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ENGLISH 9CE: Creative Expression in Writing

Primary focus on giving students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. Students will come out of the course strengthened in their ability to identify and pursue their own creative interests. For undergrads only. NOTE: For undergraduates only. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 9CT: Special Topics in Creative Expression

Focus on a particular topic or process of creative expression. Primary focus on giving students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. Students will come out of the course strengthened in their ability to identify and pursue their own creative interests. NOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot. May repeat for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Carlson-Wee, K. (PI)

ENGLISH 10C: Introduction to English I: Tradition and Individuality, Medieval to Early Modern

This course offers a comprehensive introduction to English literature from its beginning in the medieval period to the early seventeenth century. We will study individual literary voices and styles in the context of a growing national tradition. We will discuss major authors (such as Chaucer, More, Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney, Spenser, Jonson, Donne) and analyze representative literary works in a variety of genres, from the Old English elegy and Middle English lyrics to the Elizabethan sonnet, Renaissance comedy, and the allegorical epic. While the course equips students with specific analytical and interpretative tools necessary for a historical understanding of literature, it is equally committed to revealing the aesthetic interest that medieval and early modern literature still holds for the modern reader.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 12C: Introduction to English III: Modern Literature

Survey of the major trends in literary history from 1850 to the present.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kantor, R. (PI)

ENGLISH 18Q: Writer's Salon

This course explores from a writer's perspective what it takes to craft a successful novel, short story collection, or book of poetry. You will read three prize-winning books from Bay Area authors, including Creative Writing instructors here at Stanford. Each author will visit our class to talk about their work and the writing process. From week to week, you will complete short writing exercises culminating in a longer story or series of poems that you share with class. For undergrads only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ekiss, K. (PI)

ENGLISH 19Q: I Bet You Think You're Funny: Humor Writing Workshop

Nothing is harder than being funny on purpose. We often associate humor with lightness, and sometimes that's appropriate, but humor is inextricably interlinked with pain and anger, and our funniest moments often spring from our deepest wounds. Humor can also allow us a platform for rage and indignation when other forms of rhetoric feel inadequate. This workshop will take students through the techniques and aesthetics of humor writing, in a variety of forms, and the main product of the quarter will be to submit for workshop a sustained piece of humor writing. For undergrads only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Porter, E. (PI)

ENGLISH 21Q: Write Like a Poet: From Tradition to Innovation

In this poetry workshop, we will spend the first half of the quarter reading and writing in traditional forms and the second half innovating from those forms. When discussing poetry, what do we mean when we talk about craft? What is prosody and why is it important? What are the relationships between form and content? What does a modern sonnet look like? We will consider how a writer might honor a tradition without being confined by it. The culmination of the course will be a project in which the student invents (and writes in) a form of their own. All interested students are welcome¿beginners and experts alike.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Shewmaker, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 40N: Theatrical Wonders from Shakespeare to Mozart

What is the secret of theatrical illusion? How does the theater move us to wonder, sympathetic identification, and reflection? How can the theater help society understand and manage social conflict and historical change? We will ask these questions through a close examination--on the page and on the stage--of dramatic masterpieces by Shakespeare and Mozart. We will attend live performances of Gounod¿s opera Romeo and Juliet and of Mozart¿s opera The Marriage of Figaro. No prior knowledge of music or foreign languages is required; neither is prior experience in theatricals.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hoxby, B. (PI)

ENGLISH 50: HUMANITIES HOUSE WORKSHOP

For student-run workshops and research seminars in Ng House / Humanities House. Open to both residents and non-residents. May be repeated for credit. This course code covers several discrete workshops each quarter; sign up for a particular workshop via the Google Form at https://goo.gl/forms/TRU0AogJP3IHyUmr2.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENGLISH 87N: The Conscience

What kind of science, or knowledge, does the con-science impart? How does this knowledge relate to what one nineteenth-century thinker called the ¿intellectual conscience¿? The indeterminacy of conscience¿s claims makes it a subject that all but demands close reading, and it is a matter of historical fact that ethical reasoning has often taken place within and through literary forms. This course thus takes the scientific efflorescence of the early modern period (c. 1500-1800) as its historical center of gravity, but focuses above all on the development of interpretive habits. Proceeding through texts long associated with crises of conscience (selections may include Genesis, Macbeth, Moll Flanders), we will consider how the creative force of interpretation bears on evolving conceptions of ethical inquiry and intellectual obligation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Yu, E. (PI)

ENGLISH 90: Fiction Writing

The elements of fiction writing: narration, description, and dialogue. Students write complete stories and participate in story workshops. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PWR 1 (waived in summer quarter). NOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 90M: Queer Stories (FEMGEN 90M)

Like other 90 and 91-level courses, 90M will explore basic elements of fiction and nonfiction writing. Students will read a wide variety of stories and essays in order to develop a language for working through the themes, forms, and concerns of the queer prose canon. Students will complete and workshop a piece of writing that in some way draws upon the aesthetics or sensibilities of the work we have read, culled from exercises completed throughout the quarter. This final piece may be a short story, a personal essay, a chapter from a novel or memoir, or a piece that, in the spirit of queerness, blurs or interrogates standard demarcations of genre. The course is open to any and all students, regardless of how they define their gender or sexuality. NOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pufahl, S. (PI)

ENGLISH 90Q: Sports Writing

Study and practice of the unique narratives, tropes, images and arguments that creative writers develop when they write about popular sport. From regional fandom to individualist adventuring, boxing and baseball to mascot dancing and table tennis, exceptional creative writers mine from a diversity of leisure activity a rich vein of ¿sports writing¿ in the creative nonfiction genre. In doing so, they demonstrate the creative and formal adaptability required to write with excellence about any subject matter, and under the circumstances of any subjectivity. Discussion of the ways in which writers have framed, and even critiqued, our interest in athletic events, spectatorship, and athletic beauty. Writers include Joyce Carol Oates, Roland Barthes, David James Duncan, Arnold Rampersad, John Updike, Maxine Kumin, Susan Sterling, Ernest Hemingway, Norman Mailer, Dervla Murphy, Haruki Murakami, Don DeLillo, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Annie Dillard, John McPhee, and Laura Hillenbrand. Close readings of essays on form and sport, as well as book excerpts. Students will engage in class discussions and write short weekly papers, leading to a more comprehensive project at the end of the quarter.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Evans, J. (PI)

ENGLISH 91: Creative Nonfiction

Historical and contemporary as a broad genre including travel and nature writing, memoir, biography, journalism, and the personal essay. Students use creative means to express factual content. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PWR 1 (waived in summer quarter and for SLE students). NOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 92: Reading and Writing Poetry

Prerequisite: PWR 1. Issues of poetic craft. How elements of form, music, structure, and content work together to create meaning and experience in a poem. May be repeated for credit. NOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 105E: Early Medieval English Poetry

This course introduces students to the earliest recorded poems of the English medieval period. Material in this course will range from the seventh through to the end of the fourteenth century and will include a variety of poetic genres: epic and elegy, lyric and lament, riddle and romance, and more. We will encounter heroes, saints, lovers, mourners and monsters. Students will conduct close readings of individual works as well as situate poems in broader historical and literary contexts. Additionally, the readings are selected to showcase the development of the English language as it transitioned between Old and Middle English as well as shifting cultural influences from within Britain to medieval Europe more broadly. Sample texts: Cædmon¿s Hymn, Beowulf, Dream of the Rood, Exodus, Sir Orfeo, and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Quick, J. (PI)

ENGLISH 108A: Intro to Disability Studies: Disability and Technology (HUMBIO 178A)

For a long time, disability studies has focused on the past, early representations of people with disabilities and histories of the movement for disability rights. This course turns toward the future, looking at activism and speculative fiction as critical vehicles for change. Drawing on fiction by Samuel Beckett, Muriel Rukeyser, and Octavia Butler, this course will address the question of the future through an interrogation of the relationship between disability and technology, including assistive technology, genetic testing, organ transplantation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kantor, R. (PI)

ENGLISH 113: 'The secret of deep human sympathy': Great Victorian Novels

The Victorian period is often referred to as the Age of the Novel: never before or since did fiction play such a central part in the English literary landscape. Through a close scrutiny of works by Charles Dickens, Charlotte Brontë, George Eliot and Thomas Hardy, this course will probe the formal innovations of four major nineteenth-century writers. Each novel will be tackled through five main approaches: the contexts that informed the work (such as the development of London, evolving attitudes towards criminality, subjectivity, childhood, and biology); the impact of publication methods on the novel (Oliver Twist and Tess of the d¿Urbervilles originally appeared in periodicals as, respectively, a monthly and a weekly serial; Jane Eyre and Adam Bede were first published as three-volume novels); innovations with narrative voice (for example how the novelists make use of third-person omniscient and first-person narration, and how and why they address the reader); the novels¿ stylistic particularities (from their manipulation of imagery to their experimentation with genre); and the major critical debates surrounding them (such as recent discussions concerning the extent to which the Victorian novel consolidated or challenged nineteenth-century values). Throughnour four novels, we will span the Victorian period, from Queen Victoria¿s arrival on the throne to anxieties and experimentations of the fin-de-siècle.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Owens, T. (PI)

ENGLISH 117B:  Environmental and Animal Masterpieces

Works of nonfiction or fiction notable for their social influence as well as their intellectual and aesthetic power; books might include Walden, My First Summer in the Sierra, Green Acres, A Sand County Almanac, Silent Spring, Desert Solitaire, The Omnivore's Dilemma, The World Without Us, Black Beauty, or others.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Greif, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 121D: ¿Hard¿ Science Fiction

What makes hard science fiction ¿hard¿? What's the science? What's the fiction? And why do we care about the difference? nIn this course, we will investigate different traditions of hard science fiction, trace the interactions between ¿real¿ science and science fiction, and consider the scientific education and outreach potential of hard science fiction. We will read, watch, and play hard science fiction that draws on a number of domains: physics, data science, linguistics, biology, politics, and others. Course texts will include works by Ted Chiang & Carl Sagan, episodes of Star Trek, and fan reviews & commentary. We will conclude the course by thinking about the relationship between science fiction, academia, and literary prestige¿asking questions about why, how, and to whom this genre matters.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Nomura, N. (PI)

ENGLISH 143F: The Rise of the Food Memoir: 20th and 21st Century Perspectives

Marcel Proust eats a madeleine and remembers things past; M.F.K. Fisher evokes her childhood with the illicit taste of street tar; Bich Minh Nguyen recalls a red canister of Pringles in a cold Michigan house. What is it about food that lends itself so readily to the genre of the memoir? Beginning in the early 20th century and ending in the past decade, this course traces the development of the food memoir, its authors ranging from modernists to chef celebrities. As we read works by authors such as Ernest Hemingway, George Orwell, Madhur Jaffrey, Laura Esquivel, and Gabrielle Hamilton, we will consider issues of gender, race, and nationality, understanding the food memoir as situated somewhere at the intersection of ethnography and autobiography.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Smith-Drelich, H. (PI)

ENGLISH 145J: The Jewish-American Novel: Diaspora, Privilege, Anxiety, Comedy (AMSTUD 145J, JEWISHST 155J)

Jews are sometimes referred to as 'the people of the book.' Would Portnoy's Complaint count as a book that constitutes Jewish-American peoplehood? What about Fear of Flying? This seminar introduces students to influential Jewish-American novels (and some short stories and film) from the late nineteenth century to the present day. These works return time and again to questions of diaspora, race, queer social belonging, and the duty to a Jewish past, mythical or real. Through close readings of short stories and novels coupled with secondary readings about Jewish-American history and culture, we will explore how American Jewishness is constructed differently in changing historical climates. What makes a text Jewish? What do we mean by Jewish humor and Jewish seriousness? How do Jewish formulations of gender and power respond to Jews' entrance into the white American mainstream? As we read, we'll think through and elaborate on models of ethnicity, privilege, sexuality, and American pluralism. Authors include Cahan, Yezierska, Singer, Roth, Bellow, Malamud, Ozick, Mailer, Jong, and Englander.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Atura Bushnell, A. (PI)

ENGLISH 159A: Literature that Changed the World (AFRICAAM 159A, CSRE 159I)

How does literary art get involved in politics? What is the border between propaganda and art? This class examines moments when writers seem suddenly not only to represent politically charged topics and themes, but to have a part in bringing about political change. We¿ll look at case studies from the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa, the American Civil Rights struggle, 19th century Russia, and more.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bronstein, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 161: Narrative and Narrative Theory (COMPLIT 161E)

An introduction to stories and storytelling--that is, to narrative. What is narrative? When is narrative fictional and when non-fictional? How is it done, word by word, sentence by sentence? Must it be in prose? Can it be in pictures? How has storytelling changed over time? Focus on various forms, genres, structures, and characteristics of narrative.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 162W: Writing Intensive Seminar in English (WISE)

In these highly regarded, small-group seminars, students explore unique topics in English language literature, reading select primary texts alongside exemplary critical works and/or other cultural artifacts, while also honing their research and writing skills through series of assignments that culminate in a substantial original research essay. Classes are capped at 8, allowing for individualized attention and rich feedback. 2019-2020 course topics include: African American author-critics; Asian encounters in American literature; queer drama of the AIDS crisis; Elizabeth Bishop and 20th century poetry; Shakespeare and Marx; dialogue and narrative theory; the politics of ¿bad reading¿; and protest literature. Click ¿Schedule¿ below to see individual course titles (in Notes). For fuller descriptions, go to https://english.stanford.edu/writing-intensive-seminars-english-wise. Enrollment is by permission. English majors must take at least one WISE to fulfill WIM. Non-majors are welcome, space permitting (contact vbeebe@stanford.edu).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 163D: Shakespeare: The Ethical Challenge (TAPS 163D)

Was the eighteenth century right in proclaiming Shakespeare to be the greatest moral philosopher? What are the ethical challenges Shakespeare's major plays still pose for us? Can we divorce ethical decisions from the contingencies of experience? We will ask a series of normative ethical questions (to do with pleasure, power, old age, self-sacrifice, and truth telling) and attempt to answer them in relation to the dramatic situation of Shakespeare's characters on the one hand and our own cultural situation on the other. The ethical challenge of Shakespearean drama will be set against selected readings in ethical theory.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 165: Perspectives on American Identity (AMSTUD 160)

Required for American Studies majors. In this seminar we trace diverse and changing interpretations of American identity by exploring autobiographical, literary, and/or visual texts from the 18th through the 20th century in conversation with sociological, political, and historical accounts. *Fulfills Writing In the Major Requirement for American Studies Majors*
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 182E: Photography in Fiction

Since its invention in the early 19th century, photography has found countless documentary and artistic applications. As an art form, it is not only a medium of its own, but one which has entered into fascinating dialogue with other media, from film to dance. Perhaps nowhere has photography been put to such intriguing multimedia use as in fiction. Since the early 20thcentury, authors as diverse as Virginia Woolf, German novelist W.G. Sebald, and the contemporary Sri-Lankan-Canadian writer Michael Ondaatje, have deployed photographs throughout their texts. In this course, we will look at this literary tradition, exploring the way that text and image enter into a complex dance, at times enhancing narrative, at times troubling it. What can we make of these strange and wonderful hybrids? What place do images have in traditional narratives? What are the ethics of such work in an age in which the technological distinction between truth and fiction is becoming ever more blurred? As we read (and look), we will find ourselves not only drawn into the narratives themselves, but sent beyond them, into questions of history, gender, trauma, and memory.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Houghteling, S. (PI)

ENGLISH 184E: Literary Text Mining

This course will train students in applied methods for computationally analyzing texts for humanities research. The skills students will gain will include basic programming for textual analysis, applied statistical evaluation of results and the ability to present these results within a formal research paper or presentation. Students in the course will also learn the prerequisite steps of such an analysis including corpus selection and cleaning, metadata collection, and selecting and creating an appropriate visualization for the results.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fredner, E. (PI)

ENGLISH 187C: The Evolution of the Feminist First-Person Essay, 2000-present (FEMGEN 187C)

The internet age has coincided with the rise of new and reinvented modes of nonfiction writing by women online. The feminist first-person essay (what simply goes by ¿personal essay¿ in the business) has transformed internet writing formally, politically, and economically. The explosion in popularity and shareability of this nonfiction subgenre has generated a host of new media and catapulted a new coterie of women writers into prominence. Which authors have exerted the most influence upon this new subgenre, how does the emergence of the first-person essay by women signify a mainstreaming of feminist dialectic, and how has this emergence been received by both a popular readership and the media establishment?nThis course will investigate how the growth of the feminist first-person essay has promoted new publications and modes of publication. It will trace the genesis of the online personal essay genre from public journals like LiveJournal, Blogspot, and Tumblr, via its codification in online publications like The Toast, The Rumpus, Gawker, Jezebel, Guernica, The Hairpin, The Awl, and xoJane, to its eventual breakthrough into established newspapers, magazines, and traditionally published memoirs and essay collections. The course will include visits (or virtual drop-ins) from some central figures in this story, be they essayists, critics or editors.nWe will investigate questions like: What is the first person¿s effect, and affect, in interspersing an author¿s personal experience, and what feminist potential does it contain? How does the myth of journalistic ¿objectivity¿ conflict with the presentation of the first person, and how has this objectivity myth descended from patriarchal tropes of legitimation? What do the terms ¿confessional¿ and ¿silence-breaking¿ connote? How has social media simultaneously empowered these new modes of public feminist dialogue and also exposed feminist public intellectuals to alarming levels of harassment and abuse? How successfully has the personal essay subgenre acted in de-centering hegemonic identity structures including whiteness, class privilege, and heterosexuality? What role has the feminist first-person essay played in the emergence of heavily digitized political movements including Black Lives Matter and #MeToo?nWhat is ¿trauma porn¿, and how does it interface with the capitalistic structures of the first person essay economy; what problems arise when capitalism and confessionalism intersect?
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Goode, L. (PI)

ENGLISH 190: Intermediate Fiction Writing

Intermediate course in the craft and art of fiction writing. Students read a diverse range of short stories and novel excerpts, complete writing exercises, and submit a short and longer story to be workshopped and revised. Prerequisite: 90 or 91. NOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 190E: Novel Writing Intensive

The main requirement for this course is a 50,000 word novel. The course explores elements of novel writing including fictional structure, character creation, scene vs. summary, as well as description, narration, and dialogue. Students will read four to five short novels during the first half of the course and then participate in National Novel Writing Month, an international writing event. Students will additionally write synopses, outlines, character sketches, and search tirelessly for the novel¿s engine: its voice. Designed for any student who has always wanted to write a novel. NOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 190HF: Hybrid Forms: Creative Writing Across Genres (ENGLISH 192HF)

What can we learn about fiction when it's written with the concision of a poem? What can we learn about the elliptical thinking of poetry through an extended essay? What freedoms do certain forms allow and take away? This writing workshop focuses on hybrid forms that cross traditional boundaries of genre. Students will read in a wide variety of models, including flash fiction and prose poetry and longer forms that combine genres. We'll discuss how these pieces challenge our expectations, then respond with our own writing. Weekly exercises will culminate in a longer multi-genre project that your share in workshop. NOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 191: Intermediate Creative Nonfiction

Continuation of ENGLISH 91. Reading a variety of creative essays, completing short writing exercises, and discussing narrative techniques in class. Students submit a short (2-5 page) and a longer (8-20 page) nonfictional work to be workshopped and revised. Prerequisite ENGLISH 90 or ENGLISH 91. NOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 192: Intermediate Poetry Writing

Students will examine a diverse range of contemporary poetry. Students write and revise several poems that will develop into a larger poetic project. Prerequisite: 92. NOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 192HF: Hybrid Forms: Creative Writing Across Genres (ENGLISH 190HF)

What can we learn about fiction when it's written with the concision of a poem? What can we learn about the elliptical thinking of poetry through an extended essay? What freedoms do certain forms allow and take away? This writing workshop focuses on hybrid forms that cross traditional boundaries of genre. Students will read in a wide variety of models, including flash fiction and prose poetry and longer forms that combine genres. We'll discuss how these pieces challenge our expectations, then respond with our own writing. Weekly exercises will culminate in a longer multi-genre project that your share in workshop. NOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 194: Individual Research

See section above on Undergraduate Programs, Opportunities for Advanced Work, Individual Research.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ruttenburg, N. (PI)

ENGLISH 196A: Honors Seminar: Critical Approaches to Literature

Overview of literary-critical methodologies, with a practical emphasis shaped by participants' current honors projects. Restricted to students in the English Honors Program.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Staveley, A. (PI)

ENGLISH 197: Seniors Honors Essay

In two quarters.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Staveley, A. (PI)

ENGLISH 198: Individual Work

Undergraduates who wish to study a subject or area not covered by regular courses may, with consent, enroll for individual work under the supervision of a member of the department. 198 may not be used to fulfill departmental area or elective requirements without consent. Group seminars are not appropriate for 198.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 199: Senior Independent Essay

Open, with department approval, to seniors majoring in non-Honors English who wish to work throughout the year on a 10,000 word critical or scholarly essay. Applicants submit a sample of their expository prose, proposed topic, and bibliography to the Director of Undergraduate Studies before preregistration in May of the junior year. Each student accepted is responsible for finding a department faculty adviser. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 208: Literature of Disease

This course will consider representations of disease from antiquity through the present-day, ranging from depictions of Biblical plagues, the Black Death, and Renaissance "pestilence," up through the cholera outbreaks of Victorian London, the global influenza of 1918, and the ongoing AIDS pandemic. In addition to reading literary works, we will dive into the archives to consider non-literary traces of disease, from "bills of mortality" to quack remedies, paintings, sermons, letters, diaries, government ordinances, and early medical texts.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Phillips, P. (PI)

ENGLISH 215H: Shakespeare and the History Play

A close study of Shakespeare's English history plays and their influence on the romantic history plays of Schiller, Victor Hugo, and others.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hoxby, B. (PI)

ENGLISH 333: Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts Core Seminar (DLCL 333, MUSIC 332, PHIL 333)

This course serves as the Core Seminar for the PhD Minor in Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts. It introduces students to a wide range of topics at the intersection of philosophy with literary and arts criticism. The seminar is intended for graduate students. It is suitable for theoretically ambitious students of literature and the arts, philosophers with interests in value theory, aesthetics, and topics in language and mind, and other students with strong interest in the psychological importance of engagement with the arts. May be repeated for credit. In this year¿s installment, we focus on how artistic kinds or genres help set the terms on which individual works are experienced, understood, and valued, with special attention to lyric poetry and music.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 350D: Constitutional Theory

(Same as LAW 7014.) The guiding question of this course will be how we should think about the role of the U.S. Constitution in American law and American life. In considering this issue, we will address debates about constitutional interpretation (including both originalism and living constitutionalism), the nature and features of constitutional change within the American context, the role of federalism and the separation of powers in the constitutional scheme, and the nature of American constitutionalism as opposed to English and continental European models. We will tackle these debates in the context of some specific contemporary controversies about the Constitution, including: How do the civil rights movement and other social movements impact our understanding of the Constitution?; Does the Constitution reject a European-style inquisitorial process in favor of an Anglo-American vision of due process?; How important is consensus within the Supreme Court to establishing the legitimacy of constitutional meanings?; Why do we have nine Supreme Court justices, and; What is the Constitution, and how much does it include outside of the written document? Throughout we will be contemplating the extent to which our interpretation of the constitution depends on our vision of American democracy and the good society.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Meyler, B. (PI)

ENGLISH 390: Graduate Fiction Workshop

For Stegner fellows in the writing program. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENGLISH 392: Graduate Poetry Workshop

For Stegner fellows in the writing program. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENGLISH 395: Ad Hoc Graduate Seminar

Three or more graduate students who wish in the following quarter to study a subject or an area not covered by regular courses and seminars may plan an informal seminar and approach a member of the department to supervise it.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 396: Introduction to Graduate Study for Ph.D. Students

Required for first-year graduate students in English. The major historical, professional, and methodological approaches to the study of literature in English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Bronstein, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 396L: Pedagogy Seminar I

Required for first-year Ph.D students in English. Prerequisite for teaching required for Ph.D. students in English, Modern Thought and Literature and Comparative Literature. Preparation for surviving as teaching assistants in undergraduate literature courses. Focus is on leading discussions and grading papers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Algee-Hewitt, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 398R: Revision and Development of a Paper

Students revise and develop a paper under the supervision of a faculty member with a view to possible publication.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 398W: Orals, Publication and Dissertation Workshop

For third- and fourth-year graduate students in English. Strategies for studying for and passing the oral examination, publishing articles, and for writing and researching dissertations and dissertation proposals. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Algee-Hewitt, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 399: Thesis

For M.A. students only. Regular meetings with thesis advisers required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Vermeule, B. (PI)
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