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EARTHSYS 4: Coevolution of Earth and Life (GEOLSCI 4)

Earth is the only planet in the universe currently known to harbor life. When and how did Earth become inhabited? How have biological activities altered the planet? How have environmental changes affected the evolution of life? Are we living in a sixth mass extinction? In this course, we will develop and use the tools of geology, paleontology, geochemistry, and modeling that allow us to reconstruct Earth's 4.5 billion year history and to reconstruct the interactions between life and its host planet over the past 4 billion years. We will also ask what this long history can tell us about life's likely future on Earth. We will also use One half-day field trip.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Payne, J. (PI)

EARTHSYS 10: Introduction to Earth Systems

For non-majors and prospective Earth Systems majors. Multidisciplinary approach using the principles of geology, biology, engineering, and economics to describe how the Earth operates as an interconnected, integrated system. Goal is to understand global change on all time scales. Focus is on sciences, technological principles, and sociopolitical approaches applied to solid earth, oceans, water, energy, and food and population. Case studies: environmental degradation, loss of biodiversity, and resource sustainability.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 38N: The Worst Journey in the World: The Science, Literature, and History of Polar Exploration (ESS 38N, GEOLSCI 38N)

This course examines the motivations and experiences of polar explorers under the harshest conditions on Earth, as well as the chronicles of their explorations and hardships, dating to the 1500s for the Arctic and the 1700s for the Antarctic. Materials include The Worst Journey in the World by Aspley Cherry-Garrard who in 1911 participated in a midwinter Antarctic sledging trip to recover emperor penguin eggs. Optional field trip into the high Sierra in March.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Dunbar, R. (PI)

EARTHSYS 41N: The Global Warming Paradox

Preference to freshman. Focus is on the complex climate challenges posed by the substantial benefits of energy consumption, including the critical tension between the enormous global demand for increased human well-being and the negative climate consequences of large-scale emissions of carbon dioxide. Topics include: Earth¿s energy balance; detection and attribution of climate change; the climate response to enhanced greenhouse forcing; impacts of climate change on natural and human systems; and proposed methods for curbing further climate change. Sources include peer-reviewed scientific papers, current research results, and portrayal of scientific findings by the mass media and social networks.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Diffenbaugh, N. (PI)

EARTHSYS 91: Earth Systems Writers Collective

Come join a community of environmental writers, publish your work, and get course credit at the same time! Are you currently working on an article, an op-ed, translating your class projects into publishable pieces or pursuing a new writing project? Are you interested in publishing your work in the quarterly Earth Systems newsletter and the annual Earth Systems magazine? In this weekly seminar, you will collaborate with others and get constructive feedback from a community of peer writers. You can enroll in the Earth Systems Writers Collective for 1 unit, or just join without signing up for course credit. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Polk, E. (PI)

EARTHSYS 103: Understanding Energy (CEE 107A, CEE 207A)

Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 4 units, which includes lecture and in-class discussion, readings and videos, assignments, and two off-site field trips. Field trip offerings differ each fall (see syllabus for updated list), but may include Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant, Shasta dam, Tesla Gigafactory, NextEra wind farm, San Ardo oil field, Geyser¿s geothermal power plants, etc. Students choose two field trips from approximately 8 that are offered. Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD). The 3-unit option requires instructor approval - please contact Diana Gragg. Open to all: pre-majors and majors, with any background! Website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207a/ CEE 107S/207S Understanding Energy: Essentials is a shorter (3 unit) version of this course, offered summer quarter ¿ students should not take both for credit. Prerequisites: Algebra.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 112: Human Society and Environmental Change (EARTHSYS 212, ESS 112, HISTORY 103D)

Interdisciplinary approaches to understanding human-environment interactions with a focus on economics, policy, culture, history, and the role of the state. Prerequisite: ECON 1.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 119A: Will Work for Food: Designing Your Pathway to Impact in the Food System

Offered exclusively for juniors and seniors, the goal of this course is to help you align your Stanford experience with potential pathways for creating impact in the food system after Stanford. This course builds on the "paced education" model that emerged from the d.school's landmark exploration of education at Stanford known as Stanford 2025. It is comprised of three phases of learning, which will unfold over six to nine months, at a pace that is determined by the amount of time you need to move from one phase to the next. In the first phase (119A and/or 119B) you will assess your knowledge, experience, abilities, interests, and development opportunities and you will broadly explore a systemic problem of interest in the food system. In the second phase (119B), you will deepen your knowledge on a specific problem by creating a personal learning plan, a series of experiments to explore the ways in your knowledge, experience, abilities, interests, and development opportunities align with solving your problem of interest, and by developing a board of advisors to support you along the journey. In the third phase (119C), you will scope, in collaboration with a project partner, a project of real-world consequence. You must enroll in either 119A or 119B to enroll in 119C and the expectation is that you complete four units of work in total. This is a highly selective and hands-on course led by a teaching team with deep professional connections in the food system and who will act as your coaches, mentors, and connectors. nnPlease visit http://feedcollaborative.org/classes/ to apply. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Select applicants will be interviewed. Decisions will be made one week prior to the start of the quarter.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rothe, M. (PI)

EARTHSYS 139: Ecosystem Services: Frontiers in the Science of Valuing Nature (BIO 138, BIO 238, EARTHSYS 239)

This advanced course explores the science of valuing nature, beginning with its historical origins, and then its recent development in natural (especially ecological), economic, psychological, and other social sciences. We will use the ecosystem services framework (characterizing benefits from ecosystems to people) to define the state of knowledge, core methods of analysis, and research frontiers, such as at the interface with biodiversity, resilience, human health, and human development. Intended for diverse students, with a focus on research and real-world cases. To apply, please email the instructor (gdaily@stanford.edu) with a brief description of your background and research interests.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 144: Fundamentals of Geographic Information Science (GIS) (ESS 164)

Survey of geographic information including maps, satellite imagery, and census data, approaches to spatial data, and tools for integrating and examining spatially-explicit data. Emphasis is on fundamental concepts of geographic information science and associated technologies. Topics include geographic data structure, cartography, remotely sensed data, statistical analysis of geographic data, spatial analysis, map design, and geographic information system software. Computer lab assignments. All students are required to attend a weekly lab session.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lyons, E. (PI)

EARTHSYS 146A: Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: The Atmospheric Circulation (CEE 161I, CEE 261I, ESS 246A)

Introduction to the physics governing the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean and their control on climate with emphasis on the atmospheric circulation. Topics include the global energy balance, the greenhouse effect, the vertical and meridional structure of the atmosphere, dry and moist convection, the equations of motion for the atmosphere and ocean, including the effects of rotation, and the poleward transport of heat by the large-scale atmospheric circulation and storm systems. Prerequisites: MATH 51 or CME100 and PHYSICS 41.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 147: Ecosystem Ecology and Biogeochemistry (BIO 147, BIO 240, EARTHSYS 247)

An introduction to ecosystem ecology and terrestrial biogeochemistry. This course will focus on the dynamics of carbon and other biologically essential elements in the Earth System, on spatial scales from local to global. Prerequisites: Biology 117, Earth Systems 111, or graduate standing.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Vitousek, P. (PI)

EARTHSYS 150B: Fire: Social and Ecological Contexts of Conflagration (ANTHRO 150B)

Over 1 million acres burned from California wildland fires in 2018, yet conservative estimates suggest that four times as many acres burned annually in California preceding European colonialism. In this course we will explore how climate, land management, urban development, and human social institutions contribute to contrasts in wild and prescribed (intentional anthropogenic) fire patterns worldwide. We will investigate the socio-ecological values and harms associated with different fire and land-use policies and practices, ranging from Indigenous and small-scale contexts, conservation projects, and large-scale fire suppression efforts.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Marks-Block, T. (PI)

EARTHSYS 160: Sustainable Cities (URBANST 164)

Service-learning course that exposes students to sustainability concepts and urban planning as a tool for determining sustainable outcomes in the Bay Area. Focus will be on the relationship of land use and transportation planning to housing and employment patterns, mobility, public health, and social equity. Topics will include government initiatives to counteract urban sprawl and promote smart growth and livability, political realities of organizing and building coalitions around sustainability goals, and increasing opportunities for low-income and communities of color to achieve sustainability outcomes. Students will participate in team-based projects in collaboration with local community partners and take part in significant off-site fieldwork. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Chan, D. (PI)

EARTHSYS 162: Data for Sustainable Development (CS 325B, EARTHSYS 262)

The sustainable development goals (SDGs) encompass many important aspects of human and ecosystem well-being that are traditionally difficult to measure. This project-based course will focus on ways to use inexpensive, unconventional data streams to measure outcomes relevant to SDGs, including poverty, hunger, health, governance, and economic activity. Students will apply machine learning techniques to various projects outlined at the beginning of the quarter. The main learning goals are to gain experience conducting and communicating original research. Prior knowledge of machine learning techniques, such as from CS 221, CS 229, CS 231N, STATS 202, or STATS 216 is required. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students. Enrollment limited to 24. Students must apply for the class by filling out the form at https://goo.gl/forms/9LSZF7lPkHadix5D3. A permission code will be given to admitted students to register for the class.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 164: Introduction to Physical Oceanography (CEE 162D, CEE 262D, ESS 148)

Formerly CEE 164. The dynamic basis of oceanography. Topics: physical environment; conservation equations for salt, heat, and momentum; geostrophic flows; wind-driven flows; the Gulf Stream; equatorial dynamics and ENSO; thermohaline circulation of the deep oceans; and tides. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 41 (formerly 53).
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Monismith, S. (PI)

EARTHSYS 180: Principles and Practices of Sustainable Agriculture (ESS 280)

Field-based training in ecologically sound agricultural practices at the Stanford Community Farm. Weekly lessons, field work, and group projects. Field trips to educational farms in the area. Topics include: soils, composting, irrigation techniques, IPM, basic plant anatomy and physiology, weeds, greenhouse management, and marketing. Application required. Deadline: September 10 for Autumn and March 10 for Spring. nnApplication: https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_3l0kOiLP8DhwS1f
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 186: Farm and Garden Environmental Education Practicum (EARTHSYS 286)

Farms and gardens provide excellent settings for place-based environmental education that emphasize human ecological relationships and experiential learning. The O'Donohue Family Stanford Educational Farm is the setting to explore the principles and practices of farm and garden-based education in conjunction with the farm's new field trip program for local youth. The course includes readings and reflections on environmental education and emphasis on learning by doing, engaging students in the practice of team teaching. Application required. Deadline: March 14.nnApplication: https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9SPufdULCh93rbT
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Archie, P. (PI)

EARTHSYS 191: Concepts in Environmental Communication (EARTHSYS 291)

Introduction to the history, development, and current state of communication of environmental science and policy to non-specialist audiences. Includes fundamental principles, core competencies, and major challenges of effective environmental communication in the public and policy realms and an overview of the current scope of research and practice in environmental communication. Intended for graduate students and advanced undergraduates, with a background in Earth or environmental science and/or policy studies, or in communication or journalism studies with a specific interest in environmental and science communication. Prerequisite: Earth Systems core (EarthSys 111 and EarthSys 112) or equivalent. (Meets Earth Systems WIM requirement.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hayden, T. (PI)

EARTHSYS 194: Topics in Writing & Rhetoric: Introduction to Environmental Justice: Race, Class, Gender and Place (CSRE 132E, PWR 194EP, URBANST 155EP)

Environmental justice means ensuring equal access to environmental benefits and preventing the disproportionate impacts of environmental harms for all communities regardless of gender, class, race, ethnicity or other social positions. This introductory course examines the rhetoric, history and key case studies of environmental justice while encouraging critical and collaborative thinking, reading and researching about diversity in environmental movements within the global community and at Stanford, including the ways race, class and gender have shaped environmental battles still being fought today from Standing Rock to Flint, Michigan. We center diverse voices by bringing leaders, particularly from marginalized communities on the frontlines to our classroom to communicate experiences, insights and best practices. Together we will develop and present original research projects which may serve a particular organizational or community need, such as racialized dispossession, toxic pollution and human health, or indigenous land and water rights, among many others.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Diver, S. (PI); Polk, E. (PI)

EARTHSYS 197: Directed Individual Study in Earth Systems

Under supervision of an Earth Systems faculty member on a subject of mutual interest.
Terms: Aut, Spr, offered occasionally | Units: 1-9 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hoagland, S. (PI)

EARTHSYS 210A: Senior Capstone and Reflection

The Earth Systems Senior Capstone and Reflection, required of all seniors, provides students with opportunities to synthesize and reflect on their learning in the major. Students participate in guided career development and planning activities and initiate work on an independent or group capstone project related to an Earth Systems problem or question of interest. In addition, students learn and apply principles of effective oral communication through developing and giving a formal presentation on their internship. Students must also take EARTHSYS 210P, Earth Systems Capstone Project, in the quarter following the Senior Capstone and Reflection Course. Prerequisite: Completion of an approved Earth Systems internship (EARTHSYS 260).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 212: Human Society and Environmental Change (EARTHSYS 112, ESS 112, HISTORY 103D)

Interdisciplinary approaches to understanding human-environment interactions with a focus on economics, policy, culture, history, and the role of the state. Prerequisite: ECON 1.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 227: Decision Science for Environmental Threats (ESS 227)

Decision science is the study of how people make decisions. It aims to describe these processes in ways that will help people make better or more well-informed decisions. It is an interdisciplinary field that draws upon psychology, economics, political science, and management, among other disciplines. It is being used in a number of domain areas and for a variety of applications, including managing freshwater resources, designing decision support tools to aid in coastal adaptation to sea-level rise, and creating `nudges¿ to enhance energy efficiency behaviors. This course covers behavioral theories of probabilistic inference, intuitive prediction, preference, and decision making. Topics include heuristics and biases, risk perceptions and attitudes, strategies for combining different sources of information and dealing with conflicting objectives, and the roles of group and emotional processes in decision making. This course will introduce students to foundational theories of decision science, and will involve applying these theories to understand decisions about environmental threats.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 239: Ecosystem Services: Frontiers in the Science of Valuing Nature (BIO 138, BIO 238, EARTHSYS 139)

This advanced course explores the science of valuing nature, beginning with its historical origins, and then its recent development in natural (especially ecological), economic, psychological, and other social sciences. We will use the ecosystem services framework (characterizing benefits from ecosystems to people) to define the state of knowledge, core methods of analysis, and research frontiers, such as at the interface with biodiversity, resilience, human health, and human development. Intended for diverse students, with a focus on research and real-world cases. To apply, please email the instructor (gdaily@stanford.edu) with a brief description of your background and research interests.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 247: Ecosystem Ecology and Biogeochemistry (BIO 147, BIO 240, EARTHSYS 147)

An introduction to ecosystem ecology and terrestrial biogeochemistry. This course will focus on the dynamics of carbon and other biologically essential elements in the Earth System, on spatial scales from local to global. Prerequisites: Biology 117, Earth Systems 111, or graduate standing.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Vitousek, P. (PI)

EARTHSYS 250: Directed Research

Independent research. Student develops own project with faculty supervision. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-9 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ardoin, N. (PI); Arrigo, K. (PI); Asner, G. (PI); Benson, S. (PI); Block, B. (PI); Boggs, C. (PI); Boucher, A. (PI); Cain, B. (PI); Caldwell, M. (PI); Carlisle, L. (PI); Casciotti, K. (PI); Chamberlain, P. (PI); Curran, L. (PI); Daily, G. (PI); Davis, J. (PI); Denny, M. (PI); Diffenbaugh, N. (PI); Dirzo, R. (PI); Dunbar, R. (PI); Durham, W. (PI); Egger, A. (PI); Ehrlich, P. (PI); Ernst, W. (PI); Falcon, W. (PI); Fendorf, S. (PI); Field, C. (PI); Francis, C. (PI); Frank, Z. (PI); Freyberg, D. (PI); Fukami, T. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gerritsen, M. (PI); Gilly, W. (PI); Gordon, D. (PI); Gorelick, S. (PI); Goulder, L. (PI); Hadly, E. (PI); Hayden, T. (PI); Hilley, G. (PI); Ingle, J. (PI); Jamieson, A. (PI); Jones, J. (PI); Kennedy, D. (PI); Kennedy, J. (PI); Knight, R. (PI); Konings, A. (PI); Koseff, J. (PI); Kovscek, A. (PI); Lambin, E. (PI); Litvak, L. (PI); Lobell, D. (PI); Long, S. (PI); Lynham, J. (PI); Masters, G. (PI); Matson, P. (PI); Micheli, F. (PI); Milroy, C. (PI); Monismith, S. (PI); Mooney, H. (PI); Naylor, R. (PI); Nevle, R. (PI); Orr, F. (PI); Palumbi, S. (PI); Payne, J. (PI); Peay, K. (PI); Phillips, K. (PI); Rajaratnam, B. (PI); Root, T. (PI); Rothe, M. (PI); Schneider, S. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Seto, K. (PI); Siegel, R. (PI); Somero, G. (PI); Sweeney, J. (PI); Switzer, P. (PI); Tabazadeh, A. (PI); Thomas, L. (PI); Thompson, B. (PI); Victor, D. (PI); Vitousek, P. (PI); Walbot, V. (PI); Watanabe, J. (PI); Weyant, J. (PI); Wiederkehr, S. (PI); Wilber, C. (PI); Woodward, J. (PI); Zoback, M. (PI)

EARTHSYS 260: Internship

Supervised field, lab, or public/private sector project. May consist of directed research under the supervision of a Stanford faculty member, participation in one of several off campus Stanford programs, or an approved non-Stanford program or opportunity relevant to the student's Earth Systems studies. Required of and restricted to declared Earth Systems majors. For course requirements, please visit: https://pangea.stanford.edu/esys/earth-systems-internship
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hoagland, S. (PI)

EARTHSYS 262: Data for Sustainable Development (CS 325B, EARTHSYS 162)

The sustainable development goals (SDGs) encompass many important aspects of human and ecosystem well-being that are traditionally difficult to measure. This project-based course will focus on ways to use inexpensive, unconventional data streams to measure outcomes relevant to SDGs, including poverty, hunger, health, governance, and economic activity. Students will apply machine learning techniques to various projects outlined at the beginning of the quarter. The main learning goals are to gain experience conducting and communicating original research. Prior knowledge of machine learning techniques, such as from CS 221, CS 229, CS 231N, STATS 202, or STATS 216 is required. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students. Enrollment limited to 24. Students must apply for the class by filling out the form at https://goo.gl/forms/9LSZF7lPkHadix5D3. A permission code will be given to admitted students to register for the class.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

EARTHSYS 286: Farm and Garden Environmental Education Practicum (EARTHSYS 186)

Farms and gardens provide excellent settings for place-based environmental education that emphasize human ecological relationships and experiential learning. The O'Donohue Family Stanford Educational Farm is the setting to explore the principles and practices of farm and garden-based education in conjunction with the farm's new field trip program for local youth. The course includes readings and reflections on environmental education and emphasis on learning by doing, engaging students in the practice of team teaching. Application required. Deadline: March 14.nnApplication: https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9SPufdULCh93rbT
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Archie, P. (PI)

EARTHSYS 289: FEED Lab: Food System Design & Innovation (SUST 231)

FEED Lab is a course in which entrepreneurial and motivated students, engaged industry-thought leaders, and deeply experienced and connected faculty work together to design solutions to some of the food system's most consequential problems. Whether you're passionate about transforming the food system, or merely curious explore it, all students in this course will leave with practical design skills, enhanced leadership abilities, and confidence that their work will leave a lasting impact on the organizations with whom we collaborate. Students who complete this course gain access to the broad network of the FEED Collaborative, whose mission is to equip and inspire the next generation of leaders in the food system, and to connect them to meaningful opportunities after Stanford. To learn more about the FEED Collaborative, visit https://feedcollab.stanford.edu/. This course requires an application, which can be found here: https://forms.gle/5Rd93yVg8XjRCig26
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Rothe, M. (PI)

EARTHSYS 290: Master's Seminar

Required of and open only to Earth Systems co-terminal MS and MA students. This course has several elements, including, skill building through experiential learning and reflection and professional development. Students will work in teams with a community partner to complete a well-defined, manageable, but important project. Our community partners have requested help with achieving their missions and seminar students will utilize their backgrounds in social/environmental problem solving to deliver a final product. Our partners have requested help with such efforts as grant writing, data analysis, curriculum development, symposium organizing, presentation research and preparation and communications to raise awareness about an environmental challenge. Students will also explore how best to communicate their interdisciplinary skills and goals through their resumes, cv¿s or cover letters, portfolios or linkedIn profiles in preparation for the next phase of their career. Guest speakers and an in class simulation will complement these activities.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hoagland, S. (PI)

EARTHSYS 291: Concepts in Environmental Communication (EARTHSYS 191)

Introduction to the history, development, and current state of communication of environmental science and policy to non-specialist audiences. Includes fundamental principles, core competencies, and major challenges of effective environmental communication in the public and policy realms and an overview of the current scope of research and practice in environmental communication. Intended for graduate students and advanced undergraduates, with a background in Earth or environmental science and/or policy studies, or in communication or journalism studies with a specific interest in environmental and science communication. Prerequisite: Earth Systems core (EarthSys 111 and EarthSys 112) or equivalent. (Meets Earth Systems WIM requirement.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hayden, T. (PI)

EARTHSYS 292: Multimedia Environmental Communication

Introductory theory and practice of effective, accurate and engaging use of photography, audio and video production in communicating environmental science and policy concepts to the public. Emphasis on fundamental techniques, storytelling and workflow more than technical how to or gear. Includes extensive instructor and peer critiquing of work and substantial out-of-class group project work. Limited class size, preference to Earth Systems master's students. No previous multimedia experience necessary.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hayden, T. (PI)

EARTHSYS 293: Environmental Communication Practicum

Students complete an internship or similar practical experience in a professional environmental communication setting. Potential placements include environmental publications, environmental or outdoor education placements, NGOs, government agencies, on-campus departments, programs, or centers, and science centers and museums. Restricted to students admitted to the Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication Program. Can be completed in any quarter.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hayden, T. (PI)

EARTHSYS 294: Environmental Communication Capstone

The Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication capstone project provides students with an opportunity to complete an ambitious independent project demonstrating mastery of an area of environmental communication. Capstone projects are most often applied communication projects such as writing, photography, or video projects; expressive or artistic works; or student-initiated courses, workshops, or curriculum materials. Projects focused on academic scholarship or communication theory research may also be considered. Restricted to students enrolled in the Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication Program.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hayden, T. (PI)

EARTHSYS 295: Environmental Communication Seminar

Weekly seminar for students enrolled in the Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication Program, to be taken twice for credit during degree progress. Includes discussion of and reflection on current topics in environmental communication, skills and professional development workshop sessions, and mentoring and peer support for MA capstone projects.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hayden, T. (PI)

EARTHSYS 297: Directed Individual Study in Earth Systems

Under supervision of an Earth Systems faculty member on a subject of mutual interest.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-9 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Anderson, M. (PI); Archie, P. (PI); Ardoin, N. (PI); Arrigo, K. (PI); Asner, G. (PI); Banerjee, B. (PI); Barry, M. (PI); Block, B. (PI); Boggs, C. (PI); Boucher, A. (PI); Cain, B. (PI); Caldeira, K. (PI); Caldwell, M. (PI); Carlisle, L. (PI); Casciotti, K. (PI); Chamberlain, P. (PI); Curran, L. (PI); Daily, G. (PI); Davis, J. (PI); Denny, M. (PI); Diffenbaugh, N. (PI); Dirzo, R. (PI); Dunbar, R. (PI); Durham, W. (PI); Egger, A. (PI); Ernst, W. (PI); Falcon, W. (PI); Fendorf, S. (PI); Field, C. (PI); Francis, C. (PI); Frank, Z. (PI); Freyberg, D. (PI); Fukami, T. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gerritsen, M. (PI); Gilly, W. (PI); Gordon, D. (PI); Gorelick, S. (PI); Goulder, L. (PI); Hadly, E. (PI); Hawk, S. (PI); Hayden, T. (PI); Hecker, S. (PI); Hilley, G. (PI); Hoagland, S. (PI); Ihme, M. (PI); Ingle, J. (PI); Jackson, R. (PI); Jacobson, M. (PI); Jamieson, A. (PI); Jones, J. (PI); Kennedy, D. (PI); Kennedy, J. (PI); Knight, R. (PI); Koseff, J. (PI); Kovscek, A. (PI); Lambin, E. (PI); Lawrence, K. (PI); Litvak, L. (PI); Lobell, D. (PI); Long, S. (PI); Lutomski, P. (PI); Lynham, J. (PI); Lyons, E. (PI); Masters, G. (PI); Matson, P. (PI); Micheli, F. (PI); Monismith, S. (PI); Mooney, H. (PI); Mormann, F. (PI); Naylor, R. (PI); Nelson, J. (PI); Nevle, R. (PI); Novy-Hildesley, J. (PI); Orr, F. (PI); Ortolano, L. (PI); Osborne, M. (PI); Palumbi, S. (PI); Payne, J. (PI); Phillips, K. (PI); Polk, E. (PI); Rajaratnam, B. (PI); Root, T. (PI); Rothe, M. (PI); Saltzman, J. (PI); Schneider, S. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Seto, K. (PI); Shiv, B. (PI); Siegel, R. (PI); Simon, G. (PI); Somero, G. (PI); Sweeney, J. (PI); Switzer, P. (PI); Tabazadeh, A. (PI); Thomas, L. (PI); Thompson, B. (PI); Truebe, S. (PI); Victor, D. (PI); Vitousek, P. (PI); Walbot, V. (PI); Watanabe, J. (PI); Weyant, J. (PI); Wiederkehr, S. (PI); Wight, G. (PI); Wolak, F. (PI); Woodward, J. (PI); Zoback, M. (PI)
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