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ENGLISH 9CE: Creative Expression in Writing

Primary focus on giving students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. Students will come out of the course strengthened in their ability to identify and pursue their own creative interests. For undergrads only.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 9CP: Poetry Off the Page

With recent blockbuster films like Patterson and major prizes being awarded to artists like Bob Dylan and Kendrick Lamar, the borders of what constitutes traditional literature are shifting. In this Creative Writing course we will be looking at literature `off the page,¿ in songwriting, spoken word, multi-media, and visual art. We will be workshopping our own creative projects and exploring the boundaries of contemporary literature. Artists we¿ll be looking at include Iron and Wine, Lil Wayne, Allen Ginsberg, Beyonce, David Lynch, Patti Smith, Mark Strand, Anne Carson, Danez Smith, Bon Iver, and Lou Reed.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Carlson-Wee, K. (PI)

ENGLISH 9CW: Writing and World Literature

This course is an introduction to reading and writing short fiction and poetry. For inspiration and imitation, students will read models drawn from a diverse body of global literature. In a supportive, discussion-based environment, students will develop their own creativity and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. Students will come out of the course strengthened in their ability to identify and pursue their own creative interests.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ekiss, K. (PI)

ENGLISH 10C: Introduction to English I: Tradition and Individuality, Medieval to Early Modern

This course offers a comprehensive introduction to English literature from its beginning in the medieval period to the early seventeenth century. We will study individual literary voices and styles in the context of a growing national tradition. We will discuss major authors (such as Chaucer, More, Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney, Spenser, Jonson, Donne) and analyze representative literary works in a variety of genres, from the Old English elegy and Middle English lyrics to the Elizabethan sonnet, Renaissance comedy, and the allegorical epic. While the course equips students with specific analytical and interpretative tools necessary for a historical understanding of literature, it is equally committed to revealing the aesthetic interest that medieval and early modern literature still holds for the modern reader.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 11A: Introduction to English II: From Milton to the Romantics

Major moments in English literary history, from John Milton's Paradise Lost to John Keats's Hyperion. The trajectory involves a variety of literary forms, including Augustan satire, the illuminated poetry of William Blake's handcrafted books, the historical novel invented by Sir Walter Scott, the society novel of Jane Austen, and William Wordsworth's epic of psychological and artistic development. Literary texts will be studied in the context of important cultural influences, among them civil war, religious dissent, revolution, commercialization, colonialism, and industrialization.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 12A: Introduction to English III: Introduction to African American Literature (AFRICAAM 43, AMSTUD 12A)

(Formerly English 43/143). In his bold study, What Was African American Literature?, Kenneth Warren defines African American literature as a late nineteenth- to mid-twentieth-century response to the nation's Jim Crow segregated order. But in the aftermath of the Jim Crow era and the Civil Rights movement, can critics still speak, coherently, of "African American literature"? And how does this political conception of African American literary production compare with accounts grounded in black language and culture? Taking up Warren's intervention, this course will explore African American literature from its earliest manifestations in the spirituals and slave narratives to texts composed at the height of desegregation and decolonization struggles at mid-century and beyond.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Elam, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 15Q: Family Trees: The Intergenerational Novel

The vast majority of novels feature a central protagonist, or a cast of characters whose interactions play out over weeks or months. But some stories overflow our life spans, and cannot be truthfully told without the novelist reaching far back in time. In this Sophomore Seminar, we will consider three novels that seek to tell larger, more ambitious stories that span decades and continents. In the process, we will discuss how novelists build believable worlds, craft memorable characters, keep us engaged as readers, and manage such ambitious projects.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Smith, A. (PI)

ENGLISH 48N: The American Songbook and Love Poetry (AMSTUD 48N)

A study of performances (Billie Holiday, Frank Sinatra etc) of songs by classic American composers (Porter, Rogers and Hart, Cohen).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fields, K. (PI)

ENGLISH 50: HUMANITIES HOUSE WORKSHOP

For student-run workshops and research seminars in Ng House / Humanities House. Open to both residents and non-residents. May be repeated for credit. This course code covers several discrete workshops each quarter; sign up for a particular workshop via the Google Form at https://goo.gl/forms/TRU0AogJP3IHyUmr2.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENGLISH 50A: Character Development: Writing a Script, Creating Engaging Characters

Seminar with Writer in Residence John Markus (BA English '78); meets for seven sessions over three weeks in February. Students will work one on one and in small groups with this professional writer and Stanford alum. John has written everything from stand-up to critically-acclaimed network and cable television shows to independent films to, most recently, theatrical plays. This seminar is designed for students who would like to produce a piece of work in three weeks and/or to pursue a writing profession.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 72N: Serial Storytelling

"TV's Lost Weekends," a recent headline says, referring to the modern habit of binge-watching television shows. Such news stories debate the right way to watch TV. They also echo longstanding arguments about how to read books. This course juxtaposes contemporary television with classic serial novels in order to explore different ways of experiencing longform narratives. How do we read or watch when we're forced to wait before the next episode---or, conversely, given the opportunity to binge?
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Bronstein, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 82N: Thinking about Photographs

The course will begin with a short history of photography since the 19th century; followed by both a hands-on exploration of different types of photographs (possibly using the Cantor Collection) and then a more theoretical discussion of some of the acknowledged classics of photographic writing (Susan Sontag's On Photography, Roland Barthes' Camera lucida, Linfield's The Cruel Radiance.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Castle, T. (PI)

ENGLISH 90: Fiction Writing

The elements of fiction writing: narration, description, and dialogue. Students write complete stories and participate in story workshops. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PWR 1 (waived in summer quarter).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 90Q: Sports Writing

Study and practice of the unique narratives, tropes, images and arguments that creative writers develop when they write about popular sport. From regional fandom to individualist adventuring, boxing and baseball to mascot dancing and table tennis, exceptional creative writers mine from a diversity of leisure activity a rich vein of ¿sports writing¿ in the creative nonfiction genre. In doing so, they demonstrate the creative and formal adaptability required to write with excellence about any subject matter, and under the circumstances of any subjectivity. Discussion of the ways in which writers have framed, and even critiqued, our interest in athletic events, spectatorship, and athletic beauty. Writers include Joyce Carol Oates, Roland Barthes, David James Duncan, Arnold Rampersad, John Updike, Maxine Kumin, Susan Sterling, Ernest Hemingway, Norman Mailer, Dervla Murphy, Haruki Murakami, Don DeLillo, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Annie Dillard, John McPhee, and Laura Hillenbrand. Close readings of essays on form and sport, as well as book excerpts. Students will engage in class discussions and write short weekly papers, leading to a more comprehensive project at the end of the quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Evans, J. (PI)

ENGLISH 91: Creative Nonfiction

Historical and contemporary as a broad genre including travel and nature writing, memoir, biography, journalism, and the personal essay. Students use creative means to express factual content. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 91A: ASIAN-AMERICAN AUTOBIOGRAPHY/W (AMSTUD 91A, ASNAMST 91A, CSRE 91D)

This is a dual purpose class: a writing workshop in which you will generate autobiographical vignettes/essays as well as a reading seminar featuring prose from a wide range of contemporary Asian-American writers. Some of the many questions we will consider are: What exactly is `Asian-American memoir? Are there salient subjects and tropes that define the literature? And in what ways do our writerly interactions both resistant and assimilative with a predominantly non-Asian context in turn recreate that context? We'll be working/experimenting with various modes of telling, including personal essay, the epistolary form, verse, and even fictional scenarios.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lee, C. (PI)

ENGLISH 91VO: Voices of the Land

Amazing things can happen when a writer decides to push back from their desk and go out into the world in search of stories to tell. The lives of the subjects, as well as the life of the writer, can be changed forever. In this class, we will read and discuss three classic works of documentary journalism, and students will come up with a documentary project of their own. In the process, we will practice skills such as interviewing subjects, notetaking, photography, story structure, and other techniques of documentary journalism.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Smith, A. (PI)

ENGLISH 92: Reading and Writing Poetry

Prerequisite: PWR 1. Issues of poetic craft. How elements of form, music, structure, and content work together to create meaning and experience in a poem. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 94Q: The Future is Feminine? (FEMGEN 94Q)

Gender is one of the great social issues of our time. What does it mean to be female or feminine? How has femininity been defined, performed, punished, or celebrated? Writers are some of our most serious and eloquent investigators of these questions, and in this class we'll read many of our greatest writers on the subject of femininity, as embodied by both men and women, children and adults, protagonists and antagonists. From Virginia Woolf to Ernest Hemingway, from Beloved to Gone Girl (and even "RuPaul's Drag Race"), we'll ask how the feminine is rendered and contested. We'll do so in order to develop a history and a vocabulary of femininity so that we may¿in this important time¿write our own way in to the conversation. This is first and foremost a creative writing class, and our goals will be to consider in our own work the importance of the feminine¿across the entire spectrum of gender, sex, and identity¿and how we write about femininity, using other writers as models and inspiration. As we engage with these other writers, we¿ll think broadly and bravely, and explore the expressive opportunities inherent in writing. We¿ll explore our own creative practices through readings, prompted exercises, improv, games, collaboration, workshop, and revision, all with an eye toward writing the feminine future.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Pufahl, S. (PI)

ENGLISH 115C: Hamlet and the Critics (ENGLISH 215C, TAPS 151C)

Focus is on Shakespeare's Hamlet as a site of rich critical controversy from the eighteenth century to the present. Aim is to read, discuss, and evaluate different approaches to the play, from biographical, theatrical, and psychological to formalist, materialist, feminist, new historicist, and, most recently, quantitative. The ambition is to see whether there can be great literature without (a) great (deal of) criticism. The challenge is to understand the theory of literature through the study of its criticism.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lupic, I. (PI)

ENGLISH 125: Virginia Woolf in the Age of #MeToo (FEMGEN 125V)

Where is Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) in the age of #MeToo? How does a groundbreaking `first wave feminist theorist and novelistic innovator speak to successors in the third and fourth waves? Are waves the right metaphor for signaling intergenerational feminist conversation? This course argues that almost everything surging around the #MeToo movement can be found in Woolf's works, from gender oppression, to the politics of women's entry into the workplace, to the historical struggle of women to be heard and believed. Yet, just as the hashtag makes a portmanteau of the individual and the collective, so too does Woolf's life and writing merge the possibilities and challenges of that conflation. We begin with Woolf's most political arguments in A Room of One's Own (1929) and Three Guineas (1938), tying them to the premier investigative journalism and reportage on the current #MeToo movement, and then turn to the politics of reading and identity in her less acclaimed but equally important journalistic work, and to the representation of women's collective lives in her fiction.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Staveley, A. (PI)

ENGLISH 146A: Steinbeck (AMSTUD 146A)

Introduction to the work of an American writer, beloved by general readers, often reviled by critics, whose career spanned from the Great Depression through World War II to the social upheavals of the 1960s. Focus on the social and political contexts of Steinbeck's major works; his fascination with California and Mexico; his interdisciplinary interest in marine biology and in philosophy; his diverse experiments with literary form, including drama and film.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jones, G. (PI)

ENGLISH 151F: Angelheaded Hipsters: Beat Writers of San Francisco and New York (AMSTUD 151F)

Reading of central writers of the Beat movement (Ginsberg, Kerouac, di Prima, Snyder, Whalen) as well as some related writers (Creeley, Gunn, Levertov). Issues explored include NY and SF, Buddhism and leftist politics, poetry and jazz. Some exposure to reading poems to jazz accompaniment. Examination of some of the writers and performers growing out of the Beats: Bob Dylan, rock music, especially from San Francisco, and jazz.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fields, K. (PI)

ENGLISH 154F: Film & Philosophy (COMPLIT 154A, FRENCH 154, ITALIAN 154, PHIL 193C, PHIL 293C)

Issues of authenticity, morality, personal identity, and the value of truth explored through film; philosophical investigation of the filmic medium itself. Screenings to include Blade Runner (Scott), Do The Right Thing (Lee), The Seventh Seal (Bergman), Fight Club (Fincher), La Jetée (Marker), Memento (Nolan), and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Kaufman). Taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 157H: Creative Writing & Science: The Artful Interpreter (BIOHOPK 157H, BIOHOPK 257H)

What role does creativity play in the life of a scientist? How has science inspired great literature? How do you write accessibly and expressively about things like whales, DNA or cancer? This course begins with a field trip to Hopkins Marine Station, perched at the edge of the Pacific, where Stanford labs buzz with activity alongside barking seals and crashing waves. Here, in this spectacular setting, we learn to pay attention to our encounters with the natural world and translate sensory experience to the page. Students keep field journals to collect observations and cultivate a reflective practice. In-class writing experiments lead to original nonfiction combining personal narrative and scientific curiosity. Students workshop their projects, receiving supportive feedback from the group. You will develop a more patient and observant eye, improve your ability to articulate scientific concepts, and, hopefully, have a bit of fun along the way.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Michas-Martin, S. (PI)

ENGLISH 160: Poetry and Poetics

Introduction to the reading of poetry, with emphasis on how the sense of poems is shaped through diction, imagery, and technical elements of verse.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 161: Narrative and Narrative Theory

An introduction to stories and storytelling--that is, to narrative. What is narrative? When is narrative fictional and when non-fictional? How is it done, word by word, sentence by sentence? Must it be in prose? Can it be in pictures? How has storytelling changed over time? Focus on various forms, genres, structures, and characteristics of narrative.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 162W: Writing Intensive Seminar in English (WISE)

In these highly regarded, small-group seminars, students explore unique topics in English language literature, reading select primary texts alongside exemplary critical works and/or other cultural artifacts, while also honing their research and writing skills through series of assignments that culminate in a substantial original research essay. Classes are capped at 8, allowing for individualized attention and rich feedback. Click Schedule below to see individual course titles (in Notes). For fuller details and descriptions, go to https://english.stanford.edu/writing-intensive-seminars-english-wise. Enrollment is by permission. 2018-2019 course topics include: neo-slave narratives; nineteenth-century novels; Renaissance drama; American conspiracy theories; James Joyce and modernism; Shakespeare adaptations; colonies of the gothic; and the Beats. English majors must take at least one WISE to fulfill WIM. Non-majors are welcome, space permitting.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 177: Contemporary Novel in U.S. Perspective (AMSTUD 177)

This course investigates a selection of novels from 2001 to the present, either authored in the United States or strongly and meaningfully received here by critics and gatekeepers. In the absence of a fixed academic canon or acknowledged tradition of exemplary works, this course includes evaluation as one of its central enterprises. Students help to make arguments for which works matter and why. Students consider topics including the demotion of the novel to a minor art form, competition from the image, transformations of celebrity culture (in literature and outside it), relevance or irrelevance of the digital age, aftermaths of the modernist and postmodernist project, eccentricity and marginality, race and gender politics in putatively post-feminist, post-racial,and post-political vantage, and problems of meaning in rich societies oriented to risk, probability, economization, health, consumption, comfort, and recognition or representation (rather than action or event). Novels and short stories may be supplemented by philosophical and sociological visions of the contemporary.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Greif, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 190: Intermediate Fiction Writing

May be taken twice for credit. Lottery. Priority to last quarter/year in school, majors in English with Creative Writing emphasis, and Creative Writing minors. Prerequisite: 90 or 91.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 190D: Dialogue Writing

For Fiction and Film students. Study how dialogue develops character, reveals information, moves plots forward, and creates tension. Use of short story, novels, graphic novels, and films. Students will write many short assignments, one dialogue scene, and one longer story or script (10-20pages). Priority to Fiction Into Film students, but open to all. Prerequisite: 90.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Clark, H. (PI)

ENGLISH 190F: Fiction into Film

Workshop. For screenwriting students. Story craft, structure, and dialogue. Assignments include short scene creation, character development, and a long story. How fictional works are adapted to screenplays, and how each form uses elements of conflict, time, summary, and scene. Priority to seniors and Film Studies majors. Prerequisite: 90.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 190G: The Graphic Novel

Interdisciplinary. Evolution, subject matter, form, conventions, possibilities, and future of the graphic novel genre. Guest lectures. Collaborative creation of a graphic novel by a team of writers, illustrators, and designers. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 190T: Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing

Focus on a particular topic or process. Work includes aspects of reading short stories and novels, writing at least 30-50 pages of fiction, and responding to peers' work in workshop. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 91 or 90.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 190YA: Young Adult Fiction

This is an intermediate course on the art and craft of fiction writing in the young adult genre. We¿ll read widely in the genre. The aim of our reading will be to discover principles of craft, at the sentence level and at the narrative level, that generate powerful and enduring fiction. As we read, we¿ll work to develop a writer¿s definition of YA. What are the differences between great YA and other great literature? What are the best ways to understand quality in a YA text? Within what bounds¿stylistic, ethical, and otherwise¿are we working as practitioners of the art form? Students will begin a young adult novel and submit pages from their work to the class on a regular basis. We will convene as a workshop to discuss one another¿s work.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 191: Intermediate Creative Nonfiction

Continuation of 91. Workshop. The application of advanced storytelling techniques to fact-based personal narratives, emphasizing organic writing, discovering audience, and publication. Guest lecturers, collaborative writing, and publication of the final project in print, audio, or web formats. Prerequisite: 91 or 90.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 192: Intermediate Poetry Writing

May be taken twice. Lottery. Priority to last quarter/year in school, majors in English with Creative Writing emphasis, and Creative Writing minors. Prerequisite: 92.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 192V: The Occasions of Poetry

Taught by the Mohr Visiting Poet. Prerequisite: 92. Permission number required to enroll.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gluck, L. (PI)

ENGLISH 194: Individual Research

See section above on Undergraduate Programs, Opportunities for Advanced Work, Individual Research.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ruttenburg, N. (PI)

ENGLISH 197: Seniors Honors Essay

In two quarters.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Staveley, A. (PI)

ENGLISH 198: Individual Work

Undergraduates who wish to study a subject or area not covered by regular courses may, with consent, enroll for individual work under the supervision of a member of the department. 198 may not be used to fulfill departmental area or elective requirements without consent. Group seminars are not appropriate for 198.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 198L: Individual Work: Levinthal Tutorial

Undergraduate writers work individually with visiting Stegner Fellows in poetry, fiction, and if available, nonfiction. Students design their own curriculum; Stegner Fellows act as writing mentors and advisers. Prerequisites: 90, 91, or 92; submitted manuscript.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 199: Senior Independent Essay

Open, with department approval, to seniors majoring in non-Honors English who wish to work throughout the year on a 10,000 word critical or scholarly essay. Applicants submit a sample of their expository prose, proposed topic, and bibliography to the Director of Undergraduate Studies before preregistration in May of the junior year. Each student accepted is responsible for finding a department faculty adviser. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 215C: Hamlet and the Critics (ENGLISH 115C, TAPS 151C)

Focus is on Shakespeare's Hamlet as a site of rich critical controversy from the eighteenth century to the present. Aim is to read, discuss, and evaluate different approaches to the play, from biographical, theatrical, and psychological to formalist, materialist, feminist, new historicist, and, most recently, quantitative. The ambition is to see whether there can be great literature without (a) great (deal of) criticism. The challenge is to understand the theory of literature through the study of its criticism.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lupic, I. (PI)

ENGLISH 280: Eighteenth-Century British Literature

The course will survey some of the major texts and authors of eighteenth-century British literature. No previous knowledge of the period is required. Particular topics we will address will include: the social and historical backgrounds of eighteenth-century literature, satire and the rise of the novel, the relationship between "elite" art and popular culture, literature and the visual arts (Hogarth), the rise of new critical approaches to works of the period.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Castle, T. (PI)

ENGLISH 290: Advanced Fiction Writing

Workshop critique of original short stories or novel. Prerequisites: manuscript, consent of instructor, and 190-level fiction workshop. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 303D: Thinking in Fiction (COMPLIT 303D)

Is there a boundary between fact and fiction? Is fiction a stable category at all? Should we be thinking instead about description, factual reference, the place of history, and the methods of science? This course will examine the ways in which fictions figure in the workings of the human mind and human institutions, as well as in literature. Readings will include work by philosophers and critics stretching from Locke, Hume, and Adam Smith, to twentieth-century figures such as Vaihinger (the philosophy of "as if"), to "possible worlds" theory. Bruno Latour, Marie-Laure Ryan, and Ann Banfield will be joined by Catherine Gallagher and narratologists. In reaching back to the eighteenth century, we also can have in mind important essays or prefaces by such writers as Horace Walpole, Anna Laetitia Barbauld, and Anne Radcliffe. Novels, of course, raise large questions about fictionality. Works for study include: The Female Quixote, The Castle of Otranto, Tristram Shandy, and A Simple Story.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Bender, J. (PI)

ENGLISH 306: Theorizing Hybridity: Crossings of Race, Gender & Genre

¿Theorizing Hybridity: Crossings of Race, Gender & Genre¿ examines works that bend, transgress, or transform aesthetic and political conventions in the ways they press on commonly-held boundaries of race, gender, class, faith and identity, more generally. Primary selections include literature, performance, art and visual culture spanning the 19th-21st centuries that dramatize hybridity as a vehicle of social commentary or critique. Emphasis on primary and secondary scholarly material that enact or examine ¿mixed race,¿ trans identities, and hybrid modes of aesthetic expression. This course welcomes those interested new to or interested in an introduction to Critical Mixed Race Studies and/or Trans Studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Elam, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 313: Performance and Performativity (FEMGEN 313, TAPS 313)

Performance theory through topics including: affect/trauma, embodiment, empathy, theatricality/performativity, specularity/visibility, liveness/disappearance, belonging/abjection, and utopias and dystopias. Readings from Schechner, Phelan, Austin, Butler, Conquergood, Roach, Schneider, Silverman, Caruth, Fanon, Moten, Anzaldúa, Agamben, Freud, and Lacan. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Menon, J. (PI)

ENGLISH 316: American Story Cycles

A survey of American literature told through the history of an important, complex, and neglected genre, the short story cycle, ranging from Washington Irving¿s Tales of a Traveller (1824) to William Faulkner's Go Down, Moses (1942).  Other authors include Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allan Poe, Sarah Orne Jewett, Charles Chesnutt, Gertrude Stein, and Sherwood Anderson.  The course will introduce students to the patterns of American literary development, its social and cultural contexts, and the major critical/theoretical lenses through which it has been understood.  In particular, we will consider the unique formal qualities of the story cycle its liminal status between novel and story collection, its vacillation between unity and multiplicity, connection and disconnection in relation to broader American questions of identity and community.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jones, G. (PI)

ENGLISH 327: Genres of the Novel (COMPLIT 327, FRENCH 327)

Provides students with an overview of some major genres in the history of the modern novel, along with major theorists in the critical understanding of the form. Novels might include works by Cervantes, Defoe, Lafayette, Radcliffe, Goethe, Scott, Balzac, Melville, and Woolf. Theorists might include Lukacs, Bakhtin, Jameson, Gallagher, Barthes, Kristeva, and Bourdieu. *PLEASE NOTE: Course for graduate students only.*
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Cohen, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 334B: Concepts of Modernity II: Culture, Aesthetics, and Society in the Age of Globalization (COMPLIT 334B, MTL 334B)

Emphasis on world-system theory, theories of coloniality and power, and aesthetic modernity/postmodernity in their relation to culture broadly understood.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Saldivar, J. (PI)

ENGLISH 365F: American Renaissance Literature: The Invention of the American Author

Investigation of the problematic production of an American national literature in the antebellum period. Readings include generically diverse range of texts in which the particular requirements of an ¿American¿ authorship are specifically at issue. Focus upon various theories and problems of authorship as they appear explicitly or implicitly in the fiction, poetry, correspondence, and criticism of the period. These issues include the impact of the democratic-revolutionary legacy upon the development of American literary form; the rise of a literary cultural elite and its importance to the formation of an American public sphere; elite anxieties concerning the marginal status of United States literature in relation to European culture; the consequent marginalization of ¿Americanness¿ as that which resists cultural development; the literary appropriation of ¿commonness¿ as central to the representation of national character; theories of ¿the popular voice¿ and the textual emergence of voices resistant to such theories.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Ruttenburg, N. (PI)

ENGLISH 390: Graduate Fiction Workshop

For Stegner fellows in the writing program. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENGLISH 392: Graduate Poetry Workshop

For Stegner fellows in the writing program. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENGLISH 394: Independent Study

Preparation for first-year Ph.D. qualifying examination and third year Ph.D. oral exam.
Terms: Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENGLISH 395: Ad Hoc Graduate Seminar

Three or more graduate students who wish in the following quarter to study a subject or an area not covered by regular courses and seminars may plan an informal seminar and approach a member of the department to supervise it.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 396R: Old and Modern(ist) Reading Group

This two-quarter-long reading group will alternate from week-to-week between Old English Biblical and Elegaic Poetry and David Jones¿s twentieth-century transnational Modernist masterpiece, "Anathemata" (which W. H. Auden called very probably the finest long poem written in English in this century). Students can choose to join biweekly for just Old English (in the original language) or just David Jones, or complete both sets of allied reading.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Treharne, E. (PI)

ENGLISH 398R: Revision and Development of a Paper

Students revise and develop a paper under the supervision of a faculty member with a view to possible publication.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 398W: Orals, Publication and Dissertation Workshop

For third- and fourth-year graduate students in English. Strategies for studying for and passing the oral examination, publishing articles, and for writing and researching dissertations and dissertation proposals. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Moya, P. (PI)

ENGLISH 399: Thesis

For M.A. students only. Regular meetings with thesis advisers required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Vermeule, B. (PI)
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