Print Settings
 

GEOPHYS 20N: Predicting Volcanic Eruptions

Preference to sophomores. The physics and chemistry of volcanic processes and modern methods of volcano monitoring. Volcanoes as manifestations of the Earth's internal energy and hazards to society. How earth scientists better forecast eruptive activity by monitoring seismic activity, bulging of the ground surface, and the discharge of volcanic gases, and by studying deposits from past eruptions. Focus is on the interface between scientists and policy makers and the challenges of decision making with incomplete information. Field trip to Mt. St. Helens, site of the 1980 eruption.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 60N: Man versus Nature: Coping with Disasters Using Space Technology (EE 60N)

Preference to freshman. Natural hazards, earthquakes, volcanoes, floods, hurricanes, and fires, and how they affect people and society; great disasters such as asteroid impacts that periodically obliterate many species of life. Scientific issues, political and social consequences, costs of disaster mitigation, and how scientific knowledge affects policy. How spaceborne imaging technology makes it possible to respond quickly and mitigate consequences; how it is applied to natural disasters; and remote sensing data manipulation and analysis. GER:DB-EngrAppSci
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Zebker, H. (PI)

GEOPHYS 90: Earthquakes and Volcanoes (EARTHSYS 113)

Is the "Big One" overdue in California? What kind of damage would that cause? What can we do to reduce the impact of such hazards in urban environments? Does "fracking" cause earthquakes and are we at risk? Is the United States vulnerable to a giant tsunami? The geologic record contains evidence of volcanic super eruptions throughout Earth's history. What causes these gigantic explosive eruptions, and can they be predicted in the future? This course will address these and related issues. For non-majors and potential Earth scientists. No prerequisites. More information at nnhttps://pangea.stanford.edu/research/CDFM/CourseDescriptions/GP_113_announcement.pdf
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Segall, P. (PI)

GEOPHYS 100: Directed Reading

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GEOPHYS 104: The Water Course (EARTHSYS 104)

The pathway that water takes from rainfall to the tap using student home towns as an example. How the geological environment controls the quantity and quality of water; taste tests of water from around the world. Current U.S. and world water supply issues.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Knight, R. (PI)

GEOPHYS 110: Earth on the Edge: Introduction to Geophysics

Introduction to the foundations of contemporary geophysics. Topics drawn from four broad themes in: whole Earth geodynamics, geohazards, natural resources, and environment/sustainability. In each case the focus is on how the interpretation of a variety of geophysical measurements (e.g., gravity, seismology, heat flow, magnetism, electromagnetics, and geodesy) can be used to provide fundamental insight into the behavior of the Earth's complex geosystems. Prerequisite: CME 100 or MA TH 51, or co-registration in either.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Harris, J. (PI)

GEOPHYS 112: Exploring Geosciences with MATLAB

How to use MATLAB as a tool for research and technical computing, including 2-D and 3-D visualization features, numerical capabilities, and toolboxes. Practical skills in areas such as data analysis, regressions, optimization, spectral analysis, differential equations, image analysis, computational statistics, and Monte Carlo simulations. Emphasis is on scientific and engineering applications. Offered every year, autumn quarter.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mukerji, T. (PI)

GEOPHYS 120: Ice, Water, Fire (GEOPHYS 220)

Introductory application of continuum mechanics to ice sheets and glaciers, water waves and tsunamis, and volcanoes. Emphasis on physical processes and mathematical description using balance of mass and momentum, combined with constitutive equations for fluids and solids. Designed for undergraduates with no prior geophysics background; also appropriate for beginning graduate students. Prerequisites: CME 100 or MATH 52 and PHYSICS 41 (or equivalent). Offered every year, winter quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dunham, E. (PI)

GEOPHYS 130: Introductory Seismology

Introduction to seismology including: elasticity and the wave equation, P, S, and surface waves, dispersion, ray theory, reflection and transmission of seismic waves, seismic imaging, large-scale Earth structure, earthquake location, earthquake statistics and forecasting, magnitude scales, seismic source theory. Offered every year, Autumn quarter. (Beroza, G)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Nakata, N. (PI)

GEOPHYS 141: Remote Sensing of the Oceans (EARTHSYS 141, EARTHSYS 241, EESS 141, EESS 241)

How to observe and interpret physical and biological changes in the oceans using satellite technologies. Topics: principles of satellite remote sensing, classes of satellite remote sensors, converting radiometric data into biological and physical quantities, sensor calibration and validation, interpreting large-scale oceanographic features.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Arrigo, K. (PI)

GEOPHYS 146A: Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: The Atmospheric Circulation (EARTHSYS 146A, EARTHSYS 246A, EESS 146A, EESS 246A, GEOPHYS 246A)

Introduction to the physics governing the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean and their control on climate with emphasis on the atmospheric circulation. Topics include the global energy balance, the greenhouse effect, the vertical and meridional structure of the atmosphere, dry and moist convection, the equations of motion for the atmosphere and ocean, including the effects of rotation, and the poleward transport of heat by the large-scale atmospheric circulation and storm systems. Prerequisites: MATH 51 or CME100 and PHYSICS 41.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Thomas, L. (PI)

GEOPHYS 146B: Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: the Ocean Circulation (EARTHSYS 146B, EARTHSYS 246B, EESS 146B, EESS 246B, GEOPHYS 246B)

Introduction to the physics governing the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean and their control on climate with emphasis on the large-scale ocean circulation. This course will give an overview of the structure and dynamics of the major ocean current systems that contribute to the meridional overturning circulation, the transport of heat, salt, and biogeochemical tracers, and the regulation of climate. Topics include the tropical ocean circulation, the wind-driven gyres and western boundary currents, the thermohaline circulation, the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, water mass formation, atmosphere-ocean coupling, and climate variability. Prerequisites: EESS 146A or EESS 246A, or CEE 164 or CEE 262D, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Thomas, L. (PI)

GEOPHYS 150: Geodynamics: Our Dynamic Earth

In this course we cover the dynamic forces acting upon the Earth. We will investigate how geophysical forces effect the bending of tectonic plates, the flow of heat, sea level topography, the breaking point of rocks, porous flow, and how faults store and release energy. Math 52 or CME 102, GP 107 or permission from instructor. Offered every year, Spring quarter
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lawrence, J. (PI)

GEOPHYS 162: Laboratory Methods in Geophysics (GEOPHYS 259)

Lab. Types of equipment used in experimental rock physics. Principles and measurements of geophysical properties such as porosity, permeability, acoustic wave velocity, and resistivity through lectures and laboratory experiments. Training in analytical project writing skills and understanding errors for assessing accuracy and variability of measured data. Students may investigate a scientific problem to support their own research. Prerequisites: Physics 45 (Light and Heat); and CME 100 (Vector Calculus).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Vanorio, T. (PI)

GEOPHYS 170: Global Tectonics

The architecture of the Earth's crust; regional assembling of structural or deformational features and their relationship, origin and evolution. The plate-tectonic cycle: rifting, passive margins, sea-floor spreading, subduction zones, and collisions. Case studies.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 183: Reflection Seismology Interpretation (GEOPHYS 223, GES 223)

The structural and stratigraphic interpretation of seismic reflection data, emphasizing hydrocarbon traps in two and three dimensions on industry data, including workstation-based interpretation. Lectures only, 1 unit. Prerequisite: 222, or consent of instructor.
Terms: alternate years, given next year | Units: 1-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

GEOPHYS 184: Journey to the Center of the Earth (GEOPHYS 274, GES 107, GES 207)

The interconnected set of dynamic systems that make up the Earth. Focus is on fundamental geophysical observations of the Earth and the laboratory experiments to understand and interpret them. What earthquakes, volcanoes, gravity, magnetic fields, and rocks reveal about the Earth's formation and evolution. Offered every other year, winter quarter. Next offering Winter 2013-14.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 187: Environmental Soundings Image Estimation (GEOPHYS 211)

Imaging principles exemplified by means of imaging geophysical data of various uncomplicated types (bathymetry, altimetry, velocity, reflectivity). Adjoints, back projection, conjugate-gradient inversion, preconditioning, multidimensional autoregression and spectral factorization, the helical coordinate, and object-based programming. Common recurring issues such as limited aperture, missing data, signal/noise segregation, and nonstationary spectra. See http://sep.stanford.edu/sep/prof/.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Claerbout, J. (PI)

GEOPHYS 190: Near-Surface Geophysics

Introduction to the integration of geophysical field measurements and laboratory measurements for imaging and characterizing the top 100 meters of Earth. Examples will focus on applications related to water resource management. The link between the measured geophysical properties of rocks, soils, and sediments, and their material properties. Forward modeling and inversion of geophysical data sets. Each week includes two hours of lectures; plus one two-hour lab that involves acquisition of field or lab data, or computer modeling/analysis of data. Pre-requisite: CME 100 or Math 51, or co-registration in either.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Knight, R. (PI)

GEOPHYS 196: Undergraduate Research in Geophysics

Field-, lab-, or computer-based. Faculty supervision. Written reports.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 197: Senior Thesis in Geophysics

For seniors writing a thesis based on Geophysics research in 196 or as a summer research fellow. Seniors defend the results of their research at a public oral presentation.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 198: Honors Program

Experimental, observational, or theoretical honors project and thesis in geophysics under supervision of a faculty member. Students who elect to do an honors thesis should begin planning it no later than Winter Quarter of the junior year. Prerequisites: department approval. Seniors defend the results of their research at a public oral presentation.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 201: Frontiers of Geophysical Research at Stanford: Faculty Lectures

Required for new students entering the department. Second-year and other graduate students may attend either for credit or as auditors. Department faculty and senior research staff introduce the frontiers of research problems and methods being employed or developed in the department and unique to department faculty and students: what the current research is, why the research is important, what methodologies and technologies are being used, and what the potential impact of the results might be. Offered every year, autumn quarter.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Zebker, H. (PI)

GEOPHYS 202: Reservoir Geomechanics

Basic principles of rock mechanics and the state of stress and pore pressure in sedimentary basins related to exploitation of hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs. Mechanisms of hydrocarbon migration, exploitation of fractured reservoirs, reservoir compaction and subsidence, hydraulic fracturing, utilization of directional and horizontal drilling to optimize well stability. Course will have an online component in 2014-2015. Given alternate years.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Zoback, M. (PI)

GEOPHYS 210: Basic Earth Imaging

Echo seismogram recording geometry, head waves, moveout, velocity estimation, making images of complex shaped reflectors, migration by Fourier and integral methods. Anti-aliasing. Dip moveout. Computer labs. See http://sep.stanford.edu/sep/prof/. Offered every year, autumn quarter.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Clapp, R. (PI)

GEOPHYS 211: Environmental Soundings Image Estimation (GEOPHYS 187)

Imaging principles exemplified by means of imaging geophysical data of various uncomplicated types (bathymetry, altimetry, velocity, reflectivity). Adjoints, back projection, conjugate-gradient inversion, preconditioning, multidimensional autoregression and spectral factorization, the helical coordinate, and object-based programming. Common recurring issues such as limited aperture, missing data, signal/noise segregation, and nonstationary spectra. See http://sep.stanford.edu/sep/prof/.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Claerbout, J. (PI)

GEOPHYS 220: Ice, Water, Fire (GEOPHYS 120)

Introductory application of continuum mechanics to ice sheets and glaciers, water waves and tsunamis, and volcanoes. Emphasis on physical processes and mathematical description using balance of mass and momentum, combined with constitutive equations for fluids and solids. Designed for undergraduates with no prior geophysics background; also appropriate for beginning graduate students. Prerequisites: CME 100 or MATH 52 and PHYSICS 41 (or equivalent). Offered every year, winter quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dunham, E. (PI)

GEOPHYS 223: Reflection Seismology Interpretation (GEOPHYS 183, GES 223)

The structural and stratigraphic interpretation of seismic reflection data, emphasizing hydrocarbon traps in two and three dimensions on industry data, including workstation-based interpretation. Lectures only, 1 unit. Prerequisite: 222, or consent of instructor.
Terms: alternate years, given next year | Units: 1-4 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

GEOPHYS 229: Earthquake Rupture Dynamics

Physics of earthquakes, including nucleation, propagation, and arrest; slip-weakening and rate-and-state friction laws; thermal pressurization and dynamic weakening mechanisms; off-fault plasticity; dynamic fracture mechanics; earthquake energy balance. Problem sets involve numerical simulations on CEES cluster. Prerequisites: GEOPHYS 287. Offered occasionally.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dunham, E. (PI)

GEOPHYS 235: WAVES AND FIELDS IN GEOPHYSICS

Basic topics and approaches (theory and numerical simulations) on acoustic, electromagnetic, and elastic waves and fields for geophysical applications: dispersion, phase and group velocities, attenuation, reflection and transmission at planar interfaces, high frequency and low frequency approximations, heterogeneous media. Prerequisites: UG level class on waves or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Harris, J. (PI)

GEOPHYS 246A: Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: The Atmospheric Circulation (EARTHSYS 146A, EARTHSYS 246A, EESS 146A, EESS 246A, GEOPHYS 146A)

Introduction to the physics governing the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean and their control on climate with emphasis on the atmospheric circulation. Topics include the global energy balance, the greenhouse effect, the vertical and meridional structure of the atmosphere, dry and moist convection, the equations of motion for the atmosphere and ocean, including the effects of rotation, and the poleward transport of heat by the large-scale atmospheric circulation and storm systems. Prerequisites: MATH 51 or CME100 and PHYSICS 41.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Thomas, L. (PI)

GEOPHYS 246B: Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: the Ocean Circulation (EARTHSYS 146B, EARTHSYS 246B, EESS 146B, EESS 246B, GEOPHYS 146B)

Introduction to the physics governing the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean and their control on climate with emphasis on the large-scale ocean circulation. This course will give an overview of the structure and dynamics of the major ocean current systems that contribute to the meridional overturning circulation, the transport of heat, salt, and biogeochemical tracers, and the regulation of climate. Topics include the tropical ocean circulation, the wind-driven gyres and western boundary currents, the thermohaline circulation, the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, water mass formation, atmosphere-ocean coupling, and climate variability. Prerequisites: EESS 146A or EESS 246A, or CEE 164 or CEE 262D, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Thomas, L. (PI)

GEOPHYS 251: Structural Geology and Rock Mechanics (CEE 297R, GES 215)

Quantitative field and laboratory data integrated with solutions to boundary value problems of continuum mechanics to understand tectonic processes in Earth's crust that lead to the development of geological structures including folds, faults, fractures and fabrics. Topics include: techniques and tools for structural mapping¿ differential geometry to characterize structures¿ dimensional analysis and scaling relations¿ kinematics of deformation and flow¿ traction and stress analysis, conservation of mass and momentum in a deformable continuum¿ linear elastic deformation and elastic properties¿ brittle deformation including fracture and faulting¿ model development and methodology. Data sets analyzed using MATLAB. Prerequisites: GES 1, MATH 53, MATLAB or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pollard, D. (PI)

GEOPHYS 255: Report on Energy Industry Training

On-the-job-training for master's and doctoral degree students under the guidance of on-site supervisors. Students submit a report detailing work activities, problems, assignment, and key results. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: written consent of adviser.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

GEOPHYS 257: Introduction to Computational Earth Sciences

Techniques for mapping numerically intensive algorithms to modern high performance computers such as the Center for Computational Earth and Environmental Science's (CEES) . Topics include computer architecture performance analysis, and parallel programming. Topics covered include pthreads OpenMP; MPI, Cilk++, and CUDA.. Exercises using SMP and cluster computers. May be repeated for credit. Offered every other year, winter quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Clapp, R. (PI)

GEOPHYS 259: Laboratory Methods in Geophysics (GEOPHYS 162)

Lab. Types of equipment used in experimental rock physics. Principles and measurements of geophysical properties such as porosity, permeability, acoustic wave velocity, and resistivity through lectures and laboratory experiments. Training in analytical project writing skills and understanding errors for assessing accuracy and variability of measured data. Students may investigate a scientific problem to support their own research. Prerequisites: Physics 45 (Light and Heat); and CME 100 (Vector Calculus).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Vanorio, T. (PI)

GEOPHYS 262: Rock Physics

Properties of and processes in rocks as related to geophysical exploration, crustal studies, and tectonic processes. Emphasis is on wave velocities and attenuation, hydraulic permeability, and electrical resistivity in rocks. Application to in situ problems, using lab data and theoretical results. Offered every year, autumn quarter.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Mavko, G. (PI)

GEOPHYS 274: Journey to the Center of the Earth (GEOPHYS 184, GES 107, GES 207)

The interconnected set of dynamic systems that make up the Earth. Focus is on fundamental geophysical observations of the Earth and the laboratory experiments to understand and interpret them. What earthquakes, volcanoes, gravity, magnetic fields, and rocks reveal about the Earth's formation and evolution. Offered every other year, winter quarter. Next offering Winter 2013-14.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 280: 3-D Seismic Imaging

The principles of imaging complex structures in the Earth subsurface using 3-D reflection seismology. Emphasis is on processing methodologies and algorithms, with examples of applications to field data. Topics: acquisition geometrics of land and marine 3-D seismic surveys, time vs. depth imaging, migration by Kirchhoff methods and by wave-equation methods, migration velocity analysis, velocity model building, imaging irregularly sampled and aliased data. Computational labs involve some programming. Lab for 3 units. Offered every year, Spring quarter.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Biondi, B. (PI)

GEOPHYS 286: Global Seismology

This course investigates how waves propagate through the whole Earth. This course examines the questions "How do body waves and surface waves behave within the Earth?" and "What does that tell us about the Earth?" The course delves into both theory and how we apply that theory to understand seismic observations. Requirements: Math 52 or CME 102, GP130 or permission from instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lawrence, J. (PI)

GEOPHYS 287: Earthquake Seismology

Seismic wave propagation (body waves and surface waves, reflection/transmission), Green's functions, seismic moment tensors and equivalent forces, representation theorem, finite-source effects. Prerequisites: GEOPHYS 130 or equivalent. Offered every other year, spring quarter.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dunham, E. (PI)

GEOPHYS 385B: Environmental Geophysics

Research on the use of geophysical methods for near-surface environmental problems. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Knight, R. (PI)

GEOPHYS 385K: Crustal Mechanics

Research in areas of petrophysics, seismology, in situ stress, and subjects related to characterization of the physical properties of rock in situ. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Zoback, M. (PI)

GEOPHYS 385L: Earthquake Seismology, Deformation, and Stress

Research on seismic source processes, crustal stress, and deformation associated with faulting and volcanism. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

GEOPHYS 385S: Wave Physics

Theory, numerical simulation, and experiments on seismic and electromagnetic waves in complex porous media. Applications from Earth imaging and in situ characterization of Earth properties, including subsurface monitoring. Presentations by faculty, research staff, students, and visitors. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Harris, J. (PI)

GEOPHYS 385Z: Radio Remote Sensing

Research applications, especially crustal deformation measurements. Recent instrumentation and system advancements. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 400: Research in Geophysics

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 50N: Planetary Habitability, World View, and Sustainability

Sustainability lessons from the geological past Life on Earth has partially perished in sudden mass extinctions several time over the Earth's history. Threats include actions of our own volition, including fossil fuel burning as well as natural events, including the impact of large asteroids. The end Permian 250 million years ago and end Paleocene 55 million years ago extinctions involved natural burning of fossil fuels. The 65 million year ago end Cretaceous extinction involved the impact of and asteroid and possibly fossil fuel burning. Related sustainability topics in the popular press will be discussed as they arise. Student pairs lead discussions on topics on how humanity might avert these catastrophes. Offered occasionally.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 80: The Energy-Water Nexus (EARTHSYS 140)

Energy, water, and food are our most vital resources constituting a tightly intertwined network: energy production requires water, transporting and treating water needs energy, producing food requires both energy and water. The course is an introduction to learn specifically about the links between energy and water. Students will look first at the use of water for energy production, then at the role of energy in water projects, and finally at the challenge in figuring out how to keep this relationship as sustainable as possible. Students will explore case examples and are encouraged to contribute examples of concerns for discussion as well as suggest a portfolio of sustainable energy options.
Terms: alternate years, given next year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 118: Understanding Natural Hazards, Quantifying Risk, Increasing Resilience in Highly Urbanized Regions (EESS 118, EESS 218, GEOPHYS 218, GES 118, GES 218)

Integrating the science of natural hazards, methods for quantitatively estimating the risks that these hazards pose to populations and property, engineering solutions that might best ameliorate these risks and increase resilience to future events, and policy and economic decision-making studies that may increase long-term resilience to future events. Panel discussions by outside experts exploring the science, engineering, policy, and economics that underly the hazards, risks, and strategies for increasing resilience. Group assignments to evaluate the way in which natural hazards, and human population and developing interact in megacities to produce risk, and what strategies might be adopted in each area to reduce risks posted by the specific hazards faced by these urban areas.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 171: Tectonics Field Trip

Long weekend field trip to examine large-scale features in the crust. Destinations may include the San Andreas fault, Mendocino Triple Junction, Sierra Nevada, and western Basin and Range province.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Klemperer, S. (PI)

GEOPHYS 181: Fluids and Flow in the Earth: Computational Methods (GEOPHYS 200)

Interdisciplinary problems involving the state and movement of fluids in crustal systems, and computational methods to model these processes. Examples of processes include: nonlinear, time-dependent flow in porous rocks; coupling in porous rocks between fluid flow, stress, deformation, and heat and chemical transport; percolation of partial melt; diagenetic processes; pressure solution and the formation of stylolites; and transient pore pressure in fault zones. MATLAB, Lattice-Boltzmann, and COMSOL Multiphysics. Term project. No experience with COMSOL Multiphysics required. Offered every other year, winter quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Mukerji, T. (PI)

GEOPHYS 182: Reflection Seismology (GEOPHYS 222)

The principles of seismic reflection profiling, focusing on methods of seismic data acquisition and seismic data processing for hydrocarbon exploration.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 185: Rock Physics for Reservoir Characterization (GEOPHYS 260)

How to integrate well log and laboratory data to determine and theoretically generalize rock physics transforms between sediment wave properties (acoustic and elastic impendence), bulk properties (porosity, lithology, texture, permeability), and pore fluid conditions (pore fluid and pore pressure). These transforms are used in seismic interpretation for reservoir properties, and seismic forward modeling in what-if scenarios. Offered every other year, spring quarter.
Terms: alternate years, given next year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 186: Tectonophysics & Global Tectonics (GEOPHYS 290)

The physics of faulting and plate tectonics. Topics: plate driving forces, lithospheric rheology, crustal faulting, and the state of stress in the lithosphere. Exercises: lithospheric temperature and strength profiles, calculation of seismic strain from summation of earthquake moment tensors, slip on faults in 3D, and stress triggering and inversion of stress from earthquake focal mechanisms. Offered every other year, winter quarter. This course is offered in 2014-15 instead of Geophys 170/220.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 199: Senior Seminar: Issues in Earth Sciences (GES 150)

Focus is on written and oral communication in a topical context. Topics from current frontiers in earth science research and issues of concern to the public. Readings, oral presentations, written work, and peer review.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GEOPHYS 200: Fluids and Flow in the Earth: Computational Methods (GEOPHYS 181)

Interdisciplinary problems involving the state and movement of fluids in crustal systems, and computational methods to model these processes. Examples of processes include: nonlinear, time-dependent flow in porous rocks; coupling in porous rocks between fluid flow, stress, deformation, and heat and chemical transport; percolation of partial melt; diagenetic processes; pressure solution and the formation of stylolites; and transient pore pressure in fault zones. MATLAB, Lattice-Boltzmann, and COMSOL Multiphysics. Term project. No experience with COMSOL Multiphysics required. Offered every other year, winter quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Mukerji, T. (PI)

GEOPHYS 204: Spectral Finite Element Method (SPECFEM) Seismograms

This is a short course intended for graduate students, but senior level undergraduate students are welcome. The course will cover spectral finite element methods for generating synthetic seismograms. The course will emphasize application over theory, such that students will be able to generate synthetic seismograms by the end of the course. We will employ the SPECFEM code suite on the Center for Computational Earth and Environmental Science (CEES) cluster to generate synthetic seismograms. Bring your laptop to class! Pre-requisite: A working knowledge of differential equations, matrix algebra, unix/linux, and earthquake seismology.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GEOPHYS 205: Effective Scientific Presentation and Public Speaking

The ability to present your work in a compelling, concise, and engaging manner will enhance your professional career. This course breaks down presentations into their key elements: the opening, body of the talk, closing, slide and poster graphics, Q&A, pacing, pauses, and voice modulation. We use clips from archived talks, slide sets and posters to illustrate the good, the bad, and the ugly. Each participant will use their upcoming conference talk or poster (e.g., AGU, SEG), or upcoming job talk or funding pitch, as their class project. The course will be 40% group meetings and 60% individual coaching. Everyone will come away a more skilled and confident speaker than they were before. Instructor: Ross S. Stein (USGS) nThe course syllabus is the third publication in http://profile.usgs.gov/rstein
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stein, R. (PI)

GEOPHYS 206: FLUID DYNAMICS OF THE SOLID EA

Introducton to fluid dynamical processes in the interior and on the surface of the Earth. The main focus of this course are viscous flow systems with different rheologies. Topics include solid-mantle convection, lava flows, creep in ice sheets, flow instabilities in solid-fluid mixtures and basic principles of fluid percolation through porous media.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 218: Understanding Natural Hazards, Quantifying Risk, Increasing Resilience in Highly Urbanized Regions (EESS 118, EESS 218, GEOPHYS 118, GES 118, GES 218)

Integrating the science of natural hazards, methods for quantitatively estimating the risks that these hazards pose to populations and property, engineering solutions that might best ameliorate these risks and increase resilience to future events, and policy and economic decision-making studies that may increase long-term resilience to future events. Panel discussions by outside experts exploring the science, engineering, policy, and economics that underly the hazards, risks, and strategies for increasing resilience. Group assignments to evaluate the way in which natural hazards, and human population and developing interact in megacities to produce risk, and what strategies might be adopted in each area to reduce risks posted by the specific hazards faced by these urban areas.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 222: Reflection Seismology (GEOPHYS 182)

The principles of seismic reflection profiling, focusing on methods of seismic data acquisition and seismic data processing for hydrocarbon exploration.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 224: Seismic Reflection Processing

Workshop in computer processing of 2D and 3D seismic reflection data. Students individually process a seismic reflection profile (of their own choice or instructor-provided) from field recordings to migrated sections and subsurface images, using interactive software (OpenCPS from OpenGeophysical.com). Prerequisite: GEOPHYS 222 or consent of instructor.
Terms: alternate years, given next year | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

GEOPHYS 240: Borehole Seismic Modeling and Imaging

Borehole seismic imaging for applications to subsurface reservoir characterization and monitoring. Topics include data acquisition, data processing, imaging and inversion. Analysis and processing of synthetic and field datasets. Prerequisites: Waves class equivalent to GP 230, Matlab or other computer programming.
Terms: alternate years, given next year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 241A: Seismic Reservoir Characterization (ENERGY 141, ENERGY 241)

(Same as GP241) Practical methods for quantitative characterization and uncertainty assessment of subsurface reservoir models integrating well-log and seismic data. Multidisciplinary combination of rock-physics, seismic attributes, sedimentological information and spatial statistical modeling techniques. Student teams build reservoir models using limited well data and seismic attributes typically available in practice, comparing alternative approaches. Software provided (SGEMS, Petrel, Matlab).nnRecommended: ERE240/260, or GP222/223, or GP260/262 or GES253/257; ERE246, GP112
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Mukerji, T. (PI)

GEOPHYS 258: Applied Optimization Laboratory (Geophys 258) (EE 257)

Application of optimization and estimation methods to the analysis and modeling of large observational data sets. Laboratory exercises using inverse theory and applied linear algebra to solve problems of indirect and noisy measurements. Emphasis on practical solution of scientific and engineering problems, especially those requiring large amounts of data, on digital computers using scientific languages. Also addresses advantages of large-scale computing, including hardware architectures, input/output and data bus bandwidth, programming efficiency, parallel programming techniques. Student projects involve analyzing real data by implementing observational systems such as tomography for medical and Earth observation uses, radar and matched filtering, multispectral/multitemporal studies, or migration processing. Prequisites: Programming with high level language. Recommended: EE261, EE263, EE178, ME300 or equivalent.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 260: Rock Physics for Reservoir Characterization (GEOPHYS 185)

How to integrate well log and laboratory data to determine and theoretically generalize rock physics transforms between sediment wave properties (acoustic and elastic impendence), bulk properties (porosity, lithology, texture, permeability), and pore fluid conditions (pore fluid and pore pressure). These transforms are used in seismic interpretation for reservoir properties, and seismic forward modeling in what-if scenarios. Offered every other year, spring quarter.
Terms: alternate years, given next year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 265: Imaging Radar and Applications (EE 355)

Radar remote sensing, radar image characteristics, viewing geometry, range coding, synthetic aperture processing, correlation, range migration, range/Doppler algorithms, wave domain algorithms, polar algorithm, polarimetric processing, interferometric measurements. Applications: surfafe deformation, polarimetry and target discrimination, topographic mapping surface displacements, velocities of ice fields. Prerequisites: EE261. Recommended: EE254, EE278, EE279.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 270: Electromagnetic Properties of Geological Materials

Laboratory observations and theoretical modeling of the electromagnetic properties and nuclear magnetic resonance response of geological material. Relationships between these properties and water-saturated materials properties such as composition, water content, surface area, and permeability.
Terms: alternate years, given next year | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 281: Geophysical Inverse Problems

Concepts of inverse theory, with application to geophysics. Inverses with discrete and continuous models, generalized matrix inverses, resolving kernels, regularization, use of prior information, singular value decomposition, nonlinear inverse problems, back-projection techniques, and linear programming. Application to seismic tomography, earthquake location, migration, and fault-slip estimation. Prerequisite: MATH 51
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Segall, P. (PI)

GEOPHYS 284: Hydrogeophysics

The use of geophysical methods for imaging and characterizing the top 100 meters of Earth for hydrogeologic applications. Includes material properties, forward modeling, data acquisition, inversion, and integration with other forms of measurement. Each week includes three hours of lectures; plus one three-hour lab that involves acquisition of data at campus or nearby sites, or computer modeling of data. Offered occasionally.
Terms: offered occasionally | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

GEOPHYS 288A: Crustal Deformation

Earthquake and volcanic deformation, emphasizing analytical models that can be compared to data from GPS, InSAR, and strain meters. Deformation, stress, and conservation laws. Dislocation models of strike slip and dip slip faults, in 2 and 3 dimensions. Crack models, including boundary element methods. Dislocations in layered and elastically heterogeneous earth models. Models of volcano deformation, including sills, dikes, and magma chambers. Offered every other year, autumn quarter.
Terms: alternate years, given next year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 288B: Crustal Deformation

Earthquake and volcanic deformation, emphasizing analytical models that can be compared to data from GPS, InSAR, and strain meters. Viscoelasticity, post-seismic rebound, and viscoelastic magma chambers. Effects of surface topography and earth curvature on surface deformation. Gravity changes induced by deformation and elastogravitational coupling. Poro-elasticity, coupled fluid flow and deformation. Earthquake nucleation and rate-state friction. Models of earthquake cycle at plate boundaries.
Terms: alternate years, given next year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 289: Global Positioning System in Earth Sciences

The basics of GPS, emphasizing monitoring crustal deformation with a precision of millimeters over baselines tens to thousands of kilometers long. Applications: mapping with GIS systems, airborne gravity and magnetic surveys, marine seismic and geophysical studies, mapping atmospheric temperature and water content, measuring contemporary plate motions, and deformation associated with active faulting and volcanism.
Terms: alternate years, given next year | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 290: Tectonophysics & Global Tectonics (GEOPHYS 186)

The physics of faulting and plate tectonics. Topics: plate driving forces, lithospheric rheology, crustal faulting, and the state of stress in the lithosphere. Exercises: lithospheric temperature and strength profiles, calculation of seismic strain from summation of earthquake moment tensors, slip on faults in 3D, and stress triggering and inversion of stress from earthquake focal mechanisms. Offered every other year, winter quarter. This course is offered in 2014-15 instead of Geophys 170/220.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 385A: Reflection Seismology

Research in reflection seismology and petroleum prospecting. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GEOPHYS 385D: Theoretical Geophysics

Research on physics and mechanics of earthquakes, volcanoes, ice sheets, and nglaciers. Emphasis is on developing theoretical understanding of processes governing natural phenomena.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dunham, E. (PI)

GEOPHYS 385E: Tectonics

Research on the origin, major structures, and tectonic processes of the Earth's crust. Emphasis is on use of deep seismic reflection and refraction data. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

GEOPHYS 385J: Global Seismic Techniques, Theory, and Application

Topics chosen from surface wave dispersion measurement, 1D inversion techniques, regional tomographic inversion, receiver functions, ray theory in spherical geometry, seismic attenuation, seismic anisotropy, seismic focusing, reflected phases, stacking, and interpretations of seismic results in light of other geophysical constraints. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lawrence, J. (PI)

GEOPHYS 385N: Experimental Rock Physics

Research on the use of laboratory geophysical methods for the characterization of the physical properties of rocks and their response to earth stresses, temperature, and rock-fluid interactions. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Vanorio, T. (PI)

GEOPHYS 385V: Poroelasticity

Research on the mechanical properties of porous rocks: dynamic problems of seismic velocity, dispersion, and attentuation; and quasi-static problems of faulting, fluid transport, crustal deformation, and loss of porosity. Participants define, investigate, and present an original problem of their own. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mavko, G. (PI)

GEOPHYS 385W: GEOPHYSICAL MULTI-PHASE FLOWS

Research on the dynamics of multi-phase systems that are fundamental to many geophysical problems such as ice sheets and volcanoes.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints