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ECON 1: Principles of Economics

This is an introductory course in economics. We will cover both microeconomics (investigating decisions by individuals and firms) and macroeconomics (examining the economy as a whole). The primary goal is to develop and then build on your understanding of the analytical tools and approaches used by economists. This will help you to interpret economic news and economic data at a much deeper level while also forming your own opinions on economic issues. The course will also provide a strong foundation for those of you who want to continue on with intermediate microeconomics and/or intermediate macroeconomics and possibly beyond. In Spring 2019-2020 Econ 1 will use all class time for team-based learning instead of lectures; class attendance will be mandatory, and enrollment will be limited to 120 students.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 5: Frontiers in Economic Research and Policy

Interested in exploring how economics is used in professional, policy, and research settings? This course will feature weekly presentations from Stanford faculty and scholars and economists in government, non-profit, and business to demonstrate how economic analysis can be applied to a wide range of practical and policy problems. May be repeated for credit. Pre-requisites: none.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Makler, C. (PI)

ECON 10: Microcosm of Silicon Valley and Wall Street

Seminar in applied economics with focus on the microcosm of Silicon Valley, how growth companies are originated, managed and financed from start-up to IPO. Round-table discussion format. Applicable to those students with an interest in technology company formation, growth and finance including interaction with Wall Street. Enrollment limited to 10 juniors, seniors and co-term students. Application found at https://economics.stanford.edu/academics/undergraduate-program/forms.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Shanahan, T. (PI)

ECON 11N: Understanding the Welfare System

Welfare-reform legislation passed by the federal government in the mid-1990s heralded a dramatic step in the movement that has been termed the devolution revolution, which is again being discussed in the context of healthcare reform. The centerpiece of devolution is the transfer of more responsibilities for antipoverty programs to the states. We will explore the effects of these reforms and the role that devolution plays in the ongoing debates over the designs of programs that make up America's social safety net. In addition to discussing conventional welfare programs (e.g., Medicaid, food stamps, TANF, SSI) and other governmental policies assisting low-income families (EITC, minimum wages), we will examine the trends in governmental spending on anti-poverty programs and how our nation defines poverty and eligibility for income support. We will apply economics principles throughout to understand the effectiveness of America's antipoverty programs and their consequences on the behavior and circumstances of families. Prerequisites: A basic understanding/knowledge of introductory economics is recommended.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; MaCurdy, T. (PI)

ECON 22N: Causes and Consequences of the Rise in Inequality

In this class we will discuss the economic and institutional causes of the rise in inequality in the US and other countries over the last 40 years. We will also discuss the consequences of inequality in terms of social justice, economic welfare, aggregate economic performance, intergenerational mobility, and the possible implications of inequality for the recent global financial crisis.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Pistaferri, L. (PI)

ECON 25N: Public Policy and Personal Finance (PUBLPOL 55N)

The seminar will provide an introduction and discussion of the impact of public policy on personal finance. Voters regularly rate the economy as one of the most important factors shaping their political views and most of those opinions are focused on their individual bottom lines. In this course we will discuss the rationale for different public policies and how they affect personal financial situations. We will explore personal finance issues such as taxes, loans, charity, insurance, and pensions. Using the context of (hypothetical) personal finance positions, we will discuss the public policy implications of various proposals and how they affect different groups of people, for example: the implications of differential tax rates for different types of income, the promotion of home ownership in the U.S., and policies to care for our aging population. While economic policy will be the focus of much of the course, we will also examine some of the implications of social policies on personal finance as well. There will be weekly readings and several short policy-related writing assignments.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rosston, G. (PI)

ECON 50: Economic Analysis I

Individual consumer and firm behavior under perfect competition. The role of markets and prices in a decentralized economy. Monopoly in partial equilibrium. Economic tools developed from multivariable calculus using partial differentiation and techniques for constrained and unconstrained optimization. Prerequisites: Econ 1 or 1V, and Math 51 or Math 51A or CME 100 or CME 100A.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 52: Economic Analysis III

Long-run economic growth and short-run economic fluctuations. Focus on the macroeconomic tools of government: fiscal policy (spending and taxes) and monetary policy, and their effects on growth, employment, and inflation. Prerequisites: ECON 50.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 101: Economic Policy Seminar

Economic policy analysis, writing, and oral presentation. Topics vary with instructor. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: Econ 51 and 52, 102B, and two field courses. Some sections require additional prerequisites.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ECON 102A: Introduction to Statistical Methods (Postcalculus) for Social Scientists

Probabilistic modeling and statistical techniques relevant for economics. Concepts include: probability trees, conditional probability, random variables, discrete and continuous distributions, correlation, central limit theorems, point estimation, hypothesis testing and confidence intervals for both one and two populations. Prerequisite: MATH 20 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; McKeon, S. (PI)

ECON 111: Money and Banking

The primary course goal is for students to master the logic, intuition and operation of a financial system - money, financial markets (money and capital markets, debt and equity markets, derivatives markets), and financial institutions and intermediaries (the Central Bank, depository institutions, credit unions, pension funds, insurance companies, venture capital firms, investment banks, mutual funds, etc.). In other words, how money/capital change hands between agents over time, directly and through institutions. Material will be both quantitative and qualitative, yet always highly analytical with a focus on active learning - there will be an approximately equal emphasis on solving mathematical finance problems (e.g. bond or option pricing) and on policy analysis (e.g. monetary policy and financial regulation.) Students will not be rewarded for memorizing and regurgitating facts, but rather for demonstrating the ability to reason with difficult problems and situations with which they might not previously be familiar. Prerequisite: Econ 50, 52. Strongly recommended but not required: some familiarity with finance and statistics (e.g. Econ 135 or 140, Econ 102A)
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 112: Financial Markets and Institutions: Recent Developments

The course covers innovations, challenges and proposed changes to the financial system. Topics include new mortgage products, foreclosure rules, securitization, credit ratings, credit derivatives, dealer networks, repo financing, implications for prudential regulation & monetary policy. Emphasis is on quantitative studies of these topics. Prerequisites: Econ 52, Econ 102B.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Schneider, M. (PI)

ECON 137: Decision Modeling and Information

Effective decision models consider a decision maker's alternatives, information and preferences. The construction of such models in single-party situations with emphasis on the role of information. The course then evolves to two-party decision situations where one party has more information than the other. Models examined include: bidding exercises and the winner's curse, the Akerlof Model and adverse selection, the Principal-Agent model and risk sharing, moral hazard and contract design. Prerequisite: ECON 102A or equivalent. Recommended: Econ 50, Optimization and simulation in Excel.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; McKeon, S. (PI); Kim, J. (TA)

ECON 139D: Directed Reading

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Abramitzky, R. (PI); Admati, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Amador, M. (PI); Amemiya, T. (PI); Aoki, M. (PI); Arora, A. (PI); Athey, S. (PI); Attanasio, O. (PI); Auclert, A. (PI); Bagwell, K. (PI); Baron, D. (PI); Bekaert, G. (PI); Bernheim, B. (PI); Bettinger, E. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Bloom, N. (PI); Boskin, M. (PI); Brady, D. (PI); Bresnahan, T. (PI); Brest, P. (PI); Bulow, J. (PI); Canellos, C. (PI); Carroll, G. (PI); Chandrasekhar, A. (PI); Chaudhary, L. (PI); Chen, L. (PI); Chetty, R. (PI); Clerici-Arias, M. (PI); Cogan, J. (PI); Cojoc, D. (PI); David, P. (PI); DeGiorgi, G. (PI); Diamond, R. (PI); Dickstein, M. (PI); Duffie, D. (PI); Duggan, M. (PI); Dupas, P. (PI); Einav, L. (PI); Fafchamps, M. (PI); Falcon, W. (PI); Fearon, J. (PI); Fitzgerald, D. (PI); Fitzpatrick, M. (PI); Fong, K. (PI); Foster, G. (PI); Fuchs, V. (PI); Garber, A. (PI); Gentzkow, M. (PI); Goda, G. (PI); Goulder, L. (PI); Greif, A. (PI); Haak, D. (PI); Haber, S. (PI); Hall, R. (PI); Hamilton, J. (PI); Hammond, P. (PI); Hansen, P. (PI); Hanson, W. (PI); Hanushek, E. (PI); Harding, M. (PI); Harris, D. (PI); Hartmann, W. (PI); Henry, P. (PI); Hickman, B. (PI); Hong, H. (PI); Hope, N. (PI); Horvath, M. (PI); Hoxby, C. (PI); Imbens, G. (PI); Jackson, M. (PI); Jagolinzer, A. (PI); Jaimovich, N. (PI); Jarosch, G. (PI); Jayachandran, S. (PI); Jones, C. (PI); Jost, J. (PI); Judd, K. (PI); Kastl, J. (PI); Kehoe, P. (PI); Kessler, D. (PI); Klausner, M. (PI); Klenow, P. (PI); Kochar, A. (PI); Kojima, F. (PI); Kolstad, C. (PI); Koudijs, P. (PI); Krueger, A. (PI); Kuran, T. (PI); Kurlat, P. (PI); Kurz, M. (PI); Lambert, N. (PI); Larsen, B. (PI); Lau, L. (PI); Lazear, E. (PI); Levin, J. (PI); Lynham, J. (PI); MaCurdy, T. (PI); Mahajan, A. (PI); Malmendier, U. (PI); Manova, K. (PI); McClellan, M. (PI); McKinnon, R. (PI); Meier, G. (PI); Milgrom, P. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Morten, M. (PI); Moser, P. (PI); Naylor, R. (PI); Nechyba, T. (PI); Niederle, M. (PI); Noll, R. (PI); Owen, B. (PI); Oyer, P. (PI); Pencavel, J. (PI); Persson, P. (PI); Piazzesi, M. (PI); Pistaferri, L. (PI); Polinsky, A. (PI); Qian, Y. (PI); Rangel, A. (PI); Reiss, P. (PI); Richards, J. (PI); Roberts, J. (PI); Romano, J. (PI); Romer, P. (PI); Rosenberg, N. (PI); Rossi-Hansberg, E. (PI); Rosston, G. (PI); Roth, A. (PI); Rothwell, G. (PI); Royalty, A. (PI); Rozelle, S. (PI); Sargent, T. (PI); Schaffner, J. (PI); Scheuer, F. (PI); Schneider, M. (PI); Segal, I. (PI); Sharpe, W. (PI); Shotts, K. (PI); Shoven, J. (PI); Singleton, K. (PI); Skrzypacz, A. (PI); Sorkin, I. (PI); Sprenger, C. (PI); Staiger, R. (PI); Stanton, F. (PI); Sweeney, J. (PI); Taylor, J. (PI); Tendall, M. (PI); Tertilt, M. (PI); Topper, M. (PI); Vytlacil, E. (PI); Wacziarg, R. (PI); Weingast, B. (PI); Wilson, R. (PI); Wolak, F. (PI); Wolitzky, A. (PI); Wright, G. (PI); Wright, M. (PI); Yotopoulos, P. (PI)

ECON 179: Experimental Economics

Methods and major subject areas that have been addressed by laboratory experiments. Focus is on a series of experiments that build on one another. Topics include decision making, two player games, auctions, and market institutions. How experiments are used to learn about preferences and behavior, trust, fairness, and learning. Final presentation of group projects. Prerequisites: ECON 51 (Public Policy majors may take PUBLPOL 51 as a substitute for ECON 51), ECON 102A.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Niederle, M. (PI)

ECON 180: Honors Game Theory

Rigorous introduction to game theory and applications. Topics include solution concepts for static and dynamic games of complete and incomplete information, signaling games, repeated games, bargaining, and elements of cooperative game theory. Applications mainly from economics, but also political science, biology, and computer science. Prerequisites: Experience with abstract mathematics and willingness to work hard. No background in economics required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Segal, I. (PI)

ECON 199D: Honors Thesis Research

In-depth study of an appropriate question and completion of a thesis of very high quality. Normally written under the direction of a member of the Department of Economics (or some closely related department). See description of honors program. Register for at least 1 unit for at least one quarter after your honors application is approved. Winter registration for one unit under the supervision of the Director of the Honors Program is mandatory for all honors students.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Abramitzky, R. (PI); Admati, A. (PI); Alsan, M. (PI); Amador, M. (PI); Amemiya, T. (PI); Aoki, M. (PI); Arora, A. (PI); Athey, S. (PI); Attanasio, O. (PI); Auclert, A. (PI); Bagwell, K. (PI); Bekaert, G. (PI); Benkard, L. (PI); Bernheim, B. (PI); Bettinger, E. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Bloom, N. (PI); Boskin, M. (PI); Brady, D. (PI); Bresnahan, T. (PI); Bulow, J. (PI); Canellos, C. (PI); Carroll, G. (PI); Chandrasekhar, A. (PI); Chaudhary, L. (PI); Chetty, R. (PI); Clerici-Arias, M. (PI); Cogan, J. (PI); David, P. (PI); DeGiorgi, G. (PI); Diamond, R. (PI); Dickstein, M. (PI); Donaldson, D. (PI); Donohue, J. (PI); Duffie, D. (PI); Duggan, M. (PI); Dupas, P. (PI); Einav, L. (PI); Fafchamps, M. (PI); Falcon, W. (PI); Fearon, J. (PI); Fitzgerald, D. (PI); Fitzpatrick, M. (PI); Fong, K. (PI); Fuchs, V. (PI); Garber, A. (PI); Gentzkow, M. (PI); Goda, G. (PI); Goulder, L. (PI); Greif, A. (PI); Haber, S. (PI); Hall, R. (PI); Hammond, P. (PI); Hansen, P. (PI); Hanson, W. (PI); Hanushek, E. (PI); Harding, M. (PI); Harris, D. (PI); Hartmann, W. (PI); Henry, P. (PI); Hong, H. (PI); Hope, N. (PI); Hoxby, C. (PI); Imbens, G. (PI); Jackson, M. (PI); Jagolinzer, A. (PI); Jaimovich, N. (PI); Jarosch, G. (PI); Jayachandran, S. (PI); Jones, C. (PI); Judd, K. (PI); Kastl, J. (PI); Kehoe, P. (PI); Kessler, D. (PI); Klenow, P. (PI); Kochar, A. (PI); Kojima, F. (PI); Kolstad, C. (PI); Koudijs, P. (PI); Kuran, T. (PI); Kurlat, P. (PI); Kurz, M. (PI); Lambert, N. (PI); Larsen, B. (PI); Lau, L. (PI); Lazear, E. (PI); Levin, J. (PI); Loeb, S. (PI); MaCurdy, T. (PI); Mahajan, A. (PI); Manova, K. (PI); McClellan, M. (PI); McKinnon, R. (PI); Meier, G. (PI); Milgrom, P. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Morten, M. (PI); Moser, P. (PI); Naylor, R. (PI); Niederle, M. (PI); Noll, R. (PI); Owen, B. (PI); Oyer, P. (PI); Pencavel, J. (PI); Persson, P. (PI); Piazzesi, M. (PI); Pistaferri, L. (PI); Polinsky, A. (PI); Qian, Y. (PI); Rangel, A. (PI); Reiss, P. (PI); Richards, J. (PI); Roberts, J. (PI); Romano, J. (PI); Romer, P. (PI); Rosenberg, N. (PI); Rosston, G. (PI); Roth, A. (PI); Rothwell, G. (PI); Rozelle, S. (PI); Scheuer, F. (PI); Schneider, M. (PI); Segal, I. (PI); Shotts, K. (PI); Shoven, J. (PI); Singleton, K. (PI); Skrzypacz, A. (PI); Sorkin, I. (PI); Sprenger, C. (PI); Staiger, R. (PI); Stanton, F. (PI); Sweeney, J. (PI); Taylor, J. (PI); Tendall, M. (PI); Tertilt, M. (PI); Wacziarg, R. (PI); Weingast, B. (PI); Wilson, R. (PI); Wolak, F. (PI); Wolitzky, A. (PI); Wright, G. (PI); Wright, M. (PI); Yotopoulos, P. (PI); Laguna Muggenburg, E. (TA)

ECON 202: Microeconomics I

(Non-Economics graduate students register for 202N.) Open to advanced undergraduates with consent of instructors. Theory of the consumer and the implications of constrained maximization; uses of indirect utility and expenditure functions; theory of the producer, profit maximization, and cost minimization; monotone comparative statics; behavior under uncertainty; partial equilibrium analysis and introduction to models of general equilibrium. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: thorough understanding of the elements of multivariate calculus and linear algebra.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 202N: Microeconomics I For Non-Economics PhDs

Microeconomics I for non-Economics PhD students. Theory of the consumer and the implications of constrained maximization; uses of indirect utility and expenditure functions; theory of the producer, profit maximization, and cost minimization; behavior under uncertainty; partial equilibrium analysis and introduction to models of general equilibrium. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: understanding of basic calculus.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mueller-Gastell, J. (PI)

ECON 210: Macroeconomics I

Dynamic programming applied to a variety of economic problems. These problems will be formulated in discrete or continuous time, with or without uncertainty, with a finite or infinite horizon. There will be weekly problem sets and a take-home final that will require MATLAB programming. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ECON 214: Development Economics I

This is a course focusing on micro development research. It will cover: productivity, market failure, and international trade; farms and firms; markets and contracts; intra-household allocation and bargaining; microfinance; and risk sharing. Prerequisites: 202 or 202N, 270.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 220: Political Economy I (POLISCI 460A)

Introduction to empirical and theoretical research in political economy. This course focuses on issues in democracies, while Political Economy II focuses on issues in non-democracies. Topics may include institutional foundations, social choice, electoral competition and candidate positioning, accountability, voter behavior, polarization, media and political communication, redistribution, special interests and lobbying, collective action, immigration, and populism. Prerequisite for Econ PhD students: ECON 202 and 270 or permission of instructors. Prerequisites for Political Science PhD students: POLISCI 450A, POLISCI 450B, and POLISCI 356A.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 226: U.S. Economic History

The role of economic history as a distinctive approach to the study of economics, using illustrations from U.S. history. Topics: historical and institutional foundations of the U.S. rise to world economic preeminence; economic causes and consequences of slavery; the American national system of technology; the Great Depression of the 1930s; national economic performance in a globalizing world. Intended for graduate students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 233: Advanced Macroeconomics I

Topics in the theory and empirics of economic growth. For PhD-level students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 236: Financial Economics I

This course will cover research topics at the boundary between macroeconomics and finance. Topics may include the study of macroeconomic models with financial frictions, conventional and unconventional monetary policy, its transmission mechanism and the term structure of interest rates, sovereign debt crises, search frictions and segmentation in housing markets, (over)leveraging by households, heterogeneous expectations, excess volatility, financial bubbles and crises. Prerequisites: 210, 211, 212.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 239D: Directed Reading

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Abramitzky, R. (PI); Admati, A. (PI); Amador, M. (PI); Amemiya, T. (PI); Aoki, M. (PI); Arora, A. (PI); Athey, S. (PI); Attanasio, O. (PI); Auclert, A. (PI); Bagwell, K. (PI); Baron, D. (PI); Bekaert, G. (PI); Bernheim, B. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Bloom, N. (PI); Boskin, M. (PI); Brady, D. (PI); Bresnahan, T. (PI); Bulow, J. (PI); Canellos, C. (PI); Carroll, G. (PI); Chandrasekhar, A. (PI); Chaudhary, L. (PI); Chetty, R. (PI); Clerici-Arias, M. (PI); Cogan, J. (PI); David, P. (PI); DeGiorgi, G. (PI); Diamond, R. (PI); Dickstein, M. (PI); Donaldson, D. (PI); Duffie, D. (PI); Duggan, M. (PI); Dupas, P. (PI); Einav, L. (PI); Fafchamps, M. (PI); Falcon, W. (PI); Fitzgerald, D. (PI); Fitzpatrick, M. (PI); Fong, K. (PI); Fuchs, V. (PI); Garber, A. (PI); Gentzkow, M. (PI); Goda, G. (PI); Gould, A. (PI); Goulder, L. (PI); Greif, A. (PI); Haak, D. (PI); Haber, S. (PI); Hall, R. (PI); Hammond, P. (PI); Hansen, P. (PI); Hanson, W. (PI); Hanushek, E. (PI); Harding, M. (PI); Harris, D. (PI); Hartmann, W. (PI); Henry, P. (PI); Hickman, B. (PI); Hong, H. (PI); Hope, N. (PI); Horvath, M. (PI); Hoxby, C. (PI); Imbens, G. (PI); Jackson, M. (PI); Jagolinzer, A. (PI); Jaimovich, N. (PI); Jarosch, G. (PI); Jayachandran, S. (PI); Jones, C. (PI); Jost, J. (PI); Judd, K. (PI); Kastl, J. (PI); Kehoe, P. (PI); Kessler, D. (PI); Klenow, P. (PI); Kochar, A. (PI); Kojima, F. (PI); Kolstad, C. (PI); Koudijs, P. (PI); Kreps, D. (PI); Kuran, T. (PI); Kurlat, P. (PI); Kurz, M. (PI); Lambert, N. (PI); Larsen, B. (PI); Lau, L. (PI); Lazear, E. (PI); Levin, J. (PI); MaCurdy, T. (PI); Mahajan, A. (PI); Malmendier, U. (PI); Manova, K. (PI); McClellan, M. (PI); McKinnon, R. (PI); Meier, G. (PI); Milgrom, P. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Morten, M. (PI); Moser, P. (PI); Naylor, R. (PI); Nechyba, T. (PI); Niederle, M. (PI); Noll, R. (PI); Owen, B. (PI); Oyer, P. (PI); Pencavel, J. (PI); Perez-Gonzalez, F. (PI); Persson, P. (PI); Pfleiderer, P. (PI); Piazzesi, M. (PI); Pistaferri, L. (PI); Polinsky, A. (PI); Qian, Y. (PI); Rangel, A. (PI); Reiss, P. (PI); Richards, J. (PI); Roberts, J. (PI); Romano, J. (PI); Romer, P. (PI); Rosenberg, N. (PI); Rossi-Hansberg, E. (PI); Rosston, G. (PI); Roth, A. (PI); Rothwell, G. (PI); Royalty, A. (PI); Rozelle, S. (PI); Sargent, T. (PI); Schaffner, J. (PI); Scheuer, F. (PI); Schneider, M. (PI); Segal, I. (PI); Sharpe, W. (PI); Shotts, K. (PI); Shoven, J. (PI); Singleton, K. (PI); Skrzypacz, A. (PI); Somaini, P. (PI); Sorkin, I. (PI); Sprenger, C. (PI); Staiger, R. (PI); Stanton, F. (PI); Sweeney, J. (PI); Taylor, J. (PI); Tendall, M. (PI); Tertilt, M. (PI); Topper, M. (PI); Vytlacil, E. (PI); Wacziarg, R. (PI); Weingast, B. (PI); Wilson, R. (PI); Wolak, F. (PI); Wolitzky, A. (PI); Wright, G. (PI); Wright, M. (PI); Yotopoulos, P. (PI)

ECON 241: Public Economics I

Design of tax systems, transfers intended to alleviate poverty, the effect of taxes on earnings, fees intended to internalize externalities like pollution, school finance and other forms of fiscal federalism, local public goods such as schools, policy evaluation with behavioral decision makers. Students will learn to apply sophisticated applications of frontier applied econometric techniques including synthetic controls, regression discontinuity, advanced instrumental variables methods. Prerequisites: ECON 202-204, ECON 210, ECON 270, ECON 271, or equivalent with consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 246: Labor Economics I

Topics in current applied microeconomic research including intertemporal labor supply models, public policy, program evaluation, job search, migration, consumption behavior. Student and faculty presentations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Pistaferri, L. (PI)

ECON 257: Industrial Organization 1

Theoretical and empirical analyses of the determinants of market structure; firm behavior and market efficiency in oligopolies; price discrimination; price dispersion and consumer search; differentiated products; the role of information in markets, including insurance and adverse selection; auctions; collusion and cartel behavior; advertising; entry and market structure; market dynamics; strategic behavior.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 266: International Trade I

The first part of this course covers Ricardian, factor-proportions and monopolistic-competition models of international trade. The second part of the course covers commercial policy, with an emphasis on the economics of trade agreements.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bagwell, K. (PI)

ECON 270: Intermediate Econometrics I

Probability, random variables, and distributions; large sample theory; theory of estimation and hypothesis testing. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: math and probability at the level of Chapter 2, Paul G. Hoel, Introduction to Mathematical Statistics, 5th ed.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Romano, J. (PI)

ECON 278: Behavioral and Experimental Economics I

This is the first half of a three course sequence (along with Econ 279 & 280-formerly 277) on behavioral and experimental economics. The sequence has two main objectives: 1) examines theories and evidence related to the psychology of economic decision making, 2) Introduces methods of experimental economics, and explores major subject areas (including those not falling within behavioral economics) that have been addressed through laboratory experiments. Focuses on series of experiments that build on one another in an effort to test between competing theoretical frameworks, with the objects of improving the explanatory and predictive performance of standard models, and of providing a foundation for more reliable normative analyses of policy issues. Prerequisites: 204 and 271, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 285: Matching and Market Design

This is an introduction to market design, intended mainly for second year PhD students in economics (but also open to other graduates students from around the university and to undergrads who have taken undergrad market design). It will emphasize the combined use of economic theory, experiments and empirical analysis to analyze and engineer market rules and institutions. In this first quarter we will pay particular attention to matching markets, which are those in which price doesn't do all of the work, and which include some kind of application or selection process. In recent years market designers have participated in the design and implementation of a number of marketplaces, and the course will emphasize the relation between theory and practice, for example in the design of labor market clearinghouses for American doctors, and school choice programs in a growing number of American cities (including New York and Boston), and the allocation of organs for transplantation. Various forms of market failure will also be discussed.nAssignment: One final paper. The objective of the final paper is to study an existing market or an environment with a potential role for a market, describe the relevant market design questions, and evaluate how the current market design works and/or propose improvements on the current design.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 286: Game Theory and Economic Applications

Aims to provide a solid basis in game-theoretic tools and concepts, both for theorists and for students focusing in other fields. Technical material will include solution concepts and refinements, potential games, supermodular games, repeated games, reputation, and bargaining models. The class will also address some foundational issues, such as epistemic and evolutionary modeling.Prerequisite: 203 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Carroll, G. (PI)

ECON 292: Quantitative Methods for Empirical Research

This is an advanced course on quantitative methods for empirical research. Students are expected to have taken a course in linear models before. In this course I will discuss modern econometric methods for nonlinear models, including maximum likelihood and generalized method of moments. The emphasis will be on how these methods are used in sophisticated empirical work in social sciences. Special topics include discrete choice models and methods for estimating treatment effects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 299: Practical Training

Students obtain employment in a relevant research or industrial activity to enhance their professional experience consistent with their degree programs. At the start of the quarter, students must submit a one page statement showing the relevance of the employment to the degree program along with an offer letter. At the end of the quarter, a three page final report must be supplied documenting work done and relevance to degree program. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Abramitzky, R. (PI); Admati, A. (PI); Amador, M. (PI); Amemiya, T. (PI); Aoki, M. (PI); Arora, A. (PI); Athey, S. (PI); Attanasio, O. (PI); Auclert, A. (PI); Bagwell, K. (PI); Baron, D. (PI); Bekaert, G. (PI); Bernheim, B. (PI); Bettinger, E. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Blimpo, M. (PI); Bloom, N. (PI); Boskin, M. (PI); Brady, D. (PI); Bresnahan, T. (PI); Bulow, J. (PI); Canellos, C. (PI); Carroll, G. (PI); Chandrasekhar, A. (PI); Chaudhary, L. (PI); Chetty, R. (PI); Clerici-Arias, M. (PI); Cogan, J. (PI); Cojoc, D. (PI); David, P. (PI); DeGiorgi, G. (PI); Dickstein, M. (PI); Donaldson, D. (PI); Duffie, D. (PI); Duggan, M. (PI); Dupas, P. (PI); Einav, L. (PI); Fafchamps, M. (PI); Falcon, W. (PI); Fitzgerald, D. (PI); Fitzpatrick, M. (PI); Fong, K. (PI); Fuchs, V. (PI); Garber, A. (PI); Gentzkow, M. (PI); Gould, A. (PI); Goulder, L. (PI); Greif, A. (PI); Haak, D. (PI); Haber, S. (PI); Hall, R. (PI); Hamilton, J. (PI); Hammond, P. (PI); Hansen, P. (PI); Hanson, W. (PI); Hanushek, E. (PI); Harding, M. (PI); Harris, D. (PI); Hartmann, W. (PI); Henry, P. (PI); Hickman, B. (PI); Hong, H. (PI); Hope, N. (PI); Horvath, M. (PI); Hoxby, C. (PI); Imbens, G. (PI); Jackson, M. (PI); Jagolinzer, A. (PI); Jaimovich, N. (PI); Jarosch, G. (PI); Jayachandran, S. (PI); Jones, C. (PI); Jost, J. (PI); Judd, K. (PI); Kastl, J. (PI); Kehoe, P. (PI); Kessler, D. (PI); Klenow, P. (PI); Kochar, A. (PI); Kojima, F. (PI); Kolstad, C. (PI); Krueger, A. (PI); Kuran, T. (PI); Kurlat, P. (PI); Kurz, M. (PI); Lambert, N. (PI); Larsen, B. (PI); Lau, L. (PI); Lazear, E. (PI); Levin, J. (PI); MaCurdy, T. (PI); Mahajan, A. (PI); Malmendier, U. (PI); Manova, K. (PI); McClellan, M. (PI); McKeon, S. (PI); McKinnon, R. (PI); Meier, G. (PI); Milgrom, P. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Morten, M. (PI); Moser, P. (PI); Naylor, R. (PI); Nechyba, T. (PI); Niederle, M. (PI); Noll, R. (PI); Owen, B. (PI); Oyer, P. (PI); Pencavel, J. (PI); Persson, P. (PI); Piazzesi, M. (PI); Pistaferri, L. (PI); Polinsky, A. (PI); Qian, Y. (PI); Rangel, A. (PI); Reiss, P. (PI); Richards, J. (PI); Roberts, J. (PI); Romano, J. (PI); Romer, P. (PI); Rosenberg, N. (PI); Rossi-Hansberg, E. (PI); Rosston, G. (PI); Roth, A. (PI); Rothwell, G. (PI); Royalty, A. (PI); Rozelle, S. (PI); Sargent, T. (PI); Schaffner, J. (PI); Scheuer, F. (PI); Schneider, M. (PI); Segal, I. (PI); Sharpe, W. (PI); Shotts, K. (PI); Shoven, J. (PI); Singleton, K. (PI); Skrzypacz, A. (PI); Sorkin, I. (PI); Sprenger, C. (PI); Staiger, R. (PI); Stanton, F. (PI); Sweeney, J. (PI); Taylor, J. (PI); Tendall, M. (PI); Tertilt, M. (PI); Topper, M. (PI); Vytlacil, E. (PI); Wacziarg, R. (PI); Weingast, B. (PI); Wilson, R. (PI); Wolak, F. (PI); Wolitzky, A. (PI); Wright, G. (PI); Wright, M. (PI); Yotopoulos, P. (PI)

ECON 300: Third-Year Seminar

Restricted to Economics Ph.D. students. Students present current research. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ECON 310: Macroeconomic Workshop

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ECON 315: Development Workshop

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ECON 325: Economic History Workshop

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ECON 335: Experimental/Behavioral Seminar

Field seminar in experimental and behavioral economics.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ECON 341: Public Economics and Environmental Economics Seminar

Issues in measuring and evaluating the economic performance of government tax, expenditure, debt, and regulatory policies; their effects on levels and distribution of income, wealth, and environmental quality; alternative policies and methods of evaluation. Workshop format combines student research, faculty presentations, and guest speakers. Prerequisite: ECON 241 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ECON 345: Labor Economics Seminar

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ECON 355: Industrial Organization Workshop

Current research in the field by visitors, presentations by students, and discussion of recent papers. Students write an original research paper, make a formal presentation, and lead a structured discussion.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ECON 365: International Trade Workshop

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ECON 370: Econometrics Workshop

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ECON 391: Microeconomic Theory Seminar

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ECON 801: TGR Project

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
Instructors: ; Abramitzky, R. (PI); Admati, A. (PI); Amador, M. (PI); Amemiya, T. (PI); Aoki, M. (PI); Arora, A. (PI); Athey, S. (PI); Attanasio, O. (PI); Bagwell, K. (PI); Baron, D. (PI); Bekaert, G. (PI); Bernheim, B. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Bloom, N. (PI); Boskin, M. (PI); Brady, D. (PI); Bresnahan, T. (PI); Bulow, J. (PI); Canellos, C. (PI); Carroll, G. (PI); Chandrasekhar, A. (PI); Clerici-Arias, M. (PI); Cojoc, D. (PI); David, P. (PI); DeGiorgi, G. (PI); Dickstein, M. (PI); Duffie, D. (PI); Dupas, P. (PI); Einav, L. (PI); Fafchamps, M. (PI); Falcon, W. (PI); Fitzgerald, D. (PI); Fitzpatrick, M. (PI); Fong, K. (PI); Fuchs, V. (PI); Garber, A. (PI); Goulder, L. (PI); Greif, A. (PI); Haak, D. (PI); Haber, S. (PI); Hall, R. (PI); Hammond, P. (PI); Hansen, P. (PI); Hanushek, E. (PI); Harding, M. (PI); Harris, D. (PI); Hartmann, W. (PI); Henry, P. (PI); Hickman, B. (PI); Hong, H. (PI); Hope, N. (PI); Horvath, M. (PI); Hoxby, C. (PI); Jackson, M. (PI); Jagolinzer, A. (PI); Jaimovich, N. (PI); Jayachandran, S. (PI); Jones, C. (PI); Jost, J. (PI); Judd, K. (PI); Kastl, J. (PI); Kessler, D. (PI); Klenow, P. (PI); Kochar, A. (PI); Kojima, F. (PI); Kolstad, C. (PI); Koudijs, P. (PI); Krueger, A. (PI); Kuran, T. (PI); Kurlat, P. (PI); Kurz, M. (PI); Lambert, N. (PI); Lau, L. (PI); Lazear, E. (PI); Levin, J. (PI); MaCurdy, T. (PI); Mahajan, A. (PI); Malmendier, U. (PI); Manova, K. (PI); McClellan, M. (PI); McKinnon, R. (PI); Meier, G. (PI); Milgrom, P. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Moser, P. (PI); Naylor, R. (PI); Nechyba, T. (PI); Niederle, M. (PI); Noll, R. (PI); Owen, B. (PI); Oyer, P. (PI); Pencavel, J. (PI); Piazzesi, M. (PI); Pistaferri, L. (PI); Polinsky, A. (PI); Qian, Y. (PI); Rangel, A. (PI); Reiss, P. (PI); Richards, J. (PI); Roberts, J. (PI); Romano, J. (PI); Romer, P. (PI); Rosenberg, N. (PI); Rossi-Hansberg, E. (PI); Rosston, G. (PI); Roth, A. (PI); Rothwell, G. (PI); Royalty, A. (PI); Rozelle, S. (PI); Sargent, T. (PI); Schaffner, J. (PI); Scheuer, F. (PI); Schneider, M. (PI); Segal, I. (PI); Sharpe, W. (PI); Shotts, K. (PI); Shoven, J. (PI); Singleton, K. (PI); Skrzypacz, A. (PI); Sprenger, C. (PI); Staiger, R. (PI); Stanton, F. (PI); Sweeney, J. (PI); Taylor, J. (PI); Tendall, M. (PI); Tertilt, M. (PI); Topper, M. (PI); Vytlacil, E. (PI); Wacziarg, R. (PI); Weingast, B. (PI); Wilson, R. (PI); Wolak, F. (PI); Wolitzky, A. (PI); Wright, G. (PI); Wright, M. (PI); Yotopoulos, P. (PI)

ECON 802: TGR Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR
Instructors: ; Abramitzky, R. (PI); Admati, A. (PI); Amador, M. (PI); Amemiya, T. (PI); Aoki, M. (PI); Arora, A. (PI); Athey, S. (PI); Attanasio, O. (PI); Auclert, A. (PI); Bagwell, K. (PI); Baron, D. (PI); Bekaert, G. (PI); Bernheim, B. (PI); Bhattacharya, J. (PI); Bloom, N. (PI); Boskin, M. (PI); Brady, D. (PI); Bresnahan, T. (PI); Bulow, J. (PI); Canellos, C. (PI); Carroll, G. (PI); Chandrasekhar, A. (PI); Chaudhary, L. (PI); Chetty, R. (PI); Clerici-Arias, M. (PI); Cogan, J. (PI); Cojoc, D. (PI); David, P. (PI); DeGiorgi, G. (PI); Dickstein, M. (PI); Donaldson, D. (PI); Duffie, D. (PI); Duggan, M. (PI); Dupas, P. (PI); Einav, L. (PI); Fafchamps, M. (PI); Falcon, W. (PI); Fitzgerald, D. (PI); Fitzpatrick, M. (PI); Fong, K. (PI); Fuchs, V. (PI); Garber, A. (PI); Gentzkow, M. (PI); Gould, A. (PI); Goulder, L. (PI); Greif, A. (PI); Haak, D. (PI); Haber, S. (PI); Hall, R. (PI); Hammond, P. (PI); Hansen, P. (PI); Hanson, W. (PI); Hanushek, E. (PI); Harding, M. (PI); Harris, D. (PI); Hartmann, W. (PI); Henry, P. (PI); Hickman, B. (PI); Hong, H. (PI); Hope, N. (PI); Horvath, M. (PI); Hoxby, C. (PI); Imbens, G. (PI); Jackson, M. (PI); Jagolinzer, A. (PI); Jaimovich, N. (PI); Jarosch, G. (PI); Jayachandran, S. (PI); Jones, C. (PI); Jost, J. (PI); Judd, K. (PI); Kastl, J. (PI); Kehoe, P. (PI); Kessler, D. (PI); Klenow, P. (PI); Kochar, A. (PI); Kojima, F. (PI); Kolstad, C. (PI); Koudijs, P. (PI); Kreps, D. (PI); Krueger, A. (PI); Kuran, T. (PI); Kurlat, P. (PI); Kurz, M. (PI); Lambert, N. (PI); Larsen, B. (PI); Lau, L. (PI); Lazear, E. (PI); Levin, J. (PI); MaCurdy, T. (PI); Mahajan, A. (PI); Malmendier, U. (PI); Manova, K. (PI); McClellan, M. (PI); McKinnon, R. (PI); Meier, G. (PI); Milgrom, P. (PI); Miller, G. (PI); Morten, M. (PI); Moser, P. (PI); Naylor, R. (PI); Niederle, M. (PI); Noll, R. (PI); Owen, B. (PI); Oyer, P. (PI); Pencavel, J. (PI); Persson, P. (PI); Piazzesi, M. (PI); Pistaferri, L. (PI); Polinsky, A. (PI); Qian, Y. (PI); Reiss, P. (PI); Richards, J. (PI); Roberts, J. (PI); Romano, J. (PI); Romer, P. (PI); Rosenberg, N. (PI); Rossi-Hansberg, E. (PI); Rosston, G. (PI); Roth, A. (PI); Rothwell, G. (PI); Royalty, A. (PI); Rozelle, S. (PI); Sargent, T. (PI); Schaffner, J. (PI); Scheuer, F. (PI); Schneider, M. (PI); Segal, I. (PI); Sharpe, W. (PI); Shotts, K. (PI); Shoven, J. (PI); Singleton, K. (PI); Skrzypacz, A. (PI); Sorkin, I. (PI); Sprenger, C. (PI); Staiger, R. (PI); Stanton, F. (PI); Sweeney, J. (PI); Taylor, J. (PI); Tendall, M. (PI); Tertilt, M. (PI); Topper, M. (PI); Wacziarg, R. (PI); Weingast, B. (PI); Wilson, R. (PI); Wolak, F. (PI); Wolitzky, A. (PI); Wright, G. (PI); Wright, M. (PI); Yotopoulos, P. (PI)
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