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ENGLISH 1: CSN Undergraduate Colloquium (DLCL 1)

This colloquium is intended for undergraduates who are interested in the history and theory of the novel, and who would like to attend the Center for the Study of the Novel's (CSN) annual conference. Before the conference, students will meet with CSN's graduate student staff, to read and discuss a small number of key texts by participating scholars, whose presentations students will then attend. After the conference, the colloquium will meet again, to discuss both the readings and conference papers, and explore their broader implications for the study of the novel. Attendance at both meetings of the colloquium, and at least one panel at the conference, is required for course credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; McGurl, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 1D: Dickens Book Club

Through the academic year, we will read one Dickens novel, one number a week for 19 weeks, as the Victorians would have done as they read the serialized novel over the course of 19 months. The group gets together once a week for an hour and a half to discuss each number, to look carefully at the pattern that the author is weaving, to guess, as the Victorians would have done, what might be coming next, and to investigate the Victorian world Dickens presents. We look carefully at themes, characters, metaphorical patterns, and scenes that form Dickens' literary world, and spend increasing time evaluating the critique that Dickens levels at Victorian life. The weekly gatherings are casual; the discussion is lively and pointed.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Paulson, L. (PI)

ENGLISH 9CE: Creative Expression in Writing

Primary focus on giving students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. Students will come out of the course strengthened in their ability to identify and pursue their own creative interests. For undergrads only.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 9CT: Special Topics in Creative Expression

Focus on a particular topic or process of creative expression. Primary focus on giving students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. Students will come out of the course strengthened in their ability to identify and pursue their own creative interests. For undergrads only
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 10UK: Lost in the Myths of Time

Robin Hood the Outlaw; Grendel, the monster of the moors; medieval battle-sites; early roadways: the remnants of medieval villages visible through Google Earth and cyber-visualization: this course will explore what ancient English landscapes and landmarks reveal about culture, society, politics, nation and identity a thousand years ago. (Mandatory for participants in the Lost in the Myths of Time Bing Overseas Seminar)
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Treharne, E. (PI)

ENGLISH 11B: Introduction to English II: American Literature and Culture to 1855 (AMSTUD 150)

(Formerly English 23/123). A survey of early American writings, including sermons, poetry, captivity and slave narratives, essays, autobiography, and fiction, from the colonial era to the eve of the Civil War.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 12C: Introduction to English III: Modern Literature

Survey of the major trends in literary history from 1850 to the present.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; McGurl, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 44B: Contemporary British Fiction (ENGLISH 144B)

(English majors and others taking 5 units should register for 144B). How do contemporary British novelists represent dramatic changes in culture, class, demography, generation, economy, gender, race, and national identity following the allied victory in the Second World War (1939-1945)? Focusing on writers born between 1948 and 1975, we examine the structuring of historical consciousness in novels by Zadie Smith, Ian McEwan, Kazuo Ishiguro, Jeanette Winterson, Hanif Kureishi, Julian Barnes, Ali Smith, and Hilary Mantel.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Staveley, A. (PI)

ENGLISH 71: Dangerous Ideas (ARTHIST 36, EALC 36, HISTORY 3D, MUSIC 36H, PHIL 36)

Ideas matter. Concepts such as equality, progress, and tradition have inspired social movements, shaped political systems, and dramatically influenced the lives of individuals. Others, like freedom of the press, fact versus fiction, and citizenship play an important role in contemporary debates in the United States. All of these ideas are contested, and they have a real power to change lives, for better and for worse. In this one-unit class we will examine these dangerous ideas. Each week, a faculty member from a different department in the humanities and arts will explore a concept that has shaped human experience across time and space. Some weeks will have short reading assignments, but you are not required to purchase any materials.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Satz, D. (PI)

ENGLISH 76: After the Apocalypse

What happens after the world, as we know it, has ended? In the course of examining classic and newer speculative fictional narratives detailing the ravages of various post-apocalyptic societies and the challenges those societies pose to the survivors, we explore several related questions: What is an apocalypse? What resources does speculative fiction offer for understanding and responding to oppressive societies? Where does the idea of the apocalypse originate? Is an apocalypse always in the future? Or has it already occurred? For whom might apocalypse constitute an ongoing present? In this course, we use the tools of close reading and historical criticism to build an archive of knowledge about the narrative, visual, and aural features of apocalypse. Students will be guided through the creation of a multimedia portfolio over the course of the quarter, for presentation at the end. No written midterm or final exam.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Leal, J. (PI); Moya, P. (PI)

ENGLISH 90: Fiction Writing

The elements of fiction writing: narration, description, and dialogue. Students write complete stories and participate in story workshops. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PWR 1 (waived in summer quarter).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 90Q: Sports Writing

Study and practice of the unique narratives, tropes, images and arguments that creative writers develop when they write about popular sport. From regional fandom to individualist adventuring, boxing and baseball to mascot dancing and table tennis, exceptional creative writers mine from a diversity of leisure activity a rich vein of ¿sports writing¿ in the creative nonfiction genre. In doing so, they demonstrate the creative and formal adaptability required to write with excellence about any subject matter, and under the circumstances of any subjectivity. Discussion of the ways in which writers have framed, and even critiqued, our interest in athletic events, spectatorship, and athletic beauty. Writers include Joyce Carol Oates, Roland Barthes, David James Duncan, Arnold Rampersad, John Updike, Maxine Kumin, Susan Sterling, Ernest Hemingway, Norman Mailer, Dervla Murphy, Haruki Murakami, Don DeLillo, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Annie Dillard, John McPhee, and Laura Hillenbrand. Close readings of essays on form and sport, as well as book excerpts. Students will engage in class discussions and write short weekly papers, leading to a more comprehensive project at the end of the quarter.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Evans, J. (PI)

ENGLISH 91: Creative Nonfiction

(Formerly 94A.) Historical and contemporary as a broad genre including travel and nature writing, memoir, biography, journalism, and the personal essay. Students use creative means to express factual content.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 92: Reading and Writing Poetry

Prerequisite: PWR 1. Issues of poetic craft. How elements of form, music, structure, and content work together to create meaning and experience in a poem. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 94: Creative Writing Across Genres

For minors in creative writing. The forms and conventions of the contemporary short story and poem. How form, technique, and content combine to make stories and poems organic. Prerequisite: 90, 91, or 92.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pufahl, S. (PI)

ENGLISH 115D: Shakespeare, Language, Contexts

This course will consider a range of Shakespeare plays (and the language of the plays) in relation to different contemporary and post-contemporary contexts, including transvestite theater, gender, sexuality, history, geopolitics, travel, and performance.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 124: The American West (AMSTUD 124A, ARTHIST 152, HISTORY 151, POLISCI 124A)

The American West is characterized by frontier mythology, vast distances, marked aridity, and unique political and economic characteristics. This course integrates several disciplinary perspectives into a comprehensive examination of Western North America: its history, physical geography, climate, literature, art, film, institutions, politics, demography, economy, and continuing policy challenges. Students examine themes fundamental to understanding the region: time, space, water, peoples, and boom and bust cycles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 130: Sex and the Novel (FEMGEN 130S)

How do novels represent sexual life? This course reads texts from the eighteenth century to the present day, and considers how novelists represent the discombobulating effects of desire in fictional prose. Authors may include: S. Richardson, N. Hawthorne, J. Austen, E. Brontë, G. Gissing, H. James, D.H. Lawrence, J. Joyce, V. Nabokov, J. Baldwin, A. Hollinghurst and Z. Smith.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jarvis, C. (PI)

ENGLISH 144: Major Modernists: Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, Katherine Mansfield, T. S. Eliot

What made modernism `new? Is the movement `evergreen? We examine representational change, narrative innovation, and political aesthetics in the poetry, short fiction, and novels of four iconic pioneers: Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, Katherine Mansfield, and T.S. Eliot.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Staveley, A. (PI)

ENGLISH 144B: Contemporary British Fiction (ENGLISH 44B)

(English majors and others taking 5 units should register for 144B). How do contemporary British novelists represent dramatic changes in culture, class, demography, generation, economy, gender, race, and national identity following the allied victory in the Second World War (1939-1945)? Focusing on writers born between 1948 and 1975, we examine the structuring of historical consciousness in novels by Zadie Smith, Ian McEwan, Kazuo Ishiguro, Jeanette Winterson, Hanif Kureishi, Julian Barnes, Ali Smith, and Hilary Mantel.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Staveley, A. (PI)

ENGLISH 146: Development of the Short Story: Continuity and Innovation

Exploration of the short story form's ongoing evolution as diverse writers address love, death, desire. Maupassant, D.H. Lawrence, Woolf, Flannery O'Connor, Hurston, and others. Required for Creative Writing emphasis. All majors welcome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 146A: Steinbeck (AMSTUD 146A)

Introduction to the work of an American writer, beloved by general readers, often reviled by critics, whose career spanned from the Great Depression through World War II to the social upheavals of the 1960s. Focus on the social and political contexts of Steinbeck's major works; his fascination with California and Mexico; his interdisciplinary interest in marine biology and in philosophy; his diverse experiments with literary form, including drama and film.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 153: Time, Space, and Place: Humanistic Inquiry in a Digital Age

What are the digital humanities? A definition might be: Digital humanities are those pursuits which use digital tools to explore topics of humanistic inquiry. But that definition is rather general. To have a more nuanced understanding of the digital humanities, students will be exposed to a number of its practices, and practitioners. Active engagement by all participants is expected. Students will read and annotate, map and perform digital textual analysis. Ultimately, students will have a better idea of what the digital humanities are, and will be introduced to different ways they can be practiced, opening up possibilities for further exploration.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wolfenstein, G. (PI)

ENGLISH 160: Poetry and Poetics

Introduction to the reading of poetry, with emphasis on how the sense of poems is shaped through diction, imagery, and technical elements of verse.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 161: Narrative and Narrative Theory

An introduction to stories and storytelling--that is, to narrative. What is narrative? When is narrative fictional and when non-fictional? How is it done, word by word, sentence by sentence? Must it be in prose? Can it be in pictures? How has storytelling changed over time? Focus on various forms, genres, structures, and characteristics of narrative.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 162W: Writing Intensive Seminar in English (WISE)

Small literature-based, writing-intensive seminars taught by advanced graduate students in the English Ph.D. program. The goal will be to produce a high-quality final research paper. Courses will be oriented around a single text or a small group of texts in conversation with a larger spectrum of scholarship and knowledge in literary criticism and theory, film, painting, or material culture. The small format will allow undergraduates to receive detailed commentary and one-on-one feedback on their writing. To review the full list of WISE seminars, please visit this link: https://english.stanford.edu/courses/2016-2017-english-162w.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 181C: Shakespeare and Dickens

An exploration in the problems and stakes of reading two central but historically-separated authors through one another. How theatrical are Dickens's novels and how much can we understand the theatrical, in Dickens, as a working-through of Shakespeare? How do the elements of performance manifest themselves in both? What substitutes for the role of "narrator" in Shakespearean drama? How can we understand these two authors as both paradigms of "national" writing -- defining normative British culture -- and as fundamentally eccentric?
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 184: The Novel, the Global South (COMPLIT 123, DLCL 143)

Literary inventiveness and social significance of novelistic forms from the Great Depression to the present. The seminar will focus on texts by William Faulkner, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Toni Morrison, and Junot Diaz.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 184C: Data and Knowledge in the Humanities

How do different disciplines understand and use data, and how do skills such as interpretation and critical thought work with data to create knowledge? The introduction of mathematics reshaped disciplines like cosmology and sociology in the past while, in the present, the humanities are facing the same challenges with the emergence of fields such as spatial history and the digital humanities. In this class we will study how the introduction of data has transformed the way that we create knowledge.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Algee-Hewitt, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 184E: Literary Text Mining

This course will train students in applied methods for computationally analyzing texts for humanities research. The skills students will gain will include basic programming for textual analysis, applied statistical evaluation of results and the ability to present these results within a formal research paper or presentation. As an introduction, students in this course will also learn the prerequisite steps of such an analysis including corpus selection and cleaning, metadata collection, and selecting and creating an appropriate visualization for the results.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Algee-Hewitt, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 186: Tales of Three Cities: New York, Chicago, Los Angeles (AMSTUD 186)

How urban form and experience shape literary texts and how literary texts participate in the creation of place, through the literature of three American cities as they ascended to cultural and iconographical prominence: New York in the early to mid 19th century; Chicago in the late 19th and early 20th centuries; and Los Angeles in the mid to late 20th century.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Richardson, J. (PI)

ENGLISH 189D: Literature and Science

Classic literary and scientific works by writers such as Darwin, Thomas Hardy, Einstein, and Virginia Woolf. Considers how literature assays the consequences and potential of scientific theories within the subtle orderings of narrative, how a scientific theory is developed through and precipitated in language, and how novelists and scientists think outside the accumulated meanings of their time. Attends to their shared methods and preoccupations, including rendering visible the invisible; the idea of the generally significant individual; changing models of the shape of history; the contours of experiment; the cult and culture of experience and the dream of objectivity; regulative and investigatory fictions. Some discussion of literature and medicine.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Brink-Roby, H. (PI)

ENGLISH 190: Intermediate Fiction Writing

May be taken twice for credit. Lottery. Priority to last quarter/year in school, majors in English with Creative Writing emphasis, and Creative Writing minors. Prerequisite: 90 or 91.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 190T: Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing

Focus on a particular topic or process. Work includes aspects of reading short stories and novels, writing at least 30-50 pages of fiction, and responding to peers' work in workshop. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 91 or 90.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 191V: Reading for Creative Non-Fiction Writers

Taught by the Stein Visiting Writer. Prerequisite English 90 or 91. Permission number required to enroll.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Solnit, R. (PI)

ENGLISH 192: Intermediate Poetry Writing

May be taken twice. Lottery. Priority to last quarter/year in school, majors in English with Creative Writing emphasis, and Creative Writing minors. Prerequisite: 92.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 192T: Topics in Intermediate Poetry Writing

Generation and discussion of student poems. How to recognize a poem's internal structure; how to seek models for work. Students submit portfolio for group critique. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ENGLISH 92.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sharif, S. (PI)

ENGLISH 194: Individual Research

See section above on Undergraduate Programs, Opportunities for Advanced Work, Individual Research.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 197: Seniors Honors Essay

In two quarters.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Staveley, A. (PI)

ENGLISH 198: Individual Work

Undergraduates who wish to study a subject or area not covered by regular courses may, with consent, enroll for individual work under the supervision of a member of the department. 198 may not be used to fulfill departmental area or elective requirements without consent. Group seminars are not appropriate for 198.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 198F: Hoffs-Roach Fiction into Film Tutorial

Up to three undergraduate writers work with Fiction Into Film instructors. Students design their own curriculum, and Instructors act as writing mentors and advisers. Prerequisite: 190F. Submitted manuscript required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kealey, T. (PI)

ENGLISH 198L: Individual Work: Levinthal Tutorial

Undergraduate writers work individually with visiting Stegner Fellows in poetry, fiction, and if available, nonfiction. Students design their own curriculum; Stegner Fellows act as writing mentors and advisers. Prerequisites: 90, 91, or 92; submitted manuscript.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 199: Senior Independent Essay

Open, with department approval, to seniors majoring in non-Honors English who wish to work throughout the year on a 10,000 word critical or scholarly essay. Applicants submit a sample of their expository prose, proposed topic, and bibliography to the Director of Undergraduate Studies before preregistration in May of the junior year. Each student accepted is responsible for finding a department faculty adviser. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 234G: Literature and Empire (HISTORY 234G, HISTORY 334G)

This course will explore the relationship between modern British literature and imperialism. We will attend to the way imperialism shaped the evolution of a range of styles and genres, from romantic to gothic to modern, epistolary to mystery to fantasy. We will read works by authors such as Charlotte Bronte, Rudyard Kipling, Joseph Conrad, E. M. Forster, complementing them with key works of literary criticism.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 244: 101 YEARS OF LONDON

101 Years of London juxtaposes older representations of the UK's capital city (from Defoe, Dickens, Woolf and others) with contemporary accounts (from Zadie Smith, Ian McEwen and others). We will also look at films, painting, photography and websites about London.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jenkins, N. (PI)

ENGLISH 290: Advanced Fiction Writing

Workshop critique of original short stories or novel. Prerequisites: manuscript, consent of instructor, and 190-level fiction workshop. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 292: Advanced Poetry Writing

Focus is on generation and discussion of student poems, and seeking published models for the work.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Ekiss, K. (PI)

ENGLISH 308B: Gilded Age American Literature

Introduction to the creative innovations and the political tensions that stemmed from the formation of a multicultural society during the age of industrialization. We will attempt to place literary works in their historical and cultural contexts, while also surveying recent critical and theoretical developments in areas such as Realism, Naturalism, Regionalism, Minority and Race Studies, and so on.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Jones, G. (PI)

ENGLISH 314: Epic and Empire (COMPLIT 320A)

Focus is on Virgil's Aeneid and its influence, tracing the European epic tradition (Ariosto, Tasso, Camoes, Spenser, and Milton) to New World discovery and mercantile expansion in the early modern period.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Parker, P. (PI)

ENGLISH 334B: Concepts of Modernity II: Culture, Aesthetics, and Society in the Age of Globalization (COMPLIT 334B, MTL 334B)

Emphasis on world-system theory, theories of coloniality and power, and aesthetic modernity/postmodernity in their relation to culture broadly understood.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rasberry, V. (PI)

ENGLISH 373C: Text of Shakespeare

Shakespeare through textual history: where do our texts of Shakespeare come from, and how has editorial practice transformed them over the centuries? The course will focus on Hamlet, King Lear, Romeo and Juliet and Macbeth.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Orgel, S. (PI)

ENGLISH 390: Graduate Fiction Workshop

For Stegner fellows in the writing program. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENGLISH 392: Graduate Poetry Workshop

For Stegner fellows in the writing program. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENGLISH 394: Independent Study

Preparation for first-year Ph.D. qualifying examination and third year Ph.D. oral exam.
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENGLISH 395: Ad Hoc Graduate Seminar

Three or more graduate students who wish in the following quarter to study a subject or an area not covered by regular courses and seminars may plan an informal seminar and approach a member of the department to supervise it.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 396P: Publication Workshop: The Article

For English Ph.D. candidates only. A practical and theoretical study of the genre of the journal article, with critical reflection on its status as a gateway to academic professionalization and as a highly specialized form of public address. We will be reading articles published over the last decade across a diverse range of journals, focusing on issues surrounding methodology, style, tone, and audience. Participants will work on developing an already polished piece of writing into the form of an article publishable by a peer-reviewed publication. Admission by application in Autumn quarter .
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; McGurl, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 396R: Old and Modern(ist) Reading Group

This two-quarter-long reading group will alternate from week-to-week between Old English Biblical and Elegaic Poetry and David Jones¿s twentieth-century transnational Modernist masterpiece, "Anathemata" (which W. H. Auden called very probably the finest long poem written in English in this century). Students can choose to join biweekly for just Old English (in the original language) or just David Jones, or complete both sets of allied reading.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Treharne, E. (PI)

ENGLISH 398: Research Course

A special subject of investigation under supervision of a member of the department. Thesis work is not registered under this number.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 398L: Literary Lab (COMPLIT 398L)

Gathering and analyzing data, constructing hypotheses and designing experiments to test them, writing programs [if needed], preparing visuals and texts for articles or conferences. Requires a year-long participation in the activities of the Lab.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Algee-Hewitt, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 398R: Revision and Development of a Paper

Students revise and develop a paper under the supervision of a faculty member with a view to possible publication.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 398W: Orals, Publication and Dissertation Workshop

For third- and fourth-year graduate students in English. Strategies for studying for and passing the oral examination, publishing articles, and for writing and researching dissertations and dissertation proposals. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ngai, S. (PI)

ENGLISH 399: Thesis

For M.A. students only. Regular meetings with thesis advisers required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Orgel, S. (PI)
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