Print Settings
 

EMED 105: Film and Television Emergencies: Grasp Emergency Care through Pop Culture (EMED 205)

Although popular shows such as Grey's Anatomy successfully enthrall an audience, they often exchange accuracy for entertainment value. This course aims to "set the record straight" and deconstruct these medical dramas into the technical and non-technical skills involved in handling medical emergencies. Working in small groups and guided by emergency medicine faculty, students will actively curate content for discussions about the appropriate usage of these skills. Topics range from CPR and stroke management to decision making and the social influence of medial dramas. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Curtis, H. (PI)

EMED 110: Basic Cardiac Life Support: CPR for the layperson responder

Provides lay rescuers the fundamental knowledge and skills to perform. CPR on an adult, child, infant. Addresses recognizing emergency, alleviating airway obstruction, use of AED using the American CPR model for a community responder in an urban evironment. MD students take EMED 201.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Thompson, A. (PI)

EMED 111A: Emergency Medical Technician Training (EMED 211A)

Emergency Medical Technicians are trained to provide basic life support and to transport sick and injured patients to the hospital. Topics include patient assessment and management of cardiac, respiratory, neurological and other medical emergencies. Includes both lecture and practical sessions. After completion of the EMED 111 sequence and meeting all class requirements, students can sit for the National Registry EMT cognitive exam and obtain state certification as an EMT. We encourage freshman and sophomores to apply. (ONLY graduate students may enroll for 3 or 4 units with instructor permission). Prerequisites: Application (see http://emt.stanford.edu) and consent of instructor. AHA or Red Cross healthcare provider CPR certification is also required, but can be obtained during fall quarter. A one time course fee of $60 will be assessed to cover required equipment and a uniform shirt.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EMED 112A: Advanced Training and Teaching for the EMT **EMT REFRESHER** (EMED 212A)

EMED 112A/212A is a California and NREMT approved EMT refresher course which provides the equivalent of 24 hours of continuing education for recertification. Topics include both medical and traumatic emergencies as well as skills training. Students taking this course also serve as teaching assistants for EMED 111/211, the initial EMT training course. There will be one class activity on a Saturday or Sunday during the quarter, specific date will be announced during the first few weeks of class.nPrerequisites: Completion of an EMT certification course (such as EMED 111A-C), CPR for Healthcare Providers, and consent of instructor. See http://emt.stanford.edu for more details.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EMED 114SI: On the Path to Medical School

This is a course for all prospective pre-medical students, including undergraduate and graduate students, who seek knowledge and guidance on their path to medical school. Discussions, presentations, and lectures will help students discover whether the pre­medical path is right for them and if so, how best to navigate the pre-med requirements. In collaboration with physician advisors and medical students, we have designed a series of presentations on topics including strategically approaching pre-medical classes and extracurriculars, studying for the MCAT, optimizing the medical school application, preparing for medical school interviews, and evidence-based pros and cons of careers in medicine and differences between specialties. This course will be a one-stop shop for getting all the information needed to become an efficient, successful pre-medical student as students consider whether medicine is right for them and navigate the path to medical school. Currently, to our knowledge, there are no classes directly targeted towards guiding students at every stage of the premed path in this way, and yet pre-meds are among the largest group of pre-professional students at Stanford.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Weiss, E. (PI)

EMED 115: Writing Narrative Medicine (EMED 215)

This course details and models the methods required for the practice of narrative medicine. Students will examine a variety of works, including poetry, short stories, memoirs, and other illness narratives. They will engage in reflective writing exercises that will allow them to draw on the reading material and practice elements of craft that relate to the text. Through this approach, they will build their close reading and reflective writing skills, while analyzing central themes in narrative medicine, including loss, identity, and the construction of personal history.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Merritt, A. (PI)

EMED 124: Wilderness First Aid

Provides basic introductory back country and emergency medicine skill development. Topics covered include patient assessment, addressing life threats, shock, spine safety, musculoskeletal injuries, medical emergencies, and environmental emergencies.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Thompson, A. (PI)

EMED 128: Wilderness Medicine: Continued practical experience for high-quality care

Ongoing training for current wilderness medicine providers (WFA, AFR, WEMT). Students practice BLS assessment and medical care through outdoor simulations, labs, and workshops. Work in small teams, refine essential skills and garner knowledge, and judgement. Topics include traumatic, environmental, and medical scenarios in a backcountry setting where communication and resources are limited. Pre-requisite is completion of EMED224 or EMED 226 (or equivalent; current certification required) & current CPR certification; or instructor approval.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Thompson, A. (PI)

EMED 161A: Community Health Advocacy

MED161 Community Health Advocacy is a three-quarter course series that provides students with knowledge and concrete skills for working with and advocating for underserved populations. Through coursework and placements in community health clinics and social service agencies, students will broaden and deepen their understanding of the structural determinants of health, how they impact underserved populations, and the various levels at which these challenges can ¿ and should ¿ be addressed. Students will participate in weekly activities that support the mission of their placement organization, engage in direct service with clients, and collaborate on the design and implementation of a capacity-building project. Weekly classroom sessions will serve as a forum for teaching and training, discussion of class readings and placement experiences, project development, and troubleshooting and support.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EMED 199: Undergraduate Research

Consists of Emergency Medicine focused studies and projects (including Research Projects) in progress. Possible topics include management of trauma patients, common medical and surgical emergencies in pediatric and adult populations, topics in disaster medicine, biosecurity and bioterrorism response, wilderness medicine, international medicine, and others. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EMED 201: Basic Cardiac Life Support for Healthcare Professionals

All medical students must be certified in Basic Cardiac Life Support before the end of the first (autumn) quarter. Students who provide documentation of certification received within six months prior to the date of matriculation will be exempted from the requirement. The course teaches one- and two-rescuer CPR, management of an obstructed airway, and CPR for infants and children. Upon completion of the course, students receive an American Heart Association certificate in BLS.nIn addition to CPR training, we will also teach Question, Persuade, Refer (QPR) which is the CPR equivalent to psychological emergencies. This portion of the course will allow students to master techniques on how to recognize and respond to an individual in psychological distress and to help in suicide prevention. Our faculty are certified QPR instructors and students will become QPR certified during this course through the QPR Institute certification process.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

EMED 201A: Re-Certification for Basic Cardiac Life Support for Healthcare Professionals

The purpose of this course is to provide medical students re-certification in Basic Cardiac Life Support (BLS), in accordance with guidelines from the American Heart Association. Initial certification (EMED 201) occurs in the first year and expires 2 years from the initial course. This course will fulfill the requirements of the current BLS certification needed to complete the mandatory Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) training prior to graduation. Student will refresh their skills in one - and two-rescuer CPR for infants and adults, management of an obstructed airway, and use of an automated external defibrillator.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

EMED 205: Film and Television Emergencies: Grasp Emergency Care through Pop Culture (EMED 105)

Although popular shows such as Grey's Anatomy successfully enthrall an audience, they often exchange accuracy for entertainment value. This course aims to "set the record straight" and deconstruct these medical dramas into the technical and non-technical skills involved in handling medical emergencies. Working in small groups and guided by emergency medicine faculty, students will actively curate content for discussions about the appropriate usage of these skills. Topics range from CPR and stroke management to decision making and the social influence of medial dramas. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Curtis, H. (PI)

EMED 210A: Managing Emergencies: What Every Doctor Should Know (Clinical Fundamentals)

Reviews basic but critical concepts in evaluating and managing patients with possible life-threatening emergencies with a special focus on avoiding common errors. Topics include cardiovascular collapse, basic airway management, triage and shock. Teaches skills such as reading an ECG or a chest x-ray to aid students in developing a rapid response to patients with potentially fatal complaints. Class meets online.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Walker, R. (PI)

EMED 210B: Managing Emergencies: What Every Doctor Should Know (High Risk Chief Complaints)

Students learn management of various emergent and traumatic patient presentations. Some topics include advanced airway, trauma, burns, poisoning, and stroke. Key skills and common pitfalls in practice discussed. Providers completing Surg 210A and B will be better prepared to respond effectively with a challenging and urgent case. Class meets online.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Walker, R. (PI)

EMED 211A: Emergency Medical Technician Training (EMED 111A)

Emergency Medical Technicians are trained to provide basic life support and to transport sick and injured patients to the hospital. Topics include patient assessment and management of cardiac, respiratory, neurological and other medical emergencies. Includes both lecture and practical sessions. After completion of the EMED 111 sequence and meeting all class requirements, students can sit for the National Registry EMT cognitive exam and obtain state certification as an EMT. We encourage freshman and sophomores to apply. (ONLY graduate students may enroll for 3 or 4 units with instructor permission). Prerequisites: Application (see http://emt.stanford.edu) and consent of instructor. AHA or Red Cross healthcare provider CPR certification is also required, but can be obtained during fall quarter. A one time course fee of $60 will be assessed to cover required equipment and a uniform shirt.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EMED 212A: Advanced Training and Teaching for the EMT **EMT REFRESHER** (EMED 112A)

EMED 112A/212A is a California and NREMT approved EMT refresher course which provides the equivalent of 24 hours of continuing education for recertification. Topics include both medical and traumatic emergencies as well as skills training. Students taking this course also serve as teaching assistants for EMED 111/211, the initial EMT training course. There will be one class activity on a Saturday or Sunday during the quarter, specific date will be announced during the first few weeks of class.nPrerequisites: Completion of an EMT certification course (such as EMED 111A-C), CPR for Healthcare Providers, and consent of instructor. See http://emt.stanford.edu for more details.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

EMED 214: Yoga and Wellness for Bioscience and Medical Students

The class will consist of one hour of beginner friendly yoga practice followed by one hour of discussion over a light meal. Students will learn and practice yoga techniques and health practices for managing mental and emotional stressors. Students will learn to identify signs and symptoms of stress, how anxiety manifests int he body and mind, and yoga techniques for relief. This course will include yoga instruction, readings related to yoga and bioscience research/patient care outcomes, and student participation to enable students to: (1) acquire knowledge of the basic health-related components of physical fitness and the different dimensions of wellness. (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Understand and practice the behaviors that contribute to a healthy lifestyle. MD and BioScience graduate students have priority for enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

EMED 215: Writing Narrative Medicine (EMED 115)

This course details and models the methods required for the practice of narrative medicine. Students will examine a variety of works, including poetry, short stories, memoirs, and other illness narratives. They will engage in reflective writing exercises that will allow them to draw on the reading material and practice elements of craft that relate to the text. Through this approach, they will build their close reading and reflective writing skills, while analyzing central themes in narrative medicine, including loss, identity, and the construction of personal history.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: ; Merritt, A. (PI)

EMED 220: Emergency Medicine: Introduction

An introduction to the specialty of emergency medicine, including the emergency stabilization of patients in both the pre-hospital phase and in the emergency department. The course will include both lectures and hands on practical sessions. Topics consist of management of trauma patients and common medical emergencies, with hands on sessions including how to manage airway emergencies, suturing and ultrasound. Course is great for students who are looking to explore emergency medicine more, medicine in general or just interested in learning important life-saving skills to use in their daily lives. 2 units includes two four-hour emergency department shadow shifts.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

EMED 225: The ED as a Safety Net

As the sole source of medical care and social services available 24/7 to all patients regardless of insurance status, ability to pay or even complaint, Emergency Departments (ED) are safety nets for local communities. EDs serve as a window into society and offer opportunities for intervention. The field of Social Emergency Medicine uses this unique position to investigate societal patterns of health inequity and develop solutions to decrease health disparities for vulnerable populations. This dinner seminar will explore psychosocial, economic, and medical factore that contribute to human health from the perspective of ED providers. Each session will cover a different topic of societal emergency medicine such as opioid use, human trafficking, firearms, and homelessness. Possible interventions will also be discussed including buprenorphine, screening, and identification tools, medical-legal partnerships, and legislative advocacy.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wang, N. (PI); Simko, L. (TA)

EMED 229: Pediatric Point of Care Ultrasound

Point of Care Ultrasound AND Pediatric specific Point of Care Ultrasound Course emphasizes a hands on approach to teaching the key points in using beside ultrasound taught by faculty and fellows of the Stanford department of emergency medicine ultrasound section. Each class will start with a short lecture reviewing a particular ultrasound exam, followed by a large amount of hands on scanning time focusing on acquiring high quality images. This course is an excellent adjunct to not only to anatomy , physiology , pathophysiology , but also enhancing physical exam skills while constructing a differential diagnosis. In addition to the general point of care ultrasound, we will introduce and review unique and specific applications related to the Pediatric population who are at higher risk of exposure to ionizing radiation. Course will cover the pediatric abdomen for diagnosis of pyloric stenosis, intussusception, appendicitis, lungs ,for diagnosis of pneumonia or pleural effusion and the pediatric hip exam for diagnosis of septic arthritis . By the end of the course, you will be familiar with the ultrasound skills needed to start using it at bedside in upcoming clinical rotations. The course is open to all Stanford medical students, PA students, and undergraduates.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

EMED 231: Peer Counseling for Medical Students

This course meets for 5 total sessions, and covers topics including compassionate listening, problem solving, understanding imposter syndromes, role of emotions in decision making, implicit bias training, professionalism, and ethics and boundaries. Students will engage in dedicated interactive sessions to prepare them for common scenarios and potential approaches for resolution. Faculty mentors from the Office of Medical Student Wellness, Counseling and Psychological Services staff at the Vaden Health Center, and Ear4Peer (E4P) upperclass student team leaders will collaborate each week to lead the sessions. Students will also receive training on campus resources and appropriate channels for referring peers to professional services. This course is a pre-requisite for students interested in becoming an E4P. Prerequisites: Must be a currently enrolled medical or PA student
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

EMED 255: Design for Health: Helping Patients Navigate the System (DESINST 255)

For many people, participating in the American healthcare system is confusing, frustrating and often disempowering. It is also an experience fueled with emotional intensity and feelings of vulnerability. The current ecosystem, with its complexity and multiple stakeholders, is rife with human-centered design opportunities. An especially sticky set of issues lies in the ways people navigate healthcare: understanding how the system works, accessing information about services, making decisions about treatment and interventions, and advocating for needs.nAdmission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EMED 280: Early Clinical Experience in Emergency Medicine

Provides an observational experience in an emergency medicine specialty. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades
Instructors: ; Albanese, C. (PI); Auerbach, P. (PI); Barrett, B. (PI); Bonham, C. (PI); Bresler, M. (PI); Bruzoni, M. (PI); Busque, S. (PI); Chang, J. (PI); Chase, R. (PI); Concepcion, W. (PI); Curtin, C. (PI); D'Souza, P. (PI); Dalman, R. (PI); Dannenberg, B. (PI); Dirbas, F. (PI); Duriseti, R. (PI); Dutta, S. (PI); Eisenberg, D. (PI); Emond, S. (PI); Esquivel, C. (PI); Ferguson, I. (PI); Fuchs, J. (PI); Garmel, G. (PI); Gharahbaghian, L. (PI); Gilbert, G. (PI); Girod, S. (PI); Gosling, J. (PI); Govindarajan, P. (PI); Greco, R. (PI); Gregg, D. (PI); Gurtner, G. (PI); Harris, E. (PI); Harter, P. (PI); Hartman, G. (PI); Helms, J. (PI); Hentz, R. (PI); Hernandez-Boussard, T. (PI); Jeffrey, S. (PI); Kahn, D. (PI); Khosla, R. (PI); Klofas, E. (PI); Krams, S. (PI); Krummel, T. (PI); Lau, J. (PI); Lee, G. (PI); Lee, J. (PI); Leeper, N. (PI); Lin, J. (PI); Lipman, G. (PI); Longaker, M. (PI); Lorenz, H. (PI); Maggio, P. (PI); Mahadevan, S. (PI); Martinez, O. (PI); Melcher, M. (PI); Mell, M. (PI); Morton, J. (PI); Mueller, C. (PI); Murphy, K. (PI); Norris, R. (PI); Norton, J. (PI); Oberhelman, H. (PI); Perera, P. (PI); Poultsides, G. (PI); Quinn, J. (PI); Raphael, E. (PI); Rhoads, K. (PI); Rivas, H. (PI); Ryan, J. (PI); Salvatierra, O. (PI); Schendel, S. (PI); Schreiber, D. (PI); Shelton, A. (PI); Shen, S. (PI); Smith-Coggins, R. (PI); So, S. (PI); Spain, D. (PI); Srivastava, S. (PI); Staudenmayer, K. (PI); Sternbach, G. (PI); Strehlow, M. (PI); Sylvester, K. (PI); Taleghani, N. (PI); Trounce, M. (PI); Visser, B. (PI); Wan, D. (PI); Wang, N. (PI); Wapnir, I. (PI); Weiss, E. (PI); Welton, M. (PI); Whitmore, I. (PI); Williams, S. (PI); Wren, S. (PI); Yang, G. (PI); Yang, S. (PI); Zafren, K. (PI); Zarins, C. (PI); Zhou, W. (PI)

EMED 299: Directed Reading in Emergency Medicine

Consists of Emergency Medicine focused studies and projects (including Research Projects) in progress. Possible topics include management of trauma patients, common medical and surgical emergencies in pediatric and adult populations, topics in disaster medicine, biosecurity and bioterrorism response, wilderness medicine, international medicine, and others. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

EMED 308A: Bedside Ultrasound Clerkship

Open to visitors. Diagnostic bedside ultrasound (US) has become increasingly utilized and useful in multiple medical specialties, with emergency medicine in the forefront of its use. This rotation is designed to introduce bedside ultrasound to the clinical medical student, and provide more in-depth and hands-on familiarity with bedside US for a variety of modalities. These skills will better equip students to use these techniques right at the bedside of any patient in the emergency room or on the floors with greater facility and confidence. It will enhance patient diagnosis and management, procedural guidance, and patient satisfaction. It may even save a life! Primary emphasis will be on developing competent technical skills to enhance image acquisition and interpretation. The applications as defined by the American College of Emergency Medicine will be the main focus. A goal for a minimum number of ultrasound scans will be 25 per application including, eFAST, thoracic, renal, RUQ, aorta, limited ECHO and IVC, first trimester pelvic, DVT, orbital, MSK. Other advanced ultrasound applications will also be introduced (Testicular, airway, bladder, nerve blocks). Students will obtain US images in the Stanford emergency department and will have all imaging formally reviewed by an US fellowship trained emergency medicine faculty. Images will be obtained during work shifts, when one of the US EM faculty are working in the ED, during when students will scan appropriate patients and review images with the faculty member onsite. They will also have scan shifts, when an US EM faculty will teach/scan with the student in the emergency department, this is a 1:1 session. Students will attend Bedside US didactics offered by an US EM faculty member every Thursday morning, followed by 4 hours of QA review of Ultrasound scans performed in the ED. Students will have access and be expected to participate in online and computer based learning that will be provided for them as well. A multiple choice test will be given at the end of the rotation. This clerkship requires prior approval by Clerkship Director. Please contact Dr. Deborah Kimball at drdeb@stanford.edu if interested in taking the clerkship. Prereq: Complete pre-clinical training. Periods Avail: 3-12 for 2 or 4 weeks. 2 students per period. Reporting Instructions: Where: TBA; Time: 8:00 am. Units: 3 or 6. Call Code: 0.Director: Deborah Kimball, M.D. Other Faculty: K. Anderson, L. Gharahbaghian, V. Lobo, P. Perera, C. Poffenberger, and S. Williams. nCoord: Hienock Habte (650-736-8842), habte@stanford.edu (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

EMED 313A: Emergency Medicine Clerkship

Selective 1. Open to visitors. Overall Description: During this 4-week, multi-site selective, medical students will develop critical skills in the rapid evaluation and management of undifferentiated and acutely ill patients in three unique emergency department settings: Stanford University Medical Center (SUMC), Santa Clara Valley Medical Center (SCVMC), and the Kaiser Permanente Santa Clara Medical Center (KPMC). At each of these sites, rotators will work directly with an emergency medicine attending. With this high level of mentorship and guidance, learners will gain confidence assessing and resuscitating the incredible spectrum of patients presenting at each of the three clinical sites. Clinical Duties: Students will work thirteen 8-hour clinical shifts (7 at SUMC, 3 at SCVMC, 3 at KPMC) during the rotation. Rotators will have the opportunity to play an integral role on the care team, learning to take full responsibility in ensuring their patients receive high quality emergency care. Students will lead the initial assessment of each patient, performing complaint-directed history and physical exam, developing a focused differential diagnosis, and then designing and implementing a targeted care plan with input and support from the attending physician. Students will also learn essential communication skills, acting as the primary contact between the care team, patients, patient¿s families, consultants and hospital staff. Educational Curriculum: Throughout the rotation, students will have access to a number of supporting educational events outside of the emergency department. Students will attend weekly core curriculum conference with the Stanford/Kaiser Emergency Medicine residents, as well as a monthly journal club. Rotators will also have dedicated, student oriented educational sessions focused on bedside ultrasound, laceration repair, orthopedic injury management, and ECG interpretation, as well as a series of interactive, faculty-led, case discussions. The rotation culminates in a final written exam and an immersive, student-only simulation session held at Stanford¿s innovative Center for Immersive and Simulation Based Learning. Stanford students who want to do a clinical based rotation at Stanford site during Periods 7-11, please contact coordinator at malfonso@stanford.edu to coordinate enrollment in Emed 398A. Visiting students ONLY accepted periods 12-6, pre-approval is required only for visiting students for periods 12-6. Pre-approval dates are as follows: Periods 1-3 (March 19-23), Period 4-6 (June 19-23), and Period 12 (December 1-5). Please contact clerkship coordinator Maria Alfonso (malfonso@stanford.edu) to inquire about pre approval process and materials needed for submission. Prereq: All students must have completed core clerkships in medicine, surgery, Ob/Gyn and pediatrics are required. Stanford medical students must also have completed MED 313A. Exceptions only at the discretion of the clerkship director, on a case by cases basis. nPeriods Avail: Periods 12-6 only. Closed Periods 7-11. Full-time for four weeks. Visiting students and Stanford students accepted periods 12-6 only. Maximum 12 students per period. No adjustments in dates. No students may be added less than three weeks prior to start of each rotation. Reporting Instructions: Where: 900 Welch Road Suite 350; Time: Coordinator will email details one week prior to the first day of the rotation block. Students are responsible for their own transportation to and from the 3 different sites. Units: 6. Call Code: 2 (No call, but a mixture of at least 3 overnights and/or weekend shifts during the EMED block) Director: Jessica Ngo, M.D. at jngo@stanford.edu, Gregory Gilbert, M.D. at ghgilbert@stanford.edu, and Nounou Taleghani, M.D. at nounou@stanford.edu. Other Faculty: Emergency Dept Faculty. Coord: Maria Alfonso (650-497-6702), malfonso@stanford.edu (SUMC, SCVMC, KPMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

EMED 313D: Emergency Medicine Clerkship

Selective 1. Closed to visitors. This rotation focuses on the clinical practice of Emergency Medicine. The 4 week rotation consists of 14 clinical shifts in the emergency department. There are no required supplemental didactic sessions. Orientation will occur on the first day of the rotation in the Kaiser GME office (Dept. 384 MOB, Susan Krause). Please arrive at 0900 on Monday morning in the GME office for paperwork and photo ID, unless otherwise notified. An orientation video and a copy of ¿An Introduction to Clinical Emergency Medicine, Mahadevan/Garmel¿, will be provided by the GME office for use during the rotation. Faculty will orient medical students to the Emergency Department after your meeting in the GME office. Clinical shifts will consist of approximately 14 8-10 hour shifts, which will be a mix of daytime, evening, overnight, and weekend shifts. Students will usually work 1:1 with an EM attending to maximize learning. Each patient seen by the student is presented to an EM attending staff physician. Students should present each patient upon completing history and physical examination in a timely fashion. EM residents will give daily informal lectures at 4pm, which students are encouraged to attend when on shift. nPrereq: Surgery 300A, Medicine 300A, Obstetrics & Gynecology 300A and Pediatric 300A, passing score USMLE I (and II if taken) on first attempt. For visiting students, core clerkships must be completed with passing grades in Internal Medicine, Surgery, Pediatrics, and OB/GYN. nPeriods Avail: Periods 7-11 only. Stanford students only. Full-time for four weeks. 2 students per period. No students may be added less than three weeks prior to the start of each rotation. nReporting Instructions: Where: Kaiser Permanente Medical Center Emergency Department, Santa Clara, CA; Time: TBA. Prior to first shift - report to GME office, Homestead Medical Office Building at 710 Lawrence Expressway, Dept 384. Units: 6. Call Code: 2. Director: Alice Chao, M.D. Other Faculty: Staff. Coord: Susan Krause (408-851-3836) 710 Lawrence Expressway, Dept 384, Santa Clara. (KPMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

EMED 370: Medical Scholars Research

Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

EMED 398A: CLINICAL ELECTIVE IN EMERGENCY MEDICINE

Open to visitors. Provides an opportunity for a student in the clinical years to have an individualized clinical experience in one of the fields of Emergency Medicine. The quality and duration of the elective will be decided by both the student and a faculty preceptor in the Department of Emergency Medicine. Please note: Students cannot add 398A clerkships directly to their fishbowl schedules through the regular shuffles. Please contact Caroline Cheang in the Office of Medical Student Affairs at cheang@stanford.edu or 650-498-7619 with the faculty preceptor¿s name and email address to add this clerkship. Prereq: Core clerkships in medicine, surgery and pediatrics. Passing score USMLE I (and II if taken) on first attempt. Periods Avail: Periods 1-12 only. This clerkship does not take International visiting students. 6 students per period. Pre-approval is required for visiting students only from the department before formal application submission. Please send your CV and Cover Letter to Maria Alfonso (malfonso@stanford.edu). Pre-approval dates are as follows: Periods 7-9 ( August 1-5), Periods 10-12 (October 1-5). No students may be added less than three weeks prior to start of each rotation. Reporting Instructions: Where: TBA (designated faculty preceptor); Time: TBA Units: 1. Call Code: 0. Director: Jessica Ngo, M.D. at jngo@stanford.edu. nOther Faculty: Emergency Medicine Dept Faculty. Coord: Maria Alfonso (650-497-6702), malfonso@stanford.edu (SUMC)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

EMED 398W: Clinical Elective in Emergency Medicine

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical School MD Grades

EMED 399: Graduated Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Quinn, J. (PI); Yang, S. (PI)
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints