Print Settings
 

DANCE 1: Introduction to Contemporary Dance & Movement: Liquid Flow

Students in Liquid Flow will participate in a dance and movement class that 1) teaches the fundamentals of dance technique, and 2) addresses the way that you already dance in the world. Through discovering your own DIY movement signature and being aware of one another's dance, motion, and energy in space, we will transform the way that we move and connect to one another to inhabit flow states from the dance studio, into everyday life, and ultimately onto the stage. nAccompanied by contemporary and live music, Students will develop articulation, flexibility and "grace", learn contemporary and classic dance vocabulary, gain freedom dancing with others and mine dance's potential for social transformation and connection. Designed for beginners, we welcome student movers from diverse dance traditions, non-dancers, athletes, and more advanced dancers, who desire fluidity in their daily life, from thought to action.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hayes, A. (PI)

DANCE 27: Faculty Choreography

Creation, rehearsal, performance of faculty choreography. Casting by audition/invitation, first week of the quarter. For detailed project descriptions and full rehearsal/performance schedules, contact instructors directly.nnAutumn: New choreography project by Diane Frank, tentatively titled "Feral Variations: Goat-Trout-Snake-Lizard Girls." The work examines movement generated by somatic research on animal instinct, developmental and evolutionary stages, and deep experiences of the natural world in childhood. This is a dance of complex identity formation. Solo episodes will be braided with ensemble sections. Movement experiences in the Sierras will be a part of the rehearsal plan. Casting by Audition & Invitation. 6-8 dancers. Rehearsal/performances bridge Autumn & Winter quarters. Email dfrank1@stanford.edu for details. nnWinter: Choreography by Aleta Hayes. Choreography by Alex Ketley. nnSpring: The making of REVIVAL by Amara Smith.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

DANCE 30: Chocolate Heads Performance Project: Dance & Intercultural Performance Creation (AFRICAAM 37)

Students from diverse dance styles (ballet to hip-hop to contemporary) participate in the dance-making/remix process and collaborate with musicians, visual artists, designers and spoken word artists, to co-create a multidisciplinary finished production and installation. Students of all dance or athletic backgrounds are welcome to audition on Wednesday (9/26) and Monday (10/1) during class time. Visual artists, musicians and dancers may also contact the instructor for further information at ahayes1@stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hayes, A. (PI)

DANCE 46: Social Dance I

Introduction to non-competitive social ballroom dance. The partner dances found in today's popular culture include 3 kinds of swing, 3 forms of waltz, tango, salsa, cha-cha and nightclub two-step. The course also includes tips for great partnering, enhancing creativity, developing personal style, stress reduction, musicality, and the ability to adapt to changing situations. The emphasis on comfort, partnering and flexibility enables students to dance with partners whose experience comes from any dance tradition.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: way_ce | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Powers, R. (PI)

DANCE 48: Beginning Ballet

Fundametals of ballet technique including posture, placement, the foundation steps, and ballet terms; emphasis on the development of coordination, balance, flexibility, sense of lines, and sensitivity to rhythm and music. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Pankevich, A. (PI)

DANCE 50: Contemporary Choreography

Each day Ketley will develop a new phrase of choreography with the students and use this as the platform for investigation. Consistent lines of inquiry include; sculpting with the body as an emotional, instinctual, and graphic landscape, how the fracturing and the complication of strands of information can feel generative of new ways of moving, discussions around how our use of time is directly correlated to our sense of presence, and the multitude of physical colors available to each of us as artists as we expand our curiosity about movement. Classes will be very physical, trusting that much of our knowledge is contained in the body. For questions please e-mail aketley@stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ketley, A. (PI)

DANCE 58: Beginning Hip Hop

Steps and styling in one of America's 21st-century vernacular dance forms. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Reddick, R. (PI)

DANCE 59: Intermediate-Advanced Hip-Hop

Steps and styling in one of America's 21st-century vernacular dance forms. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Reddick, R. (PI)

DANCE 71: Introduction to Capoeira: An African Brazilian Art Form (AFRICAAM 71)

Capoeira is an African Brazilian art form that incorporates, dance, music, self-defense and acrobatics. Created by enslaved Africans in Brazil who used this form as a tool for liberation and survival, it has since become a popular art form practiced around the world. In this course students will learn basic movements for both Capoeira Angola and Capoeira Regional, and the history of this rich and physically rigorous art form. Students will learn basic acrobatic skills, be introduced to Capoeira songs, and learn to play rhythms on the drum, pandeiro (tambourine), and the Berimbau -- a single stringed bow instrument. This course will be physically rigorous and fun! No previous experience necessary.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | UG Reqs: way_ce | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Smith, A. (PI)

DANCE 133: History of the Waltz

Two hundred years of waltzing: Regency era waltz (1816), Vienna in the 1830s, redowa and mazurka waltz variations, waltz in 5/4 time, the Russian Mazurka Quadrille, pivots, 20th-century hesitation waltz, tango waltz, Parisian valse musette, 1930s Boston, 1950s Bandstand-style waltz, swing waltz. Each form is explored for possible adaptation to today's non-competitive social dancing. May be repeated for credit two times.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Powers, R. (PI)

DANCE 141: Advanced Contemporary Modern Technique

This advanced level technique course will cover the fundamental principles underlying modern/contemporary dance both technical and artistic in nature. Students will perform technical exercises that develop functional efficiency, strength, flexibility, musicality, range of motion and performance quality as a means towards honing their own artistic expression and physicality. More advanced concepts such as qualitative versatility, phrasing awareness, innovative physical decision-making, and attention to performance will be explored in greater depth. The contemporary technique taught in this class prepares the student to perform with clarity and artistry, and with deeper anatomical knowledge and connectivity. Short written reflections and concert attendance will supplement studio work. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Faulkner, K. (PI)

DANCE 149: Advanced Ballet

Advanced Ballet at Stanford is offered for students who are interested in rigorous, complex, and artistically compelling ballet training. The class focuses on technique, but in the broad sense of how ballet as a movement system can be used for a wide range of dance disciplines. The class honors the historical training legacy that defines classical ballet, but is in no way shackled to that history in an antiquated fashion. The students are encouraged to explore the form as artists, to question its foundations, and find their own sense of agency within classical dance. Students with a strong background in ballet are encouraged to come, but also students with less ballet training are welcome as long as they have an email dialog with the lecturer beforehand. Any questions can be directed to Lecturer Alex Ketley at aketley@stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ketley, A. (PI)

DANCE 160J: Conjure Art 101: Performances of Ritual, Spirituality and Decolonial Black Feminist Magic (AFRICAAM 160J, CSRE 160J)

Conjure Art is a movement and embodied practice course looking at the work and techniques of artists of color who utilize spirituality and ritual practices in their art making and performance work to evoke social change. In this course we will discuss the work of artists who bring spiritual ritual in their art making while addressing issues of spiritual accountability and cultural appropriation. Throughout the quarter we will welcome guest artists who make work along these lines, while exploring movement, writing, singing and visual art making. This class will culminate in a performance ritual co-created by students and instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Smith, A. (PI)

DANCE 162L: Latin/x America in Motion: An Introduction to Dance Studies (CHILATST 162, CSRE 162D, TAPS 162L, TAPS 262L)

This course introduces students to the field of Dance Studies by examining the histories of Latin American and Caribbean dances and their relationship to developing notions of race and nation in the Americas. We will study the historical emergence and transformation of ¿indigeneity,¿ ¿blackness,¿ ¿whiteness,¿ and ¿Latin/@/x¿ and consider how dance practices interacted with these identifications. No prior experience with Dance or Latin America and the Caribbean necessary.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Schwall, E. (PI)

DANCE 190: Special Research

Topics related to the discipline of dance. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hayes, A. (PI)

DANCE 290: Special Research

Individual project on the work of any choreographer, period, genre, or dance-related topic. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints