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EARTHSYS 8: The Oceans: An Introduction to the Marine Environment (ESS 8)

The course will provide a basic understanding of how the ocean functions as a suite of interconnected ecosystems, both naturally and under the influence of human activities. Emphasis is on the interactions between the physical and chemical environment and the dominant organisms of each ecosystem. The types of ecosystems discussed include coral reefs, deep-sea hydrothermal vents, coastal upwelling systems, blue-water oceans, estuaries, and near-shore dead zones. Lectures, multimedia presentations, group activities, and tide-pooling day trip.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 9: Public Service Internship Preparation (ARTSINST 40, EDUC 9, HUMBIO 9, PUBLPOL 74, URBANST 101)

Are you prepared for your internship this summer? This workshop series will help you make the most of your internship experience by setting learning goals in advance; negotiating and communicating clear roles and expectations; preparing for a professional role in a non-profit, government, or community setting; and reflecting with successful interns and community partners on how to prepare sufficiently ahead of time. You will read, discuss, and hear from guest speakers, as well as develop a learning plan specific to your summer or academic year internship placement. This course is primarily designed for students who have already identified an internship for summer or a later quarter. You are welcome to attend any and all workshops, but must attend the entire series and do the assignments for 1 unit of credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EARTHSYS 11: Introduction to Geology (GEOLSCI 1)

Why are earthquakes, volcanoes, and natural resources located at specific spots on the Earth surface? Why are there rolling hills to the west behind Stanford, and soaring granite walls to the east in Yosemite? What was the Earth like in the past, and what will it be like in the future? Lectures, hands-on laboratories, in-class activities, and one field trip will help you see the Earth through the eyes of a geologist. Topics include plate tectonics, the cycling and formation of different types of rocks, and how geologists use rocks to understand Earth's history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Sperling, E. (PI)

EARTHSYS 24: Connection Through Nature: The Art & Science of Natural History

Use art as an entry point for closer observation, deeper curiosity, and better understanding of natural systems. Guest experts in art, science, and the practice of natural history facilitate investigation of the Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve through microscopic to macroscopic lenses. Explore how field journaling, art and expressive language can mediate mindfulness, insight, and sense of connection. Find a short application at https://tinyurl.com/stanfordnaturalhistory.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EARTHSYS 46N: Exploring the Critical Interface between the Land and Monterey Bay: Elkhorn Slough (ESS 46N)

Preference to freshmen. Field trips to sites in the Elkhorn Slough, a small agriculturally impacted estuary that opens into Monterey Bay, a model ecosystem for understanding the complexity of estuaries, and one of California's last remaining coastal wetlands. Readings include Jane Caffrey's Changes in a California Estuary: A Profile of Elkhorn Slough. Basics of biogeochemistry, microbiology, oceanography, ecology, pollution, and environmental management.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 58Q: Understanding Our Oceans: Scientific Toys, Tools, & Trips

In popular science magazines we read about deep ocean critters recently discovered or the latest threats coral reefs face. But what is it actually like to do science in the ocean-to research ocean life in the various ocean ecosystems? In this course, we will explore the latest advances in marine science-what technologies are allowing scientists to explore and investigate the ocean and what are we discovering. We will have 2 one-day fieldtrips (on Fridays) to marine research centers in Moss Landing, Monterey, and institutions in the Bay Area. This course will also expose students to what life as a marine biology/science graduate student is like.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 102: Fundamentals of Renewable Power (ENERGY 102)

Do you want a much better understanding of renewable power technologies? Did you know that wind and solar are the fastest growing forms of electricity generation? Are you interested in hearing about the most recent, and future, designs for green power? Do you want to understand what limits power extraction from renewable resources and how current designs could be improved? This course dives deep into these and related issues for wind, solar, biomass, geothermal, tidal and wave power technologies. We welcome all student, from non-majors to MBAs and grad students. If you are potentially interested in an energy or environmental related major, this course is particularly useful. Recommended: Math 21 or 42.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 105B: Ecology and Natural History of Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve (BIO 105B)

Formerly 96B - Jasper Ridge Docent Training. Second of two-quarter sequence training program to join the Jasper Ridge education/docent program. The scientific basis of ecological research in the context of a field station, hands-on field research, field ecology and the natural history of plants and animals, species interactions, archaeology, geology, hydrology, land management, multidisciplinary environmental education; and research projects, as well as management challenges of the preserve. These topics are presented by faculty, local experts, and staff. Participants lead research-focused educational tours, assist with classes and research, and attend continuing education classes available to members of the JRBP community after the course. NOTE: All classes take place at Jasper Ridge.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EARTHSYS 107: Control of Nature (ESS 107)

Think controlling the earth's climate is science fiction? It is when you watch Snowpiercer or Dune, but scientists are already devising geoengineering schemes to slow climate change. Will we ever resurrect the woolly mammoth or even a T. Rex (think Jurassic Park)? Based on current research, that day will come in your lifetime. Who gets to decide what species to save? And more generally, what scientific and ethical principles should guide our decisions to control nature? In this course, we will examine the science behind ways that people alter and engineer the earth, critically examining the positive and negative consequences. We'll explore these issues first through popular movies and books and then, more substantively, in scientific research.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 110: Introduction to the Foundations of Contemporary Geophysics (GEOPHYS 110)

Introduction to the foundations of contemporary geophysics. Topics drawn from broad themes in: whole Earth geodynamics, geohazards, natural resources, and enviroment. In each case the focus is on how the interpretation of a variety of geophysical measurements (e.g., gravity, seismology, heat flow, electromagnetics, and remote sensing) can be used to provide fundamental insight into the behavior of the Earth. The course will include a weekend field trip. Prerequisite: CME 100 or MA TH 51, or co-registration in either.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 113: Earthquakes and Volcanoes (GEOPHYS 90)

Is the "Big One" overdue in California? What kind of damage would that cause? What can we do to reduce the impact of such hazards in urban environments? Does "fracking" cause earthquakes and are we at risk? Is the United States vulnerable to a giant tsunami? The geologic record contains evidence of volcanic super eruptions throughout Earth's history. What causes these gigantic explosive eruptions, and can they be predicted in the future? This course will address these and related issues. For non-majors and potential Earth scientists. No prerequisites. More information at: https://stanford.box.com/s/zr8ar28efmuo5wtlj6gj2jbxle76r4lu
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 114: Global Change and Emerging Infectious Disease (EARTHSYS 214, ESS 213, HUMBIO 114)

The changing epidemiological environment. How human-induced environmental changes, such as global warming, deforestation and land-use conversion, urbanization, international commerce, and human migration, are altering the ecology of infectious disease transmission, and promoting their re-emergence as a global public health threat. Case studies of malaria, cholera, hantavirus, plague, and HIV.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 119C: Will Work for Food: Designing Your Pathway to Impact in the Food System

Offered exclusively for juniors and seniors, the goal of this course is to help you align your Stanford experience with potential pathways for creating impact in the food system after Stanford. This course builds on the "paced education" model that emerged from the d.school's landmark exploration of education at Stanford known as Stanford 2025. It is comprised of three phases of learning, which will unfold over six to nine months, at a pace that is determined by the amount of time you need to move from one phase to the next. In the first phase (119A and/or 119B) you will assess your knowledge, experience, abilities, interests, and development opportunities and you will broadly explore a systemic problem of interest in the food system. In the second phase (119B), you will deepen your knowledge on a specific problem by creating a personal learning plan, a series of experiments to explore the ways in your knowledge, experience, abilities, interests, and development opportunities align with solving your problem of interest, and by developing a board of advisors to support you along the journey. In the third phase (119C), you will scope, in collaboration with a project partner, a project of real-world consequence. You must enroll in either 119A or 119B to enroll in 119C and the expectation is that you complete four units of work in total. This is a highly selective and hands-on course led by a teaching team with deep professional connections in the food system and who will act as your coaches, mentors, and connectors. Please visit http://feedcollaborative.org/classes/ to apply. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Select applicants will be interviewed. Decisions will be made one week prior to the start of the quarter.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rothe, M. (PI)

EARTHSYS 130A: Ecosystems of California (BIO 130)

California is home to a huge diversity of ecosystem types and processes. This course provides an introduction to the natural history, systematics, and ecosystem ecology of California ecosystems, based on a combination of lectures, student-led projects, and weekend field trips. Ecosystems to be explored will range from coasts to mountains and from desert to wetlands. Requirements include three essays and participation in three field trips (of six options).
Terms: Spr, alternate years, not given next year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Field, C. (PI); Hill, A. (TA)

EARTHSYS 131: Pathways in Sustainability Careers (EARTH 131)

Interactive, seminar-style sessions expose students to diverse career pathways in sustainability. Professionals from a variety of careers discuss their work, their career development and decision-points in their career pathways, as well as life style aspects of their choices.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EARTHSYS 143: Molecular Geomicrobiology Laboratory (BIO 142, ESS 143, ESS 243)

In this course, students will be studying the biosynthesis of cyclic lipid biomarkers, molecules that are produced by modern microbes that can be preserved in rocks that are over a billion years old and which geologist use as molecular fossils. Students will be tasked with identifying potential biomarker lipid synthesis genes in environmental genomic databases, expressing those genes in a model bacterial expression system in the lab, and then analyzing the lipid products that are produced. The overall goal is for students to experience the scientific research process including generating hypotheses, testing these hypotheses in laboratory experiments, and communicating their results through a publication style paper. Prerequisites: BIO83 and CHEM35 or permission of the instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 146B: Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: the Ocean Circulation (CEE 162I, CEE 262I, ESS 246B)

Introduction to the physics governing the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean and their control on climate with emphasis on the large-scale ocean circulation. This course will give an overview of the structure and dynamics of the major ocean current systems that contribute to the meridional overturning circulation, the transport of heat, salt, and biogeochemical tracers, and the regulation of climate. Topics include the tropical ocean circulation, the wind-driven gyres and western boundary currents, the thermohaline circulation, the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, water mass formation, atmosphere-ocean coupling, and climate variability. Prerequisites: MATH 51 or CME100; and PHYSICS 41; and CEE 162A or CEE 101B or a graduate class in fluid dynamics or consent of the instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 149: Wild Writing (EARTHSYS 249)

What is wilderness and why does it matter? In this course we will interrogate answers to this question articulated by influential and diverse American environmental thinkers of the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries, who through their writing transformed public perceptions of wilderness and inspired such actions as the founding of the National Park System, the passage of the Wilderness Act and the Clean Air and Water Acts, the establishment of the Environmental Protection Agency, and the birth of the environmental and climate justice movements. Students will also develop their own responses to the question of what is wilderness and why it matters through a series of writing exercises that integrate personal narrative, wilderness experience, and environmental scholarship, culminating in a ~3000 word narrative nonfiction essay. This course will provide students with knowledge, tools, experience, and skills that will empower them to become more persuasive environmental storytellers and advocates.nnIf you are interested in signing up for the course, complete this pre-registration form https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9XqZeZs036WIvop
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 151: Biological Oceanography (EARTHSYS 251, ESS 151, ESS 251)

Required for Earth Systems students in the oceans track. Interdisciplinary look at how oceanic environments control the form and function of marine life. Topics include distributions of planktonic production and abundance, nutrient cycling, the role of ocean biology in the climate system, expected effects of climate changes on ocean biology. Local weekend field trips. Designed to be taken concurrently with Marine Chemistry (ESS/EARTHSYS 152/252). Prerequisites: BIO 43 and ESS 8 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Arrigo, K. (PI)

EARTHSYS 152: Marine Chemistry (EARTHSYS 252, ESS 152, ESS 252)

Introduction to the interdisciplinary knowledge and skills required to critically evaluate problems in marine chemistry and related disciplines. Physical, chemical, and biological processes that determine the chemical composition of seawater. Air-sea gas exchange, carbonate chemistry, and chemical equilibria, nutrient and trace element cycling, particle reactivity, sediment chemistry, and diagenesis. Examination of chemical tracers of mixing and circulation and feedbacks of ocean processes on atmospheric chemistry and climate. Designed to be taken concurrently with Biological Oceanography (ESS/EARTHSYS 151/251)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Casciotti, K. (PI)

EARTHSYS 155: Science of Soils (ESS 155)

Physical, chemical, and biological processes within soil systems. Emphasis is on factors governing nutrient availability, plant growth and production, land-resource management, and pollution within soils. How to classify soils and assess nutrient cycling and contaminant fate. Recommended: introductory chemistry and biology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 159: Economic, Legal, and Political Analysis of Climate-Change Policy (ECON 159, ECON 209, PUBLPOL 159)

This course will advance students understanding of economic, legal, and political approaches to avoiding or managing the problem of global climate change. Theoretical contributions as well as empirical analyses will be considered. It will address economic issues, legal constraints, and political challenges associated with various emissions-reduction and adaptation strategies, and it will consider policy efforts at the local, national, and international levels. Specific topics include: interactions among overlapping climate policies, the strengths and weaknesses of alternative policy instruments, trade-offs among alternative policy objectives, and decision making under uncertainty. Prerequisites: Econ 50 or its equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 180: Principles and Practices of Sustainable Agriculture (ESS 280)

Field-based training in ecologically sound agricultural practices at the Stanford Community Farm. Weekly lessons, field work, and group projects. Field trips to educational farms in the area. Topics include: soils, composting, irrigation techniques, IPM, basic plant anatomy and physiology, weeds, greenhouse management, and marketing. Application required. Deadline: September 12 for Autumn and March 10 for Spring. nnApplication: https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0ANZWrjlz0SbhxX
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 182A: Ecological Farm Systems

A project-based course emphasizing 'ways of doing' in sustainable agricultural systems based at the Stanford Educational Farm. Students will work individually and in small groups on projects at the Stanford Educational Farm. This course will include orchard establishment and educational garden design in addition to other topics.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EARTHSYS 186: Farm and Garden Environmental Education Practicum (EARTHSYS 286)

Farms and gardens provide excellent settings for place-based environmental education that emphasize human ecological relationships and experiential learning. The O'Donohue Family Stanford Educational Farm is the setting to explore the principles and practices of farm and garden-based education in conjunction with the farm's new field trip program for local youth. The course includes readings and reflections on environmental education and emphasis on learning by doing, engaging students in the practice of team teaching. Application required. Deadline: March 14.nnApplication: https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9SPufdULCh93rbT
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EARTHSYS 187A: The Future of Food & Farming Technology

"How are we going to feed X billion people by the year ____?" A historical refrain from corporate agribusiness, academia, national policy makers and, increasingly today, investors and technologists in innovation hotspots like Silicon Valley. But with only 60 global harvests remaining due to soil degradation, the compounding feedback loop between agriculture and climate change, and nearly a billion of our current population starving or undernourished and another billion of them overweight or obese, it begs the question of whether this is the right problem for which our food system should be solving. Some even argue, including the designers of this course, that this question is responsible for the various existential crises we face today.nnThis course will examine the history of agricultural innovation and technology to look for insights as to why our food system has gone so far off the rails. We will utilize the Stanford Educational Farm as a scaled-down model of our agricultural systems, where each student will step into the role of a modern, large scale farmer under simulated conditions. Through gamified scenarios based on real-world challenges faced by farmers, students will gain a deeper understanding of the problems facing our agriculture. Based on this nuanced understanding, students will propose new and novel uses of existing and/or emerging technologies to solve these problems. These ideas will be circulated in the marketplace of your peer farmers, where ideas will either be adopted, modified and built upon, or abandoned. This process will tap into, challenge, and hone your creative problem solving abilities. In the end, we will see who has what it takes to fundamentally shift the course of our food system,nnThis class is for students who are (a) aspiring ag-tech entrepreneurs (b) generally interested in emerging technologies or (c) seeking a deeper understanding of how large scale agriculture works.nnThe application for this course can be found on the d.school¿s website: https://dschool.stanford.edu/classes/nnCourse meets : Saturday May 4th, 10 am to 3pm, Saturday May 11th, 10am to 3pm, Saturday May 25th, 10am to 3pm
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EARTHSYS 197: Directed Individual Study in Earth Systems

Under supervision of an Earth Systems faculty member on a subject of mutual interest.
Terms: Aut, Spr, offered occasionally | Units: 1-9 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hoagland, S. (PI)

EARTHSYS 207: Spanish in Science/Science in Spanish (BIO 208, LATINAM 207)

For graduate and undergraduate students interested in the natural sciences and the Spanish language. Students will acquire the ability to communicate in Spanish using scientific language and will enhance their ability to read scientific literature written in Spanish. Emphasis on the development of science in Spanish-speaking countries or regions. Course is conducted in Spanish and intended for students pursuing degrees in the sciences, particularly disciplines such as ecology, environmental science, sustainability, resource management, anthropology, and archeology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Dirzo, R. (PI)

EARTHSYS 210P: Earth Systems Capstone Project

Students work independently or in groups to complete their Senior Capstone Projects. They will participate in regular advising meetings with the instructor(s), and will give a final presentation on their projects at the end of the quarter in a special Earth Systems symposium. Prerequisite: EARTHSYS 210A, B, or C.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 214: Global Change and Emerging Infectious Disease (EARTHSYS 114, ESS 213, HUMBIO 114)

The changing epidemiological environment. How human-induced environmental changes, such as global warming, deforestation and land-use conversion, urbanization, international commerce, and human migration, are altering the ecology of infectious disease transmission, and promoting their re-emergence as a global public health threat. Case studies of malaria, cholera, hantavirus, plague, and HIV.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 249: Wild Writing (EARTHSYS 149)

What is wilderness and why does it matter? In this course we will interrogate answers to this question articulated by influential and diverse American environmental thinkers of the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries, who through their writing transformed public perceptions of wilderness and inspired such actions as the founding of the National Park System, the passage of the Wilderness Act and the Clean Air and Water Acts, the establishment of the Environmental Protection Agency, and the birth of the environmental and climate justice movements. Students will also develop their own responses to the question of what is wilderness and why it matters through a series of writing exercises that integrate personal narrative, wilderness experience, and environmental scholarship, culminating in a ~3000 word narrative nonfiction essay. This course will provide students with knowledge, tools, experience, and skills that will empower them to become more persuasive environmental storytellers and advocates.nnIf you are interested in signing up for the course, complete this pre-registration form https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9XqZeZs036WIvop
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 250: Directed Research

Independent research. Student develops own project with faculty supervision. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-9 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ardoin, N. (PI); Arrigo, K. (PI); Asner, G. (PI); Benson, S. (PI); Block, B. (PI); Boggs, C. (PI); Boucher, A. (PI); Cain, B. (PI); Caldwell, M. (PI); Carlisle, L. (PI); Casciotti, K. (PI); Chamberlain, P. (PI); Curran, L. (PI); Daily, G. (PI); Davis, J. (PI); Denny, M. (PI); Diffenbaugh, N. (PI); Dirzo, R. (PI); Dunbar, R. (PI); Durham, W. (PI); Egger, A. (PI); Ehrlich, P. (PI); Ernst, W. (PI); Falcon, W. (PI); Fendorf, S. (PI); Field, C. (PI); Francis, C. (PI); Frank, Z. (PI); Freyberg, D. (PI); Fukami, T. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gerritsen, M. (PI); Gilly, W. (PI); Gordon, D. (PI); Gorelick, S. (PI); Goulder, L. (PI); Hadly, E. (PI); Hayden, T. (PI); Hilley, G. (PI); Ingle, J. (PI); Jamieson, A. (PI); Jones, J. (PI); Kennedy, D. (PI); Kennedy, J. (PI); Knight, R. (PI); Konings, A. (PI); Koseff, J. (PI); Kovscek, A. (PI); Lambin, E. (PI); Litvak, L. (PI); Lobell, D. (PI); Long, S. (PI); Lynham, J. (PI); Masters, G. (PI); Matson, P. (PI); Micheli, F. (PI); Milroy, C. (PI); Monismith, S. (PI); Mooney, H. (PI); Naylor, R. (PI); Nevle, R. (PI); Orr, F. (PI); Palumbi, S. (PI); Payne, J. (PI); Peay, K. (PI); Phillips, K. (PI); Rajaratnam, B. (PI); Root, T. (PI); Rothe, M. (PI); Schneider, S. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Seto, K. (PI); Siegel, R. (PI); Somero, G. (PI); Sweeney, J. (PI); Switzer, P. (PI); Tabazadeh, A. (PI); Thomas, L. (PI); Thompson, B. (PI); Victor, D. (PI); Vitousek, P. (PI); Walbot, V. (PI); Watanabe, J. (PI); Weyant, J. (PI); Wiederkehr, S. (PI); Wilber, C. (PI); Woodward, J. (PI); Zoback, M. (PI); Kolstad, C. (GP)

EARTHSYS 251: Biological Oceanography (EARTHSYS 151, ESS 151, ESS 251)

Required for Earth Systems students in the oceans track. Interdisciplinary look at how oceanic environments control the form and function of marine life. Topics include distributions of planktonic production and abundance, nutrient cycling, the role of ocean biology in the climate system, expected effects of climate changes on ocean biology. Local weekend field trips. Designed to be taken concurrently with Marine Chemistry (ESS/EARTHSYS 152/252). Prerequisites: BIO 43 and ESS 8 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Arrigo, K. (PI)

EARTHSYS 252: Marine Chemistry (EARTHSYS 152, ESS 152, ESS 252)

Introduction to the interdisciplinary knowledge and skills required to critically evaluate problems in marine chemistry and related disciplines. Physical, chemical, and biological processes that determine the chemical composition of seawater. Air-sea gas exchange, carbonate chemistry, and chemical equilibria, nutrient and trace element cycling, particle reactivity, sediment chemistry, and diagenesis. Examination of chemical tracers of mixing and circulation and feedbacks of ocean processes on atmospheric chemistry and climate. Designed to be taken concurrently with Biological Oceanography (ESS/EARTHSYS 151/251)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Casciotti, K. (PI)

EARTHSYS 260: Internship

Supervised field, lab, or public/private sector project. May consist of directed research under the supervision of a Stanford faculty member, participation in one of several off campus Stanford programs, or an approved non-Stanford program or opportunity relevant to the student's Earth Systems studies. Required of and restricted to declared Earth Systems majors. For course requirements, please visit: https://pangea.stanford.edu/esys/earth-systems-internship
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hoagland, S. (PI)

EARTHSYS 286: Farm and Garden Environmental Education Practicum (EARTHSYS 186)

Farms and gardens provide excellent settings for place-based environmental education that emphasize human ecological relationships and experiential learning. The O'Donohue Family Stanford Educational Farm is the setting to explore the principles and practices of farm and garden-based education in conjunction with the farm's new field trip program for local youth. The course includes readings and reflections on environmental education and emphasis on learning by doing, engaging students in the practice of team teaching. Application required. Deadline: March 14.nnApplication: https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9SPufdULCh93rbT
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EARTHSYS 289: FEED Lab: Food System Design & Innovation

FEED Lab is a course in which entrepreneurial and motivated students, engaged industry-thought leaders, and deeply experienced and connected faculty work together to design solutions to some of the food system¿s most consequential problems. Whether you¿re passionate about transforming the food system, or merely curious explore it, all students in this course will leave with practical design skills, enhanced leadership abilities, and confidence that their work will leave a lasting impact on the organizations with whom we collaborate. Students who complete this course gain access to the broad network of the FEED Collaborative, whose mission is to equip and inspire the next generation of leaders in the food system, and to connect them to meaningful opportunities after Stanford. To learn more about the FEED Collaborative, visit https://feedcollab.stanford.edu/. This course requires an application, which can be found on the d.school¿s website: https://dschool.stanford.edu/classes/
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 293: Environmental Communication Practicum

Students complete an internship or similar practical experience in a professional environmental communication setting. Potential placements include environmental publications, environmental or outdoor education placements, NGOs, government agencies, on-campus departments, programs, or centers, and science centers and museums. Restricted to students admitted to the Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication Program. Can be completed in any quarter.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hayden, T. (PI)

EARTHSYS 294: Environmental Communication Capstone

The Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication capstone project provides students with an opportunity to complete an ambitious independent project demonstrating mastery of an area of environmental communication. Capstone projects are most often applied communication projects such as writing, photography, or video projects; expressive or artistic works; or student-initiated courses, workshops, or curriculum materials. Projects focused on academic scholarship or communication theory research may also be considered. Restricted to students enrolled in the Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication Program.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hayden, T. (PI)

EARTHSYS 295: Environmental Communication Seminar

Weekly seminar for students enrolled in the Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication Program, to be taken twice for credit during degree progress. Includes discussion of and reflection on current topics in environmental communication, skills and professional development workshop sessions, and mentoring and peer support for MA capstone projects.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hayden, T. (PI)

EARTHSYS 297: Directed Individual Study in Earth Systems

Under supervision of an Earth Systems faculty member on a subject of mutual interest.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-9 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Anderson, M. (PI); Archie, P. (PI); Ardoin, N. (PI); Arrigo, K. (PI); Asner, G. (PI); Banerjee, B. (PI); Barry, M. (PI); Block, B. (PI); Boggs, C. (PI); Boucher, A. (PI); Cain, B. (PI); Caldeira, K. (PI); Caldwell, M. (PI); Carlisle, L. (PI); Casciotti, K. (PI); Chamberlain, P. (PI); Curran, L. (PI); Daily, G. (PI); Davis, J. (PI); Denny, M. (PI); Diffenbaugh, N. (PI); Dirzo, R. (PI); Dunbar, R. (PI); Durham, W. (PI); Egger, A. (PI); Ernst, W. (PI); Falcon, W. (PI); Fendorf, S. (PI); Field, C. (PI); Francis, C. (PI); Frank, Z. (PI); Freyberg, D. (PI); Fukami, T. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gerritsen, M. (PI); Gilly, W. (PI); Gordon, D. (PI); Gorelick, S. (PI); Goulder, L. (PI); Hadly, E. (PI); Hawk, S. (PI); Hayden, T. (PI); Hecker, S. (PI); Hilley, G. (PI); Hoagland, S. (PI); Ihme, M. (PI); Ingle, J. (PI); Jackson, R. (PI); Jacobson, M. (PI); Jamieson, A. (PI); Jones, J. (PI); Kennedy, D. (PI); Kennedy, J. (PI); Knight, R. (PI); Koseff, J. (PI); Kovscek, A. (PI); Lambin, E. (PI); Lawrence, K. (PI); Litvak, L. (PI); Lobell, D. (PI); Long, S. (PI); Lutomski, P. (PI); Lynham, J. (PI); Lyons, E. (PI); Masters, G. (PI); Matson, P. (PI); Micheli, F. (PI); Monismith, S. (PI); Mooney, H. (PI); Mormann, F. (PI); Naylor, R. (PI); Nelson, J. (PI); Nevle, R. (PI); Novy-Hildesley, J. (PI); Orr, F. (PI); Ortolano, L. (PI); Osborne, M. (PI); Palumbi, S. (PI); Payne, J. (PI); Phillips, K. (PI); Polk, E. (PI); Rajaratnam, B. (PI); Root, T. (PI); Rothe, M. (PI); Saltzman, J. (PI); Schneider, S. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Seto, K. (PI); Shiv, B. (PI); Siegel, R. (PI); Simon, G. (PI); Somero, G. (PI); Sweeney, J. (PI); Switzer, P. (PI); Tabazadeh, A. (PI); Thomas, L. (PI); Thompson, B. (PI); Truebe, S. (PI); Victor, D. (PI); Vitousek, P. (PI); Walbot, V. (PI); Watanabe, J. (PI); Weyant, J. (PI); Wiederkehr, S. (PI); Wight, G. (PI); Wolak, F. (PI); Woodward, J. (PI); Zoback, M. (PI)

EARTHSYS 323: Stanford at Sea (BIOHOPK 182H, BIOHOPK 323H, ESS 323)

(Graduate students register for 323H.) Five weeks of marine science including oceanography, marine physiology, policy, maritime studies, conservation, and nautical science at Hopkins Marine Station, followed by five weeks at sea aboard a sailing research vessel in the Pacific Ocean. Shore component comprised of three multidisciplinary courses meeting daily and continuing aboard ship. Students develop an independent research project plan while ashore, and carry out the research at sea. In collaboration with the Sea Education Association of Woods Hole, MA. Only 6 units may count towards the Biology major.
Terms: Spr | Units: 16 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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