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DANCE 22: The Intersection of Performance, Architecture & Design (CEE 32Z)

In this class we will create a performance installation utilizing our expressive talents, but also accessing the ways that we are dancing and singing through life. Drawing from the everyday and extra daily movements, we will create a `sneaker ballet¿ to integrate our everyday experiences into our wild imaginings. Students will participate in a Chocolate Heads collaborative making process which will include observing peripatetic crowds, , sharing our individual and collective expressive expertise in movement, music and art while also integrating and learning art forms and ways of thinking from other members of the class. Working in art spaces and galleries, students will gain awareness of spatial relationships and site navigation from the vantage point of architecture, theater, and dance. Though field trips, guest artists and lecturers, and collaborative sharing, teaching and learning, students will create a performance event for an art gallery space that will foster community, unique expressivity, cultural understanding and fun. Designed for all levels. Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hayes, A. (PI)

DANCE 27: Faculty Choreography

Creation, rehearsal, performance of faculty choreography. Casting by audition/invitation. Repeatable for credit. For detailed project descriptions and full rehearsal/performance schedules, contact instructors directly. 2016-17 projects: AUTUMN: New Work by Diane Frank. International collaborators: composer Jarek Kapuscinski, sculptor Will Clift, Japanese master musician Ko Ishikawa. Large-scale sculptures provide a shifting landscape for sound and movement investigation of "ma," a Japanese aesthetic concept. Early February performances, Bing Concert Hall Atrium. Contact: dfrank1@stanford.edu. WINTER/SPRING: TAPS Main Stage production of "No Hero," a nationally-recognized multimedia work by choreographer Alex Ketley exploring what dance means to people throughout rural communities in the West. Rehearsals both Winter & Spring quarters, Tues/Thurs,6:30-8:30 pm. Main Stage performances end of Spring Quarter. Participation by invitation or audition. Please contact Alex Ketley at aketley@stanford.edu for more details and questions.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DANCE 29: Beginning Roots Modern Experience Dance Technique

In this course students will be introduced to a series of contemporary dance warm ups and dance combinations that are drawn from a broad range of modern dance techniques, somatic practices and dance traditions of the African diaspora with a particular focus on Afro Brazilian, Afro Cuban and Haitian dance forms. No prior dance experience is required. Each class will be comprised of a series of warm up exercises and fun dance combinations that express the connection between western contemporary technique with dance traditions of the African diaspora. Dance combinations will consist of dynamic movement patterns that condition the body for strength, flexibility, endurance, musicality and coordination. Through these exercises students learn how to become expressive and dynamic movers and gain a deeper appreciation of the multiple expressions of what is known as contemporary or modern dance.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Smith, A. (PI)

DANCE 46: Social Dance I

Introduction to non-competitive social ballroom dance. The partner dances found in today's popular culture include 3 kinds of swing, 3 forms of waltz, tango, salsa, cha-cha and nightclub two-step. The course also includes tips for great partnering, enhancing creativity, developing personal style, stress reduction, musicality, and the ability to adapt to changing situations. The emphasis on comfort, partnering and flexibility enables students to dance with partners whose experience comes from any dance tradition.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: way_ce | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Powers, R. (PI)

DANCE 48: Beginning Ballet

Fundametals of ballet technique including posture, placement, the foundation steps, and ballet terms; emphasis on the development of coordination, balance, flexibility, sense of lines, and sensitivity to rhythm and music. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pankevich, A. (PI)

DANCE 59: Intermediate-Advanced Hip-Hop

Steps and styling in one of America's 21st-century vernacular dance forms. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Reddick, R. (PI)

DANCE 100: Dance, Movement and Medicine: Immersion in Dance for PD (NENS 222)

Combining actual dancing with medical research, this Cardinal Course investigates the dynamic complementary relationship between two practices, medicine and dance, through the lens of Parkinson's disease (PD), a progressive neurological disease that manifests a range of movement disorders. "Dance for PD" is an innovative approach to dancing --and to teaching dance --for those challenged by PD. Course format consists of: 1. Weekly Lecture/Seminar Presentation: Partial list of instructors include Ms. Frank, Dr. Bronte-Stewart and other Stanford medical experts & research scientists, David Leventhal (Director, "Dance for PD") and Bay Area "Dance for PD" certified master teachers, film-maker Dave Iverson, Damara Ganley, and acclaimed choreographers Joe Goode, Alex Ketley, Judith Smith (AXIS Dance). 2. Weekly Dance Class: Stanford students will fully participate as dancers, and creative partners, in the Stanford Neuroscience Health Center's ongoing "Dance for Parkinson's" community dance class for people with PD. This Community Engaged Learning component provides opportunity to engage meaningfully with people in the PD community. Dancing together weekly, students will experience firsthand the embodied signature values of "Dance for PD" classes: full inclusion, embodied presence, aesthetic and expressive opportunity for creative engagement, and community-building in action. A weekly debriefing session within Friday's class time will allow students to integrate seminar material with their movement experiences.nnNO PRE-REQUISITES: No prior dance experience required. Beginners are welcome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Bronte-Stewart, H. (PI)

DANCE 101: Acting Free: Assertive Performance in African American History and Cultural Expression (AFRICAAM 64E, AFRICAAM 164E, HISTORY 64E, HISTORY 164E)

This course will explore the imaginative ways black Americans have expressed their desire for freedom through dance, movement, visual art, and musical performance. Each week, historian Clayborne Carson will discuss the theme of assertive performance during various periods of African American history, and dance Lecturer Aleta Hayes will guide students as they perform their own interpretations through distinctive historical periods and styles. Course will culminate in informal performance by participating students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DANCE 102: Musical Theater Dance Styles

Fundamental techniques and approaches used in the creation of dance. Basic elements of composition including: style, form, theme and variation, and phrasing, development of movement vocabulary, symmetry and asymmetry, explicit versus abstract methods of expression, elements of time, quality and use of space, motif, and repetition. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hayes, A. (PI)

DANCE 141: Advanced Contemporary Modern Technique

This advanced dance technique class is grounded in the technical training, aesthetics, and choreographic processes of Merce Cunningham, American dancer and master choreographer. Practice will increase strength, speed, articulation, amplitude and clarity of dancing. Class will provide a solid technical base applicable to other forms of dancing. Dancers must be ready to work at a high intermediate/advanced level to enroll. Short readings and concert attendance will supplement studio work. Cunningham-based technique is particularly well-suited to dancers with prior training in ballet; dancers with prior training in any form are welcome. nMay be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Frank, D. (PI)

DANCE 149: Advanced Ballet

Advanced Ballet at Stanford is offered for students who are interested in rigorous, complex, and artistically compelling ballet training. The class focuses on technique, but in the broad sense of how ballet as a movement system can be used for a wide range of dance disciplines. The class honors the historical training legacy that defines classical ballet, but is in no way shackled to that history in an antiquated fashion. The students are encouraged to explore the form as artists, to question its foundations, and find their own sense of agency within classical dance. Students with a strong background in ballet are encouraged to come, but also students with less ballet training are welcome as long as they have an email dialog with the lecturer beforehand. Any questions can be directed to Lecturer Alex Ketley at aketley@stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DANCE 156: Social Dance III

Intermediate non-competitive social ballroom dance: intermediate/advanced waltz, redowa, Bohemian National Polka, intermediate/advanced tango, cha-cha, and salsa. The course continues further tips for great partnering, enhancing creativity, developing personal style, stress reduction, musicality, and the ability to adapt to changing situations.Prerequisite: Dance 46. Dance 156 may immediately follow Dance 46.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: way_ce | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Powers, R. (PI)

DANCE 160: Performance and History: Rethinking the Ballerina (FEMGEN 160, TAPS 160, TAPS 260)

The ballerina occupies a unique place in popular imagination as an object of over-determined femininity as well as an emblem of extreme physical accomplishment for the female dancer. This seminar is designed as an investigation into histories of the ballerina as an iconographic symbol and cultural reference point for challenges to political and gender ideals. Through readings, videos, discussions and viewings of live performances this class investigates pivotal works, artists and eras in the global histories of ballet from its origins as a symbol of patronage and power in the 15th century through to its radical experiments as a site of cultural obedience and disobedience in the 20th and 21st centuries.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

DANCE 160M: Introduction to Representations of the Middle East in Dance, Performance, & Popular Culture (CSRE 160M, FEMGEN 160M, TAPS 160M)

This course will introduce students to the ways in which the Middle East has been represented and performed by/in the 'West' through dance, performance, and popular culture in both historical and contemporary contexts. A brief look through today's media sources exposes a wide range of racialized and gendered representations of the Middle East that shape the way the world imagines the Middle East to be. As postcolonial theorist Edward Said explains, the framework we call Orientalism establishes the ontological character of the Orient and the Oriental as inherently `Other'. Starting with 19th century colonialism and continuing into the post-9/11 era, this course will trace the Western production, circulation, and consumption of representations of the Middle East as 'Other' in relation to global geopolitics. We will further examine dance forms produced in mid-twentieth century Iran and Egypt, with particular attention to nation-state building and constructions of gender. Finally, we will examine artistic productions and practices from the Middle East and Middle Eastern diasporic communities that respond to colonialism, war, displacement, secularism, and Euro-American Empire. Using dance studies, postcolonial feminist, and critical race theoretical frameworks, we will consider the gender, racial, political, and cultural implications of selected performance works and practices in order to analyze how bodies produce meaning in dance, performance art, theater, film, photography, and new media. Students will engage in multiple modes of learning; the course will include lectures, engaged group discussions, viewing of live and recorded performance, embodied participation in dance practice, student oral presentations, and a variety of writing exercises. Course assignments will culminate in a final research project related to class themes and methods.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Akbarzadeh, H. (PI)

DANCE 190: Special Research

Topics related to the discipline of dance. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

DANCE 290: Special Research

Individual project on the work of any choreographer, period, genre, or dance-related topic. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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