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ENERGY 13SC: Energy in Hawaii: Forefront of Clean Energy Technology and Policy

We will explore practical, social, technical, and political issues surrounding energy production and use in Hawaii. Hawaii is at the forefront of technical changes in the electric grid and the uses of electricity, with an aspirational goal for 100% carbon-free electricity in 2045. Hawaii also has passed legislation that aspires to 100% fossil-free transportation by 2040. The explosive growth of behind-the-meter solar generation has led to opportunities for the introduction of distributed energy systems (monitoring and measurement, automated controls, and communication), while also increasing issues with grid stability and social equity. Because of these factors, there is a heightened interest nationally from federal agencies, particularly Energy and Defense. We will consider the availability and viability of solar, wind, and geothermal resources, while also considering the economic impact on Hawaii of large-scale importation of oil for generating electricity and transportation. We will consider emerging questions related to the reliability and the resiliency of the grids on different islands in the State. All of these issues will be considered in the technical, societal, cultural, and political milieu which is the unique nature of Hawaii. We will spend the first week on campus learning about energy and Hawaii, then travel to various field sites in Hawaii, including a wind farm, a utility-scale solar farm, an oil-fired power plant, a waste-to-energy facility, solar hot water systems, and neighborhoods with large proportions of rooftop solar and behind the meter battery storage. Other generation resources will also be considered for visits. We will meet with relevant policy experts and public officials from governmental agencies, universities, and public interest groups. The course will conclude with group presentations by the students. Participants will return to Stanford on September 18.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Benson, S. (PI)

ENERGY 20N: Technology in the Greenhouse

The evidence that human activities are changing the climate is overwhelming. Energy use is woven throughout the fabric of modern societies, and energy systems are also a primary way that humans interact with the global Earth systems like climate. We know enough about the potential impacts of climate change to see that we need to transform the world¿s energy systems to a much cleaner set of technologies with much lower greenhouse gas emissions. Economies that use energy in a clean, cost-effective way will be much more competitive in the future. The clean energy transition is now underway, with reductions in coal use and rapid growth in solar and wind deployment, but there is much more to do to limit the adverse impacts of climate change. This seminar explores technology options available to make the changes needed, in the developed and developing worlds. There is no shortage of energy available for our use. Instead, the challenge is to convert those energy resources into services like electricity and transportation, and that conversion requires technology, as well as policies and markets that enable innovation. The scale of the world¿s energy systems is dauntingly large, and we will need a well-diversified set of options to meet the challenge. Wind, solar, nuclear, carbon capture and storage for fossil fuel use, modified agriculture, electric (and automated) vehicles, advanced air conditioning, and many other technology options exist. We will consider these technologies and ask what barriers will have to be addressed if they are to be deployed at a scale large enough to reduce the impact climate change. The format will be discussions of technologies and their potential with a project and student presentations toward the end of the quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 101: Energy and the Environment (EARTHSYS 101)

Energy use in modern society and the consequences of current and future energy use patterns. Case studies illustrate resource estimation, engineering analysis of energy systems, and options for managing carbon emissions. Focus is on energy definitions, use patterns, resource estimation, pollution. Recommended: MATH 21 or 42.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 101A: Energizing California

A weekend field trip featuring renewable and nonrenewable energy installations in Northern California. Tour geothermal, bioenergy, and natural gas field sites with expert guides from the Department of Energy Resources Engineering. Requirements: One campus meeting and weekend field trip. Enrollment limited to 25. Freshman have first choice.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Onori, S. (PI)

ENERGY 102: Fundamentals of Renewable Power (EARTHSYS 102)

Do you want a much better understanding of renewable power technologies? Did you know that wind and solar are the fastest growing forms of electricity generation? Are you interested in hearing about the most recent, and future, designs for green power? Do you want to understand what limits power extraction from renewable resources and how current designs could be improved? This course dives deep into these and related issues for wind, solar, biomass, geothermal, tidal and wave power technologies. We welcome all student, from non-majors to MBAs and grad students. If you are potentially interested in an energy or environmental related major, this course is particularly useful. Recommended: Math 21 or 42.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 104: Sustainable Energy for 9 Billion

This course explores the transition to a sustainable energy system at large scales (national and global), and over long time periods (decades). Explores the drivers of global energy demand and the fundamentals of technologies that can meet this demand sustainably. Focuses on constraints affecting large-scale deployment of technologies, as well as inertial factors affecting this transition. Problems will involve modeling global energy demand, deployment rates for sustainable technologies, technological learning and economics of technical change. Recommended: ENERGY 101, 102.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 110: Engineering Economics

The success of energy projects and companies is judged by technical, economic and financial criteria. This course will introduce concepts of engineering economy, e.g., time value of money, life cycle costs and financial metrics, and explore their application to the business of energy. We will use case studies, business school cases and possibly industry guest lecturers. Examples from the hydrocarbon businesses that dominate energy today will provide the framework for the analysis of both conventional and renewable energy.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 112: Exploring Geosciences with MATLAB (GEOPHYS 112)

How to use MATLAB as a tool for research and technical computing, including 2-D and 3-D visualization features, numerical capabilities, and toolboxes. Practical skills in areas such as data analysis, regressions, optimization, spectral analysis, differential equations, image analysis, computational statistics, and Monte Carlo simulations. Emphasis is on scientific and engineering applications. Offered every year, autumn quarter.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 118: Safety and Environmental Aspects of Oil and Gas Production (ENERGY 218)

This course introduces safety, environmental and regulatory aspects of oil and gas development and production. Students will learn about personal and process safety management in oil and gas, as well as major State and Federal laws and regulatory programs governing oil and gas in the US. Lectures will introduce and explain concepts of safety, regulation, environment and sustainability, further illustrated through discussion of case studies from the global oil and gas industry. Parallels with renewable energy will be discussed.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 120: Fundamentals of Petroleum Engineering (ENGR 120)

Lectures, problems, field trip. Engineering topics in petroleum recovery; origin, discovery, and development of oil and gas. Chemical, physical, and thermodynamic properties of oil and natural gas. Material balance equations and reserve estimates using volumetric calculations. Gas laws. Single phase and multiphase flow through porous media.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 121: Fundamentals of Multiphase Flow (ENERGY 221)

Multiphase flow in porous media. Wettability, capillary pressure, imbibition and drainage, Leverett J-function, transition zone, vertical equilibrium. Relative permeabilities, Darcy's law for multiphase flow, fractional flow equation, effects of gravity, Buckley-Leverett theory, recovery predictions, volumetric linear scaling, JBN and Jones-Rozelle determination of relative permeability. Frontal advance equation, Buckley-Leverett equation as frontal advance solution, tracers in multiphase flow, adsorption, three-phase relative permeabilities.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 141: Seismic Reservoir Characterization (ENERGY 241, GEOPHYS 241A)

(Same as GP241) Practical methods for quantitative characterization and uncertainty assessment of subsurface reservoir models integrating well-log and seismic data. Multidisciplinary combination of rock-physics, seismic attributes, sedimentological information and spatial statistical modeling techniques. Student teams build reservoir models using limited well data and seismic attributes typically available in practice, comparing alternative approaches. Software provided (SGEMS, Petrel, Matlab). Offered every other year.nRecommended: ERE240/260, or GP222/223, or GP260/262 or GES253/257; ERE246, GP112
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 153: Carbon Capture and Sequestration (ENERGY 253)

CO2 separation from syngas and flue gas for gasification and combustion processes. Transportation of CO2 in pipelines and sequestration in deep underground geological formations. Pipeline specifications, monitoring, safety engineering, and costs for long distance transport of CO2. Comparison of options for geological sequestration in oil and gas reservoirs, deep unmineable coal beds, and saline aquifers. Life cycle analysis.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Benson, S. (PI); Wen, G. (TA)

ENERGY 155: Undergraduate Report on Energy Industry Training

On-the-job practical training under the guidance of on-site supervisors. Required report detailing work activities, problems, assignments and key results. Prerequisite: written consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 160: Uncertainty Quantification in Data-Centric Simulations (ENERGY 260)

This course provides a brief survey of mathematical methods for uncertainty quantification. It highlights various issues, techniques and practical tools available for modeling uncertainty in quantitative models of complex dynamic systems. Specific topics include basic concepts in probability and statistics, spatial statistics (geostatistics and machine learning), Monte Carlo simulations, global and local sensitivity analyses, surrogate models, and computational alternatives to Monte Carlo simulations (e.g., quasi-MC, moment equations, the method of distributions, polynomial chaos expansions). Prerequisites: algebra (CME 104 or equivalent), introductory statistics course (CME 106 or equivalent).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 167: Engineering Valuation and Appraisal of Oil and Gas Wells, Facilities, and Properties (ENERGY 267)

Appraisal of development and remedial work on oil and gas wells; appraisal of producing properties; estimation of productive capacity, reserves; operating costs, depletion, and depreciation; value of future profits, taxation, fair market value; original or guided research problems on economic topics with report. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 171: Energy Infrastructure, Technology and Economics (ENERGY 271)

Oil and gas represents more than 50% of global primary energy. In delivering energy at scale, the industry has developed global infrastructure with supporting technology that gives it enormous advantages in energy markets; this course explores how the oil and gas industry operates. From the perspective of these established systems and technologies, we will look at the complexity of energy systems, and will consider how installed infrastructure enables technology development and deployment, impacts energy supply, and how existing infrastructure and capital invested in fossil energy impacts renewable energy development. Prerequisites: Energy 101 and 102 or permission of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 192: Undergraduate Teaching Experience

Leading field trips, preparing lecture notes, quizzes under supervision of the instructor. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 193: Undergraduate Research Problems

Original and guided research problems with comprehensive report. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 194: Special Topics in Energy and Mineral Fluids

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kovscek, A. (PI)

ENERGY 199: Senior Project and Seminar in Energy Resources

Individual or group capstone project in Energy Resources Engineering. Emphasis is on report preparation. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kovscek, A. (PI)

ENERGY 203: Stanford Energy Ventures

Solving the global energy challenge will require the creation and successful scale-up of hundreds of new ventures. This project-based course provides a launchpad for the development and creation of transformational energy ventures and innovation models. Interdisciplinary teams will research, analyze, and develop detailed launch plans for high-impact opportunities in the context of the new energy venture development framework offered in this course. Please see the course website https://sev.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 205: Hydrogen Economy

This is a seminar course on the hydrogen economy as a critical piece of the global energy transformation. This course will introduce the unique characteristics of hydrogen, its potential role in decarbonizing the global energy system, and how it compares to other alternative and complementary solutions. We will cover the main ideas/themes of how hydrogen is made, transported and stored, and used around the world through a series of lectures and guest speakers.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENERGY 218: Safety and Environmental Aspects of Oil and Gas Production (ENERGY 118)

This course introduces safety, environmental and regulatory aspects of oil and gas development and production. Students will learn about personal and process safety management in oil and gas, as well as major State and Federal laws and regulatory programs governing oil and gas in the US. Lectures will introduce and explain concepts of safety, regulation, environment and sustainability, further illustrated through discussion of case studies from the global oil and gas industry. Parallels with renewable energy will be discussed.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 221: Fundamentals of Multiphase Flow (ENERGY 121)

Multiphase flow in porous media. Wettability, capillary pressure, imbibition and drainage, Leverett J-function, transition zone, vertical equilibrium. Relative permeabilities, Darcy's law for multiphase flow, fractional flow equation, effects of gravity, Buckley-Leverett theory, recovery predictions, volumetric linear scaling, JBN and Jones-Rozelle determination of relative permeability. Frontal advance equation, Buckley-Leverett equation as frontal advance solution, tracers in multiphase flow, adsorption, three-phase relative permeabilities.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 222: Advanced Reservoir Engineering

Lectures, problems. General flow equations, tensor permeabilities, steady state radial flow, skin, and succession of steady states. Injectivity during fill-up of a depleted reservoir, injectivity for liquid-filled reservoirs. Flow potential and gravity forces, coning. Displacements in layered reservoirs. Transient radial flow equation, primary drainage of a cylindrical reservoir, line source solution, pseudo-steady state. Prerequisite: 221.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 223: Reservoir Simulation

Fundamentals of petroleum reservoir simulation. Equations for multicomponent, multiphase flow between gridblocks comprising a petroleum reservoir. Relationships between black-oil and compositional models. Techniques for developing black-oil, compositional, thermal, and dual-porosity models. Practical considerations in the use of simulators for predicting reservoir performance. Class project. Prerequisite: 221 and 246, or consent of instructor. Recommended: CME 206.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 224: Advanced Reservoir Simulation

Topics include modeling of complex wells, coupling of surface facilities, compositional modeling, dual porosity models, treatment of full tensor permeability and grid nonorthogonality, local grid refinement, higher order methods, streamline simulation, upscaling, algebraic multigrid solvers, unstructured grid solvers, history matching, other selected topics. Prerequisite: 223 or consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 240: Data science for geoscience (EARTHSYS 140, EARTHSYS 240, ESS 239, GEOLSCI 140, GEOLSCI 240)

Overview of some of the most important data science methods (statistics, machine learning & computer vision) relevant for geological sciences, as well as other fields in the Earth Sciences. Areas covered are: extreme value statistics for predicting rare events; compositional data analysis for geochemistry; multivariate analysis for designing data & computer experiments; probabilistic aggregation of evidence for spatial mapping; functional data analysis for multivariate environmental datasets, spatial regression and modeling spatial uncertainty with covariate information (geostatistics). Identification & learning of geo-objects with computer vision. Focus on practicality rather than theory. Matlab exercises on realistic data problems.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Caers, J. (PI)

ENERGY 241: Seismic Reservoir Characterization (ENERGY 141, GEOPHYS 241A)

(Same as GP241) Practical methods for quantitative characterization and uncertainty assessment of subsurface reservoir models integrating well-log and seismic data. Multidisciplinary combination of rock-physics, seismic attributes, sedimentological information and spatial statistical modeling techniques. Student teams build reservoir models using limited well data and seismic attributes typically available in practice, comparing alternative approaches. Software provided (SGEMS, Petrel, Matlab). Offered every other year.nRecommended: ERE240/260, or GP222/223, or GP260/262 or GES253/257; ERE246, GP112
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 251: Thermodynamics of Equilibria

Lectures, problems. The volumetric behavior of fluids at high pressure. Equation of state representation of volumetric behavior. Thermodynamic functions and conditions of equilibrium, Gibbs and Helmholtz energy, chemical potential, fugacity. Phase diagrams for binary and multicomponent systems. Calculation of phase compositions from volumetric behavior for multicomponent mixtures. Experimental techniques for phase-equilibrium measurements. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 253: Carbon Capture and Sequestration (ENERGY 153)

CO2 separation from syngas and flue gas for gasification and combustion processes. Transportation of CO2 in pipelines and sequestration in deep underground geological formations. Pipeline specifications, monitoring, safety engineering, and costs for long distance transport of CO2. Comparison of options for geological sequestration in oil and gas reservoirs, deep unmineable coal beds, and saline aquifers. Life cycle analysis.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Benson, S. (PI); Wen, G. (TA)

ENERGY 255: Master's Report on Energy Industry Training

On-the-job training for master's degree students under the guidance of on-site supervisors. Students submit a report detailing work activities, problems, assignments, and key results. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of adviser.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENERGY 260: Uncertainty Quantification in Data-Centric Simulations (ENERGY 160)

This course provides a brief survey of mathematical methods for uncertainty quantification. It highlights various issues, techniques and practical tools available for modeling uncertainty in quantitative models of complex dynamic systems. Specific topics include basic concepts in probability and statistics, spatial statistics (geostatistics and machine learning), Monte Carlo simulations, global and local sensitivity analyses, surrogate models, and computational alternatives to Monte Carlo simulations (e.g., quasi-MC, moment equations, the method of distributions, polynomial chaos expansions). Prerequisites: algebra (CME 104 or equivalent), introductory statistics course (CME 106 or equivalent).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 263: Introduction to Quantitative Methods for Energy Decisions

This course provides students from various backgrounds with knowledge of the principles and quantitative methods of decision analysis and policy analysis to tackle interdisciplinary questions in the context of sustainable energy systems. We consider engineering analysis, decision analysis and economic analysis in the formulation of answers to address energy system problems. We will use methods such as life-cycle assessment, benefit-cost and cost-effectiveness analysis, microeconomics, distributional metrics, risk analysis methods, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis, multi-attribute utility theory, and simulation and optimization. The integration of uncertainty into formal methods is a fundamental component of the course.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 266: Town Hall Meeting (Simulated)

This course will offer students the opportunity to structure and present a simulated public meeting on a current topic involving energy production and its effects on a local community. Students will choose a topic and develop a town hall meeting event that reflects the range of concerns of public, corporate, and regulatory stakeholders. The meeting will be presented on campus to the Stanford Community and the general public. Students will have the opportunity to hone their skills in delivering persuasive oral arguments, critical thinking, and leadership.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kourt, W. (PI); Pande, K. (PI)

ENERGY 267: Engineering Valuation and Appraisal of Oil and Gas Wells, Facilities, and Properties (ENERGY 167)

Appraisal of development and remedial work on oil and gas wells; appraisal of producing properties; estimation of productive capacity, reserves; operating costs, depletion, and depreciation; value of future profits, taxation, fair market value; original or guided research problems on economic topics with report. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 271: Energy Infrastructure, Technology and Economics (ENERGY 171)

Oil and gas represents more than 50% of global primary energy. In delivering energy at scale, the industry has developed global infrastructure with supporting technology that gives it enormous advantages in energy markets; this course explores how the oil and gas industry operates. From the perspective of these established systems and technologies, we will look at the complexity of energy systems, and will consider how installed infrastructure enables technology development and deployment, impacts energy supply, and how existing infrastructure and capital invested in fossil energy impacts renewable energy development. Prerequisites: Energy 101 and 102 or permission of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 273: Special Topics in Energy Resources Engineering

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 275: Quantitative Methods in Basin and Petroleum System Modeling (GEOLSCI 256)

Examine the physical processes operating in sedimentary basins by deriving the basic equations of fundamental, coupled geologic processes such as fluid flow and heat flow, deposition, compaction, mass conservation, and chemical reactions. Through hands-on computational exercises and instructor-provided "recipes," students will deconstruct the black box of basin modeling software. Students write their own codes (Matlab) as well as gain expertise in modern finite-element modeling software (PetroMod, COMSOL).
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 281: Applied Mathematics in Reservoir Engineering

The philosophy of the solution of engineering problems. Methods of solution of partial differential equations: Laplace transforms, Fourier transforms, wavelet transforms, Green's functions, and boundary element methods. Prerequisites: CME 204 or MATH 131, and consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 293: Energy storage and conversion: Solar Cells, Fuel Cells, Batteries and Supercapacitors (EE 293)

This course provides an introduction and engineering exposure to energy storage and conversion systems and will cover the basic physics, chemistry and electrochemistry of solar cells, fuel cells, batteries and supercapacitors, state of the art of such technologies and recent developments. The course will also cover experimental methods and modeling tools for simulation and optimization aimed at characterizing efficiency and performance issues. Prerequisites: Equivalent coursework in thermodynamics, electronic properties, chemical principles, electricity, and magnetism.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Onori, S. (PI); Allam, A. (TA)

ENERGY 293B: Fundamentals of Energy Processes (EE 293B)

For seniors and graduate students. Covers scientific and engineering fundamentals of renewable energy processes involving heat. Thermodynamics, heat engines, solar thermal, geothermal, biomass. Recommended: MATH 19-21; PHYSICS 41, 43, 45
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 297: Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer

Energy systems are multiphysics and multiscale in nature. This course addresses the quantitative understanding of fundamental physical processes that govern fluid flow and mass/heat transfer processes, critical to many energy systems. The course will cover conservation laws describing the dynamics of single phase flows, relevant to energy applications including, but not limited to, laminar flow solutions in pipes and ducts, Stokes flows (relevant to flow in porous media), potential and boundary layer flow theories (relevant to wind energy), heat and mass transport (relevant to geothermal and energy storage systems, reactive transport in the subsurface, CO2 sequestration). Although motivated by specific applications in the energy landscape, the course will be focused on fundamental principles and mathematical techniques to understand the basic physics underlying flow and transport processes.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 300: Graduate Directed Reading

Independent studies under the direction of a faculty member for which academic credit may properly be allowed.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-7 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 301: The Energy Seminar (CEE 301, MS&E 494)

Interdisciplinary exploration of current energy challenges and opportunities, with talks by faculty, visitors, and students. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Weyant, J. (PI)

ENERGY 351: ERE Master's Graduate Seminar

Current research topics. Presentations by guest speakers from Stanford and elsewhere. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENERGY 352: ERE PhD Graduate Seminar

Current research topics. Presentations by guest speakers from Stanford and elsewhere. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENERGY 355: Doctoral Report on Energy Industry Training

On-the-job training for doctoral students under the guidance of on-site supervisors. Students submit a report on work activities, problems, assignments, and results. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of adviser.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENERGY 359: Teaching Experience in Energy Resources Engineering

For TAs in Energy Resources Engineering. Course and lecture design and preparation; lecturing practice in small groups. Classroom teaching practice in an Energy Resources Engineering course for which the participant is the TA (may be in a later quarter). Taught in collaboration with the Center for Teaching and Learning.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Gerritsen, M. (PI)

ENERGY 360: Advanced Research Work in Energy Resources Engineering

Graduate-level work in experimental, computational, or theoretical research. Special research not included in graduate degree program. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENERGY 361: Master's Degree Research in Energy Resources Engineering

Experimental, computational, or theoretical research. Advanced technical report writing. Limited to 6 units total.nn (Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENERGY 362: Engineer's Degree Research in Energy Resources Engineering

Graduate-level work in experimental, computational, or theoretical research for Engineer students. Advanced technical report writing. Limited to 15 units total, or 9 units total if 6 units of 361 were previously credited.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENERGY 363: Doctoral Degree Research in Energy Resources Engineering

Graduate-level work in experimental, computational, or theoretical research for Ph.D. students. Advanced technical report writing.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENERGY 365: Special Research Topics in Energy Resources Engineering

Graduate-level research work not related to report, thesis, or dissertation. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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