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EARTHSYS 4: Coevolution of Earth and Life (GEOLSCI 4)

Earth is the only planet in the universe currently known to harbor life. When and how did Earth become inhabited? How have biological activities altered the planet? How have environmental changes affected the evolution of life? Are we living in a sixth mass extinction? In this course, we will develop and use the tools of geology, paleontology, geochemistry, and modeling that allow us to reconstruct Earth's 4.5 billion year history and to reconstruct the interactions between life and its host planet over the past 4 billion years. We will also ask what this long history can tell us about life's likely future on Earth. We will also use One half-day field trip.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: ; Leslie, A. (PI)

EARTHSYS 10: Introduction to Earth Systems

For non-majors and prospective Earth Systems majors. Multidisciplinary approach using the principles of geology, biology, engineering, and economics to describe how the Earth operates as an interconnected, integrated system. Goal is to understand global change on all time scales. Focus is on sciences, technological principles, and sociopolitical approaches applied to solid earth, oceans, water, energy, and food and population. Case studies: environmental degradation, loss of biodiversity, and resource sustainability.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

EARTHSYS 22: Introduction to Landscape Architecture: Urban Ecology and Environmental Design

This 1 unit, nine-week course provides an introduction to landscape architecture, covering a brief history of the field, making connections between science and sustainable and resilient urban ecosystems, and exploring a range of projects and topics that landscape architects touch. From public spaces and streetscapes to shorelines and trails, landscape architecture projects combine art and science in the pursuit of connecting and engaging humans with built and natural environments. The practice can be used to contribute to and achieve complex goals such as climate resilience, environmental restoration, habitat creation, green infrastructure planning, and aesthetic appeal. Through targeted readings, lectures, thoughtful discussions, and foundational assignments encouraging students to get outside and observe their surrounding landscapes, students will receive an introduction to landscape architecture and engage with a creative application of earth systems science. This course begins during Week 2 of fall quarter and will invite practicing landscape architects and urban designers to give biweekly guest lectures. Students of all class years and majors are encouraged to enroll. Guest lectures will be open to the Stanford community.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

EARTHSYS 38N: The Worst Journey in the World: The Science, Literature, and History of Polar Exploration (ESS 38N, GEOLSCI 38N)

This course examines the motivations and experiences of polar explorers under the harshest conditions on Earth, as well as the chronicles of their explorations and hardships, dating to the 1500s for the Arctic and the 1700s for the Antarctic. Materials include The Worst Journey in the World by Aspley Cherry-Garrard who in 1911 participated in a midwinter Antarctic sledging trip to recover emperor penguin eggs. Optional field trip into the high Sierra in March.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci

EARTHSYS 41N: The Global Warming Paradox

Preference to freshman. Focus is on the complex climate challenges posed by the substantial benefits of energy consumption, including the critical tension between the enormous global demand for increased human well-being and the negative climate consequences of large-scale emissions of carbon dioxide. Topics include: Earth¿s energy balance; detection and attribution of climate change; the climate response to enhanced greenhouse forcing; impacts of climate change on natural and human systems; and proposed methods for curbing further climate change. Sources include peer-reviewed scientific papers, current research results, and portrayal of scientific findings by the mass media and social networks.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

EARTHSYS 61Q: Food and security (ESS 61Q, INTNLREL 61Q)

The course will provide a broad overview of key policy issues concerning agricultural development and food security, and will assess how global governance is addressing the problem of food security. At the same time the course will provide an overview of the field of international security, and examine how governments and international institutions are beginning to include food in discussions of security.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

EARTHSYS 103: Understanding Energy (CEE 107A, CEE 207A)

Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 4 units, which includes lecture and in-class discussion, readings and videos, homework assignments, virtual field trips, and a small-group discussion section once a week for 50 minutes (live participation is required, many different times will be offered). Lectures will be recorded and available on Canvas. No in-person field trips will be offered for AY 2020-2021 ¿ but alumni of the class can optionally attend field trips in future quarters. Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD). The 3-unit option requires instructor approval - please contact Diana Gragg. Open to all: pre-majors and majors, with any background! Website: https://energy.stanford.edu/understanding-energy. CEE 107S/207S Understanding Energy: Essentials is a shorter (3 unit) version of this course, offered summer quarter. Students should not take both for credit. Prerequisites: Algebra.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SI

EARTHSYS 110: Introduction to the Foundations of Contemporary Geophysics (GEOPHYS 110)

Introduction to the foundations of contemporary geophysics. Topics drawn from broad themes in: whole Earth geodynamics, geohazards, natural resources, and environment. In each case the focus is on how the interpretation of a variety of geophysical measurements (e.g., gravity, seismology, heat flow, electromagnetics, and remote sensing) can be used to provide fundamental insight into the behavior of the Earth. The course will include a weekend field trip. Prerequisite: CME 100 or MATH 51, or co-registration in either.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

EARTHSYS 112: Human Society and Environmental Change (EARTHSYS 212, ESS 112, HISTORY 103D)

Interdisciplinary approaches to understanding human-environment interactions with a focus on economics, policy, culture, history, and the role of the state. Prerequisite: ECON 1.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

EARTHSYS 144: Fundamentals of Geographic Information Science (GIS) (ESS 164)

"Everything is somewhere, and that somewhere matters." The rapid growth and maturity of spatial data technologies over the past decade represent a paradigm shift in the applied use of location data from high-level overviews of administrative interests, to highly personalized location-based services that place the individual at the center of the map, at all times. The use of spatial data and related technology continues to grow in fields ranging from environmental sciences to epidemiology to market prediction. This course will present an overview of current approaches to the use of spatial data and its creation, capture, management, analysis and presentation, in a research context. Topics will include modeling of geographic objects and associated data, modeling of geographic space and the conceptual foundations of "spatial thinking," field data collection, basic spatial statistical analysis, remote sensing & the use of satellite-based imagery, "Big Data" and machine learning approaches to spatial data, and cartographic design and presentation including the use of web-based "Storymap" platforms.n nThe course will consist of weekly lectures, guest speakers, computer lab assignments and an individual final project requirement.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR

EARTHSYS 146A: Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: The Atmospheric Circulation (CEE 161I, CEE 261I, ESS 246A)

Introduction to the physics governing the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean and their control on climate with emphasis on the atmospheric circulation. Topics include the global energy balance, the greenhouse effect, the vertical and meridional structure of the atmosphere, dry and moist convection, the equations of motion for the atmosphere and ocean, including the effects of rotation, and the poleward transport of heat by the large-scale atmospheric circulation and storm systems. Prerequisites: MATH 51 or CME100 and PHYSICS 41.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

EARTHSYS 160: Sustainable Cities (URBANST 164)

Community-engaged learning course that exposes students to sustainability concepts and urban planning as a tool for determining sustainable outcomes in the Bay Area. The focus will be on land use and transportation planning to housing and employment patterns, mobility, public health, and social equity. Topics will include government initiatives to counteract urban sprawl and promote smart growth and livability, political realities of organizing and building coalitions around sustainability goals, and increasing opportunities for low-income and communities of color to achieve sustainability outcomes. Students will participate in remote team-based projects in collaboration with Bay Area community partners. Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable 20 times (up to 100 units total)
Instructors: ; Chan, D. (PI)

EARTHSYS 182A: Ecological Farm Systems (EARTHSYS 282A)

An in-person, outdoor, project-based course in sustainable agricultural systems. Students will work individually or in small groups on projects at the Stanford Educational Farm. Potential projects this fall include building educational gardens, orchard establishment and management, and seedling propagation for plant donations for low-income families in partnership with Valley Verde in San Jose. Students are also encouraged to develop their own sustainable agriculture projects based on their interests.nn nnThe class will meet in-person, outdoors at the Stanford Educational Farm. Students will be required to follow farm and University COVID-19 protocols. By application only. The application can be found here: https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_e2tzecrtvl5lmm1
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 4 units total)

EARTHSYS 191: Concepts in Environmental Communication (EARTHSYS 291)

Introduction to the history, development, and current state of communication of environmental science and policy to non-specialist audiences. Includes fundamental principles, core competencies, and major challenges of effective environmental communication in the public and policy realms and an overview of the current scope of research and practice in environmental communication. Intended for graduate students and advanced undergraduates, with a background in Earth or environmental science and/or policy studies, or in communication or journalism studies with a specific interest in environmental and science communication. Prerequisite: Earth Systems core (EarthSys 111 and EarthSys 112) or equivalent. (Meets Earth Systems WIM requirement.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

EARTHSYS 194: Topics in Writing & Rhetoric: Introduction to Environmental Justice: Race, Class, Gender and Place (ENVRES 223, PWR 194EP)

This course examines the rhetoric, history and key case studies of environmental justice while encouraging critical and collaborative thinking, reading and researching about diversity in environmental movements within the global community and at Stanford, including the ways race, class and gender have shaped environmental battles still being fought today. We center diverse voices by bringing leaders, particularly from marginalized communities on the frontlines to our classroom to communicate experiences, insights and best practices. Together we will develop and present original research projects which may serve a particular organizational or community need, such as racialized dispossession, toxic pollution and human health, or indigenous land and water rights, among many others. Prerequisite: PWR 2
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

EARTHSYS 194A: Environmental Justice Colloquium (HUMRTS 194A, URBANST 155A)

This colloquium brings the voices and vision of leading Environmental Justice (EJ) advocates to the Stanford community, in order to educate, inspire, and transform our understanding of environmental science. Environmental Justice advances a positive vision for policies and actions that fight environmental racism. EJ approaches involve centering the voices and leadership of marginalized communities in 1) ensuring equitable access to environmental benefits, and 2) preventing or mitigating the disproportionate impacts of environmental harms for all communities, regardless of gender, class, race, ethnicity, or other social positions. This colloquium highlights the work of leading EJ thinkers and practitioners, speaking from frontline organizations on a wide range of topics. These topics include acting on toxic exposures and health disparities for community resilience, climate justice and youth action, Indigenous land and water rights, green cities and Afrofuturism, food justice and intersecting social movements, queer ecologies, and more. The colloquium will host a weekly speaker, and final symposium at the end of the quarter. nnThe first meeting for this course will take place during WEEK 3.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)
Instructors: ; Diver, S. (PI); Polk, E. (PI)

EARTHSYS 196A: Environmental Justice and Human Rights Lab (HUMRTS 196)

The Environmental Justice and Human Rights Lab is an intellectual hub and supportive learning community for students engaging in environmental justice and human rights work of any kind. Environmental justice (EJ) advances a positive vision for policies and actions that fight environmental racism, and human rights (HR) center on the notion that all people, by virtue of their existence and regardless of any given status or classification, are equally entitled to fundamental rights and protections. Our semi-structured weekly sessions will foster an open learning environment for students and peer-to-peer learning connections. Sessions will include giving and receiving feedback on capstone or community-based projects, independent research, or other relevant coursework or extracurricular activity. We also welcome students who are new to these topics and would like to learn more. We are open to students of all backgrounds and disciplines at any stage of their research or project work. Following EJ and HR principles, we seek to center local, contextualised knowledge and leadership through ethical research partnerships with community members. To do so, we follow community-based participatory research approaches and decolonizing methodologies. Examples of our work to date include 1) enabling graduate students to effectively bring EJ and HR approaches into dissertation research, 2) supporting campus leaders and directly participating in diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) initiatives, and 3) educating and learning from one another about critical EJ and HR scholarship and anti-racist approaches to our work. Lab interests include addressing inequitable impacts of climate change, advancing decolonial approaches to land and water management, promoting food justice, combatting human trafficking and labor exploitation, promoting fair and just immigration policies, and additional EJ and HR research topics. Note that this lab is intended as an open space for engagement. If you are unable to enroll for credit, but would still like to participate, please email humanrights@stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

EARTHSYS 197: Directed Individual Study in Earth Systems

Under supervision of an Earth Systems faculty member on a subject of mutual interest.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-9 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Hoagland, S. (PI)

EARTHSYS 205A: Fundamentals of Geobiology (ESS 205, GEOLSCI 205)

Lecture and discussion covering key topics in the history of life on Earth, as well as basic principles that apply to life in the universe. Co-evolution of Earth and life; critical intervals of environmental and biological change; geomicrobiology; paleobiology; global biogeochemical cycles; scaling of geobiological processes in space and time.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

EARTHSYS 210A: Senior Capstone and Reflection

The Earth Systems Senior Capstone and Reflection, required of all seniors, provides students with opportunities to synthesize and reflect on their learning in the major. Students participate in guided career development and planning activities and initiate work on an independent or group capstone project related to an Earth Systems problem or question of interest. In addition, students learn and apply principles of effective oral communication through developing and giving a formal presentation on their internship. Students must also take EARTHSYS 210P, Earth Systems Capstone Project, in the quarter following the Senior Capstone and Reflection Course. Prerequisite: Completion of an approved Earth Systems internship (EARTHSYS 260).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

EARTHSYS 212: Human Society and Environmental Change (EARTHSYS 112, ESS 112, HISTORY 103D)

Interdisciplinary approaches to understanding human-environment interactions with a focus on economics, policy, culture, history, and the role of the state. Prerequisite: ECON 1.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

EARTHSYS 227: Decision Science for Environmental Threats (ESS 227)

Decision science is the study of how people make decisions. It aims to describe these processes in ways that will help people make better or more well-informed decisions. It is an interdisciplinary field that draws upon psychology, economics, political science, and management, among other disciplines. It is being used in a number of domain areas and for a variety of applications, including managing freshwater resources, designing decision support tools to aid in coastal adaptation to sea-level rise, and creating "nudges" to enhance energy efficiency behaviors. This course covers behavioral theories of probabilistic inference, intuitive prediction, preference, and decision making. Topics include heuristics and biases, risk perceptions and attitudes, strategies for combining different sources of information and dealing with conflicting objectives, and the roles of group and emotional processes in decision making. This course will introduce students to foundational theories of decision science, and will involve applying these theories to understand decisions about environmental threats.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

EARTHSYS 250: Directed Research

Independent research. Student develops own project with faculty supervision. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-9 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Ardoin, N. (PI); Arrigo, K. (PI); Asner, G. (PI); Benson, S. (PI); Block, B. (PI); Boggs, C. (PI); Boucher, A. (PI); Cain, B. (PI); Caldwell, M. (PI); Carlisle, L. (PI); Casciotti, K. (PI); Chamberlain, P. (PI); Curran, L. (PI); Daily, G. (PI); Davis, J. (PI); Denny, M. (PI); Diffenbaugh, N. (PI); Dirzo, R. (PI); Dunbar, R. (PI); Durham, W. (PI); Egger, A. (PI); Ehrlich, P. (PI); Ernst, W. (PI); Falcon, W. (PI); Fendorf, S. (PI); Field, C. (PI); Francis, C. (PI); Frank, Z. (PI); Freyberg, D. (PI); Fukami, T. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gerritsen, M. (PI); Gilly, W. (PI); Gordon, D. (PI); Gorelick, S. (PI); Goulder, L. (PI); Hadly, E. (PI); Hayden, T. (PI); Hilley, G. (PI); Hoagland, S. (PI); Ingle, J. (PI); Jamieson, A. (PI); Jones, J. (PI); Kennedy, D. (PI); Kennedy, J. (PI); Knight, R. (PI); Konings, A. (PI); Koseff, J. (PI); Kovscek, A. (PI); Lambin, E. (PI); Litvak, L. (PI); Lobell, D. (PI); Long, S. (PI); Lynham, J. (PI); Masters, G. (PI); Matson, P. (PI); Micheli, F. (PI); Milroy, C. (PI); Monismith, S. (PI); Mooney, H. (PI); Naylor, R. (PI); Nevle, R. (PI); Orr, F. (PI); Palumbi, S. (PI); Payne, J. (PI); Peay, K. (PI); Phillips, K. (PI); Rajaratnam, B. (PI); Root, T. (PI); Rothe, M. (PI); Schneider, S. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Seto, K. (PI); Siegel, R. (PI); Somero, G. (PI); Sweeney, J. (PI); Switzer, P. (PI); Tabazadeh, A. (PI); Thomas, L. (PI); Thompson, B. (PI); Victor, D. (PI); Vitousek, P. (PI); Walbot, V. (PI); Watanabe, J. (PI); Weyant, J. (PI); Wiederkehr, S. (PI); Wilber, C. (PI); Woodward, J. (PI); Zoback, M. (PI)

EARTHSYS 260: Internship

Supervised field, lab, or public/private sector project. May consist of directed research under the supervision of a Stanford faculty member, participation in one of several off campus Stanford programs, or an approved non-Stanford program or opportunity relevant to the student's Earth Systems studies. Required of and restricted to declared Earth Systems majors. This is a 1 unit, credit/no credit course, consisting of at least 270 hours of work. Course can be fulfilled any quarter. For more course requirements, please visit: https://earth.stanford.edu/esys/undergrad/internship
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Hoagland, S. (PI)

EARTHSYS 282A: Ecological Farm Systems (EARTHSYS 182A)

An in-person, outdoor, project-based course in sustainable agricultural systems. Students will work individually or in small groups on projects at the Stanford Educational Farm. Potential projects this fall include building educational gardens, orchard establishment and management, and seedling propagation for plant donations for low-income families in partnership with Valley Verde in San Jose. Students are also encouraged to develop their own sustainable agriculture projects based on their interests.nn nnThe class will meet in-person, outdoors at the Stanford Educational Farm. Students will be required to follow farm and University COVID-19 protocols. By application only. The application can be found here: https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_e2tzecrtvl5lmm1
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 4 units total)

EARTHSYS 290: Master's Seminar

Required of and open only to Earth Systems co-terminal MS and MA students. This remote course has several elements, including, skill building through experiential learning and reflection and professional development. Students will either work in teams with a community partner in the Bay area on a predetermined project, or select a self- designed project with a partner anywhere in the world. The idea is to complete a well-defined, manageable, but important project to a high standard under significant time constraints. Our community partners have requested help with achieving their missions and seminar students will utilize their backgrounds in social/environmental problem solving to deliver a final product. Our partners have requested help with such efforts as grant and report writing, data analysis, curriculum development, symposium organizing, presentation research and preparation and communications to raise awareness about an environmental challenge. If you choose to design your own project, the instructor will help you to create this opportunity. Students will give oral presentations on their project progress throughout the quarter, culminating in a final presentation at a symposium with our partners. Students will also explore how best to communicate their interdisciplinary skills and goals through their resumes, cv¿s or cover letters, portfolios or linkedIn profiles in preparation for the next phase of their career. Guest speakers and in class workshops will complement these activities.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2

EARTHSYS 291: Concepts in Environmental Communication (EARTHSYS 191)

Introduction to the history, development, and current state of communication of environmental science and policy to non-specialist audiences. Includes fundamental principles, core competencies, and major challenges of effective environmental communication in the public and policy realms and an overview of the current scope of research and practice in environmental communication. Intended for graduate students and advanced undergraduates, with a background in Earth or environmental science and/or policy studies, or in communication or journalism studies with a specific interest in environmental and science communication. Prerequisite: Earth Systems core (EarthSys 111 and EarthSys 112) or equivalent. (Meets Earth Systems WIM requirement.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

EARTHSYS 292: Multimedia Environmental Communication

Introductory theory and practice of effective, accurate and engaging use of photography, audio and video production in communicating environmental science and policy concepts to the public. Emphasis on fundamental techniques, storytelling and workflow more than technical how to or gear. Includes extensive instructor and peer critiquing of work and substantial out-of-class group project work. Limited class size, preference to Earth Systems master's students. No previous multimedia experience necessary.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

EARTHSYS 293: Environmental Communication Practicum

Students complete an internship or similar practical experience in a professional environmental communication setting. Potential placements include environmental publications, environmental or outdoor education placements, NGOs, government agencies, on-campus departments, programs, or centers, and science centers and museums. Restricted to students admitted to the Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication Program. Can be completed in any quarter.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Hayden, T. (PI)

EARTHSYS 294: Environmental Communication Capstone

The Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication capstone project provides students with an opportunity to complete an ambitious independent project demonstrating mastery of an area of environmental communication. Capstone projects are most often applied communication projects such as writing, photography, or video projects; expressive or artistic works; or student-initiated courses, workshops, or curriculum materials. Projects focused on academic scholarship or communication theory research may also be considered. Restricted to students enrolled in the Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication Program.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Hayden, T. (PI)

EARTHSYS 295: Environmental Communication Seminar

Weekly seminar for students enrolled in the Earth Systems Master of Arts, Environmental Communication Program, to be taken twice for credit during degree progress. Includes discussion of and reflection on current topics in environmental communication, skills and professional development workshop sessions, and mentoring and peer support for MA capstone projects.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)
Instructors: ; Hayden, T. (PI)

EARTHSYS 297: Directed Individual Study in Earth Systems

Under supervision of an Earth Systems faculty member on a subject of mutual interest.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-9 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Anderson, M. (PI); Archie, P. (PI); Ardoin, N. (PI); Arrigo, K. (PI); Asner, G. (PI); Banerjee, B. (PI); Barry, M. (PI); Block, B. (PI); Boggs, C. (PI); Boucher, A. (PI); Cain, B. (PI); Caldeira, K. (PI); Caldwell, M. (PI); Carlisle, L. (PI); Casciotti, K. (PI); Chamberlain, P. (PI); Curran, L. (PI); Daily, G. (PI); Davis, J. (PI); Denny, M. (PI); Diffenbaugh, N. (PI); Dirzo, R. (PI); Dunbar, R. (PI); Durham, W. (PI); Egger, A. (PI); Ernst, W. (PI); Falcon, W. (PI); Fendorf, S. (PI); Field, C. (PI); Francis, C. (PI); Frank, Z. (PI); Freyberg, D. (PI); Fukami, T. (PI); Gardner, C. (PI); Gerritsen, M. (PI); Gilly, W. (PI); Gordon, D. (PI); Gorelick, S. (PI); Goulder, L. (PI); Hadly, E. (PI); Hawk, S. (PI); Hayden, T. (PI); Hecker, S. (PI); Hilley, G. (PI); Hoagland, S. (PI); Ihme, M. (PI); Ingle, J. (PI); Jackson, R. (PI); Jacobson, M. (PI); Jamieson, A. (PI); Jones, J. (PI); Kennedy, D. (PI); Kennedy, J. (PI); Knight, R. (PI); Koseff, J. (PI); Kovscek, A. (PI); Lambin, E. (PI); Lawrence, K. (PI); Leape, J. (PI); Litvak, L. (PI); Lobell, D. (PI); Long, S. (PI); Lutomski, P. (PI); Lynham, J. (PI); Lyons, E. (PI); Masters, G. (PI); Matson, P. (PI); Micheli, F. (PI); Monismith, S. (PI); Mooney, H. (PI); Mormann, F. (PI); Naylor, R. (PI); Nelson, J. (PI); Nevle, R. (PI); Novy-Hildesley, J. (PI); Orr, F. (PI); Ortolano, L. (PI); Osborne, M. (PI); Palumbi, S. (PI); Payne, J. (PI); Phillips, K. (PI); Polk, E. (PI); Rajaratnam, B. (PI); Root, T. (PI); Rothe, M. (PI); Saltzman, J. (PI); Schneider, S. (PI); Schoolnik, G. (PI); Seto, K. (PI); Shiv, B. (PI); Siegel, R. (PI); Simon, G. (PI); Somero, G. (PI); Sweeney, J. (PI); Switzer, P. (PI); Tabazadeh, A. (PI); Thomas, L. (PI); Thompson, B. (PI); Truebe, S. (PI); Victor, D. (PI); Vitousek, P. (PI); Walbot, V. (PI); Watanabe, J. (PI); Weyant, J. (PI); Wiederkehr, S. (PI); Wight, G. (PI); Wolak, F. (PI); Woodward, J. (PI); Zoback, M. (PI)

EARTHSYS 308: Carbon Dioxide and Methane Removal, Utilization, and Sequestration (ENERGY 308, ENVRES 295, ESS 308, ME 308)

This is a seminar on carbon dioxide and methane removal, utilization, and sequestration options, and their role in decarbonizing the global energy system. This course will cover topics including the global carbon balance, utilizing atmospheric carbon in engineered solutions, recycling and sequestering fossil-based carbon, and enhancing natural carbon sinks. The multidisciplinary lectures and discussions will cover elements of technology, economics, policy and social acceptance, and will be led by a series of guest lecturers. Short group project on carbon solutions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
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