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EE 11SC: Dream It, Build It!

The world is filled with electronic devices! There seem to be more and more all the time. Wouldn't it be cool to hack and build stuff? Bend electronics to your will? Cloud connect your own stuff? Dream It, Build It is a great place to start. Designed for folks with no experience, it will take you from zero to capable in short order. We will show you some of the worst kept secrets of how things are built and help you build stuff of your own. We'll start out with some basics about how to build things, how to measure things, how to hook stuff together and end up being able to make cloud-connected gizmos. [This is a SOPHOMORE COLLEGE course. Visit soco.stanford.edu for full details.]
Terms: Sum | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Clark, S. (PI); Pauly, J. (PI)

EE 21N: What is Nanotechnology?

Nanotechnology is an often used word and it means many things to different people. Scientists and Engineers have some notion of what nanotechnology is, societal perception may be entirely different. In this course, we start with the classic paper by Richard Feynman ("There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom"), which laid down the challenge to the nanotechnologists. Then we discuss two classic books that offer a glimpse of what nanotechnology is: Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology by Eric Drexler, and Prey by Michael Crichton. Drexler's thesis sparked the imagination of what nano machinery might do, whereas Crichton's popular novel channeled the public's attention to this subject by portraying a disastrous scenario of a technology gone astray. We will use the scientific knowledge to analyze the assumptions and predictions of these classic works. We will draw upon the latest research advances to illustrate the possibilities and impossibilities of nanotechnology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Wong, H. (PI)

EE 65: Modern Physics for Engineers

This course introduces the core ideas of modern physics that enable applications ranging from solar energy and efficient lighting to the modern electronic and optical devices and nanotechnologies that sense, process, store, communicate and display all our information. Though the ideas have broad impact, the course is widely accessible to engineering and science students with only basic linear algebra and calculus through simple ordinary differential equations as mathematics background. Topics include the quantum mechanics of electrons and photons (Schrödinger's equation, atoms, electrons, energy levels and energy bands; absorption and emission of photons; quantum confinement in nanostructures), the statistical mechanics of particles (entropy, the Boltzmann factor, thermal distributions), the thermodynamics of light (thermal radiation, limits to light concentration, spontaneous and stimulated emission), and the physics of information (Maxwell¿s demon, reversibility, entropy and noise in physics and information theory). Pre-requisite: Physics 41. Pre- or co-requisite: Math 53 or CME 102.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Miller, D. (PI)

EE 101B: Circuits II

Continuation of EE101A. Introduction to circuit design for modern electronic systems. Modeling and analysis of analog gain stages, frequency response, feedback. Filtering and analog¿to¿digital conversion. Fundamentals of circuit simulation. Prerequisites: EE101A, EE102A. Recommended: CME102.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 102B: Signal Processing and Linear Systems II

Continuation of EE 102A. Concepts and tools for continuous- and discrete-time signal and system analysis with applications in communications, signal processing and control. Analog and digital modulation and demodulation. Sampling, reconstruction, decimation and interpolation. Finite impulse response filter design. Discrete Fourier transforms, applications in convolution and spectral analysis. Laplace transforms, applications in circuits and feedback control. Z transforms, applications in infinite impulse response filter design. Prerequisite: EE 102A.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Goldsmith, A. (PI)

EE 103: Introduction to Matrix Methods (CME 103)

Introduction to applied linear algebra with emphasis on applications. Vectors, norm, and angle; linear independence and orthonormal sets; applications to document analysis. Clustering and the k-means algorithm. Matrices, left and right inverses, QR factorization. Least-squares and model fitting, regularization and cross-validation. Constrained and nonlinear least-squares. Applications include time-series prediction, tomography, optimal control, and portfolio optimization. Undergraduate students should enroll for 5 units, and graduate students should enroll for 3 units. Prerequisites:MATH 51 or CME 100, and basic knowledge of computing (CS 106A is more than enough, and can be taken concurrently). EE103/CME103 and Math 104 cover complementary topics in applied linear algebra. The focus of EE103 is on a few linear algebra concepts, and many applications; the focus of Math 104 is on algorithms and concepts.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 104: Introduction to Machine Learning

Introduction to machine learning. Formulation of supervised and unsupervised learning problems. Regression and classification. Data standardization and feature engineering. Loss function selection and its effect on learning. Regularization and its role in controlling complexity. Validation and overfitting. Robustness to outliers. Simple numerical implementation. Experiments on data from a wide variety of engineering and other disciplines. Undergraduate students should enroll for 5 units, and graduate students should enroll for 3 units. Prerequisites: EE 103; EE 178 or CS 109; CS106A or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lall, S. (PI)

EE 109: Digital Systems Design Lab

The design of integrated digital systems encompassing both customized software and hardware. Software/hardware design tradeoffs. Algorithm design for pipelining and parallelism. System latency and throughput tradeoffs. FPGA optimization techniques. Integration with external systems and smart devices. Firmware configuration and embedded system considerations. Enrollment limited to 25; preference to graduating seniors. Prerequisites: 108B, and CS 106B or X.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Olukotun, O. (PI)

EE 116: Semiconductor Devices for Energy and Electronics

The underpinnings of modern technology are the transistor (circuits), the capacitor (memory), and the solar cell (energy). EE 116 introduces the physics of their operation, their historical origins (including Nobel prize breakthroughs), and how they can be optimized for future applications. The class covers physical principles of semiconductors, including silicon and new material discoveries, quantum effects, band theory, operating principles, and device equations. Recommended (but not required) co-requisite: EE 65 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pop, E. (PI)

EE 142: Engineering Electromagnetics

Introduction to electromagnetism and Maxwell's equations in static and dynamic regimes. Electrostatics and magnetostatics: Gauss's, Coulomb's, Faraday's, Ampere's, Biot-Savart's laws. Electric and magnetic potentials. Boundary conditions. Electric and magnetic field energy. Electrodynamics: Wave equation; Electromagnetic waves; Phasor form of Maxwell's equations.nSolution of the wave equation in 1D free space: Wavelength, wave-vector, forward and backward propagating plane waves.Poynting's theorem. Propagation in lossy media, skin depth. Reflection and refraction at planar boundaries, total internal reflection. Solutions of wave equation for various 1D-3D problems: Electromagnetic resonators, waveguides periodic media, transmission lines. Formerly EE 141. Pre-requisites: Phys 43 or EE 42, CME 100, CME 102
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fan, J. (PI)

EE 178: Probabilistic Systems Analysis

Introduction to probability and statistics and their role in modeling and analyzing real world phenomena. Events, sample space, and probability. Discrete random variables, probability mass functions, independence and conditional probability, expectation and conditional expectation. Continuous random variables, probability density functions, independence and expectation, derived densities. Transforms, moments, sums of independent random variables. Simple random processes. Limit theorems. Introduction to statistics: significance, estimation and detection. Prerequisites: basic calculus.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 180: Digital Systems Architecture

The design of processor-based digital systems. Instruction sets, addressing modes, data types. Assembly language programming, low-level data structures, introduction to operating systems and compilers. Processor microarchitecture, microprogramming, pipelining. Memory systems and caches. Input/output, interrupts, buses and DMA. System design implementation alternatives, software/hardware tradeoffs. Labs involve the design of processor subsystems and processor-based embedded systems. Formerly EE 108B. Prerequisite: CS107 (required) and EE108 (recommended but not required).
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kozyrakis, C. (PI)

EE 185: Interactive Light Sculpture Project

Design, prototype, build, refine, program, and install a large interactive light sculpture in the Packard Building to celebrate the 125th anniversary of the EE department. Students may take the course for 1, 2, or 3 quarters; each quarter focuses on a different phase of the project. Topics covered include energy budgeting, communication, enclosure design, scalability, timing, circuit design, structural design, and safety. Prerequisite: ENGR 40M, or an introductory EE or CS course in circuits or programming.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 190: Special Studies or Projects in Electrical Engineering

Independent work under the direction of a faculty member. Individual or team activities involve lab experimentation, design of devices or systems, or directed reading. Course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EE 191: Special Studies and Reports in Electrical Engineering

Independent work under the direction of a faculty member given for a letter grade only. If a letter grade given on the basis of required written report or examination is not appropriate, enroll in 190. Course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EE 191A: Special Studies and Reports in Electrical Engineering

EE191A is part of the Accelerated Calculus for Engineers program. Independent work under the direction of a faculty member given for a letter grade only. EE 191A counts as a Math one unit seminar course: it is this unit that constitutes the ACE program.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EE 191W: Special Studies and Reports in Electrical Engineering (WIM)

WIM-version of EE 191. For EE students using special studiesn(e.g., honors project, independent research project) to satisfy thenwriting-in-major requirement. A written report that has gone through revision with an advisor is required. An advisor from the Writing Center is recommended.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-10 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EE 195: Electrical Engineering Instruction

Students receive training from faculty or graduate student mentors to prepare them to assist in instruction of Electrical Engineering courses. The specific training and units of credit received are to be defined in consultation with one of the official instructors of EE 195. Note that University regulations prohibit students from being paid for the training while receiving academic credit for it. Enrollment limited.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EE 207: Neuromorphics: Brains in Silicon (BIOE 313)

(Formerly EE 304) Neuromorphic systems run perceptual, cognitive and motor tasks in real-time on a network of highly interconnected nonlinear units. To maximize density and minimize energy, these units--like the brain's neurons--are heterogeneous and stochastic. The first half of the course covers learning algorithms that automatically synthesize network configurations to perform a desired computation on a given heterogeneous neural substrate. The second half of the course surveys system-on-a-chip architectures that efficiently realize highly interconnected networks and mixed analog-digital circuit designs that implement area and energy-efficient nonlinear units. Prerequisites: EE102A is required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Boahen, K. (PI)

EE 235: Analytical Methods in Biotechnology

This course provides fundamental principles underlying important analytical techniques used in modern biotechnology. The course comprises of lectures and hands-on laboratory experiments. Students will learn the core principles for designing, implementing and analyzing central experimental methods including polymerase chain reaction (PCR), electrophoresis, immunoassays, and high-throughput sequencing. The overall goal of the course is to enable engineering students with little or no background in molecular biology to transition into research in the field of biomedicine.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Gould, T. (PI); Soh, H. (PI)

EE 236C: Lasers

Atomic systems, spontaneous emission, stimulated emission, amplification. Three- and four-level systems, rate equations, pumping schemes. Laser principles, conditions for steady-state oscillation. Transverse and longitudinal mode control and tuning. Exemplary laser systems: gas (HeNe), solid state (Nd:YAG, Ti:sapphire) and semiconductors. Elements of laser dynamics and noise. Formerly EE231. Prerequisites: EE 236B and familiarity with modern physics and semiconductor physics. Recommended: EE 216 and EE 223 (either may be taken concurrently).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Heinz, T. (PI)

EE 237: Solar Energy Conversion

This course will be an introduction to solar photovoltaics. Basics of solar energy conversion in photovoltaic devices. Economics of solar energy. Solar cell device physics: electrical and optical. Different generations of photovoltaic technology: crystalline silicon, thin film, multi-junction solar cells. Perovskite and silicon tandem cells. Advanced energy conversion concepts like photon up-conversion, quantum dot solar cells. Solar system issues including module assembly, inverters, and micro-inverters. Guest speakers include distinguished engineers, entrepreneurs and venture capitalists actively engaged in solar industry. No prior photovoltaics knowledge is required. Recommended: EE116, EE216 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Saraswat, K. (PI)

EE 238: Introduction to Fourier Optics

Fourier analysis applied to optical imaging. Theoretical topics include Fourier transform and angular spectrum to describe diffraction, Fourier transforming properties of lenses, image formation with coherent and incoherent light and aberrations. Application topics will cover image deconvolution/reconstruction, amplitude and phase pupil engineering, computational adaptive optics, and others motivated by student interest. Prerequisites: familiarity with Fourier transform and analysis, EE 102 and EE 142 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dubra, A. (PI)

EE 254: Advanced Topics in Power Electronics

In this course, we will study the practical issues related to the practical design of power electronic converters. We will also explore the trade-offs involved in selecting among the different circuits used to convert ac to dc, dc to ac and back to dc over a wide range of power levels suitable for different applications. In Advanced Topics in Power Electronic, as a multidisciplinary field, we will discuss power electronics circuits, extraction of transfer functions in Continuous and discontinuous conduction mode, voltage and current control of power converters, design of input/output filters to meet Electro Magnetic Interference specifications, layout of power electronics circuits and put this knowledge in a very practical context. Prerequisites: EE 153/253.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rivas-Davila, J. (PI)

EE 267: Virtual Reality

OpenGL, real-time rendering, 3D display systems, display optics & electronics, IMUs and sensors, tracking, haptics, rendering pipeline, multimodal human perception and depth perception, stereo rendering, presence. Emphasis on VR technology. Hands-on programming assignments. The 3-unit version requires a final programming assignment in which you create your own virtual environment. The 4-unit version requires a final course project and written report in lieu of the final assignment. Prerequisites: Strong programming skills, EE 103 or equivalent. Helpful: basic computer graphics / OpenGL.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wetzstein, G. (PI)

EE 267W: Virtual Reality (WIM)

Writing in the Major (WIM) version of the 4-unit EE 267 theory + lab/project course. This course also meets the EE design requirement. Topics include: OpenGL, real-time rendering, 3D display systems, display optics & electronics, IMUs and sensors, tracking, haptics, rendering pipeline, multimodal human perception and depth perception, stereo rendering, presence. Emphasis on VR technology. Hands-on programming assignments. The 5-unit WIM version requires everything the 4-unit version does, i.e. a final course project and written report in lieu of the final assignment. The 5-unit WIM version additional requires participation in 2 writing in the major workshops, and weekly writing assignments. Prerequisites: Strong programming skills, EE 103 or equivalent. Helpful: basic computer graphics / OpenGL.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wetzstein, G. (PI)

EE 284A: Introduction to Internet of Things

Internet of Things (IoT) origin, vision and definition. Application domains, use case scenarios and value propositions. Functional blocks of IoT systems: devices, communications, services, management, security, and application. Architectural reference model and design methodology. IoT Devices: sensors, actuators and embedded systems. Communications aspects of IoT systems: Internet infrastructure; wireless local area networks; radio access networks; wireless personal area networks; wireless sensor networks; wireless communication in vehicular environments; 5G. Current IoT frameworks and underlying architectures. Data storage and analytics. Web services. IoT system management tools. Security aspects of IoT systems. Open issues.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tobagi, F. (PI)

EE 290A: Curricular Practical Training for Electrical Engineers

For EE majors who need work experience as part of their program of study. Final report required. Prerequisites: for 290B, EE MS and PhD students who have received a Satisfactory ("S") grade in EE290A; for 290C, EE PhD degree candidacy and an "S" grade in EE 290B; for 290D, EE PhD degree candidacy, an "S" grade in EE 290C and instructor consent.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tobagi, F. (PI)

EE 290B: Curricular Practical Training for Electrical Engineers

For EE majors who need work experience as part of their program of study. Final report required. Prerequisites: for 290B, EE MS and PhD students who have received a Satisfactory ("S") grade in EE290A; for 290C, EE PhD degree candidacy and an "S" grade in EE 290B; for 290D, EE PhD degree candidacy, an "S" grade in EE 290C and instructor consent.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tobagi, F. (PI)

EE 290C: Curricular Practical Training for Electrical Engineers

For EE majors who need work experience as part of their program of study. Final report required. Prerequisites: for 290B, EE MS and PhD students who have received a Satisfactory ("S") grade in EE290A; for 290C, EE PhD degree candidacy and an "S" grade in EE 290B; for 290D, EE PhD degree candidacy, an "S" grade in EE 290C and instructor consent.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tobagi, F. (PI)

EE 290D: Curricular Practical Training for Electrical Engineers

For EE majors who need work experience as part of their program of study. Final report required. Prerequisites: for 290B, EE MS and PhD students who have received a Satisfactory ("S") grade in EE290A; for 290C, EE PhD degree candidacy and an "S" grade in EE 290B; for 290D, EE PhD degree candidacy, an "S" grade in EE 290C and instructor consent.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tobagi, F. (PI)

EE 290E: Curricular Practical Training for Electrical Engineers

For EE majors who need work experience as part of their program of study. Final report required. Prerequisites: for 290B, EE MS and PhD students who have received a Satisfactory ("S") grade in EE290A; for 290C, EE PhD degree candidacy and an "S" grade in EE 290B; for 290D, EE PhD degree candidacy, an "S" grade in EE 290C and instructor consent; for 290E, EE PhD degree candidacy, an "S" grade in EE 290D and instructor consent.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tobagi, F. (PI)

EE 290F: Curricular Practical Training for Electrical Engineers

For EE majors who need work experience as part of their program of study. Final report required. Prerequisites: EE PhD degree candidacy, an "S" grade in EE 290E and instructor consent.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tobagi, F. (PI)

EE 290G: Curricular Practical Training for Electrical Engineers

For EE majors who need work experience as part of their program of study. Final report required. Prerequisites: EE PhD degree candidacy, an "S" grade in EE 290F and instructor consent.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tobagi, F. (PI)

EE 292A: Electronic Design Automation (EDA) and Machine Learning Hardware

The class teaches cutting-edge optimization and analysis algorithms for the design of complex digital integrated circuits and their use in designing machine learning hardware. It provides working knowledge of the key technologies in Electronic Design Automation (EDA), focusing on synthesis, placement and routing algorithms that perform the major transformations between levels of abstraction and get a design ready to be fabricated. As an example, the design of a convolutional neural network (CNN) for basic image recognition illustrates the interaction between hardware and software for machine learning. It will be implemented on a state-of-the-art FPGA board. Prerequisite: EE 108.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 292C: Chemical Vapor Deposition and Epitaxy for Integrated Circuits and Nanostructures

Fundamental aspects of CVD are initially considered, first focusing on processes occurring in the gas phase and then on those occurring on the surface. Qualitative understanding is emphasized, with minimal use of equations. Adding energy both thermally and by using a plasma is discussed; atomic-layer deposition is briefly considered. Examples of CVD equipment are examined. The second portion of the tutorial examines layers deposited by CVD. The focus is on group IV semiconductors ¿ especially epitaxial and heteroepitaxial deposition, in which the crystal structure of the depositing layer is related to that of the substrate. Polycrystalline silicon and the IC interconnect system are then discussed. Finally, the use of high-density plasmas for rapid gap filling is contrasted with alternative CVD dielectric deposition processes.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kamins, T. (PI)

EE 292E: Seminar Series for Image Systems Engineering

Seminar. For engineering students interested in camera and display engineering, computer vision, and computational imaging. Speakers include Stanford faculty and research scientists as well as industry professionals, mostly from consumer electronics companies.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EE 292I: Insanely Great Products: How do they get built?

Great products emerge from a sometimes conflict-laden process of collaboration between different functions within companies. This Seminar seeks to demystify this process via case-studies of successful products and companies. Engineering management and businesspeople will share their experiences in discussion with students. Previous companies profiled: Apple, Intel, Facebook, and Genentech -- to name a few. Previous guests include: Jon Rubinstein (NeXT, Apple, Palm), Diane Greene (VMware), and Ted Hoff (Intel). Pre-requisites: None
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Obershaw, D. (PI)

EE 292T: SmartGrids and Advanced Power Systems Seminar (CEE 272T)

A series of seminar and lectures focused on power engineering. Renowned researchers from universities and national labs will deliver bi-weekly seminars on the state of the art of power system engineering. Seminar topics may include: power system analysis and simulation, control and stability, new market mechanisms, computation challenges and solutions, detection and estimation, and the role of communications in the grid. The instructors will cover relevant background materials in the in-between weeks. The seminars are planned to continue throughout the next academic year, so the course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rajagopal, R. (PI)

EE 293: Energy storage and conversion: Solar Cells, Fuel Cells, Batteries and Supercapacitors (ENERGY 293)

This course provides an introduction and engineering exposure to energy storage and conversion systems and will cover the basic physics, chemistry and electrochemistry of solar cells, fuel cells, batteries and supercapacitors, state of the art of such technologies and recent developments. The course will also cover experimental methods and modeling tools for simulation and optimization aimed at characterizing efficiency and performance issues. Prerequisites: Equivalent coursework in thermodynamics, electronic properties, chemical principles, electricity, and magnetism.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Onori, S. (PI)

EE 300: Master's Thesis and Thesis Research

Independent work under the direction of a department faculty. Written thesis required for final letter grade. The continuing grade 'N' is given in quarters prior to thesis submission. See 390 if a letter grade is not appropriate. Course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EE 303: Autonomous Implantable Systems

Integrating electronics with sensing, stimulation, and locomotion capabilities into the body will allow us to restore or enhance physiological functions. In order to be able to insert these electronics into the body, energy source is a major obstacle. This course focuses on the analysis and design of wirelessly powered catheter-deliverable electronics. Emphases will be on the interaction between human and electromagnetic fields in order to transfer power to the embedded electronics via electromagnetic fields, power harvesting circuitry, electrical-tissue interface, and sensing and actuating frontend designs. Prerequisites: EE 252 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Poon, A. (PI)

EE 310: SystemX: Ubiquitous Sensing, Computing and Communication Seminar

This is a seminar course with invited speakers. Sponsored by Stanford's SystemX Alliance, the talks will cover emerging topics in contemporary hardware/software systems design. Special focus will be given to the key building blocks of sensors, processing elements and wired/wireless communications, as well as their foundations in semiconductor technology, SoC construction, and physical assembly as informed by the SystemX Focus Areas. The seminar will draw upon distinguished engineering speakers from both industry and academia who are involved at all levels of the technology stack and the applications that are now becoming possible. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Candelaria, J. (PI)

EE 311: Advanced Integrated Circuits Technology

What are the practical and fundamental limits to the evolution of the technology of modern MOS devices and interconnects? How are modern devices and circuits fabricated and what future changes are likely? Advanced techniques and models of MOS devices and back-end (interconnect and contact) processing. What are future device structures and materials to maintain progress in integrated electronics? MOS front-end and back-end process integration. Prerequisites: EE 216 or equivalent. Recommended: EE 212.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 317: Special Topics on Wide Bandgap Materials and Devices

Wide-bandgap (WBG) semiconductors present a pathway to push the limits of efficiency in optoelectronics and electronics enabling significant energy savings, offering new and compact architecture, and more functionality. We will first study the examples set by GaN and SiC in lighting, radiofrequency and power applications, then use it to explore new materials like Ga2O3, AlN and diamond to understand their potential to drive the future semiconductor industry. The term papers will include a short project that may require simulation to conduct device design and analysis. Prerequisites: EE 216 or EE 218
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Chowdhury, S. (PI)

EE 340: Optical Micro- and Nano-Cavities

Optical micro- and nano-cavities and their device applications. Types of optical cavities (microdisks, microspheres, photonic crystal cavities, plasmonic cavities), and their electromagnetic properties, design, and fabrication techniques. Cavity quantum electrodynamics: strong and weak-coupling regime, Purcell factor, spontaneous emission control. Applications of optical cavities, including low-threshold lasers, optical modulators, quantum information processing devices, and bio-chemical sensors. Prerequisites: Advanced undergraduate or basic graduate level knowledge of electromagnetics, quantum.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Vuckovic, J. (PI)

EE 348: Advanced Optical Fiber Communications

Optical amplifiers: gain, saturation, noise. Semiconductor amplifiers. Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers. System applications: preamplified receiver performance, amplifier chains. Raman amplifiers, lumped vs. distributed amplification. Group-velocity dispersion management: dispersion-compensating fibers, filters, gratings. Interaction of dispersion and nonlinearity, dispersion maps. Multichannel systems. Wavelength-division multiplexing components: filters, multiplexers. WDM systems, crosstalk. Time, subcarrier, code and polarization-division multiplexing. Comparison of modulation techniques: differential phase-shift keying, phase-shift keying, quadrature-amplitude modulation. Comparison of detection techniques: noncoherent, differentially coherent, coherent. Prerequisite: 247.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kahn, J. (PI)

EE 364B: Convex Optimization II (CME 364B)

Continuation of 364A. Subgradient, cutting-plane, and ellipsoid methods. Decentralized convex optimization via primal and dual decomposition. Monotone operators and proximal methods; alternating direction method of multipliers. Exploiting problem structure in implementation. Convex relaxations of hard problems. Global optimization via branch and bound. Robust and stochastic optimization. Applications in areas such as control, circuit design, signal processing, and communications. Course requirements include project. Prerequisite: 364A.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pilanci, M. (PI)

EE 371: Advanced VLSI Circuit Design

Design of high-performance digital systems, the things that cause them to fail, and how to avoid these problems. Topics will focus on current issues including: wiring resistance and how to deal with it, power and Gnd noise and regulation, clock (or asynchronous) system design and how to minimize clocking overhead, high-speed I/O design, energy minimization including leakage control, and structuring your Verilog code to result in high-performance, low energy systems. Extensive use of modern CAD tools. Prerequisites: EE 213 and EE 271, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Raina, P. (PI)

EE 373A: Adaptive Signal Processing

Learning algorithms for adaptive digital filters. Self-optimization. Wiener filter theory. Quadratic performance functions, their eigenvectors and eigenvalues. Speed of convergence. Asymptotic performance versus convergence rate. Applications of adaptive filters to statistical prediction, process modeling, adaptive noise canceling, adaptive antenna arrays, adaptive inverse control, and equalization and echo canceling in modems. Artificial neural networks. Cognitive memory/human and machine. Natural and artificial synapses. Hebbian learning. The Hebbian-LMS algorithm. Theoretical and experimental research projects in adaptive filter theory, communications, audio systems, and neural networks. Biomedical research projects, supervised jointly by EE and Medical School faculty. Recommended: EE263, EE264, EE278.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Widrow, B. (PI)

EE 380: Colloquium on Computer Systems

Live presentations of current research in the design, implementation, analysis, and applications of computer systems. Topics range over a wide range and are different every quarter. Topics may include fundamental science, mathematics, cryptography, device physics, integrated circuits, computer architecture, programming, programming languages, optimization, applications, simulation, graphics, social implications, venture capital, patent and copyright law, networks, computer security, and other topics of related to computer systems. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EE 382A: Parallel Processors Beyond Multicore Processing

Formerly EE392Q. The current parallel computing research emphasizes multi-cores, but there are alterna-tive array processors with significant potential. This hands-on course focuses on SIMD (Single-Instruction, Multiple-Data) massively parallel processors. Topics: Flynn's Taxonomy, parallel architectures, Kestrel architecture and simulator, principles of SIMD programming, parallel sorting with sorting networks, string comparison with dynamic programming (edit distance, Smith-Waterman), arbitrary-precision operations with fixed-point numbers, reductions, vector and matrix multiplication, image processing algo-rithms, asynchronous algorithms on SIMD ("SIMD Phase Programming Model"), Man-delbrot set, analysis of parallel performance.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Di Blas, A. (PI)

EE 384S: Performance Engineering of Computer Systems & Networks

Modeling and control methodologies for high-performance network engineering, including: Markov chains and stochastic modeling, queueing networks and congestion management, dynamic programming and task/processor scheduling, network dimensioning and optimization, and simulation methods. Applications for design of high-performance architectures for wireline/wireless networks and the Internet, including: traffic modeling, admission and congestion control, quality of service support, power control in wireless networks, packet scheduling in switches, video streaming over wireless links, and virus/worm propagation dynamics and countermeasures. Enrollment limited to 30. Prerequisites: basic networking technologies and probability.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bambos, N. (PI)

EE 390: Special Studies or Projects in Electrical Engineering

Independent work under the direction of a faculty member. Individual or team activities may involve lab experimentation, design of devices or systems, or directed reading. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EE 391: Special Studies and Reports in Electrical Engineering

Independent work under the direction of a faculty member; written report or written examination required. Letter grade given on the basis of the report; if not appropriate, student should enroll in 390. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EE 392B: Industrial Internet of Things

The seminar will feature guest lectures from the industry to discuss the state of the affairs in the Industrial Internet of Things (IoT) with emphasis on existing and new Data Science, analytics, and Big Data applications. The class will address several verticals. One of them is electrical power industry, which is undergoing transition to renewables and distributed generation. Another one is aerospace industry including airlines and equipment vendors. Other verticals are oil and gas, data centers, and semiconductor manufacturing.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EE 400: Thesis and Thesis Research

Limited to candidates for the degree of Engineer or Ph.D.May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EE 402T: Entrepreneurship in Asian High Tech Industries (EALC 402T, EASTASN 402T)

Distinctive patterns and challenges of entrepreneurship in Asia; update of business and technology issues in the creation and growth of start-up companies in major Asian economies. Distinguished speakers from industry, government, and academia.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dasher, R. (PI)
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