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EE 116: Semiconductor Devices for Energy and Electronics

The underpinnings of modern technology are the transistor (circuits), the capacitor (memory), and the solar cell (energy). EE 116 introduces the physics of their operation, their historical origins (including Nobel prize breakthroughs), and how they can be optimized for future applications. The class covers physical principles of semiconductors, including silicon and new material discoveries, quantum effects, band theory, operating principles, and device equations. Recommended (but not required) co-requisite: EE 65 or equivalent.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 237: Solar Energy Conversion

This course will be an introduction to solar photovoltaics. No prior photovoltaics knowledge is required. Class lectures will be supplemented by guest lectures from distinguished engineers, entrepreneurs and venture capitalists actively engaged in solar industry. Past guest speakers include Richard Swanson (CEO, SunPower), Benjamin Cook (Managing Partner at NextPower Capital) and Shahin Farshchi (Partner, Lux Capital). Topics Include: Economics of solar energy. Solar energy policy. Solar cell device physics: electrical and optical. Different generations of photovoltaic technology: crystalline silicon, thin film, multi-junction solar cells. Perovskite and silicon tandem cells. Advanced energy conversion concepts like photon up-conversion, quantum dot solar cells. Solar system issues including module assembly, inverters, micro-inverters and microgrid. No prior photovoltaics knowledge is required. Recommended: EE116, EE216 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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