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ECON 1: Principles of Economics

This is an introductory course in economics. We will cover both microeconomics (investigating decisions by individuals and firms) and macroeconomics (examining the economy as a whole). The primary goal is to develop and then build on your understanding of the analytical tools and approaches used by economists. This will help you to interpret economic news and economic data at a much deeper level while also forming your own opinions on economic issues. The course will also provide a strong foundation for those of you who want to continue on with intermediate microeconomics and/or intermediate macroeconomics and possibly beyond.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

ECON 5: Frontiers in Economic Research and Policy

Interested in exploring how economics is used in professional, policy, and research settings? This course will feature weekly presentations from Stanford faculty and scholars and economists in government, non-profit, and business to demonstrate how economic analysis can be applied to a wide range of practical and policy problems. May be repeated for credit. Pre-requisites: none.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 4 units total)
Instructors: ; Makler, C. (PI)

ECON 12: Economics of Artificial Intelligence

How will artificial intelligence and machine learning reshape the economy? This course examines the prospective impact of AI on jobs, wages, inequality, industrial power, and global competition. We begin by examining the effects of previous technological revolutions (from the Industrial Revolution to the digital age) on living standards, relative power of labor and capital, and organization of economic activity. We then review the tools and methods economists use to analyze the potential consequences of AI and machine learning. We conclude by assessing priorities for government policy, including opportunities for harnessing AI to create a more prosperous and equitable society.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

ECON 44: The Modern Financial System

The purpose of the class is to introduce you to the modern financial system. What are the major financial instruments -- bonds, bank loans and also equity - and how are their prices determined. What are the key financial institutions that lend, provide liquidity and make markets. What role does the government play through regulation, monetary policy and special intervention in crisis time. We'll devote particular attention to the payments system: how do households and firms make payments, how do financial institutions organize these payments, and how could this business change with potential entry of new digital currencies, provided by central banks or the private sector. Prerequisites: Econ 1 is recommended.
Terms: Win | Units: 5

ECON 50: Economic Analysis I

Individual consumer and firm behavior under perfect competition. The role of markets and prices in a decentralized economy. Monopoly in partial equilibrium. Economic tools developed from multivariable calculus using partial differentiation and techniques for constrained and unconstrained optimization. Prerequisites: Econ 1 or 1V, and Math 51 or Math 51A or CME 100 or CME 100A.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR, WAY-SI

ECON 52: Economic Analysis III

Long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations. Focus on the macroeconomic tools of government: fiscal policy (spending and taxes) and monetary policy, and their effects on growth, employment, and inflation. Prerequisites: ECON 50.
Terms: Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

ECON 101: Economic Policy Seminar

Economic policy analysis, writing, and oral presentation. Topics vary with instructor. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: Econ 51 and 52, 102B, and two field courses. Some sections require additional prerequisites.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit

ECON 102A: Introduction to Statistical Methods (Postcalculus) for Social Scientists

Probabilistic modeling and statistical techniques relevant for economics. Concepts include: probability trees, conditional probability, random variables, discrete and continuous distributions, correlation, central limit theorems, point estimation, hypothesis testing and confidence intervals for both one and two populations. Prerequisite: MATH 20 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-SI

ECON 102B: Applied Econometrics

Hypothesis tests and confidence intervals for population variances, chi-squared goodness-of-fit tests, hypothesis tests for independence, simple linear regression model, testing regression parameters, prediction, multiple regression, omitted variable bias, multicollinearity, F-tests, regression with indicator random variables, simultaneous equation models and instrumental variables. Topics vary slightly depending on the quarter. Prerequisites: Econ 102A or equivalent. Recommended: computer experience (course often uses STATA software to run regressions).
Terms: Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI

ECON 102C: Advanced Topics in Econometrics

The program evaluation problem. Identifying and estimating the effects of policies on outcomes of interest (e.g., tax rates on labor supply, etc.). Identifying and estimating the effects of human capital on earnings and other labor market outcomes. Topics: Instrumental variables estimation; limited dependent variable models (probit, logit, Tobit models); Panel data techniques (fixed and random effect models, dynamic panel data models); Duration models; Bootstrap and Estimation by Simulation. Prerequisite: Econ 102B
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI
Instructors: ; Pistaferri, L. (PI)

ECON 118: Development Economics

The microeconomic problems and policy concerns of less developed countries. Topics include: health and education; risk and insurance; microfinance; agriculture; technology; governance. Emphasis is on economic models and empirical evidence. Prerequisites: ECON 50, ECON 102B.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-AQR, WAY-SI
Instructors: ; Morten, M. (PI)

ECON 124: Economic Development and Challenges of East Asia (INTLPOL 224)

(Formerly IPS 224) This course explores East Asia's rapid economic development and the current economic challenges. For the purpose of this course, we will focus on China, Japan, and Korea. The first part of the course examines economic growth in East Asia and the main mechanisms. In this context, we will examine government and industrial policy, international trade, firms and business groups, and human capital. We will discuss the validity of an East Asian model for economic growth. The second part of the course focuses on the current economic challenges confronting these countries, such as, political economy, human capital, inequality, and entrepreneurship and innovation. Readings will come from books, journal articles, reports, news articles, and case studies. Many of the readings will have an empirical component and students will be able to develop their understanding of how empirical evidence is presented in articles. Prerequisites: INTPOL 301B, Polisci150A(355A), Econ 102B or equivalent courses that cover regression analysis.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: ; Lee, Y. (PI)

ECON 131: The Chinese Economy

This is a survey course of the Chinese economy with emphasis on understanding the process of economic reform, transition and development during the past 40 years. It will help students learn the different historical stages of institutional changes, develop an informed perspective on economic and political rationale and the effectiveness of the economic policies that have shaped China's economic emergence, and think critically about the process of economic and social changes. Prerequisite: Econ 1.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: ; Li, H. (PI); Rozelle, S. (PI)

ECON 136: Market Design

Use of economic theory and analysis to design allocation mechanisms and market institutions. Course focuses on three areas: the design of matching algorithms to solve assignment problems, with applications to school choice, entry-level labor markets, and kidney exchanges; the design of auctions to solve general resource allocation problems, with applications to the sale of natural resources, financial assets, radio spectrum, and advertising; and the design of platforms and exchanges, with applications to internet markets. Emphasis on connecting economic theory to practical applications. Students must write term paper.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR
Instructors: ; Milgrom, P. (PI)

ECON 139D: Directed Reading

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Abramitzky, R. (PI); Admati, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Amador, M. (PI); Amemiya, T. (PI); Arora, A. (PI); Athey, S. (PI); Attanasio, O. (PI); Auclert, A. (PI); Bagwell, K. (PI); Baron, D. (PI); Bekaert, G. (PI); Bernheim, B. (PI); Bettinger, E. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Bloom, N. (PI); Bocola, L. (PI); Boskin, M. (PI); Brady, D. (PI); Bresnahan, T. (PI); Brest, P. (PI); Bulow, J. (PI); Canellos, C. (PI); Carroll, G. (PI); Chan, D. (PI); Chandrasekhar, A. (PI); Chaudhary, L. (PI); Chen, L. (PI); Chetty, R. (PI); Clerici-Arias, M. (PI); Cogan, J. (PI); David, P. (PI); Diamond, R. (PI); Donohue, J. (PI); Duffie, D. (PI); Duggan, M. (PI); Dupas, P. (PI); Einav, L. (PI); Fafchamps, M. (PI); Falcon, W. (PI); Fearon, J. (PI); Fetter, D. (PI); Fitzpatrick, M. (PI); Foster, G. (PI); Fuchs, V. (PI); Garber, A. (PI); Gentzkow, M. (PI); Goda, G. (PI); Gould, A. (PI); Goulder, L. (PI); Greif, A. (PI); Haak, D. (PI); Haber, S. (PI); Hall, R. (PI); Hamilton, J. (PI); Hammond, P. (PI); Hanson, W. (PI); Hanushek, E. (PI); Harris, D. (PI); Hartmann, W. (PI); Henry, P. (PI); Hickman, B. (PI); Hong, H. (PI); Hope, N. (PI); Horvath, M. (PI); Hoxby, C. (PI); Imbens, G. (PI); Jackson, M. (PI); Jagolinzer, A. (PI); Jarosch, G. (PI); Jones, C. (PI); Jost, J. (PI); Judd, K. (PI); Kehoe, P. (PI); Kessler, D. (PI); Klausner, M. (PI); Klenow, P. (PI); Kochar, A. (PI); Kojima, F. (PI); Kolstad, C. (PI); Koudijs, P. (PI); Krueger, A. (PI); Kuran, T. (PI); Kurlat, P. (PI); Kurz, M. (PI); Lambert, N. (PI); Larsen, B. (PI); Lau, L. (PI); Lazear, E. (PI); Leeson, R. (PI); Levin, J. (PI); Lynham, J. (PI); MaCurdy, T. (PI); Malmendier, U. (PI); McClellan, M. (PI); McKeon, S. (PI); Meier, G. (PI); Milgrom, P. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Morten, M. (PI); Naylor, R. (PI); Nechyba, T. (PI); Niederle, M. (PI); Noll, R. (PI); Owen, B. (PI); Oyer, P. (PI); Pencavel, J. (PI); Persson, P. (PI); Piazzesi, M. (PI); Pistaferri, L. (PI); Polinsky, A. (PI); Qian, Y. (PI); Reiss, P. (PI); Richards, J. (PI); Roberts, J. (PI); Romano, J. (PI); Romer, P. (PI); Rosenberg, N. (PI); Rossi-Hansberg, E. (PI); Rosston, G. (PI); Roth, A. (PI); Royalty, A. (PI); Rozelle, S. (PI); Sargent, T. (PI); Schaffner, J. (PI); Schneider, M. (PI); Segal, I. (PI); Sharpe, W. (PI); Shotts, K. (PI); Shoven, J. (PI); Singleton, K. (PI); Skrzypacz, A. (PI); Sorkin, I. (PI); Sweeney, J. (PI); Taylor, J. (PI); Tendall, M. (PI); Topper, M. (PI); Vytlacil, E. (PI); Wacziarg, R. (PI); Weingast, B. (PI); Williams, H. (PI); Wilson, R. (PI); Wolak, F. (PI); Wolitzky, A. (PI); Wright, G. (PI); Wright, M. (PI); Yotopoulos, P. (PI)

ECON 144: Family and Society

The family into which a child is born plays a powerful role in determining lifetime opportunities. This course will apply tools from economics and related social sciences to study how the functioning of families is shaped by laws, social insurance, social norms, and technology. Topics will include intergenerational transmission of wealth and health, the importance of the early family environment, partnership formation, cohabitation and marriage, teen pregnancy and contraception, assisted reproduction, Tiger Moms and Helicopter Parenting, and the employment effects of parenthood. In the context of these topics, the course will cover social science empirical methods, including regression analysis, causal inference, and quasi-experimental methods. Throughout the course, we will think critically about the role of the government and how the design of public policy targeting families affect our ability to solve some of the most important social and economic problems of our time. Prerequisites: Econ 50
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: ; Persson, P. (PI)

ECON 149: The Modern Firm in Theory and Practice

Examines the empirics on the economics, management and strategy of organizations (e.g. firms). Topics include the organization of firms in US and internationally. Management practices around information systems, target setting and human resources. Focus on management practices in manufacturing, but also analyze retail, hospitals and schools, plus some recent field-experiments in developing countries. Prerequisites: ECON 51 (Public Policy majors may take PUBLPOL 51 as a substitute for ECON 51), ECON 102B.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: ; Bloom, N. (PI)

ECON 150: Economic Policy Analysis (PUBLPOL 104, PUBLPOL 204)

The relationship between microeconomic analysis and public policy making. How economic policy analysis is done and why political leaders regard it as useful but not definitive in making policy decisions. Economic rationales for policy interventions, methods of policy evaluation and the role of benefit-cost analysis, economic models of politics and their application to policy making, and the relationship of income distribution to policy choice. Theoretical foundations of policy making and analysis, and applications to program adoption and implementation. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and ECON 102B. Undergraduate Public Policy students are required to take this class for a letter grade and enroll in this class for five units.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR
Instructors: ; Rosston, G. (PI)

ECON 155: Environmental Economics and Policy

Economic sources of environmental problems and alternative policies for dealing with them (technology standards, emissions taxes, and marketable pollution permits). Evaluation of policies addressing local air pollution, global climate change, and the use of renewable resources. Connections between population growth, economic output, environmental quality, sustainable development, and human welfare. Prerequisite: ECON 50. May be taken concurrently with consent of the instructor.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: ; Goulder, L. (PI)

ECON 162: Games Developing Nations Play (POLISCI 247A, POLISCI 347A)

If, as economists argue, development can make everyone in a society better off, why do leaders fail to pursue policies that promote development? The course uses game theoretic approaches from both economics and political science to address this question. Incentive problems are at the heart of explanations for development failure. Specifically, the course focuses on a series of questions central to the development problem: Why do developing countries have weak and often counterproductive political institutions? Why is violence (civil wars, ethnic conflict, military coups) so prevalent in the developing world, and how does it interact with development? Why do developing economies fail to generate high levels of income and wealth? We study how various kinds of development traps arise, preventing development for most countries. We also explain how some countries have overcome such traps. This approach emphasizes the importance of simultaneous economic and political development as two different facets of the same developmental process. No background in game theory is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI
Instructors: ; Weingast, B. (PI)

ECON 178: Behavioral Economics

The field of behavioral economics draws on insights from other disciplines, especially psychology, to enrich our understanding of economic behavior. The course will discuss how people may display systematic behavioral patterns that diverge from the predictions of standard economic models, as well as the ways in which economists incorporate those considerations into their theories, and the implications of those theories for market outcomes and public policies. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and ECON 102A. Econ 51 is recommended.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

ECON 199D: Honors Thesis Research

In-depth study of an appropriate question and completion of a thesis of very high quality. Normally written under the direction of a member of the Department of Economics (or some closely related department). See description of honors program. Register for at least 1 unit for at least one quarter after your honors application is approved. Winter registration for one unit under the supervision of the Director of the Honors Program is mandatory for all honors students.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Abramitzky, R. (PI); Admati, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Amador, M. (PI); Amemiya, T. (PI); Arora, A. (PI); Athey, S. (PI); Attanasio, O. (PI); Auclert, A. (PI); Bagwell, K. (PI); Bekaert, G. (PI); Benkard, L. (PI); Bernheim, B. (PI); Bettinger, E. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Bloom, N. (PI); Bocola, L. (PI); Boskin, M. (PI); Brady, D. (PI); Bresnahan, T. (PI); Bulow, J. (PI); Canellos, C. (PI); Carroll, G. (PI); Chandrasekhar, A. (PI); Chaudhary, L. (PI); Chetty, R. (PI); Clerici-Arias, M. (PI); Cogan, J. (PI); David, P. (PI); Diamond, R. (PI); Donohue, J. (PI); Duffie, D. (PI); Duggan, M. (PI); Dupas, P. (PI); Einav, L. (PI); Fafchamps, M. (PI); Falcon, W. (PI); Fearon, J. (PI); Fetter, D. (PI); Fitzpatrick, M. (PI); Fuchs, V. (PI); Garber, A. (PI); Gentzkow, M. (PI); Goda, G. (PI); Gould, A. (PI); Goulder, L. (PI); Greif, A. (PI); Haber, S. (PI); Hall, R. (PI); Hammond, P. (PI); Hanson, W. (PI); Hanushek, E. (PI); Harris, D. (PI); Hartmann, W. (PI); Henry, P. (PI); Hong, H. (PI); Hope, N. (PI); Hoxby, C. (PI); Imbens, G. (PI); Jackson, M. (PI); Jagolinzer, A. (PI); Jarosch, G. (PI); Jones, C. (PI); Judd, K. (PI); Kehoe, P. (PI); Kessler, D. (PI); Klenow, P. (PI); Kochar, A. (PI); Kojima, F. (PI); Kolstad, C. (PI); Koudijs, P. (PI); Kuran, T. (PI); Kurlat, P. (PI); Kurz, M. (PI); Lambert, N. (PI); Larsen, B. (PI); Lau, L. (PI); Lazear, E. (PI); Leeson, R. (PI); Levin, J. (PI); Li, H. (PI); Loeb, S. (PI); MaCurdy, T. (PI); McClellan, M. (PI); McKeon, S. (PI); Meier, G. (PI); Milgrom, P. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Morten, M. (PI); Naylor, R. (PI); Niederle, M. (PI); Noll, R. (PI); Owen, B. (PI); Oyer, P. (PI); Pencavel, J. (PI); Persson, P. (PI); Piazzesi, M. (PI); Pistaferri, L. (PI); Polinsky, A. (PI); Qian, Y. (PI); Reiss, P. (PI); Richards, J. (PI); Roberts, J. (PI); Romano, J. (PI); Romer, P. (PI); Rosenberg, N. (PI); Rosston, G. (PI); Roth, A. (PI); Rozelle, S. (PI); Schneider, M. (PI); Segal, I. (PI); Shotts, K. (PI); Shoven, J. (PI); Singleton, K. (PI); Skrzypacz, A. (PI); Sorkin, I. (PI); Strebulaev, I. (PI); Sweeney, J. (PI); Taylor, J. (PI); Tendall, M. (PI); Wacziarg, R. (PI); Weingast, B. (PI); Williams, H. (PI); Wilson, R. (PI); Wolak, F. (PI); Wolitzky, A. (PI); Wright, G. (PI); Wright, M. (PI); Yotopoulos, P. (PI); Yurukoglu, A. (PI); Sheeler, P. (GP)

ECON 203: Microeconomics II

(Non-Economics graduate students register for 203N.) Non-cooperative game theory including normal and extensive forms, solution concepts, games with incomplete information, and repeated games. Externalities and public goods. The theory of imperfect competition: static Bertrand and Cournot competition, dynamic oligopoly, entry decisions, entry deterrence, strategic behavior to alter market conditions. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: ECON 202.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: ; Milgrom, P. (PI)

ECON 211: Macroeconomics II

Dynamic stochastic general equilibrium models using dynamic programming methods that are solved with MATLAB. Growth models (neoclassical, human capital, technical change) using optimal control theory. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: ECON 210.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

ECON 215: Development Economics II

This is a course focusing on macro development research. It will cover dynamic models of growth and development, with a focus on migration; technological change; the functioning of financial markets; barriers to agricultural productivity; informal financial systems (savings, credit, and insurance); and public finance in less developed countries. Prerequisites: 202 or 202N, 270.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: ; Morten, M. (PI)

ECON 221: Political Economy II (POLISCI 460B)

Continuation of ECON 220 / POLISCI 460A. Preparation for advanced research in political economy. This quarter will focus on topics related to culture, institutions, political and economic development, historical evolution, nondemocratic politics, conflict and cooperation. We will cover both empirical and theoretical work. Prerequisite for Political Science PhDnstudents: POLISCI 356A.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

ECON 229: Topics in Economic History

Topics in Economic History: covers topics in Economic History such as the industrial revolution, the demographic transition, the great divergence, the importance of institutions, the diffusion of knowledge, the causes and consequences of income inequality, and immigration over the last two centuries. The course will highlight the roles of economic history in modern economics, the use of economic theory in guiding hypothesis testing, and the construction of new datasets and the execution of empirical analysis. The course is open to PhD students only.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Abramitzky, R. (PI)

ECON 234: Advanced Macroeconomics II

This is an advanced class on monetary economics. We cover empirical evidence, neoclassical models, recent advances in New Keynesian models, monetary policy with heterogeneous agents and financial frictions, alternative models of price setting and other topics. Students enrolled in MGTECON 612 take the class for 4 units. Students develop a research proposal and present it to the instructors as the final exam. Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the economics department's core macro requirement or consent of the instructors.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

ECON 236: Financial Economics I

This course will cover research topics at the boundary between macroeconomics and finance. Topics may include the study of macroeconomic models with financial frictions, conventional and unconventional monetary policy, its transmission mechanism and the term structure of interest rates, sovereign debt crises, search frictions and segmentation in housing markets, (over)leveraging by households, heterogeneous expectations, excess volatility, financial bubbles and crises. Prerequisites: 210, 211, 212.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

ECON 237: Financial Economics II (MGTECON 617)

This Ph.D. course will cover research topics at the boundary between macroeconomics and finance. Topics will include the study of macroeconomic models with financial frictions, the term structure of interest rates, conventional and unconventional monetary policy, sovereign debt crises, search frictions and segmentation in housing markets, (over)leveraging by households, heterogeneous expectations, excess volatility, financial bubbles and crises. Student presentations and course paper requirement. Designed for second year PhD students in economics or finance.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

ECON 239D: Directed Reading

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Abramitzky, R. (PI); Admati, A. (PI); Amador, M. (PI); Amemiya, T. (PI); Arora, A. (PI); Athey, S. (PI); Attanasio, O. (PI); Auclert, A. (PI); Bagwell, K. (PI); Bekaert, G. (PI); Bernheim, B. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Bloom, N. (PI); Bocola, L. (PI); Boskin, M. (PI); Brady, D. (PI); Bresnahan, T. (PI); Bulow, J. (PI); Canellos, C. (PI); Carroll, G. (PI); Chandrasekhar, A. (PI); Chaudhary, L. (PI); Chetty, R. (PI); Clerici-Arias, M. (PI); Cogan, J. (PI); Cuesta, J. (PI); David, P. (PI); Diamond, R. (PI); Duffie, D. (PI); Duggan, M. (PI); Dupas, P. (PI); Einav, L. (PI); Fafchamps, M. (PI); Falcon, W. (PI); Fetter, D. (PI); Fitzpatrick, M. (PI); Fuchs, V. (PI); Garber, A. (PI); Gentzkow, M. (PI); Goda, G. (PI); Gould, A. (PI); Goulder, L. (PI); Greif, A. (PI); Haber, S. (PI); Hall, R. (PI); Hammond, P. (PI); Hanson, W. (PI); Hanushek, E. (PI); Harris, D. (PI); Hartmann, W. (PI); Henry, P. (PI); Hong, H. (PI); Hope, N. (PI); Hoxby, C. (PI); Imbens, G. (PI); Jackson, M. (PI); Jagolinzer, A. (PI); Jarosch, G. (PI); Jones, C. (PI); Judd, K. (PI); Kehoe, P. (PI); Kessler, D. (PI); Klenow, P. (PI); Kochar, A. (PI); Kojima, F. (PI); Kolstad, C. (PI); Koudijs, P. (PI); Kreps, D. (PI); Kuran, T. (PI); Kurlat, P. (PI); Kurz, M. (PI); Lambert, N. (PI); Larsen, B. (PI); Lau, L. (PI); Lazear, E. (PI); Levin, J. (PI); MaCurdy, T. (PI); McClellan, M. (PI); Meier, G. (PI); Milgrom, P. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Morten, M. (PI); Naylor, R. (PI); Niederle, M. (PI); Noll, R. (PI); Owen, B. (PI); Oyer, P. (PI); Pencavel, J. (PI); Persson, P. (PI); Pfleiderer, P. (PI); Piazzesi, M. (PI); Pistaferri, L. (PI); Polinsky, A. (PI); Qian, Y. (PI); Reiss, P. (PI); Richards, J. (PI); Roberts, J. (PI); Romano, J. (PI); Romer, P. (PI); Rosenberg, N. (PI); Rosston, G. (PI); Roth, A. (PI); Rozelle, S. (PI); Schneider, M. (PI); Segal, I. (PI); Shotts, K. (PI); Shoven, J. (PI); Singleton, K. (PI); Skrzypacz, A. (PI); Sorkin, I. (PI); Sweeney, J. (PI); Taylor, J. (PI); Tendall, M. (PI); Wacziarg, R. (PI); Weingast, B. (PI); Williams, H. (PI); Wilson, R. (PI); Wolak, F. (PI); Wolitzky, A. (PI); Wright, G. (PI); Wright, M. (PI); Yotopoulos, P. (PI); Sheeler, P. (GP)

ECON 243: Public Economics III

The first part of the course concerns inequality and the design of social insurance. We also explore questions in the intersection of public and family economics such as the unit of taxation, and the interaction between social insurance and intra-family insurance. The second half of the course covers local public policy and urban economics, and includes topics such as spatial equilibrium, placed-based policies and housing policy. Prerequisites: Econ 202, 203, 204, 210, 270, 271, or equivalent with consent of instructor. Recommended: Econ 241.270, 271, or equivalent with consent of instructor. Recommended: Econ 241 and 242
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

ECON 244: Market Failures and Public Policy

Market failures are the classic justification for government intervention in private markets. This course will focus on a small number of economically important markets where market failures are thought to be important: credit, health care, innovation, and insurance. For each of these markets, we will discuss theory and evidence on the existence and magnitude of market failures, and theory and evidence on the efficiency of public policy interventions designed to address those market failures. Prerequisites: ECON 202-204, ECON 270, ECON 271, or equivalent with consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

ECON 247: Labor Economics II

Recent topics in applied micro, focusing on papers from top journals (QJE, AER, JPE, Econometrica and REStud) over the last ten years. Broad overview of current topic and techniques in applied-micro research. Topics include inequality, polarization and skill-biased technical change, discrimination, technology adoption and the spread of information, management practices, field experiments, peer effects and academic spillovers. Combination of student and faculty presentations. Additional sessions on general presentations, paper writing and research skills to prepare for job market. Typically also run a class trip to the NBER West-Coast labor meetings at the San Francisco Fed.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: ; Bloom, N. (PI)

ECON 250: Environmental Economics

Theoretical and empirical analysis of sources of and solutions to environmental problems, with application to local pollution challenges and global environmental issues such as climate change. Topics include: analysis of market failure, choice of environmental policy instruments, integrating environmental and distortionary taxes, environmental policy making under uncertainty, valuing environmental amenities, and measuring /promoting sustainable development.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: ; Goulder, L. (PI)

ECON 258: Industrial Organization IIA

Topics may include theoretical and empirical analysis of bargaining, dynamic models of entry and investment, models of household borrowing, models of markets with asymmetric information, advertising, brands, and markets for information, and research at the boundaries between IO and neighboring fields such as trade, behavioral economics, and household finance. Prerequisite: Econ 257.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

ECON 271: Intermediate Econometrics II

Analysis of Randomized Experiments, Linear Regression Model, Instrumental Variables, Methods for Causal Effects. Prerequisite: Econ 270 or MGTECON 603 or permission of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

ECON 273: Advanced Econometrics I

Possible topics: parametric asymptotic theory. M and Z estimators. General large sample results for maximum likelihood; nonlinear least squares; and nonlinear instrumental variables estimators including the generalized method of moments estimator under general conditions. Model selection test. Consistent model selection criteria. Nonnested hypothesis testing. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. Nonparametric and semiparametric methods. Quantile Regression methods.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: ; Hong, H. (PI)

ECON 279: Behavioral and Experimental Economics II

This is part of a three course sequence (along with Econ 278 & 280-formerly 277) on behavioral and experimental economics. The sequence has two main objectives: 1) examines theories and evidence related to the psychology of economic decision making, 2) Introduces methods of experimental economics, and explores major subject areas (including those not falling within behavioral economics) that have been addressed through laboratory experiments. Focuses on series of experiments that build on one another in an effort to test between competing theoretical frameworks, with the objects of improving the explanatory and predictive performance of standard models, and of providing a foundation for more reliable normative analyses of policy issues. Prerequisites: 204 and 271, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: ; Niederle, M. (PI)

ECON 282: Contracts, Information, and Incentives

Basic theories and recent developments in mechanism design and the theory of contracts. Topics include: hidden characteristics and hidden action models with one and many agents, design of mechanisms and markets with limited communication, long-term relationships under commitment and under renegotiation, property rights and theories of the firm.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: ; Segal, I. (PI)

ECON 287: Mechanism and Market Design (MS&E 365)

Primarily for doctoral students. Focus on quantitative models dealing with sustainability and related to operations management. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Ashlagi, I. (PI)

ECON 299: Practical Training

Students obtain employment in a relevant research or industrial activity to enhance their professional experience consistent with their degree programs. At the start of the quarter, students must submit a one page statement showing the relevance of the employment to the degree program along with an offer letter. Submit this documentation to the Econ professor, who has agreed to the student enrolling in their Econ 299 section. At the end of the quarter, a three page final report must be supplied documenting work done and relevance to degree program. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Abramitzky, R. (PI); Admati, A. (PI); Amador, M. (PI); Amemiya, T. (PI); Arora, A. (PI); Athey, S. (PI); Attanasio, O. (PI); Auclert, A. (PI); Bagwell, K. (PI); Baron, D. (PI); Bekaert, G. (PI); Bernheim, B. (PI); Bettinger, E. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Bloom, N. (PI); Bocola, L. (PI); Boskin, M. (PI); Brady, D. (PI); Bresnahan, T. (PI); Bulow, J. (PI); Canellos, C. (PI); Carroll, G. (PI); Chandrasekhar, A. (PI); Chaudhary, L. (PI); Chetty, R. (PI); Clerici-Arias, M. (PI); Cogan, J. (PI); David, P. (PI); Diamond, R. (PI); Duffie, D. (PI); Duggan, M. (PI); Dupas, P. (PI); Einav, L. (PI); Fafchamps, M. (PI); Falcon, W. (PI); Fetter, D. (PI); Fitzpatrick, M. (PI); Fuchs, V. (PI); Garber, A. (PI); Gentzkow, M. (PI); Gould, A. (PI); Goulder, L. (PI); Greif, A. (PI); Haak, D. (PI); Haber, S. (PI); Hall, R. (PI); Hamilton, J. (PI); Hammond, P. (PI); Hanson, W. (PI); Hanushek, E. (PI); Harris, D. (PI); Hartmann, W. (PI); Henry, P. (PI); Hickman, B. (PI); Hong, H. (PI); Hope, N. (PI); Horvath, M. (PI); Hoxby, C. (PI); Imbens, G. (PI); Jackson, M. (PI); Jagolinzer, A. (PI); Jarosch, G. (PI); Jones, C. (PI); Jost, J. (PI); Judd, K. (PI); Kehoe, P. (PI); Kessler, D. (PI); Klenow, P. (PI); Kochar, A. (PI); Kojima, F. (PI); Kolstad, C. (PI); Krueger, A. (PI); Kuran, T. (PI); Kurlat, P. (PI); Kurz, M. (PI); Lambert, N. (PI); Larsen, B. (PI); Lau, L. (PI); Lazear, E. (PI); Leeson, R. (PI); Levin, J. (PI); MaCurdy, T. (PI); Malmendier, U. (PI); McClellan, M. (PI); McKeon, S. (PI); Meier, G. (PI); Milgrom, P. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Morten, M. (PI); Naylor, R. (PI); Nechyba, T. (PI); Niederle, M. (PI); Noll, R. (PI); Owen, B. (PI); Oyer, P. (PI); Pencavel, J. (PI); Persson, P. (PI); Piazzesi, M. (PI); Pistaferri, L. (PI); Polinsky, A. (PI); Qian, Y. (PI); Reiss, P. (PI); Richards, J. (PI); Roberts, J. (PI); Romano, J. (PI); Romer, P. (PI); Rosenberg, N. (PI); Rossi-Hansberg, E. (PI); Rosston, G. (PI); Roth, A. (PI); Royalty, A. (PI); Rozelle, S. (PI); Sargent, T. (PI); Schaffner, J. (PI); Schneider, M. (PI); Segal, I. (PI); Sharpe, W. (PI); Shotts, K. (PI); Shoven, J. (PI); Singleton, K. (PI); Skrzypacz, A. (PI); Sorkin, I. (PI); Sweeney, J. (PI); Taylor, J. (PI); Tendall, M. (PI); Topper, M. (PI); Vytlacil, E. (PI); Wacziarg, R. (PI); Weingast, B. (PI); Williams, H. (PI); Wilson, R. (PI); Wolak, F. (PI); Wolitzky, A. (PI); Wright, G. (PI); Wright, M. (PI); Yotopoulos, P. (PI); Sheeler, P. (GP)

ECON 310: Macroeconomic Workshop

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

ECON 315: Development Workshop

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

ECON 325: Economic History Workshop

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

ECON 335: Experimental/Behavioral Seminar

Field seminar in experimental and behavioral economics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

ECON 341: Public Economics and Environmental Economics Seminar

Issues in measuring and evaluating the economic performance of government tax, expenditure, debt, and regulatory policies; their effects on levels and distribution of income, wealth, and environmental quality; alternative policies and methods of evaluation. Workshop format combines student research, faculty presentations, and guest speakers. Prerequisite: ECON 241 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

ECON 345: Labor Economics Seminar

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

ECON 354: Law and Economics Seminar

This seminar will examine current research by lawyers and economists on a variety of topics in law and economics. Several sessions of the seminar will consist of an invited speaker, usually from another university, who will discuss his or her current research. Representative of these sessions have been discussions of compensation for government regulations and takings, liability rules for controlling accidents, the definition of markets in antitrust analysis, the role of the government as a controlling shareholder, and optimal drug patent length. Contact the instructor listed for the class to request permission to enroll. Cross-listed with the Law School (Law 7506 and Law 7507).
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2-3

ECON 355: Industrial Organization Workshop

Current research in the field by visitors, presentations by students, and discussion of recent papers. Students write an original research paper, make a formal presentation, and lead a structured discussion.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

ECON 365: International Trade Workshop

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

ECON 370: Econometrics Workshop

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

ECON 391: Microeconomic Theory Seminar

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

ECON 801: TGR Project

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Abramitzky, R. (PI); Admati, A. (PI); Amador, M. (PI); Amemiya, T. (PI); Arora, A. (PI); Athey, S. (PI); Attanasio, O. (PI); Bagwell, K. (PI); Baron, D. (PI); Bekaert, G. (PI); Bernheim, B. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Bloom, N. (PI); Boskin, M. (PI); Brady, D. (PI); Bresnahan, T. (PI); Bulow, J. (PI); Canellos, C. (PI); Carroll, G. (PI); Chandrasekhar, A. (PI); Clerici-Arias, M. (PI); David, P. (PI); Duffie, D. (PI); Dupas, P. (PI); Einav, L. (PI); Fafchamps, M. (PI); Falcon, W. (PI); Fitzpatrick, M. (PI); Fuchs, V. (PI); Garber, A. (PI); Goulder, L. (PI); Greif, A. (PI); Haak, D. (PI); Haber, S. (PI); Hall, R. (PI); Hammond, P. (PI); Hanushek, E. (PI); Harris, D. (PI); Hartmann, W. (PI); Henry, P. (PI); Hickman, B. (PI); Hong, H. (PI); Hope, N. (PI); Horvath, M. (PI); Hoxby, C. (PI); Jackson, M. (PI); Jagolinzer, A. (PI); Jones, C. (PI); Jost, J. (PI); Judd, K. (PI); Kessler, D. (PI); Klenow, P. (PI); Kochar, A. (PI); Kojima, F. (PI); Kolstad, C. (PI); Koudijs, P. (PI); Krueger, A. (PI); Kuran, T. (PI); Kurlat, P. (PI); Kurz, M. (PI); Lambert, N. (PI); Lau, L. (PI); Lazear, E. (PI); Levin, J. (PI); MaCurdy, T. (PI); Malmendier, U. (PI); McClellan, M. (PI); Meier, G. (PI); Milgrom, P. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Naylor, R. (PI); Nechyba, T. (PI); Niederle, M. (PI); Noll, R. (PI); Owen, B. (PI); Oyer, P. (PI); Pencavel, J. (PI); Piazzesi, M. (PI); Pistaferri, L. (PI); Polinsky, A. (PI); Qian, Y. (PI); Reiss, P. (PI); Richards, J. (PI); Roberts, J. (PI); Romano, J. (PI); Romer, P. (PI); Rosenberg, N. (PI); Rossi-Hansberg, E. (PI); Rosston, G. (PI); Roth, A. (PI); Royalty, A. (PI); Rozelle, S. (PI); Sargent, T. (PI); Schaffner, J. (PI); Schneider, M. (PI); Segal, I. (PI); Sharpe, W. (PI); Shotts, K. (PI); Shoven, J. (PI); Singleton, K. (PI); Skrzypacz, A. (PI); Sweeney, J. (PI); Taylor, J. (PI); Tendall, M. (PI); Topper, M. (PI); Vytlacil, E. (PI); Wacziarg, R. (PI); Weingast, B. (PI); Williams, H. (PI); Wilson, R. (PI); Wolak, F. (PI); Wolitzky, A. (PI); Wright, G. (PI); Wright, M. (PI); Yotopoulos, P. (PI); Sheeler, P. (GP)

ECON 802: TGR Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Abramitzky, R. (PI); Admati, A. (PI); Amador, M. (PI); Amemiya, T. (PI); Arora, A. (PI); Athey, S. (PI); Attanasio, O. (PI); Auclert, A. (PI); Bagwell, K. (PI); Baron, D. (PI); Bekaert, G. (PI); Bernheim, B. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Bloom, N. (PI); Bocola, L. (PI); Boskin, M. (PI); Brady, D. (PI); Bresnahan, T. (PI); Bulow, J. (PI); Canellos, C. (PI); Carroll, G. (PI); Chandrasekhar, A. (PI); Chaudhary, L. (PI); Chetty, R. (PI); Clerici-Arias, M. (PI); Cogan, J. (PI); David, P. (PI); Diamond, R. (PI); Duffie, D. (PI); Duggan, M. (PI); Dupas, P. (PI); Einav, L. (PI); Fafchamps, M. (PI); Falcon, W. (PI); Fetter, D. (PI); Fitzpatrick, M. (PI); Fuchs, V. (PI); Garber, A. (PI); Gentzkow, M. (PI); Gould, A. (PI); Goulder, L. (PI); Greif, A. (PI); Haak, D. (PI); Haber, S. (PI); Hall, R. (PI); Hammond, P. (PI); Hanson, W. (PI); Hanushek, E. (PI); Harris, D. (PI); Hartmann, W. (PI); Henry, P. (PI); Hickman, B. (PI); Hong, H. (PI); Hope, N. (PI); Horvath, M. (PI); Hoxby, C. (PI); Imbens, G. (PI); Jackson, M. (PI); Jagolinzer, A. (PI); Jarosch, G. (PI); Jones, C. (PI); Jost, J. (PI); Judd, K. (PI); Kehoe, P. (PI); Kessler, D. (PI); Klenow, P. (PI); Kochar, A. (PI); Kojima, F. (PI); Kolstad, C. (PI); Koudijs, P. (PI); Kreps, D. (PI); Krueger, A. (PI); Kuran, T. (PI); Kurlat, P. (PI); Kurz, M. (PI); Lambert, N. (PI); Larsen, B. (PI); Lau, L. (PI); Lazear, E. (PI); Leeson, R. (PI); Levin, J. (PI); MaCurdy, T. (PI); Malmendier, U. (PI); McClellan, M. (PI); McKeon, S. (PI); Meier, G. (PI); Milgrom, P. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Morten, M. (PI); Naylor, R. (PI); Niederle, M. (PI); Noll, R. (PI); Owen, B. (PI); Oyer, P. (PI); Pencavel, J. (PI); Persson, P. (PI); Piazzesi, M. (PI); Pistaferri, L. (PI); Polinsky, A. (PI); Qian, Y. (PI); Reiss, P. (PI); Richards, J. (PI); Roberts, J. (PI); Romano, J. (PI); Romer, P. (PI); Rosenberg, N. (PI); Rossi-Hansberg, E. (PI); Rosston, G. (PI); Roth, A. (PI); Royalty, A. (PI); Rozelle, S. (PI); Sargent, T. (PI); Schaffner, J. (PI); Schneider, M. (PI); Segal, I. (PI); Sharpe, W. (PI); Shotts, K. (PI); Shoven, J. (PI); Singleton, K. (PI); Skrzypacz, A. (PI); Sorkin, I. (PI); Sweeney, J. (PI); Taylor, J. (PI); Tendall, M. (PI); Topper, M. (PI); Wacziarg, R. (PI); Weingast, B. (PI); Williams, H. (PI); Wilson, R. (PI); Wolak, F. (PI); Wolitzky, A. (PI); Wright, G. (PI); Wright, M. (PI); Yotopoulos, P. (PI); Sheeler, P. (GP)
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