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CSRE 1A: My Journey: Conversations on Race and Ethnicity

This course meets once a week for one hour, over lunch (provided). Students will meet with CSRE faculty who will share their work, their life stories, their reasons for believing that race and ethnicity are of central concern to all members of our society. Diverse fields will be represented: sociology, history, literature, psychology and others.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 1T: The Public Life of Science and Technology (STS 1)

The course focuses on key social, cultural, and values issues raised by contemporary scientific and technological developments. The STS interdisciplinary lens helps students develop and apply skills in three areas: (a) Historical analysis of contemporary global affairs (e.g., spread of technologies; responses to climate change); (b) Bioethical reasoning around health issues (e.g., disease management; privacy rights); and (c) The sociological study of knowledge (e.g., intellectual property, science publishing). A discussion section is required and will be assigned the first week of class.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Edwards, P. (PI)

CSRE 5C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (EMED 5C, FEMGEN 5C, HISTORY 5C, INTNLREL 5C)

(Same as History 105C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 29SI: Migration is Beautiful: Histories, Realities, and Policies of Immigrant Justice

In the current political landscape, many political stakeholders have endorsed anti-immigrant policies using inflammatory rhetoric that has disturbed American attitudes toward immigration. This course challenges the underlying assumptions of this discourse. We will begin by analyzing the history of immigration policy and politics in the United States. We will discuss specific issues related to border control, detention, and law enforcement and then delve into the intersections of immigration, criminal justice, health, and education policies. Throughout, we will emphasize the importance of using empirical data and personal narratives when analyzing and participating in the contemporary discourse on immigration-related issues.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jimenez, T. (PI)

CSRE 30Q: The Big Shift

Is the middle class shrinking? How do people who live at the extremes of American society- the super rich, the working poor and those who live on the margins, imagine and experience "the good life"? How do we understand phenomena such as gang cultures, addiction and the realignment of white consciousness? This class uses the methods and modes of ethnographic study in an examination of American culture. Ethnographic materials range from an examination of the new American wealth boom of the last 20 years (Richistan by Robert Frank) to the extreme and deadlynworld of the invisible underclass of homeless addicts on the streets of San Francisco (Righteous Dopefiend by Phillipe Bourgois and Jeff Schonberg). The experiences of Hispanic immigrants and the struggle to escape gang life in Los Angeles are highlighted in the story of Homeboy Industries a job creation program initiated by a priest working in LA's most deadly neighborhoods (G-Dog and the Homeboys by Celeste Fremon). Finally in Searching for Whitopia: an improbable journeyninto the heart of White America, Rich Benjamin explores the creation on ethnic enclaves (whitopias) as fear over immigration and the shrinking white majority redefine race consciousnessnin the 21st century. Each of these narratives provides a window into the various ways in which Americans approach the subjects of wealth and the good life, poverty and the underclass, and thenconstruction of class, race, and gender in American society. Students will not be required to have any previous knowledge, just curiosity and an open mind.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 35SI: An Introduction to Labor Organizing on Campus

Campus Workers are critical to maintaining our university, so how can you support them as a student? What is campus labor organizing and how does it work on a practical level? How can students make a difference in the lives of workers on campus? This class offers an opportunity to gain knowledge of and firsthand experience in campus labor and campus labor organizing. Classes will consist of seeking to understand how race, class, and gender affect laborers experiences at Stanford, as well as how to build an intersectional labor movement.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Marquez, R. (PI)

CSRE 41: Black & White Race Relations in American Fiction & Film (AFRICAAM 101, AMSTUD 42Q)

Movies and the fiction that inspires them; power dynamics behind production including historical events, artistic vision, politics, and racial stereotypes. What images of black and white does Hollywood produce to forge a national identity? How do films promote equality between the races? What is lost or gained in film adaptations of books? NOTE: Students must attend the first day; admission to the class will be determined based on an in class essay.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Mesa, C. (PI)

CSRE 50S: Nineteenth Century America (AFRICAAM 50B, HISTORY 50B)

(Same as HISTORY 150B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register in 150B.) Territorial expansion, social change, and economic transformation. The causes and consequences of the Civil War. Topics include: urbanization and the market revolution; slavery and the Old South; sectional conflict; successes and failures of Reconstruction; and late 19th-century society and culture.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; White, R. (PI)

CSRE 51Q: Comparative Fictions of Ethnicity (AMSTUD 51Q, COMPLIT 51Q)

We may "know" "who" we "are," but we are, after all, social creatures. How does our sense of self interact with those around us? How does literature provide a particular medium for not only self expression, but also for meditations on what goes into the construction of "the Self"? After all, don't we tell stories in response to the question, "who are you"? Besides a list of nouns and names and attributes, we give our lives flesh and blood in telling how we process the world. Our course focuses in particular on this question--Does this universal issue ("who am I") become skewed differently when we add a qualifier before it, like "ethnic"? Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take course for a Letter Grade.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Palumbo-Liu, D. (PI)

CSRE 55M: MMUF Seminar

This seminar is designed to help MMUF honor students in the following ways: (1) developing and refining research paper topics, (2) learning about the various approaches to research and writing, and (3) connecting to Stanford University resources such as the library and faculty. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 63N: The Feminist Critique: The History and Politics of Gender Equality (AMSTUD 63N, FEMGEN 63N, HISTORY 63N)

This course explores the long history of ideas about gender and equality. Each week we read, dissect, compare, and critique a set of primary historical documents (political and literary) from around the world, moving from the 15th century to the present. We tease out changing arguments about education, the body, sexuality, violence, labor, politics, and the very meaning of gender, and we place feminist critics within national and global political contexts.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Freedman, E. (PI)

CSRE 74: History of South Africa (AFRICAAM 47, HISTORY 47)

(Same as HISTORY 147. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 147.) Introduction, focusing particularly on the modern era. Topics include: precolonial African societies; European colonization; the impact of the mineral revolution; the evolution of African and Afrikaner nationalism; the rise and fall of the apartheid state; the politics of post-apartheid transformation; and the AIDS crisis.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 85B: Jewish History: 20th Century (HISTORY 85B, JEWISHST 85B, REES 85B)

(Same as HISTORY 185B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 185B.) This course explores the full expanse of Jewish life today and in the recent past. The inner workings of religious faith, the content of Jewish identify shorn of belief, the interplay between Jewish powerlessness and influence, the myth and reality of Jewish genius, the continued pertinence of antisemitism, the rhythms of Jewish economic life ¿ all these will be examined in weekly lectures, classroom discussion, and with the use of a widely diverse range of readings, films, and other material. Explored in depth will the ideas and practices of Zionism, the content of contemporary secularism and religious Orthodoxy, the impact Holocaust, the continued crisis facing Israel and the Palestinians. Who is to be considered Jewish, in any event, especially since so many of the best known (Spinoza, Freud, Marx) have had little if anything to do with Jewish life with their relationships to it indifferent, even hostile?
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 91D: ASIAN-AMERICAN AUTOBIOGRAPHY/W (AMSTUD 91A, ASNAMST 91A, ENGLISH 91A)

This is a dual purpose class: a writing workshop in which you will generate autobiographical vignettes/essays as well as a reading seminar featuring prose from a wide range of contemporary Asian-American writers. Some of the many questions we will consider are: What exactly is Asian-American memoir? Are there salient subjects and tropes that define the literature? And in what ways do our writerly interactions both resistant and assimilative with a predominantly non-Asian context in turn recreate that context? We'll be working/experimenting with various modes of telling, including personal essay, the epistolary form, verse, and even fictional scenarios. NOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lee, C. (PI)

CSRE 103F: Intergroup Communication Facilitation (PSYCH 103F)

Are you interested in strengthening your skills as a facilitator or section leader? Interested in opening up dialogue around identity within your community or among friends? This course will provide you with facilitation tools and practice, but an equal part of the heart of this class will come from your own reflection on the particular strengths and challenges you may bring to facilitation and how to craft a personal style that works best for you. This reflection process is ongoing, for the instructors as well as the students.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 105C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (EMED 105C, FEMGEN 105C, HISTORY 105C, HUMRTS 112, INTNLREL 105C)

(Same as HISTORY 5C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 109B: Native Nation Building (NATIVEAM 109B)

The history of competing tribal and Western economic models, and the legal, political, social, and cultural implications for tribal economic development. Case studies include mineral resource extraction, gaming, and cultural tourism. 21st-century strategies for sustainable economic development and protection of political and cultural sovereignty.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Biestman, K. (PI)

CSRE 117: Expanding Engineering Limits: Culture, Diversity, and Equity (CSRE 217, ENGR 117, ENGR 217, FEMGEN 117, FEMGEN 217)

This course investigates how culture and diversity shape who becomes an engineer, what problems get solved, and the quality of designs, technology, and products. As a course community, we consider how cultural beliefs about race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, abilities, socioeconomic status, and other intersectional aspects of identity interact with beliefs about engineering, influence diversity in the field, and affect equity in engineering education and practice. We also explore how engineering cultures and environments respond to and change with individual and institutional agency. The course involves weekly presentations by scholars and engineers, readings, short writing assignments, small-group discussion, and hands-on, student-driven projects. Enrollment limited to 100.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 118S: Family Stories: Uncovering Histories of Identity and Difference (AFRICAAM 118X, AMSTUD 118, ASNAMST 118S)

This course examines family history as a site for understanding identity, power, and social difference in American society. Focusing in particular on the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality, we approach the family as an archive through which we might write alternative histories to the ones that dominate the national historical consciousness. To do this, we examine memoirs, oral histories, and first-person documentaries as historical texts that can be used to foreground marginalized historical voices. Students will then be asked to apply course readings and theories to their own family histories as a means of better understanding issues of identity and difference.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Gow, W. (PI)

CSRE 125E: Shades of Green: Redesigning and Rethinking the Environmental Justice Movements (EARTHSYS 125, EARTHSYS 225, URBANST 125)

Historically, discussions of race, ethnicity, culture, and equity in the environment have been relegated to the environmental justice movement, which often focuses on urban environmental degradation and remains separated from other environmental movements. This course will seek to break out of this limiting discussion. We will explore access to outdoor spaces, definitions of wilderness, who is and isn't included in environmental organizations, gender and the outdoors, how colonialism has influenced ways of knowing, and the future of climate change. The course will also have a design thinking community partnership project. Students will work with partner organizations to problem-solve around issues of access and diversity. We value a diversity of experiences and epistemological beliefs, and therefore undergraduates and graduate students from all disciplines are welcome.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 135P: The Psychology of Diverse Community (PSYCH 135)

This course is an exploration. Its aim is to identify distinguishing features of good diverse communities and articulate them well enough to offer principles or guidelines for how to design and mange such communities e.g. schools, universities, academic disciplines, etc.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 141X: Activism and Intersectionality (AFRICAAM 141X, FEMGEN 141, SOC 153)

How are contemporary U.S. social movements shaped by the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality? This course explores the emergence, dynamics, tactics, and targets of social movements. Readings include empirical and theoretical social movement texts, including deep dives into Black, White, and Chicana feminisms; the KKK; and queer/LGBT movements. We will explore how social movement emergence and persistence is related to participants¿ identities and experiences with inequality; how the dynamics, targets, and tactics of mobilized participants are shaped by race, class, gender, and/or sexuality; and how social movement scholars have addressed the intersectional nature of inequality, identity, and community.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Crossley, A. (PI)

CSRE 146A: Approaching Research and the Community (URBANST 123)

Comparative perspective on research with communities and basic overview of research methodologies, with an emphasis on the principles and practices of doing community-based research as a collaborative enterprise between academic researchers and community members. How academic scholarship can be made useful to communities. How service experiences and interests can be used to develop research questions in collaboration with communities and serve as a starting point for developing senior theses or other independent research projects. Through the coursework, students are encouraged to develop a draft proposal for an actual community-based research project. The course is highly recommended for students planning to apply for community-based summer research fellowships through the Haas Center for Public Service (Community-based Research Fellowship Program). Students who complete the course will be given priority for these fellowships. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 148D: Ingl├ęs Personal: Coaching Everyday Community English (CHILATST 148, EDUC 148)

Theoretical foundation for volunteer tutors of English language learners in urban environments working with children in school-based programs or adults in community-based settings. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Valdes, G. (PI)

CSRE 149: The Laboring of Diaspora & Border Literary Cultures (COMPLIT 149, ILAC 149)

Focus is given to emergent theories of culture and on comparative literary and cultural studies. How do we treat culture as a social force? How do we go about reading the presence of social contexts within cultural texts? How do ethno-racial writers re-imagine the nation as a site with many "cognitive maps" in which the nation-state is not congruent with cultural identity? How do diaspora and border narratives/texts strive for comparative theoretical scope while remaining rooted in specific local histories. Note: This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 149A: The Urban Underclass (SOC 149, SOC 249, URBANST 112)

(Graduate students register for 249.) Recent research and theory on the urban underclass, including evidence on the concentration of African Americans in urban ghettos, and the debate surrounding the causes of poverty in urban settings. Ethnic/racial conflict, residential segregation, and changes in the family structure of the urban poor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 150A: Race and Crime (PSYCH 150)

The goal of this course is to examine social psychological perspectives on race, crime, and punishment in the United States. Readings will be drawn not only from psychology, but also from sociology, criminology, economics, and legal studies. We will consider the manner in which social psychological variables may operate at various points in the crimina; justice system- from policing, to sentencing, to imprisonment, to re-entry. Conducted as a seminar. Students interested in participating should attend the first session and complete online application for permission at https://goo.gl/forms/CAut7RKX6MewBIuG3.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 150B: RACE AND CRIME PRACTICUM (PSYCH 150B)

This practicum is designed to build on the lessons learned in Psych 150: Race & Crime. In this community service learning course, students will participate in community partnerships relevant to race and crime, as well as reflection to connect these experiences to research and course content. Interested students should complete an application for permission at: https://goo.gl/forms/CAut7RKX6MewBIuG3. nnPrerequisite: Psych 150 (taken concurrently or previously).
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 150S: Nineteenth Century America (AFRICAAM 150B, AMSTUD 150B, HISTORY 150B)

(Same as HISTORY 50B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 150B.) Territorial expansion, social change, and economic transformation. The causes and consequences of the Civil War. Topics include: urbanization and the market revolution; slavery and the Old South; sectional conflict; successes and failures of Reconstruction; and late 19th-century society and culture.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; White, R. (PI)

CSRE 153D: Creative Research for Artists (DANCE 153D)

This generative lab is dedicated to juniors and seniors in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, African and African American Studies, or related fields in the arts who are pursuing an advanced creative honors thesis or capstone project around questions of identity, diversity and aesthetics. Students sharpen methodologies, get feedback on works in progress, and make formidable connections between their academic and artistic pursuits
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Smith, A. (PI)

CSRE 162A: Spirituality and Nonviolent Urban and Social Transformation (RELIGST 162X, URBANST 126)

A life of engagement in social transformation is often built on a foundation of spiritual and religious commitments. Case studies of nonviolent social change agents including Rosa Parks in the civil rights movement, César Chávez in the labor movement, and WIlliam Sloane Coffin in the peace movement; the religious and spiritual underpinnings of their commitments. Theory and principles of nonviolence. Films and readings. Service learning component includes placements in organizations engaged in social transformation. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 174: History of South Africa (AFRICAAM 147, HISTORY 147)

(Same as HISTORY 47. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 147.) Introduction, focusing particularly on the modern era. Topics include: precolonial African societies; European colonization; the impact of the mineral revolution; the evolution of African and Afrikaner nationalism; the rise and fall of the apartheid state; the politics of post-apartheid transformation; and the AIDS crisis.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Campbell, J. (PI)

CSRE 174S: When Half is Whole: Developing Synergistic Identities and Mestiza Consciousness (ASNAMST 174S)

This is an exploration of the ways in which individuals construct whole selves in societies that fragment, label, and bind us in categories and boxes. We examine identities that overcome the destructive dichotomies of ¿us¿ and ¿them, ¿ crossing borders of race, ethnicity, culture, nation, sex, and gender. Our focus is on the development of hybrid and synergistic forms of identity and mestiza consciousness in which the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 180A: Foundations of Social Research (SOC 180A, SOC 280A)

Formulating a research question, developing hypotheses, probability and non-probability sampling, developing valid and reliable measures, qualitative and quantitative data, choosing research design and data collection methods, challenges of making causal inference, and criteria for evaluating the quality of social research. Emphasis is on how social research is done, rather than application of different methods. Limited enrollment; preference to Sociology and Urban Studies majors, and Sociology coterms.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Pedulla, D. (PI)

CSRE 180E: Introduction to Chicanx/Latinx Studies (CHILATST 180E, EDUC 179E)

This course draws on intersectional and interdisciplinary approaches to introduce students to the range of issues, experiences, and methodologies that form the foundation of Latina/o/x studies. By considering the relationship between the creation of "Latinx" and "American" identities, students will critically reconsider the borders that constitute the U.S. as a political and cultural formation. The course balances depth and breadth in its study of the variety of perspectives and experiences that come to be associated with U.S. Latinxs. Thus, we will analyze the histories of predominant U.S. Latinx sub-groups, such as Mexicans/Chicanxs and Puerto Ricans, while also incorporating considerations of the ways in which broader populations with ties to Central America, South America, and the Caribbean play crucial roles in constituting U.S. Latinx identities. Topics include the U.S./Mexico border and the borderlands; (im)migration and diaspora; literary and cultural traditions; music and expressive practices; labor and structural inequality; social movements; Latinx urbanism; gender and sexuality; political and economic shifts; and inter- and intra-group relations. Sources include a range of social science and humanities scholarship. This course will meet at Sequoia High School. Transportation will be provided.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rosa, J. (PI)

CSRE 185B: Jewish History: 20th Century (HISTORY 185B, HISTORY 385C, JEWISHST 185B, REES 185B)

(Same as HISTORY 85B.) This course explores the full expanse of Jewish life today and in the recent past. The inner workings of religious faith, the content of Jewish identify shorn of belief, the interplay between Jewish powerlessness and influence, the myth and reality of Jewish genius, the continued pertinence of antisemitism, the rhythms of Jewish economic life ¿ all these will be examined in weekly lectures, classroom discussion, and with the use of a widely diverse range of readings, films, and other material. Explored in depth will the ideas and practices of Zionism, the content of contemporary secularism and religious Orthodoxy, the impact Holocaust, the continued crisis facing Israel and the Palestinians. Who is to be considered Jewish, in any event, especially since so many of the best known (Spinoza, Freud, Marx) have had little if anything to do with Jewish life with their relationships to it indifferent, even hostile?
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 198: Internship for Public Service (CHILATST 198)

Students should consult with CCSRE Director of Community Engaged Learning (ddmurray@stanford.edu) to develop or gain approval for an internship that addresses race/ethnicity, public service, and social justice. Students will read a selection of short readings relevant to their placement, write bi-weekly reflections, and meet bi-weekly with the Director of Community Engaged Learning. Units are determined by the number of hours per week at the internship (2 hours/week = 1 unit; 5 hours/week = 2 units; 8 hours/week = 3 units; etc.) Group meetings may be required. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Marquez, R. (PI)

CSRE 199: Preparation for Senior Thesis (FEMGEN 199X)

This course is designed for juniors (majors, minors, and those seeking Interdisciplinary Honors in CSRE or FGSS) who intend to write a senior thesis in one of the CSRE Family of Programs or FGSS Interdisciplinary Honors. The course offers resources and strategies for putting together a significant and original senior thesis. Topics to be covered include: getting funding; finding an advisor; navigating the institutional review board; formulating an appropriate question; and finding the right data/medium/texts.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 200Y: CSRE Senior Honors Research

Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 212: Biology, Culture and Social Justice in Latin America: Perspectives from Forensic Anthropology

As forensic anthropologists, we are routinely asked to make identifications of unknown human remains and provide courtroom testimony. Latin America has become a nexus for social justice work, as we respond to the humanitarian crisis along the U.S.-México Border. To improve identification methods of the undocumented dead, we must understand the diversity in Latinx people and adopt best scientific practices. This course provides a cross-disciplinary, bio-cultural approach to Latin American variation and training in applied methods of forensic anthropology. Explore how tools of biological and cultural anthropology are used jointly in human rights investigation and social justice advancement. Discover the breadth of Latinx diversity and how historical, geographic, and socio-cultural factors shape this variation. Gain hands-on experience in case analysis, using skeletal, genetic, and recovery context information to estimate key parameters of identity. Use case studies to contextualize this work through an intersectional lens that attends to the living families and the applicable historical, geo-political and socio-cultural conditions.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 217: Expanding Engineering Limits: Culture, Diversity, and Equity (CSRE 117, ENGR 117, ENGR 217, FEMGEN 117, FEMGEN 217)

This course investigates how culture and diversity shape who becomes an engineer, what problems get solved, and the quality of designs, technology, and products. As a course community, we consider how cultural beliefs about race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, abilities, socioeconomic status, and other intersectional aspects of identity interact with beliefs about engineering, influence diversity in the field, and affect equity in engineering education and practice. We also explore how engineering cultures and environments respond to and change with individual and institutional agency. The course involves weekly presentations by scholars and engineers, readings, short writing assignments, small-group discussion, and hands-on, student-driven projects. Enrollment limited to 100.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CSRE 221D: Crafting Challenging Conversations in a Conflicted World (NATIVEAM 221)

In moments of divisive, time-sensitive conflict and disagreement, interdependent community groups that are we-us oriented often struggle to maintain cohesive relationships. In this interactive, project-based course, participants will dive into the art of designing new products, services, or experiences for conflict. Throughout the course, participants can expect to unpack the fundamentals of design thinking and components of strong listening, leadership, and effective cultural competency. Individual one-on-one conversations as well as indigenous forms of group-interviewing, known as Peacemaking and Ho'oponopono, will be also explored. At the end of the course, students can expect to have created a low-resolution prototype based on qualitative research that answers the question: How might we lead with community-centered approaches, rather than with independent, divisive reactions in moments of conflict?
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (AFRICAAM 245, EDUC 245)

This seminar will explore the impact and relative salience of racial/ethnic identity on select issues including: discrimination, social justice, mental health and academic performance. Theoretical perspectives on identity development will be reviewed, along with research on other social identity variables, such as social class, gender and regional identifications. New areas within this field such as the complexity of multiracial identity status and intersectional invisibility will also be discussed. Though the class will be rooted in psychology and psychological models of identity formation, no prior exposure to psychology is assumed and other disciplines-including cultural studies, feminist studies, and literature-will be incorporated into the course materials.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; LaFromboise, T. (PI)

CSRE 248X: Language, Literacy, and Culture (EDUC 248)

This field-based Cardinal Course will provide a unique opportunity to combine theory and practice in the study of language, literacy, and culture in educational settings. It is a collaborative partnership between Stanford (through the Haas Center for Public Service) and the Boys and Girls Club of the Peninsula. Stanford students will work directly with children enrolled in the Boys and Girls Club after-school program at a youth center in Redwood City.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Garcia, A. (PI)

CSRE 285: Texts and Contexts: French-English Translation (FRENCH 185, FRENCH 285)

This course introduces students to the ways in which translation has shaped the image of France and the Francophone world. What texts and concepts were translated, how, where, and to what effect? Students will work on a translation project throughout the quarter and translate texts from French to English and English to French. Topics may include the role of translation in the development of cultures; the political dimension of translation, translation in the context of migration, and the socio-cultural frameworks that shape translations. Case studies: Camus, Fanon, Glissant, de Beauvoir, Meddeb, Duras. Prior knowledge of French language required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ulloa, M. (PI)

CSRE 385: Race, Ethnicity, and Language: Pedagogical Possibilities (EDUC 389C)

This seminar explores the intersections of language and race/racism/racialization in the public schooling experiences of students of color. We will briefly trace the historical emergence of the related fields of sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology, explore how each of these scholarly traditions approaches the study of language, and identify key points of overlap and tension between the two fields before considering recent examples of inter-disciplinary scholarship on language and race in urban schools. Issues to be addressed include language variation and change, language and identity, bilingualism and multilingualism, language ideologies, and classroom discourse. We will pay particular attention to the implications of relevant literature for teaching and learning in urban classrooms.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Banks, A. (PI)
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