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EE 25N: Science of Information

We live in the Information Age, but what is information, anyway? In 1948, Claude Shannon published a seminal paper formalizing our modern notion of information. Through lectures and lab visits, we'll learn how information can be measured and represented, why bits are the universal currency for information exchange, and how these ideas led to smartphones, the Internet, and more. We¿ll get a glimpse of information elements in other domains, including neural codes of the brain, cryptographic codes, genetic code, quantum information, and even entertainment. As a final project, students will create podcast episodes on one of the topics explored in the course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EE 100: The Electrical Engineering Profession

Lectures/discussions on topics of importance to the electrical engineering professional. Continuing education, professional societies, intellectual property and patents, ethics, entrepreneurial engineering, and engineering management.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EE 103: Introduction to Matrix Methods (CME 103)

Introduction to applied linear algebra with emphasis on applications. Vectors, norm, and angle; linear independence and orthonormal sets; applications to document analysis. Clustering and the k-means algorithm. Matrices, left and right inverses, QR factorization. Least-squares and model fitting, regularization and cross-validation. Constrained and nonlinear least-squares. Applications include time-series prediction, tomography, optimal control, and portfolio optimization. Undergraduate students should enroll for 5 units, and graduate students should enroll for 3 units. Prerequisites:MATH 51 or CME 100, and basic knowledge of computing (CS 106A is more than enough, and can be taken concurrently). EE103/CME103 and Math 104 cover complementary topics in applied linear algebra. The focus of EE103 is on a few linear algebra concepts, and many applications; the focus of Math 104 is on algorithms and concepts.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 108: Digital System Design

Digital circuit, logic, and system design. Digital representation of information. CMOS logic circuits. Combinational logic design. Logic building blocks, idioms, and structured design. Sequential logic design and timing analysis. Clocks and synchronization. Finite state machines. Microcode control. Digital system design. Control and datapath partitioning. Lab. *In Autumn, enrollment preference is given to EE majors. Any EE majors who must enroll in Autumn are invited to contact the instructor. Formerly EE 108A.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mitra, S. (PI)

EE 114: Fundamentals of Analog Integrated Circuit Design (EE 214A)

Analysis and simulation of elementary transistor stages, current mirrors, supply- and temperature-independent bias, and reference circuits. Overview of integrated circuit technologies, circuit components, component variations and practical design paradigms. Differential circuits, frequency response, and feedback will also be covered. Performance evaluation using computer-aided design tools. Undergraduates must take EE 114 for 4 units. Prerequisite: 101B. GER:DB-EngrAppSci
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rekhi, A. (PI)

EE 185: Interactive Light Sculpture Project

Design, prototype, build, refine, program, and install a large interactive light sculpture in the Packard Building to celebrate the 125th anniversary of the EE department. Students may take the course for 1, 2, or 3 quarters; each quarter focuses on a different phase of the project. Topics covered include energy budgeting, communication, enclosure design, scalability, timing, circuit design, structural design, and safety. Prerequisite: ENGR 40M, or an introductory EE or CS course in circuits or programming.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 190: Special Studies or Projects in Electrical Engineering

Independent work under the direction of a faculty member. Individual or team activities involve lab experimentation, design of devices or systems, or directed reading. Course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EE 191: Special Studies and Reports in Electrical Engineering

Independent work under the direction of a faculty member given for a letter grade only. If a letter grade given on the basis of required written report or examination is not appropriate, enroll in 190. Course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EE 191A: Special Studies and Reports in Electrical Engineering

EE191A is part of the Accelerated Calculus for Engineers program. Independent work under the direction of a faculty member given for a letter grade only. EE 191A counts as a Math one unit seminar course: it is this unit that constitutes the ACE program.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EE 191W: Special Studies and Reports in Electrical Engineering (WIM)

WIM-version of EE 191. For EE students using special studiesn(e.g., honors project, independent research project) to satisfy thenwriting-in-major requirement. A written report that has gone through revision with an advisor is required. An advisor from the Writing Center is recommended.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-10 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EE 195: Electrical Engineering Instruction

Students receive training from faculty or graduate student mentors to prepare them to assist in instruction of Electrical Engineering courses. The specific training and units of credit received are to be defined in consultation with one of the official instructors of EE 195. Note that University regulations prohibit students from being paid for the training while receiving academic credit for it. Enrollment limited.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EE 205: Product Management for Electrical Engineers and Computer Scientists

Successful products are the highest impact contribution anyone can make in product development. Students will learn to build successful products using fundamental concepts in Product Management. These include understanding customers, their job to be done, Identifying new product opportunities, and defining what to build that is technically feasible, valuable to the customer, and easy to use The course has two components, Product Management Project with corporate partners, and case-based classroom discussion of PM concepts and application. Prerequisite: Students must be currently enrolled in a MS or PhD engineering degree program.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Gibbons, F. (PI)

EE 212: Integrated Circuit Fabrication Processes

For students interested in the physical bases and practical methods of silicon VLSI chip fabrication, or the impact of technology on device and circuit design, or intending to pursue doctoral research involving the use of Stanford's Nanofabrication laboratory. Process simulators illustrate concepts. Topics: principles of integrated circuit fabrication processes, physical and chemical models for crystal growth, oxidation, ion implantation, etching, deposition, lithography, and back-end processing. Required for 410.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Plummer, J. (PI)

EE 214A: Fundamentals of Analog Integrated Circuit Design (EE 114)

Analysis and simulation of elementary transistor stages, current mirrors, supply- and temperature-independent bias, and reference circuits. Overview of integrated circuit technologies, circuit components, component variations and practical design paradigms. Differential circuits, frequency response, and feedback will also be covered. Performance evaluation using computer-aided design tools. Undergraduates must take EE 114 for 4 units. Prerequisite: 101B. GER:DB-EngrAppSci
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rekhi, A. (PI)

EE 216: Principles and Models of Semiconductor Devices

Carrier generation, transport, recombination, and storage in semiconductors. Physical principles of operation of the p-n junction, heterojunction, metal semiconductor contact, bipolar junction transistor, MOS capacitor, MOS and junction field-effect transistors, and related optoelectronic devices such as CCDs, solar cells, LEDs, and detectors. First-order device models that reflect physical principles and are useful for integrated-circuit analysis and design. Prerequisite: 116 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 222: Applied Quantum Mechanics I (MATSCI 201)

Emphasis is on applications in modern devices and systems. Topics include: Schrödinger's equation, eigenfunctions and eigenvalues, solutions of simple problems including quantum wells and tunneling, quantum harmonic oscillator, coherent states, operator approach to quantum mechanics, Dirac notation, angular momentum, hydrogen atom, calculation techniques including matrix diagonalization, perturbation theory, variational method, and time-dependent perturbation theory with applications to optical absorption, nonlinear optical coefficients, and Fermi's golden rule. Prerequisites: MATH 52 and 53, EE 65 or PHYSICS 65 (or PHYSICS 43 and 45).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Miller, D. (PI)

EE 236A: Modern Optics

Geometrical optics; lens analysis and design, aberrations, optical instruments, radiometry. ray matrices. Wave nature of light; polarization, plane waves at interfaces and in media with varying refractive index, diffraction, Fourier Optics, Gaussian beams. Interference; single-beam interferometers (Fabry-Perot), multiple-beam interferometers (Michelson, Mach-Zehnder). nPrerequisites: EE 142 or familiarity with electromagnetism and plane waves.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Zaman, M. (PI)

EE 242: Electromagnetic Waves

This course will provide an advanced treatment of electromagnetic waves in free space and media. The first part of the course will cover reflection, refraction, resonators, and waveguides. The second part will cover general concepts in finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) computation, and students will be introduced to commercial FDTD software. The third part will cover potentials, Green's functions, far-field radiation, near-field radiation, and antennas. The fourth part will focus on an analysis of EM waves in matter. In lieu of a final exam, students will perform a quantitative group project based on a technical paper or research idea. This course will serve as a foundation for other specialized 200 and 300-level optics courses. Prerequisites: EE 142 or PHYSICS 120.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fan, J. (PI)

EE 260A: Principles of Robot Autonomy I (AA 174A, AA 274A, CS 237A)

Basic principles for endowing mobile autonomous robots with perception, planning, and decision-making capabilities. Algorithmic approaches for robot perception, localization, and simultaneous localization and mapping; control of non-linear systems, learning-based control, and robot motion planning; introduction to methodologies for reasoning under uncertainty, e.g., (partially observable) Markov decision processes. Extensive use of the Robot Operating System (ROS) for demonstrations and hands-on activities. Prerequisites: CS 106A or equivalent, CME 100 or equivalent (for linear algebra), and CME 106 or equivalent (for probability theory).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Bohg, J. (PI); Pavone, M. (PI)

EE 261: The Fourier Transform and Its Applications

The Fourier transform as a tool for solving physical problems. Fourier series, the Fourier transform of continuous and discrete signals and its properties. The Dirac delta, distributions, and generalized transforms. Convolutions and correlations and applications; probability distributions, sampling theory, filters, and analysis of linear systems. The discrete Fourier transform and the FFT algorithm. Multidimensional Fourier transform and use in imaging. Further applications to optics, crystallography. Emphasis is on relating the theoretical principles to solving practical engineering and science problems. Prerequisites: Math through ODEs, basic linear algebra, Comfort with sums and discrete signals, Fourier series at the level of 102A
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Osgood, B. (PI); Zhou, Z. (PI)

EE 263: Introduction to Linear Dynamical Systems (CME 263)

Applied linear algebra and linear dynamical systems with applications to circuits, signal processing, communications, and control systems. Topics: least-squares approximations of over-determined equations, and least-norm solutions of underdetermined equations. Symmetric matrices, matrix norm, and singular-value decomposition. Eigenvalues, left and right eigenvectors, with dynamical interpretation. Matrix exponential, stability, and asymptotic behavior. Multi-input/multi-output systems, impulse and step matrices; convolution and transfer-matrix descriptions. Control, reachability, and state transfer; observability and least-squares state estimation. Prerequisites: Linear algebra and matrices as in EE 103 or MATH 104; ordinary differential equations and Laplace transforms as in EE 102B or CME 102.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 269: Signal Processing for Machine Learning

This course will introduce you to fundamental signal processing concepts and tools needed to apply machine learning to discrete signals. You will learn about commonly used techniques for capturing, processing, manipulating, learning and classifying signals. The topics include: mathematical models for discrete-time signals, vector spaces, Fourier analysis, time-frequency analysis, Z-transforms and filters, signal classification and prediction, basic image processing, compressed sensing and deep learning. This class will culminate in a final project. Prerequisites: EE 102A and EE 102B or equivalent, basic programming skills (Matlab). EE 103 and EE 178 are recommended.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Pilanci, M. (PI)

EE 271: Introduction to VLSI Systems

Provides a quick introduction to MOS transistors and IC fabrication and then creates abstractions to allow you to create and reason about complex digital systems. It uses a switch resistor model of a transistor, uses it to model gates, and then shows how gates and physical layout can be synthesized from Verilog or SystemVerilog descriptions. Most of the class will be spent on providing techniques to create designs that can be validated, are low power, provide good performance, and can be completed in finite time. Prerequisites: 101A, 108A and 108B; familiarity with transistors, logic design, Verilog and digital system organization
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Raina, P. (PI)

EE 278: Introduction to Statistical Signal Processing

Review of basic probability and random variables. Random vectors and processes; convergence and limit theorems; IID, independent increment, Markov, and Gaussian random processes; stationary random processes; autocorrelation and power spectral density; mean square error estimation, detection, and linear estimation. Formerly EE 278B. Prerequisites: EE178 and linear systems and Fourier transforms at the level of EE102A,B or EE261.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 284: Introduction to Computer Networks

Structure and components of computer networks; functions and services; packet switching; layered architectures; OSI reference model; physical layer; data link layer; error control; window flow control; media access control protocols used in local area networks (Ethernet, Token Ring, FDDI) and satellite networks; network layer (datagram service, virtual circuit service, routing, congestion control, Internet Protocol); transport layer (UDP, TCP); application layer.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tobagi, F. (PI)

EE 290A: Curricular Practical Training for Electrical Engineers

For EE majors who need work experience as part of their program of study. Final report required. Prerequisites: for 290B, EE MS and PhD students who have received a Satisfactory ("S") grade in EE290A; for 290C, EE PhD degree candidacy and an "S" grade in EE 290B; for 290D, EE PhD degree candidacy, an "S" grade in EE 290C and instructor consent.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tobagi, F. (PI)

EE 290B: Curricular Practical Training for Electrical Engineers

For EE majors who need work experience as part of their program of study. Final report required. Prerequisites: for 290B, EE MS and PhD students who have received a Satisfactory ("S") grade in EE290A; for 290C, EE PhD degree candidacy and an "S" grade in EE 290B; for 290D, EE PhD degree candidacy, an "S" grade in EE 290C and instructor consent.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tobagi, F. (PI)

EE 290C: Curricular Practical Training for Electrical Engineers

For EE majors who need work experience as part of their program of study. Final report required. Prerequisites: for 290B, EE MS and PhD students who have received a Satisfactory ("S") grade in EE290A; for 290C, EE PhD degree candidacy and an "S" grade in EE 290B; for 290D, EE PhD degree candidacy, an "S" grade in EE 290C and instructor consent.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tobagi, F. (PI)

EE 290D: Curricular Practical Training for Electrical Engineers

For EE majors who need work experience as part of their program of study. Final report required. Prerequisites: for 290B, EE MS and PhD students who have received a Satisfactory ("S") grade in EE290A; for 290C, EE PhD degree candidacy and an "S" grade in EE 290B; for 290D, EE PhD degree candidacy, an "S" grade in EE 290C and instructor consent.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tobagi, F. (PI)

EE 290E: Curricular Practical Training for Electrical Engineers

For EE majors who need work experience as part of their program of study. Final report required. Prerequisites: for 290B, EE MS and PhD students who have received a Satisfactory ("S") grade in EE290A; for 290C, EE PhD degree candidacy and an "S" grade in EE 290B; for 290D, EE PhD degree candidacy, an "S" grade in EE 290C and instructor consent; for 290E, EE PhD degree candidacy, an "S" grade in EE 290D and instructor consent.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tobagi, F. (PI)

EE 290F: Curricular Practical Training for Electrical Engineers

For EE majors who need work experience as part of their program of study. Final report required. Prerequisites: EE PhD degree candidacy, an "S" grade in EE 290E and instructor consent.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tobagi, F. (PI)

EE 290G: Curricular Practical Training for Electrical Engineers

For EE majors who need work experience as part of their program of study. Final report required. Prerequisites: EE PhD degree candidacy, an "S" grade in EE 290F and instructor consent.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tobagi, F. (PI)

EE 292E: Seminar Series for Image Systems Engineering

Seminar. For engineering students interested in camera and display engineering, computer vision, and computational imaging. Speakers include Stanford faculty and research scientists as well as industry professionals, mostly from consumer electronics companies.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EE 292H: Engineering, Entrepreneurship & Climate Change

The purpose of this seminar series course is to help students and professionals develop the tools to apply the engineering and entrepreneurial mindset to problems that stem from climate change, in order to consider and evaluate possible stabilizing, remedial and adaptive approaches. This course is not a crash course on climate change or policy. Instead we will focus on learning about and discussing the climate problems that seem most tractable to these approaches. Each week Dr. Field and/or a guest speaker will lead a short warm-up discussion/activity and then deliver a talk in his/her area of expertise. We will wrap up with small-group and full-class discussions of related challenges/opportunities and possible engineering-oriented solutions. Class members are asked to do background reading before each class, to submit a question before each lecture, and to do in-class brainstorming. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Field, L. (PI)

EE 292T: SmartGrids and Advanced Power Systems Seminar (CEE 272T)

A series of seminar and lectures focused on power engineering. Renowned researchers from universities and national labs will deliver bi-weekly seminars on the state of the art of power system engineering. Seminar topics may include: power system analysis and simulation, control and stability, new market mechanisms, computation challenges and solutions, detection and estimation, and the role of communications in the grid. The instructors will cover relevant background materials in the in-between weeks. The seminars are planned to continue throughout the next academic year, so the course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rajagopal, R. (PI)

EE 292X: Battery Systems for Transportation and GridnServices (CEE 292X)

Driven by high-capacity battery systems, electrification is transforming mobility solutions and the grid that powers them. This course provides an introduction to battery systems for transportation and grid services: cell technologies, topology selection, thermal and aging management, safety monitoring, AC and DC charging, and operation control/optimization. Invited experts introduce students to the state¿of¿theart of each topic. The course is aimed at mezzanine and graduate levels students who wish to design battery systems, model them from data, integrate them into applications, or just learn about them. It can be taken for 1 unit (Credit/no Credit) for attending seminars, or for 3 units (letter grade only) for also doing an optional project. Prerequisites: No prerequisites needed for taking the course for 1 unit. Relevant background in selected project area is recommended, for example, CEE 272R for grid applications; EE 253 for AC or DC charging and battery controller design; CEE 322, CS 229 or EE 104 for data-based projects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 300: Master's Thesis and Thesis Research

Independent work under the direction of a department faculty. Written thesis required for final letter grade. The continuing grade 'N' is given in quarters prior to thesis submission. See 390 if a letter grade is not appropriate. Course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EE 301: Introductory Research Seminar in Electrical Engineering

The EE 301 seminar course is offered each Autumn Quarter primarily for incoming EE PhD students. All students and faculty in the Department are welcome to attend. EE faculty members present seminars on their research, giving new PhD students an overview of research opportunities across the Department.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Prabhakar, B. (PI)

EE 310: SystemX: Ubiquitous Sensing, Computing and Communication Seminar

This is a seminar course with invited speakers. Sponsored by Stanford's SystemX Alliance, the talks will cover emerging topics in contemporary hardware/software systems design. Special focus will be given to the key building blocks of sensors, processing elements and wired/wireless communications, as well as their foundations in semiconductor technology, SoC construction, and physical assembly as informed by the SystemX Focus Areas. The seminar will draw upon distinguished engineering speakers from both industry and academia who are involved at all levels of the technology stack and the applications that are now becoming possible. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Candelaria, J. (PI)

EE 315: Analog-Digital Interface Circuits

Analysis and design of circuits and circuit architectures for signal conditioning and data conversion. Fundamental circuit elements such as operational transconductance amplifiers, active filters, sampling circuits, switched capacitor stages and voltage comparators. Sensor interfaces for micro-electromechanical and biomedical applications. Nyquist and oversampling A/D and D/A converters. Prerequisite: EE 214B.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Muratore, D. (PI)

EE 329: The Electronic Structure of Surfaces and Interfaces (PHOTON 329)

Physical concepts and phenomena for surface science techniques probing the electronic and chemical structure of surfaces, interfaces and nanomaterials. Microscopic and atomic models of microstructures; applications including semiconductor device technology, catalysis and energy. Physical processes of UV and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, surface EXAFS, low energy electron diffraction, electron/photon stimulated ion desorption, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, ion scattering, energy loss spectroscopy and related imaging methods; and experimental aspects of these surface science techniques. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 70 and MATSCI 199/209, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pianetta, P. (PI)

EE 336: Nanophotonics (MATSCI 346)

Recent developments in micro- and nanophotonic materials and devices. Basic concepts of photonic crystals. Integrated photonic circuits. Photonic crystal fibers. Superprism effects. Optical properties of metallic nanostructures. Sub-wavelength phenomena and plasmonic excitations. Meta-materials. Prerequisite: Electromagnetic theory at the level of 242.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EE 356A: Resonant Converters

Miniaturization of efficient power converters remain a challenge in power electronics whose goal is improving energy use and reducing waste. In this course, we will study the design of Resonant converters which are capable of operating at higher frequencies than their 'hard-switch' counterparts. Resonant converter are found in high performance applications where high control bandwidth and high power density are required. We will also explore practical design issues and trade off in selecting converter topologies in high performance applications. Prerequisites: EE153/EE253.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EE 380: Colloquium on Computer Systems

Live presentations of current research in the design, implementation, analysis, and applications of computer systems. Topics range over a wide range and are different every quarter. Topics may include fundamental science, mathematics, cryptography, device physics, integrated circuits, computer architecture, programming, programming languages, optimization, applications, simulation, graphics, social implications, venture capital, patent and copyright law, networks, computer security, and other topics of related to computer systems. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EE 390: Special Studies or Projects in Electrical Engineering

Independent work under the direction of a faculty member. Individual or team activities may involve lab experimentation, design of devices or systems, or directed reading. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EE 391: Special Studies and Reports in Electrical Engineering

Independent work under the direction of a faculty member; written report or written examination required. Letter grade given on the basis of the report; if not appropriate, student should enroll in 390. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EE 400: Thesis and Thesis Research

Limited to candidates for the degree of Engineer or Ph.D.May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EE 402A: Topics in International Technology Management (EALC 402A, EASTASN 402A)

Theme for Autumn 2019 is "Edge Computing: Different Directions for Asia and the U.S.?" Distinguished guest speakers discuss Asian and U.S. approaches to 5G network integration, federated learning, computer chips and servers for edge AI processing, and IOT systems built around intelligent clients, such as register-less stores, smart factories, autonomous vehicles, and augmented reality applications. See syllabus for specific requirements, which may differ from those of other seminars at Stanford.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dasher, R. (PI)

EE 469B: RF Pulse Design for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) based on the use of radio frequency pulses to manipulate magnetization. Analysis and design of major types of RF pulses in one and multiple dimensions, analysis and design of sequences of RF pulses for fast imaging, and use of RF pulses for the creation of image contrast in MRI. Prerequisite: 369B.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pauly, J. (PI)
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