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DANCE 1: Contemporary Modern I: Liquid Flow

Students in Liquid Flow will participate in a dance and movement class that 1) teaches the fundamentals of dance technique, and 2) addresses the way that you already dance in the world. Through discovering your own DIY movement signature and being aware of one another's dance, motion, and energy in space, we will transform the way that we move and connect to one another to inhabit flow states from the dance studio, into everyday life, and ultimately onto the stage. nAccompanied by contemporary and live music, Students will develop articulation, flexibility and "grace", learn contemporary and classic dance vocabulary, gain freedom dancing with others and mine dance's potential for social transformation and connection. Designed for beginners, we welcome student movers from diverse dance traditions, non-dancers, athletes, and more advanced dancers, who desire fluidity in their daily life, from thought to action.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce
Instructors: ; Hayes, A. (PI)

DANCE 11: Introduction to Dance Studies (TAPS 11)

This class is an introduction to dance studies and the complex meanings bodily performances carry both onstage and off. Using critical frames drawn from dance criticism, history and ethnography and performance studies, and readings from cultural studies, dance, theater and critical theory, the class explores how performing bodies make meanings. We will read theoretical and historical texts and recorded dance as a means of developing tools for viewing and analyzing dance and understanding its place in larger social, cultural, and political structures. Special attention will be given to new turns in queer and feminist dance studies. TAPS 11 has been certified to fulfill the Writing in the Major (WIM) requirement.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

DANCE 27: Faculty Choreography

Creation, rehearsal, performance of faculty choreography. For detailed project descriptions and full rehearsal/performance schedules, contact instructors directly.nnStudents enrolled in Aut 2019-20 will participate in Revival with Amara Smith. nnFor students enrolled in Spring 19-20, the course description is below: nIn online Zoom work sessions, project participants will create together a Phrase Bank for the Future, contributing to, and drawing from, a growing Google account of shared phrase material. Our focus will be on shared movement invention and development. That large growing bank of fragments and phrases will provide source material to create solos. By the end of the term, we will have created a Phrase Bank together, as well as a video-recorded solo line for and by each dancer. All this material will be available for a future site-specific live dance performance at the Anderson Collection Museum, exact date tbd/tba, but likely Autumn 2020.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce | Repeatable for credit

DANCE 29: Roots Modern I

In this course students will be introduced to a series of contemporary dance warm ups and dance combinations that are drawn from a broad range of modern dance techniques, somatic practices and dance traditions of the African diaspora with a particular focus on Afro Brazilian, Afro Cuban and Haitian dance forms. No prior dance experience is required. Each class will be comprised of a series of warm up exercises and fun dance combinations that express the connection between western contemporary technique with dance traditions of the African diaspora. Dance combinations will consist of dynamic movement patterns that condition the body for strength, flexibility, endurance, musicality and coordination. Through these exercises students learn how to become expressive and dynamic movers and gain a deeper appreciation of the multiple expressions of what is known as contemporary or modern dance.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: ; Smith, A. (PI)

DANCE 30: Contemporary Choreography: Chocolate Heads Performance Project (AFRICAAM 37)

The Chocolate Heads Movement Band attracts dancers and beginner movers from diverse dance styles and cultures (Hip-Hop to Contemporary, Skateboarding to Wushu). Students participate in the dance-making/remix process, alongside storytellers, musicians, visual artists, and filmmakers, to co-design a multimedia production. Autumn 2020, we will pioneer the ¿visceral in the virtual¿ to create a gestural portrait of a brilliant artistic community. Where are you in the world? Imagine moving through a sensorial landscape while traveling in place. What personal passion will drive your exploration? Audition: Tuesday (9/15) during class. Callbacks and Alternate Audition: Thursday (9/17), with instructor permission. Dancers, interdisciplinarians, and artists of all stripes are encouraged to contact the instructor, ahayes1@stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Hayes, A. (PI)

DANCE 30S: Contemporary Choreography: Chocolate Heads On-Screen: Dance and Video Project

Cinematography plus choreography equals Screendance. Now, all dance is screendance. Think of your favorite youtube videos, tik toks, and all your favorite movie musicals. This is your chance to star in a Chocolate Heads film production. During Fall quarter, the Chocolate Heads Movement Band conducted a series of dance and film experiments at home, that culminated in a fantastic Zoom Dance called 'Traveling in Place'. We started in our own homespaces, came together virtually, and made magic. If you'd link to see what we did in the fall, visit the Chocolate Heads Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ykDVlai-c2s Our goal is to cultivate the talents of all dancers through teamwork to touch, move, and inspire the audience. We will be partnering with the Stanford Doc Film Program, featuring guest workshops on storytelling through motion and film. We'll ultimately come together as a dance & filmmaking posse to create a screendance with both live and virtual elements. Be one of the brilliant dancers and choreographers who are shaping dance, art and video, integrating different dance styles and cultures, to unite the world.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: ; Hayes, A. (PI)

DANCE 45: Dance Improvisation from Freestyle to Hip Hop (AFRICAAM 45)

This class is an arena for physical and artistic exploration to fire the imagination of dance improvisers, cultivate sensation and perception within and without studio practice and to promote interactive intelligence.nStudents will learn to harness and transform habitual movement patterns and dance trainings as resources for new ways of moving: expand their awareness of being a part of a bigger picture, while being attentive to everything all at once: and to use visual, aural and kinesthetic responses to convert those impulses into artistic material. Class will be accompanied by live and recorded music and include weekly jam sessions. Open to students from all dance, movement, athletic backgrounds and skill levels. Beginners welcome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Hayes, A. (PI)

DANCE 46: Social Dance I

Introduction to non-competitive social ballroom dance. Adapted to online Zoom format so that individuals can take the course without a partner. The social dances found in today's popular culture include 3 kinds of swing, 3 forms of waltz, tango, salsa, bachata, cha-cha and nightclub two-step. The course also includes tips for great partnering, enhancing creativity, developing personal style, stress reduction, musicality, and the ability to adapt to changing situations. The emphasis on comfort, partnering and flexibility will enable students to dance with partners whose experience comes from any dance tradition. Many students are taken from the waiting list. If the class is filled, register to get on the waitlist.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: way_ce | Repeatable 12 times (up to 12 units total)
Instructors: ; Powers, R. (PI)

DANCE 48: Ballet I: Introduction to Ballet

Fundametals of ballet technique including posture, placement, the foundation steps, and ballet terms; emphasis on the development of coordination, balance, flexibility, sense of lines, and sensitivity to rhythm and music. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Pankevich, A. (PI)

DANCE 50: Contemporary Choreography

Each day Ketley will develop a new phrase of choreography with the students and use this as the platform for investigation. Consistent lines of inquiry include; sculpting with the body as an emotional, instinctual, and graphic landscape, how the fracturing and the complication of strands of information can feel generative of new ways of moving, discussions around how our use of time is directly correlated to our sense of presence, and the multitude of physical colors available to each of us as artists as we expand our curiosity about movement. Classes will be very physical, trusting that much of our knowledge is contained in the body. For questions please e-mail aketley@stanford.edu.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce
Instructors: ; Ketley, A. (PI)

DANCE 58: Hip Hop I: Introduction to Hip Hop

Steps and styling in one of America's 21st-century vernacular dance forms. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Reddick, R. (PI)

DANCE 59: Hip-Hop II

Steps and styling in one of America's 21st-century vernacular dance forms. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Reddick, R. (PI)

DANCE 106I: Stanford Dance Community: Inter-Style Choreography Workshop (AFRICAAM 106I)

Designed for adventurous dancers, choreographers and student dance team leaders across Stanford campus. Students will explore a multiplicity of dance styles presented both by peer choreographers, as well as professionals in the field, to create a community of dancers who want to experiment and innovate within their form. The emphasis of the class is on individual growth as a dancer and dance maker through exposure to new and unfamiliar styles. Student dance team leaders and dancers with a strong interest in both choreography and learning different forms are highly encouraged to attend. Interested participants encouraged but not required to contact instructor, Aleta Hayes: ahayes1@stanford.edu. Course will consist of weekly choreography master classes taught by peers, composition intensives facilitated by the instructor, and guest professional master classes, not represented by the class participants.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | UG Reqs: way_ce
Instructors: ; Hayes, A. (PI)

DANCE 109: Choreography: Strategies to Building Movement, Dance, and Time Based Art

A class for students interested in contemporary methods of devising movement for performance. At the forefront of current dance culture hybridity has become the new normal, with movement blended from everyday actions, classical forms, hip-hop, and beyond. The body as a vehicle for expression is an ever expanding landscape and the class will focus on the plethora of ways movement can be derived including; the many ways improvisation can engender movement, how systemic approaches to performance can enhance a creators understanding of the body in space, the ways chaos and ugliness can redefine our notions of beauty, and how environment, sound, music, and context can inform our physical sensibilities. The class is open to all students from any movement background or those new to dance with a curiosity about how the body can be a vibrant and multifaceted artistic tool. For more information please contact choreographer and lecturer Alex Ketley at aketley@stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 2 times (up to 4 units total)
Instructors: ; Ketley, A. (PI)

DANCE 118: Developing Creativity In Dance

This introductory course explores the creative process in dance. Two fields will constantly overlap and feed into each other. One is the Creative Process, with dozens of tips and suggestions which will be useful in your other work beyond dance, and the other is the Art of Choreography. Processes will include design by analogy, musicality, effective use of contrast, intuitive leaps, creation by accident, lateral thinking, overcoming creative blocks, and stress reduction to relax into a more creative state of mind. This will be an online course; students must have this time slot available for Zoom participatory sessions. Class sessions will alternate between theory and practice, with student choreographies submitted and discussed within an encouraging, supportive group of new creators. Previous dance experience is not required to take this course.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: ; Powers, R. (PI)

DANCE 140: Contemporary Modern II

This intermediate level course will cover fundamental principles underlying the evolving style of modern/contemporary dance both technical and artistic in nature. Students will perform creative and technical exercises that develop strength, flexibility, musicality, increased range of motion, functional efficiency, and performance quality as a means towards developing more, efficient, expressive, and communicative bodies. The contemporary technique taught in this class prepares the student to perform with clarity and artistry, and with deeper anatomical knowledge and connectivity.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Faulkner, K. (PI)

DANCE 141: Contemporary Modern III

This advanced level technique course will cover the fundamental principles underlying modern/contemporary dance both technical and artistic in nature. Students will perform technical exercises that develop functional efficiency, strength, flexibility, musicality, range of motion and performance quality as a means towards honing their own artistic expression and physicality. More advanced concepts such as qualitative versatility, phrasing awareness, innovative physical decision-making, and attention to performance will be explored in greater depth. The contemporary technique taught in this class prepares the student to perform with clarity and artistry, and with deeper anatomical knowledge and connectivity. Short written reflections and concert attendance will supplement studio work. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Faulkner, K. (PI)

DANCE 147: Social Dance History: Living Traditions of Swing

A survey of 110 years of American swing dancing, as one form evolved into the next. Adapted to online Zoom format so that individuals can take the course without a partner. Swing dances will include the Texas Tommy, early Lindy of the 1920s; 6 and 8-count Lindy hop, Shag, Big Apple, 1950s Rock 'n' Roll swing, disco Hustle and West Coast Swing, with tips for partnering, improvisation and personal creativity. This will be an online Zoom course; students must have this time slot available for Zoom participatory sessions. Previous dance experience is not required to take this course.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: way_ce | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Powers, R. (PI)

DANCE 148: Ballet II

Intermediate Ballet at Stanford is designed for students who have done ballet in their past, but maybe have stepped away from the form for awhile. The class focuses on technique, musicality, vocabulary, coordination and artistic choice. The class looks at ballet as an enduring and vibrant movement system that can be used for classical purposes or as a way to strengthen and diversify the movement vocabulary inherent in other dance forms like modern, hip-hop, or social dancing.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Pankevich, A. (PI)

DANCE 149: Ballet III

Advanced Ballet at Stanford is offered for students who are interested in rigorous, complex, and artistically compelling ballet training. The class focuses on technique, but in the broad sense of how ballet as a movement system can be used for a wide range of dance disciplines. The class honors the historical training legacy that defines classical ballet, but is in no way shackled to that history in an antiquated fashion. The students are encouraged to explore the form as artists, to question its foundations, and find their own sense of agency within classical dance. Students with a strong background in ballet are encouraged to come, but also students with less ballet training are welcome as long as they have an email dialog with the lecturer beforehand. Any questions can be directed to Lecturer Alex Ketley at aketley@stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: ; Ketley, A. (PI)

DANCE 160J: Conjure Art 101: Performances of Ritual, Spirituality and Decolonial Black Feminist Magic (AFRICAAM 160J, CSRE 160J)

Conjure Art is a movement and embodied practice course looking at the work and techniques of artists of color who utilize spirituality and ritual practices in their art making and performance work to evoke social change. In this course we will discuss the work of artists who bring spiritual ritual in their art making while addressing issues of spiritual accountability and cultural appropriation. Throughout the quarter we will welcome guest artists who make work along these lines, while exploring movement, writing, singing and visual art making. This class will culminate in a performance ritual co-created by students and instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: ; Smith, A. (PI)

DANCE 166: History of Social Dance in Western Culture

A survey of movement and historical dance from the past five centuries to today, with the technique and general deportment that is distinctive to each era. Historic dances will include the Galliard, Pavan, Minuet, Waltz, Tango, Jazz Age and Swing Era dances, through today's social dance forms. The course will include techniques for historical dance reconstruction, with students creating their own dance reconstructions. This course will culminate by utilizing the understanding of five centuries of dance evolution to envision a better, more evolved, future of social dance forms. This will be an online Zoom course; students must have this time slot available for Zoom participatory sessions. Previous dance experience is not required to take this course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce
Instructors: ; Powers, R. (PI)

DANCE 190: Special Research

Topics related to the discipline of dance. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

DANCE 196: Dancing Black: Embodying the African Diaspora in the United States and the Caribbean (AFRICAAM 196, TAPS 196, TAPS 396)

What does it mean to dance black? How can studying comparative dance practices across the United States and the Caribbean expose continuities and differences in African diaspora experience? How can we draw strategies from black performance to inform our current movements for social change? This class will explore how dance and writing about performance have shaped notions of what it means to identify or be marked as an African diaspora subject. From the ring shouts of captive Africans to the 20th-century concert dance stage, from New York queer ballroom culture to Tiktok fads, this class will expose students to both historical and ethnographic methods for using dance to study the formation of black community in the New World. Looking beyond the surface of skin, we¿ll explore how race is experienced in muscle and flesh, and how black performers have historically taken advantage of or disavowed racialized ideas of how they can/should move. We will read theories of diaspora, queer of color critique and black feminist theory, and performance theory. We will search for the common questions and conversations about embodiment, the spectator¿s gaze, and black belonging that run through all three disciplines. Students will be required to do some movement research (through accessible, at-home dance practice), write weekly journals, and complete short essay projects. Students develop will skills for writing, speaking, and making performance to explore the intersections between race, sexuality, and dance.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: ; Reid, A. (PI)

DANCE 290: Special Research

Individual project on the work of any choreographer, period, genre, or dance-related topic. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit
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