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CSRE 14N: Growing Up Bilingual (CHILATST 14N, EDUC 114N)

This course is a Freshman Introductory Seminar that has as its purpose introducing students to the sociolinguistic study of bilingualism by focusing on bilingual communities in this country and on bilingual individuals who use two languages in their everyday lives. Much attention is given to the history, significance, and consequences of language contact in the United States. The course focuses on the experiences of long-term US minority populations as well as that of recent immigrants.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Valdes, G. (PI)

CSRE 29SI: Migration is Beautiful: Historical and Political Perspectives on Immigrant Justice

We will begin the course by analyzing the history of immigration politics and policy in the United States. How did immigrants fit into and complicate the constructed racial hierarchy throughout history? What characterized the waves of migration to the United States? How have undocumented been marginalized, and what are the ways in which the community responded? In looking at this history, we will learn about the effects it has had on the immigrant community as it relates to the long-lasting disparate impacts in education, criminal justice, and political representation. nnImmigrants make up a profoundly diverse community that is often mischaracterized. We will discuss the varying perceptions of immigrants today and how they impact attitudes and current policies. Although the course and the trip are designed with a focus on national immigration policy, we will also spend some time in this course narrowing in and using the Bay Area as a case study
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jimenez, T. (PI)

CSRE 30SI: Housing Justice and Stratification in the Bay Area

This is a survey course on relevant topics to local housing justice concerns, including current debates in housing policy and the role of various sectors in shaping the local housing market. This course will prepare participants to both personally engage in service learning and critically engage with actors in housing policy over spring break. n nTo begin, we will explore paradigms of critical community engagement and develop a decolonized framework about the history of the local land. With these underlying philosophies in mind, we will dive into the politics behind ongoing gentrification, the rise of the city and the decline of suburbs in the Bay Area. From there, we will analyze housing policies which have strongly influenced the local housing situation, including national policies such as the Fair Housing Act and East Palo Alto affordability measures.nnTo close, the course will focus on the role of different actors and sectors in affecting change. We will examine possible obligations local technology companies and real estate developers might have in shaping the region¿s housing market. Finally, we will study the notion of housing as a human right and ask whether achieving housing justice would require a formally declared right to affordable and fair housing.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Palumbo-Liu, D. (PI)

CSRE 38: Deliberative Democracy Practicum: Applying Deliberative Polling (COMM 138, COMM 238)

In this course, students will work directly on a real-world deliberative democracy project using the method of Deliberative Polling. Students in this course will work in partnership with the Center for Deliberative Democracy at Stanford, a research center devoted to the research in democracy and public opinion around the world. This unique practicum will allow students to work on an actual Deliberative Polling project on campus. In just one quarter, the students will prepare for, implement, and analyze the results for an Deliberative Polling project. This is a unique opportunity that allows students to take part in the entire process of a deliberative democracy project. Through this practicum, students will apply quantitative and qualitative research methods in a local community or local high school and subsequently, analyze the relevant quantitative and qualitative data. Students will explore the underlying challenges and complexities of what it means to actually do community-engaged research in the real world. As such, this course will provide students with skills and experience in research design in deliberative democracy, community and stakeholder engagement, and the practical aspects of working in local communities. This practicum is a collaboration between the Center for Deliberative Democracy, the Bill Lane Center for the American West and the Haas Center for Public Service.nnCDD website: http://cdd.stanford.edunBill Lane Center website: http://west.stanford.edunHass Center website: https://haas.stanford.edu
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Siu, A. (PI)

CSRE 41A: Genes and Identity (AFRICAAM 41, ANTHRO 41)

In recent decades genes have increasingly become endowed with the cultural power to explain many aspects of human life: physical traits, diseases, behaviors, ancestral histories, and identity. In this course we will explore a deepening societal intrigue with genetic accounts of personal identity and political meaning. Students will engage with varied interdisciplinary sources that range from legal cases to scientific articles, medical ethics guidelines, films, and anthropological works (ethnographies). We will explore several case studies where the use of DNA markers (as proof of heritage, disease risk, or legal standing) has spawned cultural movements that are biosocial in nature. Throughout we will look at how new social movements are organized around gene-based definitions of personhood, health, and legal truth. Several examples include political analyses of citizenship and belonging. On this count we will discuss issues of African ancestry testing as evidence in slavery reparations cases, revisit debates on whether Black Freedman should be allowed into the Cherokee and Seminole Nations, and hear arguments on whether people with genetic links to Jewish groups should have a right of return to Israel. We will also examine the ways genetic knowledge may shape different health politics at the individual and societal level. On this count we will do close readings of how personal genomics testing companies operate, we will investigate how health disparities funding as well as orphan disease research take on new valences when re-framed in genetic terms, and we will see how new articulations of global health priorities are emerging through genetic research in places like Africa. Finally we will explore social implications of forensic uses of DNA. Here we will examine civil liberties concerns about genetic familial searching in forensic databases that disproportionately target specific minority groups as criminal suspects, and inquire into the use of DNA to generate digital mugshots of suspects that re-introduce genetic concepts of race.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 51Q: Comparative Fictions of Ethnicity (AMSTUD 51Q, COMPLIT 51Q)

We may "know" "who" we "are," but we are, after all, social creatures. How does our sense of self interact with those around us? How does literature provide a particular medium for not only self expression, but also for meditations on what goes into the construction of "the Self"? After all, don't we tell stories in response to the question, "who are you"? Besides a list of nouns and names and attributes, we give our lives flesh and blood in telling how we process the world. Our course focuses in particular on this question--Does this universal issue ("who am I") become skewed differently when we add a qualifier before it, like "ethnic"?
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Palumbo-Liu, D. (PI)

CSRE 55M: MMUF Seminar

This seminar is designed to help MMUF honor students in the following ways: (1) developing and refining research paper topics, (2) learning about the various approaches to research and writing, and (3) connecting to Stanford University resources such as the library and faculty.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 63N: The Feminist Critique: The History and Politics of Gender Equality (AMSTUD 63N, FEMGEN 63N, HISTORY 63N)

This course explores the emergence of concepts of gender equality in world history. It asks how gender inequality relates to racial, ethnicity, and sexual identities, how men engage with feminism, whether gender equality is purely a western cultural tradition, and much more. We approach the long history of ideas about gender and equality by reading primary historical documents from around the world, moving from the 15th century to the present. Topics include education, the body, sexuality, violence, labor, and politics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Freedman, E. (PI)

CSRE 66: SPECTACULAR TRIALS: SEX, RACE AND VIOLENCE IN MODERN AMERICAN CULTURE (AMSTUD 106)

This course will use the phenomenon of the spectacular trial as a framework for exploring the intersections of sex, race, and violence in the formation of modern American culture. Beginning in the late nineteenth century and continuing through the 1990s, we will focus our inquiry on a number of notorious cases, some associated with familiar names¿the ¿Scottsboro Boys,¿ Emmett Till, O.J. Simpson¿others involving once-infamous actors¿like Joan Little and Inez Garcia¿whose ordeals have receded into historical memory, considering a range of questions arising from this thematic nexus. For instance, in what ways are sexual transgressions racialized and gendered? What are the practical and theoretical ramifications of the seemingly inextricable conjunction of sex and violence in legal and popular discourse? And what insights might such spectacles afford when broached as an arena in which sexual meanings, identities, and practices are refracted and ultimately constructed? We will also examine the role of the pertinent professions in the evolution of these events, in particular how the interplay of law, medicine, psychiatry, and forensic science helped define the shifting boundaries of legality, and how print, radio, and television journalism operated not only in sensationalizing, but also in reflecting, modeling, and shaping prevailing attitudes and behaviors. Our study of this vital facet of our ¿society of the spectacle¿ will draw on a series of compelling secondary readings complemented by a diverse array of primary sources¿from contemporaneous pamphlets and newspaper accounts to photographs, letters, trial testimony, and psychological commentary¿that will enable class members to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of different textual genres, experiment with alternative methods of fashioning historical interpretations, and contemplate the ways history might be employed to illuminate the persistent problems of racial bias, reflexive sexualization, and the packaging of trials as mass entertainment in the present day.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Cardyn, L. (PI)

CSRE 85B: Jews in the Contemporary World: Faith and Ethnicity, Visibility and Vulnerability (HISTORY 85B, JEWISHST 85B, REES 85B)

(Same as HISTORY 185B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 185B.) This course explores the full expanse of Jewish life today and in the recent past. The inner workings of religious faith, the content of Jewish identify shorn of belief, the interplay between Jewish powerlessness and influence, the myth and reality of Jewish genius, the continued pertinence of antisemitism, the rhythms of Jewish economic life ¿ all these will be examined in weekly lectures, classroom discussion, and with the use of a widely diverse range of readings, films, and other material. Explored in depth will the ideas and practices of Zionism, the content of contemporary secularism and religious Orthodoxy, the impact Holocaust, the continued crisis facing Israel and the Palestinians. Who is to be considered Jewish, in any event, especially since so many of the best known (Spinoza, Freud, Marx) have had little if anything to do with Jewish life with their relationships to it indifferent, even hostile?
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Zipperstein, S. (PI)

CSRE 100B: Grassroots Community Organizing Practicum

Continuation of projects and community engagement from CSRE 100. Prerequisite: completion of CSRE 100.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Murray, D. (PI)

CSRE 102A: Art and Social Criticism (AMSTUD 102, ARTHIST 162B)

Contemporary visual artists have long been in the forefront of social criticism in America and their key works have become anchors for discourses on racism, sexism, economic inequality, and immigrant rights. We will consider political art by artists such as ACT-UP, Judy Chicago, Fred Wilson, Guerilla Girls, Ai Weiwei and many others that raises social awareness, inspires social change and galvanizes activism. What makes their art enduring social criticism? How have they contributed to our understanding of American history?
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hertz, B. (PI)

CSRE 103: Intergroup Communication (PSYCH 103)

In an increasingly globalized world, our ability to connect and engage with new audiences is directly correlated with our competence and success in any field How do our intergroup perceptions and reactions influence our skills as communicators? This course uses experiential activities and discussion sections to explore the role of social identity in effective communication.nnThe objective of the course is to examine and challenge our explicit and implicit assumptions about various groups to enhance our ability to successfully communicate across the complex web of identity.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 109B: Indian Country Economic Development (NATIVEAM 109B)

The history of competing tribal and Western economic models, and the legal, political, social, and cultural implications for tribal economic development. Case studies include mineral resource extraction, gaming, and cultural tourism. 21st-century strategies for sustainable economic development and protection of political and cultural sovereignty.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Biestman, K. (PI)

CSRE 121: Discourse of the Colonized: Native American and Indigenous Voices (NATIVEAM 121)

Using the assigned texts covering the protest movements in the 20th century to the texts written from the perspective of the colonized at the end of the 20th century, students will engage in discussions on decolonization. Students will be encouraged to critically explore issues of interest through two short papers and a 15-20 minute presentation on the topic of interest relating to decolonization for Native Americans in one longer paper. Approaching research from an Indigenous perspective will be encouraged throughout.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Red Shirt, D. (PI)

CSRE 127X: The Ethics of Anonymity (COMM 127X, ETHICSOC 2)

When is it ethical to conceal your identity or to permit another to remain anonymous? What is the value to remaining unknown, and what might be the cost? Does anonymity free you to think, act, or be in ways you wouldn't otherwise? What else might it allow or constrain? How might your answers differ depending on the circumstances or context? In this one-unit lunchtime seminar, guest speakers will discuss topics that might include: anonymous sources in journalism; anonymity online; the history of anonymous authorship and attribution; whistleblowers and confidential informants; anonymous egg or sperm donors and birth parents; anonymity vs. confidentiality for research participants; anonymity and art; technology and anonymity.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Elam, H. (PI)

CSRE 129B: Literature and Global Health (AFRICAAM 229, AFRICAST 229, COMPLIT 229, FRENCH 229, HUMBIO 175L, MED 234)

This course examines the ways writers in literature and medicine have used the narrative form to explore the ethics of care in what has been called the developing world. We will begin with a call made by the editor-in-chief of The Lancet for a literature of global health, namely fiction modeled on the social reform novels of the nineteenth century, understood to have helped readers develop a conscience for public health as the field emerged as a modern medical specialty. We will then spend the quarter understanding how colonial, postcolonial, and world literatures have answered and complicated this call. Readings will include prose fiction by Albert Camus, Joseph Conrad, Tsitsi Dangaremgba, Amitav Ghosh, Susan Sontag as well as physician memoirs featuring Frantz Fanon, Albert Schweitzer, Abraham Verghese, Paul Farmer. And each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical, and policy writings that deeply inform the field of global health.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ikoku, A. (PI)

CSRE 131C: Trauma, healing, and empowerment in Asian America (ASNAMST 131)

This course will look at the ways in which Asian Americans are affected by the legacy of war, occupation and colonialism through themes of home, displacement, community, roots, identity, and inter-generational trauma. The approach is integrative, including scholarly investigation, embodied practice, and creative approach. This self-reflective process uses narrative, oral and written, as a means of becoming whole and healing personal, historical, and collective wounds.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 140C: Stand Up Comedy and the "Great American Joke" Since 1945 (AMSTUD 140)

Development of American Stand Up Comedy in the context of social and cultural eruptions after 1945, including the Borscht Belt, the Chitlin¿ Circuit, the Cold War, censorship battles, Civil Rights and other social movements of the 60s and beyond. The artistry of stories, monologues, jokes, impersonations, persona, social satire, scatology, obscenity, riffs, rants, shtick, and more by such artists as Lenny Bruce, Dick Gregory, Richard Pryor, George Carlin, Margaret Cho, Sarah Silverman, Jon Stewart, Stephen Colbert, as well as precursors such as Mark Twain, minstrelsy and vaudeville and related films, TV shows, poems and other manifestations of similar sensibilities and techniques.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Obenzinger, H. (PI)

CSRE 146A: Approaching Research and the Community (URBANST 123)

Comparative perspective on research with communities and basic overview of research methodologies, with an emphasis on the principles and practices of doing community-based research as a collaborative enterprise between academic researchers and community members. How academic scholarship can be made useful to communities. How service experiences and interests can be used to develop research questions in collaboration with communities and serve as a starting point for developing senior theses or other independent research projects. Through the coursework, students are encouraged to develop a draft proposal for an actual community-based research project. The course is highly recommended for students planning to apply for community-based summer research fellowships through the Haas Center for Public Service (Community-based Research Fellowship Program) or CRSE (Community Research Summer Internship). Students who complete the course will be given priority for these fellowships.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hurd, C. (PI); Ned, J. (PI)

CSRE 152: Introduction to Improvisation in Dance: From Salsa to Vodun to Tap Dance (AFRICAAM 52, DANCE 152, TAPS 152)

This seminar introduces students to Dance Studies by exploring the topic of improvisation, a central concept in multiple genres of dance and music. We will survey a range of improvised dance forms¿from salsa to vodun to tap dance¿through readings, video viewings, discussion, and movement exercises (no previous dance experience required). When studying each genre, we will examine how race, gender, sexuality, citizenship, and other power structures affect the practices and theorizations of improvisation. Topics include community and identity formation; questions of technique versus ¿natural¿ ability; improvisation as a spiritual practice; and the role of history in improvisers¿ quest for spontaneity. Course material will focus on improvised dance, but we will also read pertinent literature in jazz music, theatre, and the law.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Carrico, R. (PI)

CSRE 172: Out of Place: (W)riting Home (FEMGEN 172, TAPS 172, TAPS 272)

A creative writing workshop; all genres. This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of a productive creative writing practice, including ¿the beginner¿s mind¿ (as founded in Eastern spiritual practices); and, an indigenous approach to ¿authenticity¿ in one¿s work and one¿s words. Through w(riting), one returns to the body of home-knowledges, languages, and geographies to uncover what is profoundly original in us as artists, writers and thinkers.¿
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lee, S. (PI); Moraga, C. (PI)

CSRE 185B: Jews in the Contemporary World: Faith and Ethnicity, Vulnerability and Visibility (HISTORY 185B, HISTORY 385C, JEWISHST 185B, REES 185B)

This course explores the full expanse of Jewish life today and in the recent past. The inner workings of religious faith, the content of Jewish identify shorn of belief, the interplay between Jewish powerlessness and influence, the myth and reality of Jewish genius, the continued pertinence of antisemitism, the rhythms of Jewish economic life ¿ all these will be examined in weekly lectures, classroom discussion, and with the use of a widely diverse range of readings, films, and other material. Explored in depth will the ideas and practices of Zionism, the content of contemporary secularism and religious Orthodoxy, the impact Holocaust, the continued crisis facing Israel and the Palestinians. Who is to be considered Jewish, in any event, especially since so many of the best known (Spinoza, Freud, Marx) have had little if anything to do with Jewish life with their relationships to it indifferent, even hostile?
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Zipperstein, S. (PI)

CSRE 188Q: Imagining Women: Writers in Print and in Person (FEMGEN 188Q)

Gender roles, gender relations and sexual identity explored in contemporary literature and conversation with guest authors. Weekly meetings designated for book discussion and meeting with authors. Interest in writing and a curiosity about diverse women's lives would be helpful to students. Students will use such tools as close reading, research, analysis and imagination. Seminar requires strong voice of all participants. Oral presentations, discussion papers, final projects.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Miner, V. (PI)

CSRE 192E: Sexual Violence in America (AFRICAAM 192, AMSTUD 258, FEMGEN 258, FEMGEN 358, HISTORY 258, HISTORY 358)

This undergraduate/graduate colloquium explores the history of sexual violence in America, with particular attention to the intersections of gender and race in the construction of rape. We discuss the changing definitions of sexual violence in law and in cultural representations from early settlement through the late-twentieth century, including slavery, wartime and prison rape, the history of lynching and anti-lynching movements, and feminist responses to sexual violence. In addition to introducing students to the literature on sexual violence, the course attempts to teach critical skills in the analysis of secondary and primary historical texts. Students write short weekly reading responses and a final paper; no final exam; fifth unit research or CEL options.nnLimited enrollment, permission of instructor required. Submit application form (available on Coursework) by Dec. 1, 2015 and indicate interest in CEL option. Priority admission to History, FGSS, CSRE, AFRICAAM, and AMSTUD declared majors and minors.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Freedman, E. (PI)

CSRE 196D: Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race & Ethnicity: Continuing Community Engagement

In this continuation of CSRE 196C, students will continue to develop an interactive map that explores race and community in the Bay Area, through the work of local musicians. In collaboration with the SF-based non-profit, PeaceTones, you will interview musicians and contribute to an online map. The working map can be found at bayareamusicmap.weebly.com. Students will complete readings to explore diversity in the arts, specifically focusing on policy and advocacy implications as we develop the map as a tool for this work. Students will also meet as a group every other week for 50 minutes to reflect and discuss the work (we will set a time that works for everyone) and submit bi-weekly reflections of 500 words.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Murray, D. (PI)

CSRE 198: Internship for Public Service (CHILATST 198)

Students should consult with CCSRE Director of Community Engaged Learning (ddmurray@stanford.edu) to develop or sign-up for a community service internship. Group meetings may be required. May be repeated for credit. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Murray, D. (PI)

CSRE 200R: Directed Research

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 200W: Directed Reading

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 200Y: CSRE Senior Honors Research

Terms: Win | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 201B: From Racial Justice to Multiculturalism: Movement-based Arts Organizing in the Post Civil Rights Era (CHILATST 201B)

How creative projects build and strengthen communities of common concern. Projects focus on cultural reclamation, multiculturalism, cultural equity and contemporary cultural wars, media literacy, independent film, and community-based art. Guest artists and organizers, films, and case studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Hernandez, G. (PI)

CSRE 221: Sentencing, Corrections, and Criminal Justice Policy (PUBLPOL 221)

This introductory course will familiarize students with the history, structure, and performance of America's sentencing and corrections system. Sentencing is the process by which criminal sanctions are imposed in individual cases following criminal convictions. Corrections deals with the implementation and evaluation of criminal sentences after they are handed down. In fact, the two subject areas are inseparable. The course will examine sentencing and corrections from global and historical views, from theoretical and policy perspectives, and with close attention to many problem-specific areas. We will explore sentencing theories and their application, the nature, scope and function of corrections, the impact of mass incarceration on crime and communities, the effectiveness of rehabilitation, the relationship between sanctions and crime, and the consequences of prisoner reentry. These topics will be considered as they play out in current political and policy debates. Guest lectures may include presentations by legal professionals, victims, offenders, and correctional leaders. We also plan to visit a correctional facility. This course is open to 1Ls, 2Ls, and 3Ls in the Law School. Special Instructions: Grades will be based on class participation, and either: (1) three reflection papers of 5 to 7 pages each, or (2) a longer research paper. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02) which meets the research (R) requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class participation, reflection papers or research paper. Cross-listed with Comparative Studies in Race & Ethnicity (CSRE 221) and open to Juniors and Seniors, Law (LAW 621), Public Policy (PUBLPOL 221).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Petersilia, J. (PI)

CSRE 226X: Curating Experience: Representation in and beyond Museums (AMSTUD 226X, EDUC 226)

In an age when some 50% of museum visitors only "visit" museums online and when digital technologies have broken open archival access, anyone can be a curator, a critic, an historian, an archivist. In this context, how do museums create experiences that teach visitors about who they are and about the world around them? What are the politics of representation that shape learning in these environments? Using an experimental instructional approach, students will reconsider and redefine what it means to curate experience.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kelman, A. (PI)

CSRE 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (AFRICAAM 245, EDUC 245)

African American, Native American, Mexican American, and Asian American racial and ethnic identity development; the influence of social, political and psychological forces in shaping the experience of people of color in the U.S. The importance of race in relationship to social identity variables including gender, class, and occupational, generational, and regional identifications. Bi- and multiracial identity status, and types of white racial consciousness.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; LaFromboise, T. (PI)

CSRE 275B: History of Modern Mexico (AMSTUD 275B, CHILATST 275B, HISTORY 275B, HISTORY 375C)

Surveys the history of governance, resistance, and identity formation in Mexico from the nineteenth century to the present. Explores Mexico's historical struggles to achieve political stability, economic prosperity, and social justice and examines how regional, class, ethnic, and gender differences have figured prominently in the shaping of Mexican affairs. Topics include Mexico's wars and their legacies, the power of the state, violence and protest, debates over the meaning of "Mexicanness," youth culture, and the politics of indigenismo.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Minian Andjel, A. (PI)

CSRE 314: Performing Identities (FEMGEN 314, TAPS 314)

This course examines claims and counter-claims of identity, a heated political and cultural concept over the past few decades. We will consider the ways in which theories of performance have offered generative discursive frameworks for the study of identities, variously shaped by vectors of race, gender, sexuality, religion, class, nation, ethnicity, among others. How is identity as a social category different from identity as a unique and personal attribute of selfhood? Throughout the course we will focus on the inter-locking ways in which certain dimensions of identity become salient at particular historical conjunctures. In addition, we will consider the complex discourses of identity within transnational and historical frameworks. Readings include Robin Bernstein, Ann Pellegrini, Tavia Nyong¿o, Jose Munoz, Michael Taussig, Wendy Brown, Talal Asad, Jasbir Puar, among others.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Menon, J. (PI)

CSRE 385: Language, Race, and Urban Schools (EDUC 385)

This seminar explores the intersections of language and race/racism/racialization in the public schooling experiences of students of color. As we examine relevant literature from the fields of sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology, we will devote significant attention to considering implications for teaching and learning in urban classrooms. Issues to be addressed include language variation and change, language and identity, bilingualism and multilingualism, language ideologies, and classroom discourse.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Martinez, R. (PI)
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