-Paul Sartre, Kamel Daoud, Mouloud Feraoun, Alice Kaplan, A.B. Yehoshua, Yasmina Khadra. This course is a WIM course. Students will work on their production of written French, in addition to speaking French and reading comprehension. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FRENLANG 124 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ulloa, M. (PI)

HISTORY 239C: Humanities Core: Great Books, Big Ideas -- Europe, Modern (DLCL 13, FRENCH 13, HUMCORE 13, PHIL 13)

This three-quarter sequence asks big questions of major texts in the European and American tradition. What is a good life? How should society be organized? Who belongs? How should honor, love, sin, and similar abstractions govern our actions? What duty do we owe to the past and future? This third and final quarter focuses on the modern period, from the rise of revolutionary ideas to the experiences of totalitarianism and decolonization in the twentieth century. Authors include Locke, Mary Shelley, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Weber, Primo Levi, and Frantz Fanon.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 239J: Work and Leisure in Nineteenth Century Britain (HISTORY 339J)

This course charts the changes wrought by the Industrial Revolution, empire, and social factors in Britons' lives at work and at home in the nineteenth century. Readings will explore trade unionism and Chartism, urban migration, consumer culture, print culture, organized sports, shows, rational leisure" and the development of exhibitions and public museums. Students will gain a sense of how Britons worked and played in a century that gave birth to pastimes and institutions that continue to shape our own.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Williams, J. (PI)

HISTORY 240: The History of Evolution (HISTORY 340)

This course examines the history of evolutionary biology from its emergence around the middle of the eighteenth century. We will consider the continual engagement of evolutionary theories of life with a larger, transforming context: philosophical, political, social, economic, institutional, aesthetic, artistic, literary. Our goal will be to achieve a historical rich and nuanced understanding of how evolutionary thinking about life has developed to its current form.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Riskin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 243C: People, Plants, and Medicine: Colonial Science and Medicine (HISTORY 343C)

Explores the global exchange of knowledge, technologies, plants, peoples, disease, and medicines. Considers primarily Africans, Amerindians, and Europeans in the eighteenth-century West but also takes examples from other knowledge traditions. Readings treat science and medicine in relation to voyaging, colonialism, slavery, racism, plants, and environmental exchange. Colonial sciences and medicines were important militarily and strategically for positioning emerging nation states in global struggles for land and resources.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Schiebinger, L. (PI)

HISTORY 244F: Beyond Pink and Blue: Gender in Tech (FEMGEN 344F, HISTORY 344F)

This d-school seminar prototypes concepts and methods for "inclusive" design. From the moment we arrive on the planet, gender shapes our perception of the world. Examples of products (including objects, services, and systems) gone awry will serve as prompts for design activities, challenges, and discussions on gender issues to illustrate the different needs of women, men, and gender-fluid people. Class sessions mix use case explorations with design methodology, design thinking abilities, and guest speakers from technology, design, and academia. Students will be asked to work in interdisciplinary teams on several design challenges, culminating in the development of a toolkit for inclusive design. Methods will interact in crucial ways to create "intersectional thinking" (i.e., to consider how gender, ethnicity, sexuality, socio-economic status, etc. work together to require new solutions in design). Topics include: algorithms, media, seat belts for pregnant women, robotics, assistive technologies, tech for developing worlds, video games, urban/rural design, software development, and many more. Admission by application only. Visit d.school.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 245C: Casablanca - Algiers - Tunis : Cities on the Edge (AFRICAAM 236B, COMPLIT 236A, CSRE 140S, FRENCH 236, FRENCH 336, URBANST 140F)

Casablanca, Algiers and Tunis embody three territories, real and imaginary, which never cease to challenge the preconceptions of travelers setting sight on their shores. In this class, we will explore the myriad ways in which these cities of North Africa, on the edge of Europe and of Africa, have been narrated in literature, cinema, and popular culture. Home to Muslims, Christians, and Jews, they are an ebullient laboratory of social, political, religious, and cultural issues, global and local, between the nineteenth and twenty-first centuries. We will look at mass images of these cities, from films to maps, novels to photographs, sketching a new vision of these magnets as places where power, social rituals, legacies of the Ottoman and French colonial pasts, and the influence of the global economy collude and collide. Special focus on class, gender, and race.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ulloa, M. (PI)

HISTORY 248: Religion, Radicalization and Media in Africa since 1945 (AFRICAST 248, AFRICAST 348, HISTORY 348, RELIGST 230X, RELIGST 330X)

What are the paths to religious radicalization, and what role have media- new and old- played in these conversion journeys? We examine how Pentecostal Christians and Reformist Muslims in countries such as South Africa, Nigeria, Sudan, and Ethiopia have used multiple media forms- newspapers, cell phones, TV, radio, and the internet- to gain new converts, contest the authority of colonial and post-colonial states, construct transnational communities, and position themselves as key political players.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Cabrita, J. (PI)

HISTORY 252C: The Old South: Culture, Society, and Slavery (AFRICAAM 252C, CSRE 252C)

This course explores the political, social, and cultural history of the antebellum American South, with an emphasis on the history of African-American slavery. Topics include race and race making, slave community and resistance, gender and reproduction, class and immigration, commodity capitalism, technology, disease and climate, indigenous Southerners, white southern honor culture, the Civil War, and the region's place in national mythmaking and memory.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Olivarius, K. (PI)

HISTORY 257C: LGBTQ History of the United States (FEMGEN 140D, FEMGEN 240D)

An introductory course that explores LGBT/Queer social, cultural, and political history in the United States. By analyzing primary documents that range from personal accounts (private letters, autobiography, early LGBT magazines, and oral history interviews) to popular culture (postcards, art, political posters, lesbian pulp fiction, and film) to medical, military, and legal papers, students will understand how the categories of gender and sexuality have changed over the past 150 years. This class investigates the relationship among queer, straight and transgender identities. Seminar discussions will question how the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality influenced the construction of these categories.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Davies, A. (PI)

HISTORY 257E: History of Conservatism (HISTORY 357E)

What is conservatism in America? Where did it come from, and where might it be going? Looking at conservatism as a political, social, and intellectual movement, we will consider these questions by reading primary and secondary sources and archival material. Suitable for students of any or no particular political persuasion. No prerequisites or background required, although the reading will be considerable.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Burns, J. (PI)

HISTORY 258B: History of Education in the United States (AMSTUD 201, EDUC 201)

How education came to its current forms and functions, from the colonial experience to the present. Focus is on the 19th-century invention of the common school system, 20th-century emergence of progressive education reform, and the developments since WW II. The role of gender and race, the development of the high school and university, and school organization, curriculum, and teaching.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 261D: Democracy in Crisis: Historical Perspectives

Scholars and pundits warn that American democracy is in crisis. But what is at stake? How new is this crisis? And can historical analysis offer insight into our present predicament?nnThis course will examine five historical crises of democracy: the Constitutional Convention, the Civil War, the Progressive Movement, World War II, and the protest movements of the 1960s. For each crisis, we will explore the political, cultural, and intellectual factors that defined and resolved (or failed to resolve) each crisis.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Johnson, N. (PI)

HISTORY 270F: History of the Police in the United States

How did police come to have the power to use violence? Who counts as a police officer and why? Topics include: growth of professional policing, creation of private police forces and vigilantism, slave patrols, political economy of policing, global policing, and cultural depictions of police. The entanglement of race, class, gender, and state power with police work is central.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Adams, B. (PI)

HISTORY 279: Latin American Development: Economy and Society, 1800-2014 (HISTORY 379)

The newly independent nations of Latin America began the 19th century with economies roughly equal to the U.S. and Canada. What explains the economic gap that developed since 1800? Why are some Latin American nations rich and others poor and how have societies changed over time? Marxist, dependency, neoclassical, and institutionalist interpretive frameworks are explored. The effects of globalization on Latin American economic growth, autonomy, and potential for social justice are examined and debated.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Frank, Z. (PI)

HISTORY 281E: Oil, Maps, Data: Technology in the Middle East (HISTORY 381E)

This course introduces students to a wide range of humanities and social science concepts pertaining to the global study of technology with an emphasis on the Middle East in the 19th, 20th and 21st-centuries. The main body of the course focuses on three case studies namely oil, mapping, and the internet through which issues of power, race, colonialism, financial imperialism, violence, and surveillance will be explored. This colloquium provides a unique perspective on contemporary debates about the politics and ethics of technology through a study of their global circulation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Zakar, A. (PI)

HISTORY 299M: Undergraduate Directed Research: Martin Luther King, Jr., Research and Education Institute

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Carson, C. (PI)

HISTORY 299P: Mastering Uncertainty: The Power of Archival Thinking (HISTORY 399P)

When confronted with chaos and uncertainty, do you know how to stay calm, ask the right questions, and find the answers? Archival researchers do. Do you realize that less than 1 percent of primary sources have been digitized, and that 99 percent still exist in their original formats in collections, small and large, scattered all across the world? Do you know how to find them and use them? Archival researchers do. Through hands-on exercises in Stanford¿s archives, students learn the fundamentals of archival research. Pursuing their own research interests, students will learn to become self-sufficient, independent researchers capable of navigating uncertainty and producing knowledge--a skill set in demand no matter what their major or post-graduate plans. Instructor permission required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mullaney, T. (PI)

HISTORY 301A: The Global Drug Wars (HISTORY 201A)

Explores the global story of the struggle over drugs from the nineteenth century to the present. Topics include the history of the opium wars in China, controversies over wine and tobacco in Iran, narco-trafficking and civil war in Lebanon, the Afghan 'narco-state,' Andean cocaine as a global commodity, the politics of U.S.- Mexico drug trafficking, incarceration, drugs, and race in the U.S., and the globalization of the American 'war on drugs.'
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Crews, R. (PI)

HISTORY 301D: History Goes Pop! Songwriting the Past (HISTORY 201D)

Historical research doesn't always take the form of a thesis, an article, or a book. Sometimes, research leads to film, museum exhibits, works of art, or... music. In this class, students will collaborate to write, record, and produce original pop music (perhaps even an entire album) based on original research in Stanford's wealth of archives and Special Collections. The thematic focus of the class will be on the global history of civil rights and social justice movements during the modern period. Archives include, but are not limited to, rare materials on the 2017 Women's March, Solidarity (Solidarno¿¿), Tiananmen Square, the NAACP, the United Farm Workers of America, the Black Panthers, the Gay Activists Alliance, Martin Luther King Jr., and more.nnA background in music is NOT required, but openness, supportiveness, and (a little bit of) bravery ARE. nnSpace Limited. Requires permission by instructor (apply at https://forms.gle/1MaYLjugN1bwvB6GA )
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mullaney, T. (PI)

HISTORY 302F: Surveillance States: Policing and Information Gathering in the Modern Era (HISTORY 202F)

The course analyzes the evolution, functions, structures and consequences of surveillance in the modern era. Among issues discussed are the rise of the modern state and population politics, information gathering and its uses in domestic and national security arenas, institutions of surveillance in various regimes, the challenge of privacy and ethical dilemmas.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Weiner, A. (PI)

HISTORY 302G: Peoples, Armies and Governments of the Second World War (HISTORY 202G)

Clausewitz conceptualized war as always consisting of a trinity of passion, chance, and reason, mirrored, respectively, in the people, army and government. Following Clausewitz, this course examines the peoples, armies, and governments that shaped World War II. Analyzes the ideological, political, diplomatic and economic motivations and constraints of the belligerents and their resulting strategies, military planning and fighting. Explores the new realities of everyday life on the home fronts and the experiences of non-combatants during the war, the final destruction of National Socialist Germany and Imperial Japan, and the emerging conflict between the victors. How the peoples, armies and governments involved perceived their possibilities and choices as a means to understand the origins, events, dynamics and implications of the greatest war in history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Vardi, G. (PI)

HISTORY 304D: Advanced Topics in Agnotology (HISTORY 204D)

Advanced research into the history of ignorance. Our goal will be to explore how ignorance is created, maintained and destroyed, using case studies from topics such as tobacco denialism, global climate denialism, and other forms of resistance to knowledge making. Course culminates in a research paper on the theory and practice of agnotology, the science of ignorance.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Proctor, R. (PI)

HISTORY 306: Beyond Borders: Approaches to Transnational History

This core colloquium for the Transnational, International, and Global (TIG) field will introduce students to the major historiographical trends, methodological challenges, and theoretical approaches to studying and writing transnational histories.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 306D: World History: Graduate Colloquium

How do historians engage the global scale in the classroom as well as in research? The world history canon including Toynbee, McNeill, Braudel, Wolf, and Wallerstein; contrasting approaches, recent research, and resources for teaching. Recommended: concurrent enrollment in HISTORY 306K.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lewis, M. (PI); Wigen, K. (PI)

HISTORY 306K: World History Pedagogy Workshop

Students draft a syllabus and create a curriculum module for use in a world history lecture course. Corequisite: HISTORY 306D, recommended.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lewis, M. (PI); Wigen, K. (PI)

HISTORY 307D: Transhistory Colloquium (HISTORY 207D)

Colloquium on the history of transgender practices and identities. Readings will include scholarly texts from the emerging historical field of transhistory as well as adjacent fields within gender history. Colloquium will investigate avenues for deepening transhistory through further historical inquiry.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stokes, L. (PI)

HISTORY 310: The History of Occupation, 1914-2010 (HISTORY 210)

(History 210 is an undergraduate course offered for 5 units; History 310 is a graduate course offered for 4-5 units.) Examines the major cases of occupation in the twentieth century, from the first World War until the present, and issues of similarities, differences, and implications for contemporary policy making. Topics include European and Asian cases emerging from World War I and World War II, the Israeli occupation of the West Bank; the Soviet and American occupations of Afghanistan; and the American occupation of Iraq. Discussions will revolve around the problems, efficacy, and effects of occupation in historical perspective.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Naimark, N. (PI)

HISTORY 311: Out of Eden: Deportation, Exile, and Expulsion from Antiquity to the Renaissance (HISTORY 211)

This course examines the long pedigree of modern deportations and mass expulsions, from the forced resettlements of the ancient world to the expulsion of Jews from Spain in 1492, and from the outlawry of Saga-era Iceland to the culture of civic exile in Renaissance Italy. The course focuses on Europe and the Mediterranean from antiquity to the early modern period, but students are welcome to venture beyond these geographical and chronological boundaries for their final papers.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dorin, R. (PI)

HISTORY 326D: The Holocaust: Causes, Consequences, Memory (HISTORY 226D)

Overview of the history of the Holocaust, the genocide of European Jews. Explores its causes, course, consequences, and memory. Addresses the events themselves, as well as the roles of perpetrators and bystanders, dilemmas faced by victims, collaboration of local populations, and the issue of rescue. Considers how the Holocaust was and is remembered and commemorated by victims and participants alike. Uses different kinds of sources: scholarly work, memoirs, diaries, film, and primary documents.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 330A: Early Modern Colloquium

Historiographical survey from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment. Topics include Renaissance, Reformation, European expansion, state and nation building, printing, military, and scientific revolutions, origins of Enlightenment. Designed to prepare students doing either a primary or secondary graduate field in early modern European history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Stokes, L. (PI)

HISTORY 331C: Modern European Core: The Twentieth Century

The historiography of 20th-century Europe. Topics include WW I, the Russian Revolution, National Socialism, and the EU.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Press, S. (PI)

HISTORY 339J: Work and Leisure in Nineteenth Century Britain (HISTORY 239J)

This course charts the changes wrought by the Industrial Revolution, empire, and social factors in Britons' lives at work and at home in the nineteenth century. Readings will explore trade unionism and Chartism, urban migration, consumer culture, print culture, organized sports, shows, rational leisure" and the development of exhibitions and public museums. Students will gain a sense of how Britons worked and played in a century that gave birth to pastimes and institutions that continue to shape our own.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Williams, J. (PI)

HISTORY 340: The History of Evolution (HISTORY 240)

This course examines the history of evolutionary biology from its emergence around the middle of the eighteenth century. We will consider the continual engagement of evolutionary theories of life with a larger, transforming context: philosophical, political, social, economic, institutional, aesthetic, artistic, literary. Our goal will be to achieve a historical rich and nuanced understanding of how evolutionary thinking about life has developed to its current form.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Riskin, J. (PI)

HISTORY 343C: People, Plants, and Medicine: Colonial Science and Medicine (HISTORY 243C)

Explores the global exchange of knowledge, technologies, plants, peoples, disease, and medicines. Considers primarily Africans, Amerindians, and Europeans in the eighteenth-century West but also takes examples from other knowledge traditions. Readings treat science and medicine in relation to voyaging, colonialism, slavery, racism, plants, and environmental exchange. Colonial sciences and medicines were important militarily and strategically for positioning emerging nation states in global struggles for land and resources.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Schiebinger, L. (PI)

HISTORY 344F: Beyond Pink and Blue: Gender in Tech (FEMGEN 344F, HISTORY 244F)

This d-school seminar prototypes concepts and methods for "inclusive" design. From the moment we arrive on the planet, gender shapes our perception of the world. Examples of products (including objects, services, and systems) gone awry will serve as prompts for design activities, challenges, and discussions on gender issues to illustrate the different needs of women, men, and gender-fluid people. Class sessions mix use case explorations with design methodology, design thinking abilities, and guest speakers from technology, design, and academia. Students will be asked to work in interdisciplinary teams on several design challenges, culminating in the development of a toolkit for inclusive design. Methods will interact in crucial ways to create "intersectional thinking" (i.e., to consider how gender, ethnicity, sexuality, socio-economic status, etc. work together to require new solutions in design). Topics include: algorithms, media, seat belts for pregnant women, robotics, assistive technologies, tech for developing worlds, video games, urban/rural design, software development, and many more. Admission by application only. Visit d.school.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 348: Religion, Radicalization and Media in Africa since 1945 (AFRICAST 248, AFRICAST 348, HISTORY 248, RELIGST 230X, RELIGST 330X)

What are the paths to religious radicalization, and what role have media- new and old- played in these conversion journeys? We examine how Pentecostal Christians and Reformist Muslims in countries such as South Africa, Nigeria, Sudan, and Ethiopia have used multiple media forms- newspapers, cell phones, TV, radio, and the internet- to gain new converts, contest the authority of colonial and post-colonial states, construct transnational communities, and position themselves as key political players.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Cabrita, J. (PI)

HISTORY 351F: Core in American History, Part VI

Required of all first-year Ph.D. students in U.S. History.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Chang, G. (PI)

HISTORY 357E: History of Conservatism (HISTORY 257E)

What is conservatism in America? Where did it come from, and where might it be going? Looking at conservatism as a political, social, and intellectual movement, we will consider these questions by reading primary and secondary sources and archival material. Suitable for students of any or no particular political persuasion. No prerequisites or background required, although the reading will be considerable.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Burns, J. (PI)

HISTORY 361D: History of Civil Rights Law

(Same as LAW 7838.) This is a seminar that will examine canonical civil rights law using history. We will investigate the historical context behind the enactment of particular laws and judicial decisions. We will also discuss the meaning and implications of the term "civil rights law." Readings will include cases, law review articles, primary sources, and history articles. Topics will include segregation, abortion, workers' rights, and disability. 14th Amendment is not a prerequisite for the seminar. Requirements for the course include regular class participation and, at the students' election, either response papers or a historiographical essay. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Belt, R. (PI)

HISTORY 379: Latin American Development: Economy and Society, 1800-2014 (HISTORY 279)

The newly independent nations of Latin America began the 19th century with economies roughly equal to the U.S. and Canada. What explains the economic gap that developed since 1800? Why are some Latin American nations rich and others poor and how have societies changed over time? Marxist, dependency, neoclassical, and institutionalist interpretive frameworks are explored. The effects of globalization on Latin American economic growth, autonomy, and potential for social justice are examined and debated.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Frank, Z. (PI)

HISTORY 381E: Oil, Maps, Data: Technology in the Middle East (HISTORY 281E)

This course introduces students to a wide range of humanities and social science concepts pertaining to the global study of technology with an emphasis on the Middle East in the 19th, 20th and 21st-centuries. The main body of the course focuses on three case studies namely oil, mapping, and the internet through which issues of power, race, colonialism, financial imperialism, violence, and surveillance will be explored. This colloquium provides a unique perspective on contemporary debates about the politics and ethics of technology through a study of their global circulation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Zakar, A. (PI)

HISTORY 385B: Graduate Colloquium in Modern Jewish History (JEWISHST 385B)

Instructor consent required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Zipperstein, S. (PI)

HISTORY 395J: Gender and Sexuality in Chinese History (CHINGEN 395, FEMGEN 395J)

Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Sommer, M. (PI)

HISTORY 399P: Mastering Uncertainty: The Power of Archival Thinking (HISTORY 299P)

When confronted with chaos and uncertainty, do you know how to stay calm, ask the right questions, and find the answers? Archival researchers do. Do you realize that less than 1 percent of primary sources have been digitized, and that 99 percent still exist in their original formats in collections, small and large, scattered all across the world? Do you know how to find them and use them? Archival researchers do. Through hands-on exercises in Stanford¿s archives, students learn the fundamentals of archival research. Pursuing their own research interests, students will learn to become self-sufficient, independent researchers capable of navigating uncertainty and producing knowledge--a skill set in demand no matter what their major or post-graduate plans. Instructor permission required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mullaney, T. (PI)

HISTORY 438: European History Workshop

All European history graduate students in residence register for this weekly workshop, at which dissertation chapters and prospectuses, papers, and grant proposals by students and faculty are read and discussed.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Robinson, P. (PI)

HISTORY 468B: Graduate Research Seminar: U.S. History in the 20th Century Part II

Prerequisite: History 468A.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Burns, J. (PI)

HISTORY 481: Research Seminar in Middle East History (JEWISHST 287S, JEWISHST 481)

Student-selected research topics. May be repeated for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 486A: Graduate Research Seminar in Jewish History (JEWISHST 486A)

Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Zipperstein, S. (PI)

HISTORY 496B: Research Seminar in Chinese History

Second part of a two part sequence. Primary sources and research methods to be used in the study of modern Chinese history. Prerequisite: HISTORY 496A.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Mullaney, T. (PI)
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