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EDUC 98: Service Learning Practicum

For Alternative Spring Break program leaders. The skills and philosophical framework to develop and lead an ASB experience. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 100A: EAST House Seminar: Current Issues and Debates in Education

Education and Society Theme (EAST) House seminar. In autumn quarter, faculty and other scholars from around the University discuss the latest issues, debates, and research in the field of Education. In winter quarter, the theme is "Ten Careers in Education in Ten Weeks." Each week will feature a speaker from a different sector in education including school administration, arts education, information technology, special education, international development, student affairs, education consulting, and education policy. In the spring, the seminar will focus on Human Rights Education. Through an examination of these topics, students are able to share and develop their varied interests in educational research, policy, and practice. Notes: Attendance at first class required. Seminar meets in the EAST House Dining Hall located at 554 Governor's Ave. The seminar is open to all students at Stanford with first-priority given to pre-assign residents of EAST House followed by other residents of EAST and all other undergraduates. Graduate students are allowed to enroll on a space-available basis. Visitors/auditors are not allowed. The seminar is required for all pre-assigned residents of EAST House and is repeatable for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Antonio, A. (PI)

EDUC 101: Introduction to Teaching and Learning

This course is designed to help undergraduates explore career interests in education; it is the core course for the Undergraduate Minor in Education, and fulfills requirements for Honors in Education. The course considers the philosophy, history, politics, professional practice and social structures of teaching in the United States. Students will read and discuss teaching theory and research, participate in learning activities and visit school teaching sites, as well as examine and analyze artifacts and models of teaching.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Wolf, J. (PI)

EDUC 103A: Tutoring: Seeing a Child through Literacy (EDUC 203A)

Experience tutoring grade school readers in a low income community near Stanford under supervision. Training in tutoring; the role of instruction in developing literacy; challenges facing low income students and those whose first language is not English. How to see school and print through the eyes of a child. Ravenswood Reads tutors encouraged to enroll. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Scott, R. (PI)

EDUC 103B: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (AFRICAAM 106, CSRE 103B, EDUC 337)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 116N: Howard Zinn and the Quest for Historical Truth (HISTORY 116N)

With more than two million copies in print, Howard Zinn's A People's History is a cultural icon. We will use Zinn's book to probe how we determine what was true in the past. A People's History will be our point of departure, but our journey will visit a variety of historical trouble spots: debates about whether the US was founded as a Christian nation, Holocaust denial, and the "Birther" controversy of President Obama.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wineburg, S. (PI)

EDUC 117: Research and Policy on Postsecondary Access (EDUC 417)

The transition from high school to college. K-16 course focusing on high school preparation, college choice, remediation, pathways to college, and first-year adjustment. The role of educational policy in postsecondary access. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Antonio, A. (PI)

EDUC 118S: Designing Your Stanford (ME 104S)

DYS uses a Design Thinking approach to help Freshmen and Sophomores learn practical tools and ideas to make the most of their Stanford experience. Topics include the purpose of college, major selection, educational and vocational wayfinding, and innovating college outcomes, explored through the design thinking process. This seminar class incorporates small group discussion, in-class activities, field exercises, personal reflection, and individual coaching. Expect ideation tools, storytelling practices, prototyping to discover more about yourself and possible paths forward. The course concludes with creation of multiple versions of what college might look like and how to make those ideas reality. All enrolled and waitlisted students should attend class on day 1 for admission. Additional course information at http://www.designingyourstanford.org.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 119S: History of American Indian & Alaska Native Education (EDUC 429S, NATIVEAM 119S)

How the federal government placed education at the center of its Indian policy in second half of 19th century, subjecting Native Americans to programs designed to erase native cultures and American Indian responses to those programs. Topics include traditional Indian education, role of religious groups, Meriam Report, Navajo-Hopi Rehabilitation Act, Johnson-O'Malley Act, and public schools.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Anderson, J. (PI)

EDUC 137: The Role of Policy in Shaping U.S. Education: Early Childhood through High School

We will explore current issues in preK-12 education policy including the expansion of early childhood programs, the effectiveness of accountability, the challenges facing teacher labor markets, and the financing of education. We discuss the role government and non-government agencies have (or should have) in making and evaluating education policies. In all discussions, we will call attention to the vast inequities that exist in our current education system. In this course, you will learn how to analyze and critique education policies.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 148: Ingl├ęs Personal: Coaching Everyday Community English (CHILATST 148, CSRE 148D)

Theoretical foundation for volunteer tutors of English language learners in urban environments working with children in school-based programs or adults in community-based settings. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Valdes, G. (PI)

EDUC 149: Theory and Issues in the Study of Bilingualism (EDUC 249)

Sociolinguistic perspective. Emphasis is on typologies of bilingualism, the acquisition of bilingual ability, description and measurement, and the nature of societal bilingualism. Prepares students to work with bilingual students and their families and to carry out research in bilingual settings.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Valdes, G. (PI)

EDUC 177A: Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course (CHILATST 177A, CSRE 177E, HUMBIO 29A)

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Schell, E. (PI)

EDUC 180: Directed Reading in Education

For undergraduates and master's degree students. (All Areas)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Adams, C. (PI); Alim, H. (PI); Alvarado, A. (PI); Antonio, A. (PI); Ardoin, N. (PI); Aukerman, M. (PI); Ball, A. (PI); Banks, A. (PI); Barron, B. (PI); Bayati, M. (PI); Bettinger, E. (PI); Blikstein, P. (PI); Boaler, J. (PI); Bonnet, G. (PI); Booker, A. (PI); Borko, H. (PI); Brazer, S. (PI); Brest, P. (PI); Bromley, P. (PI); Brown, B. (PI); Bryk, T. (PI); Calfee, R. (PI); Callan, E. (PI); Carlson, J. (PI); Carnoy, M. (PI); Carter, P. (PI); Cohen, G. (PI); Cotterman, K. (PI); Cox, G. (PI); Cuban, L. (PI); Damon, W. (PI); Darling-Hammond, L. (PI); Dee, T. (PI); Domingue, B. (PI); Ehrlich, T. (PI); Eisner, E. (PI); Ellch, L. (PI); Emery, D. (PI); Fogg, B. (PI); Fong, B. (PI); Forssell, K. (PI); Garcia, A. (PI); Goldenberg, C. (PI); Goldman, S. (PI); Gordon, L. (PI); Grossman, P. (PI); Gumport, P. (PI); Haertel, E. (PI); Hakuta, K. (PI); Hoagland, G. (PI); Imbens, G. (PI); Juel, C. (PI); Kamil, M. (PI); Kelman, A. (PI); Kijima, R. (PI); Kim, P. (PI); Kirst, M. (PI); Koski, W. (PI); Krumboltz, J. (PI); Kuboyama, E. (PI); Kushner, M. (PI); LaFromboise, T. (PI); Labaree, D. (PI); Langer-Osuna, J. (PI); Lee, G. (PI); Leslie, M. (PI); Levine, S. (PI); Lit, I. (PI); Loeb, S. (PI); Lotan, R. (PI); Loyalka, P. (PI); Lythcott, J. (PI); Martinez, A. (PI); Martinez, R. (PI); McCandliss, B. (PI); McDermott, R. (PI); McFarland, D. (PI); McLaughlin, M. (PI); Mendoza-Newman, M. (PI); Meyerson, D. (PI); Murata, A. (PI); Nandagopal, K. (PI); Nasir, N. (PI); O'Hara, S. (PI); Obradovic, J. (PI); Olkin, I. (PI); Osborne, J. (PI); Padilla, A. (PI); Pea, R. (PI); Perez-Granados, D. (PI); Peterson, M. (PI); Phillips, D. (PI); Pope, D. (PI); Porteus, A. (PI); Powell, W. (PI); Ramirez, F. (PI); Reich, R. (PI); Rogosa, D. (PI); Rohlen, T. (PI); Rosa, J. (PI); Roth, B. (PI); Ruiz-Primo, M. (PI); Schwartz, D. (PI); Scott, R. (PI); Shavelson, R. (PI); Silverman, R. (PI); Singleton, K. (PI); Smith, S. (PI); Solano-Flores, G. (PI); Sorcar, P. (PI); Staklis, S. (PI); Stevens, M. (PI); Stipek, D. (PI); Strober, M. (PI); Suarez, D. (PI); Thille, C. (PI); Tyack, D. (PI); Valdes, G. (PI); Walker, D. (PI); Wieman, C. (PI); Williamson, P. (PI); Willinsky, J. (PI); Wineburg, S. (PI); Wise, S. (PI); Wolf, J. (PI); Wotipka, C. (PI); Yisrael, D. (PI); reardon, s. (PI)

EDUC 185: Master's Thesis

(all areas)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 190: Directed Research in Education

For undergraduates and master's students. May be repeated for credit. (all areas)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Alim, H. (PI); Alvarado, A. (PI); Antonio, A. (PI); Ardoin, N. (PI); Aukerman, M. (PI); Ball, A. (PI); Banks, A. (PI); Barron, B. (PI); Bettinger, E. (PI); Blikstein, P. (PI); Boaler, J. (PI); Booker, A. (PI); Borko, H. (PI); Brazer, S. (PI); Brest, P. (PI); Bromley, P. (PI); Brown, B. (PI); Bryk, T. (PI); Calfee, R. (PI); Callan, E. (PI); Carlson, J. (PI); Carnoy, M. (PI); Carter, P. (PI); Cohen, G. (PI); Cox, G. (PI); Cuban, L. (PI); Damon, W. (PI); Darling-Hammond, L. (PI); Dee, T. (PI); Domingue, B. (PI); Ehrlich, T. (PI); Eisner, E. (PI); Emery, D. (PI); Fogg, B. (PI); Fong, B. (PI); Forssell, K. (PI); Garcia, A. (PI); Goldenberg, C. (PI); Goldman, S. (PI); Gordon, L. (PI); Grossman, P. (PI); Gumport, P. (PI); Haertel, E. (PI); Hakuta, K. (PI); Hoagland, G. (PI); Juel, C. (PI); Kamil, M. (PI); Kijima, R. (PI); Kirst, M. (PI); Krumboltz, J. (PI); Kuboyama, E. (PI); Kushner, M. (PI); LaFromboise, T. (PI); Labaree, D. (PI); Langer-Osuna, J. (PI); Levine, S. (PI); Lit, I. (PI); Loeb, S. (PI); Lotan, R. (PI); Loyalka, P. (PI); Lythcott, J. (PI); Martinez, R. (PI); McCandliss, B. (PI); McDermott, R. (PI); McFarland, D. (PI); McLaughlin, M. (PI); Meyerson, D. (PI); Murata, A. (PI); Nasir, N. (PI); Nass, C. (PI); O'Hara, S. (PI); Obradovic, J. (PI); Olkin, I. (PI); Osborne, J. (PI); Padilla, A. (PI); Pea, R. (PI); Phillips, D. (PI); Pope, D. (PI); Porteus, A. (PI); Powell, W. (PI); Ramirez, F. (PI); Rogosa, D. (PI); Rohlen, T. (PI); Rosa, J. (PI); Ruiz-Primo, M. (PI); Schwartz, D. (PI); Scott, R. (PI); Shavelson, R. (PI); Silverman, R. (PI); Solano-Flores, G. (PI); Sorcar, P. (PI); Staklis, S. (PI); Stevens, M. (PI); Stipek, D. (PI); Strober, M. (PI); Suarez, D. (PI); Thille, C. (PI); Tyack, D. (PI); Valdes, G. (PI); Walker, D. (PI); Wieman, C. (PI); Williamson, P. (PI); Willinsky, J. (PI); Wineburg, S. (PI); Wolf, J. (PI); Wotipka, C. (PI); reardon, s. (PI)

EDUC 192A: Interpersonal Learning & Leadership: An Introduction to the RA Role

Preparing students for roles as Resident and Community Assistants, "Intelligent Leadership" explores research on college student development, leadership and the complex dynamics of our changing society both within and outside the college environment. Participants will engage in course work that builds skills relevant to their positions and allow students to implement these skills in a real world environment. Through reflection, self-examination and engagement in interpersonal dynamics and analysis, students will examine how their peer group develops while at the university.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 192B: Interpersonal Learning & Leadership - Row Staff Class

"Interpersonal Learning & Leadership - Row Staff Class" explores research on leadership and the complex dynamics of our changing society. Participants will engage in course work intended to build skills relevant to being on a Row Staff team. Students will practice self reflection, risk taking, facilitating, decision-making and group leadership. Students will develop strategies to build community and facilitate challenging conversations while creating a safe environment for their peers to do the same.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 192E: EDUC 192E: Interpersonal Learning and Leadership: An Intro to the RA Role: Summer Session Staff Only

Preparing students for roles as Resident and Community Assistants, "Intelligent Leadership" explores research on college student development, leadership and the complex dynamics of our changing society both within and outside the college environment. Participants will engage in course work that builds skills relevant to their positions and allow students to implement these skills in a real world environment. Through reflection, self-examination and engagement in interpersonal dynamics and analysis, students will examine how their peer group develops while at the university.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 193A: Listen Up! Core Peer Counseling Skills

Topics: verbal and non-verbal skills, open and closed questions, paraphrasing, working with feelings, summarization, and integration. Individual training, group exercises, role play practice with optional video feedback. Sections on relevance to crisis counseling and student life. Guest speakers from University and community agencies. Students develop and apply skills in University settings. Sections will be assigned during the first week of the quarter.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 193P: Peer Counseling at the Bridge

Mental health issues such as relationships, substance abuse, sexual assault, depression, eating disorders, academic stressors, suicide, and grief and bereavement. Guest speakers.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 193S: Peer Counseling on Comprehensive Sexual Health

Information on sexually transmitted infections and diseases, and birth control methods. Topics related to sexual health such as communication, societal attitudes and pressures, pregnancy, abortion, and the range of sexual expression. Role-play and peer-education outreach projects. Required for those wishing to counsel at the Sexual Health Peer Resource Center (SHPRC).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Yisrael, D. (PI)

EDUC 194B: Frosh 101: Curriculum Leader Training

This course will provide Frosh 101 leaders with the content and facilitator training needed to lead a discussion style course designed to support first-year students in their transition to Stanford's dynamic campus. Prerequisite: EDUC 194A.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Brown, C. (PI)

EDUC 196: Senior Research in Public Service (URBANST 196)

Limited to seniors approved by their departments for honors thesis and admitted to the year-round Public Service Scholars Program sponsored by the Haas Center for Public Service. What standards in addition to those expected by the academy apply to research conducted as a form of public service? How can communities benefit from research? Theory and practice of research as a form of public service readings, thesis workshops, and public presentation of completed research. May be repeated for credit. Corequisite: 199.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Tien, J. (PI)

EDUC 199A: Undergraduate Honors Seminar

Required of juniors and seniors in the honors program in the School of Education. Student involvement and apprenticeships in educational research. Participants share ongoing work on their honors thesis. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit once.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kelman, A. (PI)

EDUC 200A: Introduction to Data Analysis and Interpretation

Primarily for master's students in the School of Education. Focus is on reading literature and interpreting descriptive and inferential statistics, especially those commonly found in education. Topics: basic research design, instrument reliability and validity, descriptive statistics, correlation, t-tests, one-way analysis of variance, and simple and multiple regression. All offerings of this course (whether meeting on Mon & Weds or Tues & Thurs) will be taught identically.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 200B: Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods

(Formerly EDUC 151.) Primarily for master's students: An introduction to the core concepts and methods of qualitative research. Through a variety of hands-on learning activities, readings, field experiences, class lectures, and discussions, students will explore the processes and products of qualitative inquiry.nnThis is a graduate level course. No undergraduates may enroll. Priority will be given to GSE students, and final enrollment depends on instructor approval after the first day of class.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 202: Introduction to International and Comparative Education

Contemporary theoretical debates about educational change and development, and the international dimension of issues in education. Emphasis is on the development of students' abilities to make cross-national and historical comparisons of educational phenomena. Enrollment in EDUC 202L is required to enroll in EDUC 202.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Carnoy, M. (PI)

EDUC 203A: Tutoring: Seeing a Child through Literacy (EDUC 103A)

Experience tutoring grade school readers in a low income community near Stanford under supervision. Training in tutoring; the role of instruction in developing literacy; challenges facing low income students and those whose first language is not English. How to see school and print through the eyes of a child. Ravenswood Reads tutors encouraged to enroll. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Scott, R. (PI)

EDUC 204: Introduction to Philosophy of Education (ETHICSOC 204, PHIL 231)

How to think philosophically about educational problems. Recent influential scholarship in philosophy of education. No previous study in philosophy required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Callan, E. (PI)

EDUC 206A: Applied Research Methods in International and Comparative Education I: Introduction

Required for M.A. students in ICE and IEPA. Orientation to the M.A. program and research project; exploration of resources for study and research.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 209A: Policy, Organization, and Leadership Studies Seminar

This is a required course for all POLS students. The goals of the POLS Seminar (EDUC 209ABC) are to assist students in making the most of their Stanford graduate experience across several dimensions (academic, professional, and social). EDUC 209A is focused on orienting students to the academic and extra-curricular aspects of the experience as quickly as possible, while helping them coalesce as a group and learn how to leverage each other's professional knowledge. Another goals is to help student define their graduate degree goals, so they can plan their year in a very intentional manner that will result in a project or experiences they can highlight during the required Spring quarter POLS Project Forum.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cox, G. (PI); Stevens, M. (PI)

EDUC 213: Introduction to Teaching

Key concepts in teaching and learning; teacher content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge; student prior knowledge and preconceptions; cognition and metacognition; classroom culture, motivation, and management; teaching diverse populations; comparison of teaching models; analysis of teaching; standards, accountability, and assessment of learning; assessing teaching quality; online learning and teaching.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wischnia, S. (PI)

EDUC 215: LDT Internship Workshop

The required internship is a cornerstone of the LDT program. This course will provide students an opportunity to link their academic learning to real world experience through in-class discussions, presentations, and reflective writing. It will allow the program director to monitor the quality of the experience and provide timely advice and support as needed for an optimal learning experience.nnThe course will meet several times each quarter, adjacent to LDT seminar (Fridays, 12-1). An internship agreement will be required at the beginning of the course signed by the faculty advisor), as well as a reflection paper at the end of the course. Students will take the course for 1 unit, unless they request additional units for unpaid internship hours.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Forssell, K. (PI)

EDUC 228F: Becoming Literate in School II

Second in a three-course required sequence of reading and language arts theory and methodology for candidates in the STEP Elementary program. Theories for guiding instruction and curricular choices.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 229A: Learning Design and Technology Seminar

Four-quarter required seminar for the LDT master's program. Discussions and activities related to designing for learning with technology. Support for internships and Master's project. Theoretical and practical perspectives, hands-on development, and collaborative efforts. (LDT)
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rosier, S. (PI); Wang, K. (TA)

EDUC 230: Learning Experience Design

This course explores the design of tools for learning, leveraging scholarship and real-world projects to create prototypes of new digital learning tools. Students will engage in design activities to come up with prototypes of new learning tools for community partners. Designing these tools will require project groups to gather and apply knowledge, evaluating options and synthesizing ideas in order to create an effective (and elegant!) solution. A community-based Cardinal Course. To learn about the design of digital tools for learning, we recommend taking this course together with EDUC 281, Technology for Learners
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Forssell, K. (PI)

EDUC 232: Culture, Learning, and Poverty

This course examines the categories and methods used to analyze and explain educational inequalities in the United States from 1950 to present. Approaches to theories of school failure and methods of intervention are distinguished by their ideas on the play of learning, language, cognition, culture, and social class in human development. Particular attention is given to the Culture of Poverty controversies of the 1960s and their recent emergence.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Beckham, K. (PI)

EDUC 240: Adolescent Development and Learning

How do adolescents develop their identities, manage their inner and outer worlds, and learn? Presuppositions: that fruitful instruction takes into account the developmental characteristics of learners and the task demands of specific curricula; and that teachers can promote learning and motivation by mediating among the characteristics of students, the curriculum, and the wider social context of the classroom. Prerequisite: STEP student or consent of instructor. (STEP)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 244: Classroom Management and Leadership

Student and teacher roles in developing a classroom community. Strategies for classroom management within a theoretical framework. STEP secondary only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 244F: Building Classroom Communities

Skills for developing a positive classroom learning environment. Theoretical issues and opportunities to acquire strategies and make links with practice teaching class. STEP elementary only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 246B: Secondary Teaching Seminar

Preparation and practice in issues and strategies for teaching in classrooms with diverse students. Topics: guided observations, building classroom community, classroom interaction processes, topics in special education portfolio development, teacher professionalism, patterns of school organization, teaching contexts, and government educational policy. Classroom observation and student teaching with accompanying seminars during each quarter of STEP year. 16 units required for completion of the program. Prerequisite: STEP student.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 246F: Elementary Teaching Seminar

Integrating theory and practice in teacher development. Topics include: equity, democracy, and social justice in the context of teaching and learning; teacher reflection, inquiry, and research; parent/teacher relationships; youth development and community engagement; professional growth and development; teacher leadership and school change processes; preparation for the job search, the STEP Elementary Portfolio, and the STEP Elementary Conference. Prerequisite: STEP student.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-6 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lit, I. (PI); Pura, T. (TA)

EDUC 249: Theory and Issues in the Study of Bilingualism (EDUC 149)

Sociolinguistic perspective. Emphasis is on typologies of bilingualism, the acquisition of bilingual ability, description and measurement, and the nature of societal bilingualism. Prepares students to work with bilingual students and their families and to carry out research in bilingual settings.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Valdes, G. (PI)

EDUC 250: What Do Students Really Know? The Risks of Modern Assessment

This course focuses on helping students to advance their knowledge about theory, design and research issues related to assessing student learning for accountability and learning purposes. The course explores assessment topics with a critical perspective in two contexts: large-scale and classroom assessment. The course will help students become critical test consumers, better-informed assessment evaluators, and advocator of reliable, valid and fair assessments for culturally and linguistically diverse populations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ruiz-Primo, M. (PI)

EDUC 250A: Inquiry and Measurement in Education

Part of doctoral research core. The logic of scientific inquiry in education, including identification of research questions, selection of qualitative or quantitative research methods, design of research studies, measurement, and collection, analysis and interpretation of evidence.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Ruiz-Primo, M. (PI)

EDUC 262B: Curriculum and Instruction in English

Approaches to teaching English in the secondary school, including goals for instruction, teaching techniques, and methods of evaluation. STEP secondary only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Wolf, J. (PI); Moore, D. (TA)

EDUC 263B: Curriculum and Instruction in Mathematics

The purposes and programs of mathematics in the secondary curriculum; teaching materials, methods. Prerequisite: STEP student or consent of instructor. (STEP) 263A. Sum, 263B. Aut, 263C. Win
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 263F: Quantitative Reasoning in Mathematics II

Second of a three-course sequence in mathematics for STEP elementary teacher candidates. Content, pedagogy, and context. Mathematics subject matter; the orchestration of teaching and learning of elementary mathematics including curriculum, classroom and lesson design, and cases studies. Sociocultural and linguistic diversity, equity, differentiation of instruction, the impact of state and national standards, and home/community connections.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 264B: Curriculum and Instruction in World Languages

Approaches to teaching foreign languages in the secondary school, including goals for instruction, teaching techniques, and methods of evaluation. STEP secondary only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 264E: Methods and Materials in Bilingual Classrooms

Restricted to STEP elementary teacher candidates in the BCLAD program. Theories, research, and methods related to instruction of Spanish-English bilingual children, grades K-8. Approaches to dual language instruction, and pedagogical and curricular strategies for the instruction of reading, language arts, science, history, social science, and math in Spanish. Assessment issues and practices with bilingual students. In Spanish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Martinez, C. (PI)

EDUC 267B: Curriculum and Instruction in Science

Possible objectives of secondary science teaching and related methods: selection and organization of content and instructional materials; lab and demonstration techniques; evaluation, tests; curricular changes; ties with other subject areas. Prerequisite: STEP student or consent of instructor. (STEP)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 267E: Development of Scientific Reasoning and Knowledge

For STEP elementary teacher candidates. Theories and methods of teaching and learning science. How to develop curricula and criteria for critiquing curricula. Students design a science curriculum plan for a real setting. State and national science frameworks and content standards. Alternative teaching approaches; how to select approaches that are compatible with learner experience and lesson objectives. Focus is on the linguistic and cultural diversity of California public school students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 268B: Curriculum and Instruction in History and Social Science

The methodology of history instruction: teaching for historical thinking and reasoning; linking the goals of teaching history with literacy; curriculum trends; and opportunities to develop teaching and resource units. Prerequisite: STEP student.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 281: Technology for Learners

How can we use technology to improve learning? Many hope that technology will make learning easier, faster, or accessible to more learners. This course explores a variety of approaches to designing tools for learning, the theories behind them, and the research that tests their effectiveness. Strong focus on evaluating new tools for specific learners and subjects. Space is limited. Priority is given to master's students in the LDT Master's Program. To learn about the design of digital tools for learning, we recommend taking this course together with EDUC 230, Learning Experience Design.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Forssell, K. (PI)

EDUC 283: Child Development In and Beyond Schools

(Formerly EDUC 144). How schools form a context for children's social and cognitive development. Focus is on early and middle childhood. Transactional processes between children and learning opportunities in classroom contexts. Topics include: alternative theoretical perspectives on the nature of child development; early experience and fit with traditional school contexts; assessment practices and implications for developing identities as learners; psychological conceptions of motivational processes and alternative perspectives; the role of peer relationships in schools; and new designs for learning environments. Readings address social science and methodological issues. STEP Elementary only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 285A: Supporting Students with Special Needs

For STEP Secondary teacher candidates. Needs of exceptional learners, identification of learning differences and disabilities, and adaptations in the regular inclusion classroom. Legal requirements of special education, testing procedures, development of individualized education plans, and support systems and services. Students follow a special needs learner to understand diagnosis, student needs, and types of services.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 291: Learning Sciences and Technology Design Research Seminar and Colloquium

Students and faculty present and critique new and original research relevant to the Learning Sciences and Technology Design doctoral program. Goal is to develop a community of scholars who become familiar with each other's work. Practice of the arts of presentation and scholarly dialogue while introducing seminal issues and fundamental works in the field.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 295: Entrepreneurship and Innovation in Education Technology Seminar

How do entrepreneurs, educators, and VC's evaluate and grow successful education and edtech startups? Why do most startups fail, and what are the key ingredients for success? This course will teach you the skills and strategies necessary to effectively evaluate educational services and technology startups much like prospective employees, expert educators, entrepreneurs, philanthropists, and venture capital investors do. Each week, we will invite an executive or entrepreneur from a innovative education technology startup (for-profit & non-profit) as a guest speaker, and we'll evaluate all aspects of their invention. A fundamental question we'll explore in this course is how educators and technologists can collaborate to improve equity and access to education by leveraging the massive impact technology solutions can provide. Maximum capacity is 30 students; students will be admitted to the course by the professor. Juniors, Seniors and all graduate students are welcome. Students should complete this brief course interest form at http://bit.ly/educ-295. We will notify all students of their status before the first class on Monday, Sept. 23rd. Syllabus can be viewed here: http://bit.ly/educ295-syllabus2019
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 299: Equity and Schooling

(Formerly EDUC 167.) Introduction to the theories and practices of equity and democracy in education. How to think about teaching and schooling in new ways; the individual moral and political reasons for becoming a teacher. Enrollment restricted to students in the STEP Program only. (STEP)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 306A: Economics of Education in the Global Economy

Case material considers development problems in the U.S. and abroad. Discussion sections on economic aspects of educational development.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Carnoy, M. (PI); Rosa, L. (PI)

EDUC 306Y: Economic Support Seminar for Education and Economic Development

Core economic concepts that address issues in education in developing and developed countries. Supply and demand, elasticity, discount rates, rate of return analysis, utility functions, and production functions. Corequisite: 306A. (Carnoy)
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Carnoy, M. (PI)

EDUC 310: Sociology of Education (SOC 332)

Seminar. Key sociological theories and empirical studies of of the relationship between education and other major social institutions, focusing on drivers of educational change, the organizational infrastructures of education, and the implication of education in processes of social stratification. Targeted to doctoral students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stevens, M. (PI)

EDUC 325A: Proseminar 1

Required of and limited to first-year Education doctoral students. Core questions in education: what is taught, to whom, and why; how do people learn; how do teachers teach and how do they learn to teach; how are schools organized; how are educational systems organized; and what are the roles of education in society?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EDUC 333A: Understanding Learning Environments

Advanced seminar. Theoretical approaches to learning used to analyze learning environments and develop goals for designing resources and activities to support effective learning practices.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 337: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (AFRICAAM 106, CSRE 103B, EDUC 103B)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 339: Advanced Topics in Quantitative Policy Analysis

For doctoral students. How to develop a researchable question and research design, identify data sources, construct conceptual frameworks, and interpret empirical results. Presentation by student participants and scholars in the field. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 343A: Navigating the Academic Profession

For DARE doctoral fellows only. The roles and responsibilities of faculty members in American colleges and universities in the 21st century. How to become productive faculty members within the higher education enterprise.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Golde, C. (PI)

EDUC 350: Workshop on New Research

This course will integrate attendance and participation at the research lectures given by visitors with separate, faculty-led workshops that discuss the presented study, its methodologies, and the research and policy contexts in which it is situated. This workshop will also provide an opportunity for professional development relevant to academic publishing and effective presentation.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Reininger, M. (PI)

EDUC 361: Workshop: Networks and Organizations (SOC 361W)

For students doing advanced research. Group comments and criticism on dissertation projects at any phase of completion, including data problems, empirical and theoretical challenges, presentation refinement, and job market presentations. Collaboration, debate, and shaping research ideas. Prerequisite: courses in organizational theory or social network analysis.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Powell, W. (PI)

EDUC 367: Cultural Psychology

(Formerly 292.) The relationship between culture and psychological processes; how culture becomes an integral part of cognitive, social, and moral development. Both historical and contemporary treatments of cultural psychology, including deficit models, crosscultural psychology, ecological niches, culturally specific versus universal development, sociocultural frameworks, and minority child development. The role of race and power in research on cultural psychology. Course is designed to meet the interests of doctoral students. Enrollment of undergraduate seniors considered; course content not appropriate for freshman, sophomore, nor junior undergraduates.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 374: Philanthropy and Civil Society (POLISCI 334, SOC 374)

Cross-listed with Law (LAW 781), Political Science (POLISCI 334) and Sociology (SOC 374). Associated with the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS). Year-long workshop for doctoral students and advanced undergraduates writing senior theses on the nature of civil society or philanthropy. Focus is on pursuit of progressive research and writing contributing to the current scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and philanthropy. Accomplished in a large part through peer review. Readings include recent scholarship in aforementioned fields. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 375A: Seminar on Organizational Theory (MS&E 389, SOC 363A)

The social science literature on organizations assessed through consideration of the major theoretical traditions and lines of research predominant in the field. For PhD students only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Powell, W. (PI)

EDUC 377C: Individual Philanthropy: Giving Models, Purpose & Practicum

(Same as GSBGEN 381). A philanthropist is anyone who gives anything-time, expertise, networks, credibility, dollars, experience-in any amount to create a better world. Philanthropy is resource, background, age, profession, and industry agnostic, and ¿Individual Philanthropy: Giving Models, Purpose & Practicum¿ will amplify your ability to make your giving, volunteering, service and leadership matter more. You have extraordinary potential to create social change, and this course will empower you with the perspective, experience and inspiration to actualize that potential both immediately and over your lifetime. You will be exposed to a diverse array of giving models and approaches, and be given structured space to weigh and appraise your individual philanthropic point of view and approach. Through deep introspection, you will define and/or refine your social change purpose and create a theory of change that maps how you will transform your values, beliefs and resources (including intellectual, human, network, experiential and financial capital) into measurable social value. Class activities will include debates and simulations such as discussing the benefits and challenges of diverse giving models, creating personal giving strategies, giving fundraising pitches and assessing actual foundation grant proposals. Each student will select and complete due diligence on a local nonprofit and create a formal grant proposal. Students will peer-review grant proposals, participate in a multi-stage grantmaking process and allocate $20,000 of grants funded by the Learning by Giving Foundation and Andreessen Philanthropies. Students will also have the unique opportunity to directly connect and engage with globally renowned philanthropic leaders, including Darren Walker (Ford Foundation), Laura Muñoz Arnold (Arnold Ventures), Justin Steele (Google.org), Crystal Hayling (Libra Foundation) and Holden Karnofsky (Open Philanthropy Project), among others.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Arrillaga, L. (PI)

EDUC 377G: Problem Solving for Social Change

(Also GSBGEN 367). Stanford graduates will play important roles in solving many of today's and tomorrow's major societal problems -- such as improving educational and health outcomes, conserving energy, and reducing global poverty -- which call for actions by nonprofit, business, and hybrid organizations as well as governments. This course teaches skills and bodies of knowledge relevant to these roles through problems and case studies drawn from nonprofit organizations, for-profit social enterprises, and governments. Topics include designing, implementing, scaling, and evaluating social strategies; systems thinking; decision making under risk; psychological biases that adversely affect people's decisions; methods for influencing individuals' and organizations' behavior, ranging from incentives and penalties to "nudges;" human-centered design; corporate social responsibility; and pay-for-success programs. We will apply these concepts and tools to address an actual social problem facing Stanford University. (With the exception of several classes on strategy and evaluation, there is no substantial overlap with Paul Brest's and Mark Wolfson's course, Strategic Philanthropy and Impact Investing (GSBGEN 319), which has a different focus from this one.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Brest, P. (PI)

EDUC 380: Supervised Internship

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Alim, H. (PI); Alvarado, A. (PI); Antonio, A. (PI); Ardoin, N. (PI); Atkin, J. (PI); Aukerman, M. (PI); Ball, A. (PI); Barron, B. (PI); Bernert, R. (PI); Bettinger, E. (PI); Blikstein, P. (PI); Booker, A. (PI); Borko, H. (PI); Brazer, S. (PI); Brest, P. (PI); Bridges, E. (PI); Brown, B. (PI); Brown, N. (PI); Bryk, T. (PI); Calfee, R. (PI); Callan, E. (PI); Carnoy, M. (PI); Carter, P. (PI); Cohen, G. (PI); Cuban, L. (PI); Damon, W. (PI); Darling-Hammond, L. (PI); Dee, T. (PI); Ehrlich, T. (PI); Eisner, E. (PI); Fogg, B. (PI); Forssell, K. (PI); Gage, N. (PI); Goldenberg, C. (PI); Goldman, S. (PI); Gordon, L. (PI); Greeno, J. (PI); Grossman, P. (PI); Gumport, P. (PI); Haertel, E. (PI); Hakuta, K. (PI); Hanushek, E. (PI); Heath, S. (PI); Hoagland, G. (PI); Juel, C. (PI); Kamil, M. (PI); Kelman, A. (PI); Kennedy, D. (PI); Kim, P. (PI); Kirst, M. (PI); Koski, W. (PI); Krumboltz, J. (PI); LaFromboise, T. (PI); Labaree, D. (PI); Levin, H. (PI); Lit, I. (PI); Loeb, S. (PI); Lotan, R. (PI); Lythcott, J. (PI); March, J. (PI); Martinez, A. (PI); Massy, W. (PI); McDermott, R. (PI); McFarland, D. (PI); McLaughlin, M. (PI); Mendoza-Newman, M. (PI); Meyerson, D. (PI); Murata, A. (PI); Nasir, N. (PI); Noddings, N. (PI); O'Hara, S. (PI); Obradovic, J. (PI); Olkin, I. (PI); Osborne, J. (PI); Padilla, A. (PI); Pea, R. (PI); Phillips, D. (PI); Pope, D. (PI); Porteus, A. (PI); Post, L. (PI); Powell, W. (PI); Ramirez, F. (PI); Reich, R. (PI); Rickford, J. (PI); Rogosa, D. (PI); Rohlen, T. (PI); Salinas, N. (PI); Schwartz, D. (PI); Shavelson, R. (PI); Shulman, L. (PI); Simms, W. (PI); Spindler, G. (PI); Staklis, S. (PI); Stevens, M. (PI); Stipek, D. (PI); Stout, F. (PI); Strober, M. (PI); Suarez, D. (PI); Thoresen, C. (PI); Tyack, D. (PI); Valdes, G. (PI); Walker, D. (PI); Weiler, H. (PI); Willinsky, J. (PI); Wineburg, S. (PI); Wotipka, C. (PI); reardon, s. (PI)

EDUC 387: Workshop: Comparative Studies of Educational and Political Systems (SOC 311A)

Analysis of quantitative and longitudinal data on national educational systems and political structures. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 388F: Introduction to Academic Language

This course will provide opportunities for pre-service teachers to begin to develop an understanding of language uses, forms, and mechanics through application of a functional approach to academic language. By exploring language structures (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics) as well as lanauge-in-use (pragmatics and discourse), teacher candidates will be able to better recognize linguistic demands and challenges of students in the classroom.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hill-Bonnet, L. (PI)

EDUC 400A: Introduction to Statistical Methods in Education

(Formerly EDUC 160.) Basic techniques in descriptive and inferential statistics for educational research will be covered with an emphasis on rigorous preparation for intermediate and advanced courses. Topics include central tendency, variance, probability, distributions, confidence interval, t-test, F-test, correlation, regression, and analysis of variance. Non-parametric statistics and graphical principles for data representation will also be addressed. Students will also be introduced to STATA in preparation for subsequent higher level courses.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Schwartz, D. (PI)

EDUC 401A: Mini Courses in Methodology: Statistical Packages for the Social Sciences (SPSS)

Statistical analysis using SPSS, including generating descriptive statistics, drawing graphs, calculating correlation coefficients, conducting t-tests, analysis of variance, and linear regression. Building up datasets, preparing datasets for analysis, conducting statistical analysis, and interpreting results.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lang, D. (PI)

EDUC 401B: Mini Courses in Methodology: Stata

The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the Stata statistical software package for use in quantitative research. By the end of the course, students should be able to import and export data, clean and manage data, conduct standard statistical tests (e.g., correlation, t-test, regression), and produce a graph.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Stenhaug, B. (PI)

EDUC 404: Topics in Brazilian Education: Public Policy and Innovation for the 21st Century

The objective of this seminar is to provide students from different backgrounds an opportunity to learn about current issues and debates on Brazilian education. The seminar will cover topics on the history of Brazilian education; an overview of current school reforms at the federal level; educational assessments; education and economic growth; educational equity; teacher labor market; technology and education; early childhood; and higher education to Brazil.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 417: Research and Policy on Postsecondary Access (EDUC 117)

The transition from high school to college. K-16 course focusing on high school preparation, college choice, remediation, pathways to college, and first-year adjustment. The role of educational policy in postsecondary access. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Antonio, A. (PI)

EDUC 421: Powerful Ideas for Learning Sciences and Technology Design: Sociocultural Practices of the Blues

This course is intended as a graduate level seminar that provides in-depth readings and discussions, Professor Roy Pea's professional reflections, and student essay-writing on topics examined in Dr. Pea's select publications and associated influential writings.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pea, R. (PI)

EDUC 425: Advanced Topics in Research on Self and Stigma

This course focuses on the relevance of self, identity, and stigmatization to understanding and remedying social problems. A key focus will be on how interactions between the self-system and social systems (e.g. schools, workplaces, institutions) drive outcomes over time, including educational and economic inequality. More broadly, class discussion and readings will address a social psychological analysis of intervention and change.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cohen, G. (PI)

EDUC 426: Unleashing Personal Potential: Behavioral Science and Design Thinking Applied to Self (PSYCH 264)

This course facilitates the application of the methods, theories, and findings of behavioral science to students own lives and improvement projects. It does so by combining behavioral science with a design thinking approach. You will learn to identify your potential, navigate to achieve it, and stay resilient during the journey. Students will design their own action plans, define goals and prototype strategies to test them, in an iterative feedback cycle. Our course thus blends two intellectual streams that seldom intersect: behavioral science and design thinking.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EDUC 429S: History of American Indian & Alaska Native Education (EDUC 119S, NATIVEAM 119S)

How the federal government placed education at the center of its Indian policy in second half of 19th century, subjecting Native Americans to programs designed to erase native cultures and American Indian responses to those programs. Topics include traditional Indian education, role of religious groups, Meriam Report, Navajo-Hopi Rehabilitation Act, Johnson-O'Malley Act, and public schools.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Anderson, J. (PI)

EDUC 430A: Experimental Research Design and Analysis

The course will cover the following topics: a) the logic of causal inference and the Fisher/Neyman/Rubin counterfactual causal model (Fisher, 1935; Heckman, 1979; Holland, 1986; Neyman, 1990; Rubin, 1978); b) randomized experiments; c) complex randomized experiments in education (cluster randomized trials, multi-site trials, staggered implementation via randomization, etc.); d) policy experiments with randomization; e) meta-analysis; and f) power in randomized experiments; g) the ethics and politics of randomized experiments.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Bettinger, E. (PI)

EDUC 437: Curricular Practical Training

"Curricular Practical Training" independent study sections specifically created for international students in F-1 Visa Status who wish to receive credit and to be paid for internships.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 445: Entrepreneurial Approaches to Education Reform

(Same as STRAMGT 335) In this course, students will investigate opportunities and challenges of entrepreneurial ventures trying to make a positive impact in public education. The course requires a basic level of understanding of the U.S. K-12 public school system. The first session will analyze the structure of the public education as an industry, with a special emphasis on understanding the achievement gap. Subsequent sessions will explore challenges in increasing efficacy, ensuring financial sustainability, and scaling for entrepreneurs who have sought to change student outcomes, solve pain points, and innovate. The course will feature a variety of ventures (including schools, education technology, training, and supplemental services) and organizational models (for-profit, not-for-profit, and benefit corporation). This course is suitable for students aspiring to be entrepreneurs, leaders in entrepreneurial organizations, leaders in educational organizations, Board members, donors or investors. (Note: this is not a "how-to" course on starting an entrepreneurial venture.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lee, G. (PI)

EDUC 450B: Using Video as Data in the Learning Sciences

This seminar will focus on key theoretical and methodological advances in the use of digital video-based data in the learning sciences as a fruitful part of a research agenda on teaching, learning, and other educational processes. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Langer-Osuna, J. (PI)

EDUC 465: Development and Psychological Sciences (DAPS) Faculty Student Seminar

Faculty and students in the DAPS graduate training program will convene to discuss how the disciplines of developmental and psychological sciences impact education, ground these issues in the work of current faculty and advanced student research, discuss professional development issues unique to this area, and share student perspectives on the field and their progress in the program. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 466: Doctoral Seminar in Curriculum Research

Required of all doctoral students in CTE, normally during their second year in the program. Students present their ideas regarding a dissertation or other research project, and prepare a short research proposal that often satisfies their second-year review.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 470: Practicum

For advanced graduate students. (all areas)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Alvarado, A. (PI); Antonio, A. (PI); Ardoin, N. (PI); Atkin, J. (PI); Aukerman, M. (PI); Ball, A. (PI); Barron, B. (PI); Bettinger, E. (PI); Blikstein, P. (PI); Booker, A. (PI); Bridges, E. (PI); Brown, B. (PI); Brown, N. (PI); Bryk, T. (PI); Calfee, R. (PI); Callan, E. (PI); Carnoy, M. (PI); Cuban, L. (PI); Damon, W. (PI); Darling-Hammond, L. (PI); Davis, S. (PI); Eisner, E. (PI); Fogg, B. (PI); Gage, N. (PI); Goldman, S. (PI); Gordon, L. (PI); Greeno, J. (PI); Grossman, P. (PI); Gumport, P. (PI); Haertel, E. (PI); Hakuta, K. (PI); Hanushek, E. (PI); Heath, S. (PI); Juel, C. (PI); Kamil, M. (PI); Kennedy, D. (PI); Kirst, M. (PI); Krumboltz, J. (PI); LaFromboise, T. (PI); Labaree, D. (PI); Levin, H. (PI); Lit, I. (PI); Loeb, S. (PI); Lotan, R. (PI); Lythcott, J. (PI); March, J. (PI); Martinez, A. (PI); Massy, W. (PI); McDermott, R. (PI); McFarland, D. (PI); McLaughlin, M. (PI); Mendoza-Newman, M. (PI); Meyerson, D. (PI); Murata, A. (PI); Nasir, N. (PI); Noddings, N. (PI); Olkin, I. (PI); Padilla, A. (PI); Pea, R. (PI); Perez-Granados, D. (PI); Phillips, D. (PI); Pope, D. (PI); Porteus, A. (PI); Post, L. (PI); Powell, W. (PI); Ramirez, F. (PI); Reich, R. (PI); Rickford, J. (PI); Rogosa, D. (PI); Rohlen, T. (PI); Schwartz, D. (PI); Shavelson, R. (PI); Shulman, L. (PI); Simms, W. (PI); Spindler, G. (PI); Staklis, S. (PI); Stipek, D. (PI); Stout, F. (PI); Strober, M. (PI); Suarez, D. (PI); Thoresen, C. (PI); Tyack, D. (PI); Valdes, G. (PI); Walker, D. (PI); Weiler, H. (PI); Williamson, J. (PI); Willinsky, J. (PI); Wineburg, S. (PI); Wotipka, C. (PI); reardon, s. (PI)

EDUC 480: Directed Reading

For advanced graduate students. (all areas)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Adams, C. (PI); Alim, H. (PI); Alvarado, A. (PI); Antonio, A. (PI); Ardoin, N. (PI); Atkin, J. (PI); Aukerman, M. (PI); Ball, A. (PI); Banks, A. (PI); Barron, B. (PI); Bettinger, E. (PI); Blikstein, P. (PI); Boaler, J. (PI); Bonnet, G. (PI); Booker, A. (PI); Borko, H. (PI); Brazer, S. (PI); Brest, P. (PI); Bridges, E. (PI); Bromley, P. (PI); Brown, B. (PI); Brown, N. (PI); Bryk, T. (PI); Calfee, R. (PI); Callan, E. (PI); Carlson, J. (PI); Carnoy, M. (PI); Carter, P. (PI); Cohen, G. (PI); Cotterman, K. (PI); Cuban, L. (PI); Damon, W. (PI); Darling-Hammond, L. (PI); Dee, T. (PI); Domingue, B. (PI); Ehrlich, T. (PI); Eisner, E. (PI); Ellch, L. (PI); Emery, D. (PI); Fogg, B. (PI); Fong, B. (PI); Forssell, K. (PI); Gage, N. (PI); Garcia, A. (PI); Gilbert, D. (PI); Goldenberg, C. (PI); Goldman, S. (PI); Gordon, L. (PI); Greeno, J. (PI); Grossman, P. (PI); Gumport, P. (PI); Haertel, E. (PI); Hakuta, K. (PI); Hanushek, E. (PI); Haysman, C. (PI); Heath, S. (PI); Hoagland, G. (PI); Juel, C. (PI); Kamil, M. (PI); Kelman, A. (PI); Kennedy, D. (PI); Kijima, R. (PI); Kim, P. (PI); Kirst, M. (PI); Krumboltz, J. (PI); Kuboyama, E. (PI); Kushner, M. (PI); LaFromboise, T. (PI); Labaree, D. (PI); Langer-Osuna, J. (PI); Levin, H. (PI); Levine, S. (PI); Lit, I. (PI); Litvak, L. (PI); Loeb, S. (PI); Lotan, R. (PI); Loyalka, P. (PI); Lyall, K. (PI); Lythcott, J. (PI); March, J. (PI); Martinez, A. (PI); Martinez, R. (PI); Massy, W. (PI); McCandliss, B. (PI); McDermott, R. (PI); McFarland, D. (PI); McLaughlin, M. (PI); Mendoza-Newman, M. (PI); Meyerson, D. (PI); Monsalve, S. (PI); Murata, A. (PI); Nandagopal, K. (PI); Nasir, N. (PI); Noddings, N. (PI); O'Hara, S. (PI); Obradovic, J. (PI); Olkin, I. (PI); Osborne, J. (PI); Padilla, A. (PI); Pea, R. (PI); Peterson, M. (PI); Phillips, D. (PI); Plank, D. (PI); Pope, D. (PI); Porteus, A. (PI); Post, L. (PI); Powell, W. (PI); Ramirez, F. (PI); Reich, R. (PI); Rickford, J. (PI); Rodriguez, E. (PI); Rogosa, D. (PI); Rohlen, T. (PI); Rosa, J. (PI); Ruiz-Primo, M. (PI); Salinas, N. (PI); Schorr, J. (PI); Schwartz, D. (PI); Shavelson, R. (PI); Shulman, L. (PI); Silverman, R. (PI); Simms, W. (PI); Solano-Flores, G. (PI); Sorcar, P. (PI); Spencer, S. (PI); Spindler, G. (PI); Staklis, S. (PI); Stevens, M. (PI); Stipek, D. (PI); Stout, F. (PI); Strober, M. (PI); Suarez, D. (PI); Thille, C. (PI); Thoresen, C. (PI); Tyack, D. (PI); Valdes, G. (PI); Van Lare, M. (PI); Walker, D. (PI); Weiler, H. (PI); Wieman, C. (PI); Williamson, P. (PI); Willinsky, J. (PI); Wineburg, S. (PI); Wolf, J. (PI); Wotipka, C. (PI); reardon, s. (PI)

EDUC 489: RILE Colloquium on Race, Inequality, and Language in Education

This course is a workshop for PhD students focusing on interdisciplinary empirical work related to Race, Inequality, and Language in Education.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EDUC 490: Directed Research

For advanced graduate students. (all areas)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Alim, H. (PI); Alvarado, A. (PI); Antonio, A. (PI); Ardoin, N. (PI); Aukerman, M. (PI); Ball, A. (PI); Banks, A. (PI); Barron, B. (PI); Bettinger, E. (PI); Blikstein, P. (PI); Boaler, J. (PI); Booker, A. (PI); Borko, H. (PI); Brazer, S. (PI); Brest, P. (PI); Bromley, P. (PI); Brown, B. (PI); Bryk, T. (PI); Calfee, R. (PI); Callan, E. (PI); Carlson, J. (PI); Carnoy, M. (PI); Carter, P. (PI); Cohen, G. (PI); Cuban, L. (PI); Damon, W. (PI); Darling-Hammond, L. (PI); Dee, T. (PI); Domingue, B. (PI); Ehrlich, T. (PI); Eisner, E. (PI); Fogg, B. (PI); Fong, B. (PI); Garcia, A. (PI); Gilbert, D. (PI); Goldenberg, C. (PI); Goldman, S. (PI); Gordon, L. (PI); Grossman, P. (PI); Gumport, P. (PI); Haertel, E. (PI); Hakuta, K. (PI); Hoagland, G. (PI); Juel, C. (PI); Kamil, M. (PI); Kelman, A. (PI); Kijima, R. (PI); Kim, P. (PI); Kirst, M. (PI); Koski, W. (PI); Krumboltz, J. (PI); Kuboyama, E. (PI); Kushner, M. (PI); LaFromboise, T. (PI); Labaree, D. (PI); Langer-Osuna, J. (PI); Levine, S. (PI); Lit, I. (PI); Loeb, S. (PI); Lotan, R. (PI); Loyalka, P. (PI); Lythcott, J. (PI); Martinez, R. (PI); McCandliss, B. (PI); McDermott, R. (PI); McFarland, D. (PI); McLaughlin, M. (PI); Meyerson, D. (PI); Murata, A. (PI); Nasir, N. (PI); Obradovic, J. (PI); Olkin, I. (PI); Osborne, J. (PI); Padilla, A. (PI); Pea, R. (PI); Phillips, D. (PI); Plank, D. (PI); Pope, D. (PI); Porteus, A. (PI); Powell, W. (PI); Ramirez, F. (PI); Rodriguez, E. (PI); Rogosa, D. (PI); Rosa, J. (PI); Ruiz-Primo, M. (PI); Schwartz, D. (PI); Shavelson, R. (PI); Silverman, R. (PI); Solano-Flores, G. (PI); Sorcar, P. (PI); Staklis, S. (PI); Stevens, M. (PI); Stipek, D. (PI); Strober, M. (PI); Suarez, D. (PI); Thille, C. (PI); Tyack, D. (PI); Valdes, G. (PI); Walker, D. (PI); Wieman, C. (PI); Williamson, P. (PI); Willinsky, J. (PI); Wineburg, S. (PI); Wolf, J. (PI); Wotipka, C. (PI); reardon, s. (PI)

EDUC 801: TGR Project

For advanced graduate students. Instructor consent required. (all areas)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR

EDUC 802: TGR Dissertation

For advanced graduate students. Instructor consent required. (all areas)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
Instructors: ; Alim, H. (PI); Alvarado, A. (PI); Antonio, A. (PI); Ardoin, N. (PI); Aukerman, M. (PI); Ball, A. (PI); Barron, B. (PI); Bettinger, E. (PI); Blikstein, P. (PI); Boaler, J. (PI); Booker, A. (PI); Borko, H. (PI); Bromley, P. (PI); Brown, B. (PI); Bryk, T. (PI); Calfee, R. (PI); Callan, E. (PI); Carlson, J. (PI); Carnoy, M. (PI); Carter, P. (PI); Cohen, G. (PI); Cuban, L. (PI); Damon, W. (PI); Darling-Hammond, L. (PI); Dee, T. (PI); Domingue, B. (PI); Eisner, E. (PI); Goldenberg, C. (PI); Goldman, S. (PI); Gordon, L. (PI); Grossman, P. (PI); Gumport, P. (PI); Haertel, E. (PI); Hakuta, K. (PI); Juel, C. (PI); Kelman, A. (PI); Kirst, M. (PI); Krumboltz, J. (PI); LaFromboise, T. (PI); Labaree, D. (PI); Langer-Osuna, J. (PI); Levine, S. (PI); Lit, I. (PI); Loeb, S. (PI); Lotan, R. (PI); Loyalka, P. (PI); Lythcott, J. (PI); Martinez, R. (PI); McDermott, R. (PI); McFarland, D. (PI); McLaughlin, M. (PI); Meyerson, D. (PI); Murata, A. (PI); Nasir, N. (PI); Obradovic, J. (PI); Olkin, I. (PI); Osborne, J. (PI); Padilla, A. (PI); Pea, R. (PI); Phillips, D. (PI); Pope, D. (PI); Porteus, A. (PI); Powell, W. (PI); Ramirez, F. (PI); Rogosa, D. (PI); Rosa, J. (PI); Ruiz-Primo, M. (PI); Schwartz, D. (PI); Shavelson, R. (PI); Shulman, L. (PI); Silverman, R. (PI); Solano-Flores, G. (PI); Spindler, G. (PI); Staklis, S. (PI); Stevens, M. (PI); Stipek, D. (PI); Strober, M. (PI); Suarez, D. (PI); Thille, C. (PI); Tyack, D. (PI); Valdes, G. (PI); Walker, D. (PI); Wieman, C. (PI); Williamson, P. (PI); Willinsky, J. (PI); Wineburg, S. (PI); Wotipka, C. (PI); reardon, s. (PI)
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